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Sample records for capability arac response

  1. The atmospheric release advisory capability (ARAC): A federal emergency response capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1988-03-01

    The Atmospheric Release Capability (ARAC) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored emergency-response service set up to provide real-time prediction of the dose levels and the extent of surface contamination resulting from a broad range of possible occurrences (accidents, spills, extortion threats involving nuclear material, reentry of nuclear-powered satellites, and atmospheric nuclear tests) that could involve the release of airborne radioactive material. During the past decade, ARAC has responded to more than 150 real-time situations, including exercises. The most notable responses include the Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania, the Titan II missile accident in Arkansas, the reentry of the USSR's COSMOS-954 into the atmosphere over Canada, the accidental release of uranium hexafluoride from the Sequoyah Facility accident in Oklahoma, and, most recently, the Chernobyl reactor accident in the Soviet Union. ARAC currently supports the emergency-preparedness plans at 50 Department of Defense (DOD) and DOE sites within the US and also responds to accidents that happen elsewhere. Our ARAC center serves as the focal point for data acquisition, data analysis and assessments during a response, using a computer-based communication network to acquire real-time weather data from the accident site and the surrounding region, as well as pertinent accident information. Its three-dimensional computer models for atmospheric dispersion, MATHEW and ADPIC, digest all this information and produce the predictions used in accident assessment. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

  3. ARAC: A support capability for emergency managers

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.C.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper is intended to introduce to the non-radiological emergency management community the 20-year operational history of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), its concept of operations, and its applicability for use in support of emergency management decision makers. ARAC is a centralized federal facility for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time, using a robust suite of three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion models, extensive geophysical and source-description databases, automated meteorological data acquisition systems, and experienced staff members. Although originally conceived to respond to nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has proven to be extremely adaptable, and has been used successfully during a wide variety of nonradiological hazardous chemical situations. ARAC represents a proven, validated, operational support capability for atmospheric hazardous releases.

  4. Utilization of the atmospheric release advisory capability (ARAC) services during and after the Three Mile Island accident

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Greenly, G.D.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1980-07-01

    At 0820 PST on 28 March 1979, the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center advised the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) that the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, had experienced an accident some four hours earlier, resulting in the atmospheric release of xenon-133 and krypton-88. This report describes ARAC's response to the Three Mile Island accident, including the role ARAC played throughout the 20 days that real-time assessments were made available to the Department of Energy on-scene commander. It also describes the follow-up population-dose calculations performed for the President's Commission on Three Mile Island. At the request of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a questionnaire addressing the usefulness of ARAC products during the accident was sent to ARAC-product users. A summary of the findings from this questionnaire, along with recommendations for improving ARAC service, is also presented. The accident at Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, is discussed in the context of a well-planned emergency response by local and Federal officials.

  5. Optimization aspects of the ARAC real-time radiological emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1985-07-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory responds to radiological emergencies throughout the Continental United States. Using complex three-dimensional dispersion models to account for the effects of complex meteorology and regional terrain, ARAC simulates the release of radioactive materials and provides dispersion, deposition, and dose calculations that are displayed over local geographic features for use by authorities at the accident/release site. ARAC's response is ensured by a software system that (1) makes optimal use of dispersion models, (2) minimizes the time required to provide projections, and (3) maximizes the fault-tolerance of the system. In this paper we describe ARAC's goals and functionality and the costs associated with its development and use. Specifically, we address optimizations in ARAC notifications, meteorological data collection, the determination of site- and problem-specific parameters, the generation of site-specific topography and geography, the running of models, and the distribution of ARAC products. We also discuss the backup features employed to ensure ARAC's ability to respond.

  6. ARAC`s site workstation final design and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Abriam, R.O.; Moore, R.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) Center located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, provides real-time estimates of the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity or other hazardous materials into the atmosphere anywhere in the world. ARAC`s expertise includes integrating a suite of local, regional and global dispersion models into a highly automated system. Since 1979, on-site computers have provided the link between DOE and DOD facilities around the U.S. and the ARAC Center. Beginning in 1993, these facilities have been replacing their personal computers with UNIX workstations running ARAC`s Site Workstation Systems (SWS) software. The SWS consists of a collection of applications that help sites prepare for and respond to incidents involving an atmospheric release. The SWS can be used either as a real-time emergency-response tool or to make historical or hypothetical assessments of releases.

  7. The current status of ARAC (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) and its application to the Chernobyl event

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.; Harvey, T.F.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project, developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provides real-time dose assessments and estimates of the extent of surface contamination that may result from an atmospheric release of radioactivity. It utilizes advanced computer-based data communication and processing systems to acquire the meteorological and source term information needed by the three-dimensional atmospheric dispersion models to derive the consequence assessments. The ARAC responded to the recent Chernobyl reactor accident in the Soviet Union by estimating the source term and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. This analysis revealed that approximately 50% of the estimated core inventories of I-131 and Cs-137 were released. The estimated committed effective dose equivalent due to inhalation of radioactivty during cloud passage is of the order of 10 mrem within parts of Scandinavia and eastern Europe, while most of the populations within central Europe were exposed to levels ranging from 1 to 10 mrem. The amount of Cs-137 released by the Chernobyl accident far exceeds that released by previous reactor accidents, but is only about 6% of the Cs-137 produced by the atmospheric weapon testing programs. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Incorporation of an explosive cloud rise code into ARAC's (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) ADPIC transport and diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.; Freis, R.P. ); Nasstrom, J.S. )

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) supports various government agencies by modeling the transport and diffusion of radiological material released into the atmosphere. ARAC provides this support principally in the form of computer-generated isopleths of radionuclide concentrations. In order to supply these concentration estimates in a timely manner, a suite of operational computer models is maintained by the ARAC staff. One primary tools used by ARAC is the ADPIC transport and diffusion computer model. This three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code simulates the release of a pollutant into the atmosphere, by injecting marker particles into a gridded, mass-consistent modeled wind field. The particles are then moved through the gridded domain by applying the appropriate advection, diffusion, and gravitational fall velocities. A cloud rise module has been incorporated into ARAC's ADPIC dispersion model to allow better simulation of particle distribution early after an explosive release of source material. The module is based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, which are solved for the cloud radius, height, temperature, and velocity as a function of time. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of /sup 85/Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF/sub 6/ accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material.

  10. Dose refinement. ARAC's role

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; Baskett, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, since the late 1970's has been involved in assessing consequences from nuclear and other hazardous material releases into the atmosphere. ARAC's primary role has been emergency response. However, after the emergency phase, there is still a significant role for dispersion modeling. This work usually involves refining the source term and, hence, the dose to the populations affected as additional information becomes available in the form of source term estimates release rates, mix of material, and release geometry and any measurements from passage of the plume and deposition on the ground. Many of the ARAC responses have been documented elsewhere. 1 Some of the more notable radiological releases that ARAC has participated in the post-emergency phase have been the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (NPP) accident outside Harrisburg, PA, the 1986 Chernobyl NPP accident in the Ukraine, and the 1996 Japan Tokai nuclear processing plant explosion. ARAC has also done post-emergency phase analyses for the 1978 Russian satellite COSMOS 954 reentry and subsequent partial burn up of its on board nuclear reactor depositing radioactive materials on the ground in Canada, the 1986 uranium hexafluoride spill in Gore, OK, the 1993 Russian Tomsk-7 nuclear waste tank explosion, and lesser releases of mostly tritium. In addition, ARAC has performed a key role in the contingency planning for possible accidental releases during the launch of spacecraft with radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board (i.e. Galileo, Ulysses, Mars-Pathfinder, and Cassini), and routinely exercises with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in preparation for offsite consequences of radiological releases from NPPs and nuclear weapon accidents or incidents. Several accident post-emergency phase assessments are discussed in this paper in order to illustrate

  11. ARAC status report: 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.; Greenly, G.D.

    1985-05-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability is a real-time emergency-response service available to federal and state agencies for providing estimates of the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. This includes the estimation of radiation doses to nearby population centers and the levels and extent of surface contamination. The service is currently being expanded to support the emergency response plans at approximately 50 Department of Defense and Department of Energy facilities. This expansion consists of the installation of enhanced computational and data communications and processing systems, development of terrain and geographic data bases, improvements in modeling capabilities, as well as increased staff housing facilities. This report summarizes the current status of ARAC and the requirements to receive the service.

  12. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  13. Expansion of ARAC for chemical releases

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Blair, M.D.; Foster, C.S.; Taylor, A.G.

    1997-07-01

    In 1996 the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed an effort to expand its national emergency response modeling system for chemical releases. Key components of the new capability include the integration of (1) an extensive chemical property database, (2) source modeling for tanks and evaporating pools, (3) denser-than-air dispersion, (4) public exposure guidelines, and (5) an interactive graphical user interface (GUI). Recent use and the future of the new capability are also discussed.

  14. Evaluation of ARAC`s participation in a long-range transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.C.; Pobanz, B.M.; Foster, C.S.; Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III

    1996-12-31

    The 1994 European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) involved two releases of inert tracer gas in western France, allowing subsequent detection at many locations across Europe. Twenty four operational and research facilities from 20 countries made predictions of the motion of the released plume and the resulting concentrations detected at the sampler locations. This paper describes participation by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in ETEX. In its role as a real-time emergency response center, ARAC operates a suite of numerical models which simulate the advection and diffusion of airborne releases, and which calculate the estimated downwind concentration of the released material. The models and procedures used by ARAC to participate in ETEX were essentially the same as those which would be used to respond to a release at any previously unspecified location.

  15. ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1993-10-07

    Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware.

  16. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  17. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  18. Design of an ectoine-responsive AraC mutant and its application in metabolic engineering of ectoine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shan; Jiang, Peixia; Yao, Jun; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Gui, Xiwu; Dong, Zhiyang; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-07-01

    Advanced high-throughput screening methods for small molecules may have important applications in the metabolic engineering of the biosynthetic pathways of these molecules. Ectoine is an excellent osmoprotectant that has been widely used in cosmetics. In this study, the Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC was engineered to recognize ectoine as its non-natural effector and to activate transcription upon ectoine binding. As an endogenous reporter of ectoine, the mutated AraC protein was successfully incorporated into high-throughput screening of ectoine hyper-producing strains. The ectoine biosynthetic cluster from Halomonas elongata was cloned into E. coli. By engineering the rate-limiting enzyme L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), ectoine production and the specific activity of the EctB mutant were increased. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering regulatory proteins into sensitive and rapid screening tools for small molecules and highlighted the importance and efficacy of directed evolution strategies applied to the engineering of genetic components for yield improvement in the biosynthesis of small molecules. PMID:26051748

  19. ARAC dispersion modeling of the August 1998 Tracy, California tire fire

    SciTech Connect

    Aluzzi, F J; Baskett, R L; Bowen, B M; Foster, C S; Pace, J C; Pobanz, B; Vogt, P J

    1998-08-28

    At about 4:30 pm PDT on Friday, August 7, 1998 a fire ignited the large tire disposal pit of Royster Tire Co. on Macarthur Drive about 5 km (3 miles) south of downtown Tracy, California. While providing on-scene mutual aid late Friday night, the LLNL Fire Department called and requested that the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) make a plume forecast for Saturday. The response team in the field was interested in the forecasted location as well as an estimate of potential health effects on the following day. Not having any previous experience with tire fire source terms, ARAC assessors used a constant unit source rate (1 g/s) of particulate and produced plots showing only the location of the ground-level normalized time-integrated air concentrations from the smoke plume. Very early Saturday morning the assessors faxed plots of ground-level smoke air concentrations forecasted for Saturday from 6 am through 6 pm PDT to the Tracy Fire Emergency Operations Center. (As a part of standard procedure, before delivering the plots, the assessors notified ARAC's DOE sponsor.) Fortunately due to the intense heat from the fire, the dense black smoke immediately lofted into the air preventing high ground-level concentrations close to the tire dump. Later on Saturday morning ARAC forecasted a second set of plume integrated air concentrations for Sunday. By Monday the intensity of the fire lessened, and ARAC's support was no longer requested. Following ARAC's response, we made a third calculation on a large scale of the continuous smoke dispersion for 3 days after the fire. A newspaper photograph showed the plume initially rising toward the northeast and the upper part of the smoke cloud turning counterclockwise toward the north. Winds from ARAC's mesoscale prognostic model reproduced this plume structure, while data from the Friday afternoon sounding from Oakland did not. On the 250 km scale, using gridded wind outputs from our mesoscale forecast model to initialize

  20. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  1. Evaluation of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability emergency response model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Freis, R.P.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1993-10-07

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses a modeling system to calculate the impact of accidental radiological or toxic releases to the atmosphere anywhere in the world. Operated for the US Departments of Energy and Defense, ARAC has responded to over 60 incidents in the past 18 years, and conducts over 100 exercises each year. Explosions are one of the most common mechanisms by which toxic particulates are injected into the atmosphere during accidents. Automated algorithms with default assumptions have been developed to estimate the source geometry and the amount of toxic material aerosolized. The paper examines the sensitivity of ARAC`s dispersion model to the range of input values for explosive sources, and analyzes the model`s accuracy using two field measurement programs.

  2. ARAC simulations of the ash plume from the December 1997 eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J S; Lefevre, R J; Pace, J C; Vogt, P J; Voight, B

    1998-10-01

    Ash clouds generated by erupting volcanoes represent a serious hazard to military and civil aviation. The dispersion modeling system of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has been used to model the cloud resulting from the eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat in December 1997. A clone of parts of the ARAC system, now being installed at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), will enable AFWA to provide hazard guidance to military operations in the vicinity of erupting volcanoes. This paper presents ARAC's modeling results and discusses potential application of similar calculations for AFWA support during future events.

  3. 78 FR 1154 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing a draft regulatory basis document to support the potential amendment of its regulations concerning nuclear power plant licensees' onsite emergency response capabilities. The NRC is seeking public comments on this document. The issuance of this draft regulatory basis document is one of the actions stemming from the NRC's......

  4. Analysis of amino acid substitutions in AraC variants that respond to triacetic acid lactone.

    PubMed

    Frei, Christopher S; Wang, Zhiqing; Qian, Shuai; Deutsch, Samuel; Sutter, Markus; Cirino, Patrick C

    2016-04-01

    The Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC regulates expression of ara genes in response to l-arabinose. In efforts to develop genetically encoded molecular reporters, we previously engineered an AraC variant that responds to the compound triacetic acid lactone (TAL). This variant (named "AraC-TAL1") was isolated by screening a library of AraC variants, in which five amino acid positions in the ligand-binding pocket were simultaneously randomized. Screening was carried out through multiple rounds of alternating positive and negative fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Here we show that changing the screening protocol results in the identification of different TAL-responsive variants (nine new variants). Individual substituted residues within these variants were found to primarily act cooperatively toward the gene expression response. Finally, X-ray diffraction was used to solve the crystal structure of the apo AraC-TAL1 ligand-binding domain. The resolved crystal structure confirms that this variant takes on a structure nearly identical to the apo wild-type AraC ligand-binding domain (root-mean-square deviation 0.93 Å), suggesting that AraC-TAL1 behaves similar to wild-type with regard to ligand recognition and gene regulation. Our results provide amino acid sequence-function data sets for training and validating AraC modeling studies, and contribute to our understanding of how to design new biosensors based on AraC. PMID:26749125

  5. 77 FR 56909 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Renewal. SUMMARY: The FAA announces the charter renewal of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC), a Federal Advisory Committee that works...

  6. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  7. Strengthening the Federal Emergency Management Agency's disaster response capabilities.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Glenn M

    2008-04-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) Disaster Operations Directorate provides the core federal response capability to save lives and to protect property in US communities that have been overwhelmed by the impact of a major disaster or emergency. The directorate executes its mission through three main programme areas: operational direction, command and control; operational teams; and operational planning. Based on lessons learned from years of disaster response experience, FEMA is now taking a more proactive and collaborative approach with its partners. This paper discusses how FEMA is placing a greater emphasis on response operations and strengthening capabilities across the full range of operational and support missions by comprehensively revamping its disaster operations model; enhancing its headquarters and regional operations centres; enhancing its headquarters and regional operational planning capabilities; and addressing catastrophic disaster planning and related critical preparedness issues. PMID:21339114

  8. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  9. Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project: Infrastructure Enhancements and New Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos-OConnor, Gaudy M.

    2015-01-01

    This oral presentation highlights the technical investments the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project under the Integrated Systems Research Program within ARMD made during FY10-FY14 to upgrade/enhance the NASA infrastructure/testing assets and new capabilities required to mature the ERA N=2 Portfolio of airframe and propulsion technologies to TRL 5/6.

  10. The challenge of emergency response dispersion models on the meso-gamma urban scale: A case study of the July 26, 1993 Oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W.; Pobanz, B.M.; Foster, C.S.; Ellis, J.S.

    1994-08-01

    This paper presents a recent case study that illustrates the difficulty of modeling accidental toxic releases in urban area. On the morning of July 26, 1993, oleum was accidentally released from a railroad tank car in Richmond, California. State and local agencies requested real-time modeling from the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although the ARAC`s with the US Department of Energy is for nuclear materials, the team responded to the accident under an Agreement in Principle with the State of California. ARAC provided model plots describing the location and progress of the toxic cloud to the agencies managing the response. The primary protective action for the public was to shelter in place. Highways, rail lines and public transportation were blocked. The incident was significant, enough that over 24,000 people sought medical attention within the week following the release.

  11. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, John A.

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  12. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the additions and modifications made to the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1997 in support of the ASAC ORS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope and defines the QRS. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) facility that supports the QRS, and it includes a summary of the planned additions to the QRS in FY 1998. The document has five appendices.

  13. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  14. Mutations in the araC regulatory gene of Escherichia coli B/r that affect repressor and activator functions of AraC protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cass, L G; Wilcox, G

    1986-01-01

    Mutations in the araC gene of Escherichia coli B/r were isolated which alter both activation of the araBAD operon expression and autoregulation. The mutations were isolated on an araC-containing plasmid by hydroxylamine mutagenesis of plasmid DNA. The mutant phenotype selected was the inability to autoregulate. The DNA sequence of 16 mutants was determined and found to consist of seven different missense mutations located within the distal third of the araC gene. Enzyme activities revealed that each araC mutation had altered both autoregulatory and activator functions of AraC protein. The mutational analysis presented in this paper suggests that both autoregulatory and activator functions are localized to the same determinants of the AraC protein and that the amino acid sequence within the carboxy-terminal region of AraC protein is important for site-specific DNA binding. Images PMID:3011750

  15. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January-March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, R. L.; Pace, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive 'No Go' decisions using Version 7.05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the 'instantaneous' ambient air concentration 'Tier 2' limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  16. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions. PMID:20656104

  17. Response capabilities of the National Guard: a focus on domestic disaster medical response.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The National Guard has a 373-year history of responding to the nation's call to duty for service both at home and abroad (The National Guard Bureau Web site: Available at http://www.ngb.army.mil/default. aspx.). The National Guard (NG) is a constitutionally unique organization (United States Constitution, US Government Printing Office Web site: Available at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitution/index.html.). Today's Guard conducts domestic disaster response and civilian assistance missions on a daily basis. Yet, the NG's role, mission, and capabilities are not well-known or understood. The National Response Framework (NRF) places significant responsibility on the local and state disaster planners (Department of Homeland Security: National Response Framework. US Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC, January 2008). The public health professionals are an integral component of the disaster planning community. It is critical that the public health community be knowledgeable of types and capabilities of all the response assets at their disposal. PMID:20349703

  18. In Vitro Activation of the Transcription of araBAD Operon by araC Activator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy; Wilcox, Gary; Gielow, William; Arnold, John; Cleary, Paul; Englesberg, Ellis

    1974-01-01

    The transcription of araBAD operon requires araC activator and cyclic AMP. D-Fucose inhibits ara mRNA synthesis. Our results indicate that the positive control by araC activator is exerted at the level of transcription. PMID:4362626

  19. RSVP [Response System with Variable Prescriptions]: Instructional Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anandam, Kamala; Myers, Donald E.

    This report provides information on the operation and potential uses of the Response System with Variable Prescriptions (RSVP), a computer-based program of individualized instruction implemented at Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC). Following introductory material, Section A describes RSVP and outlines its uses in maintaining records on each…

  20. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  1. Regulation of the araC gene of Escherichia coli: catabolite repression, autoregulation, and effect on araBAD expression.

    PubMed Central

    Miyada, C G; Stoltzfus, L; Wilcox, G

    1984-01-01

    The araC gene encodes a positive regulatory protein required for L-arabinose utilization in Escherichia coli. Transcription from the araC promoter has been shown to be under positive control by cAMP receptor protein and under negative control by its protein product (autoregulation). This work describes the identification of the region of the araC promoter that interacts with the cAMP receptor protein to mediate catabolite repression. A 3-base-pair deletion centered 60 base pairs from the transcriptional initiation site results in a mutant araC promoter that, in the absence of araC protein, reduces transcriptional activity when compared with the wild-type promoter and is unresponsive to various concentrations of intracellular cAMP in vivo. The same deletion results in a lowered affinity of the araC promoter for cAMP receptor protein in vitro. However, this lowered affinity for the mutant araC promoter does not result in substantial reduction of intracellular araC protein because autoregulation of the araC gene dominates catabolite repression. The 3-base-pair deletion in the cAMP receptor protein binding site of the araC promoter does not affect catabolite repression of the adjacent araBAD operon. The implications of these results on current models for expression of the araBAD operon and the araC gene are discussed. Images PMID:6377308

  2. 30 CFR 254.45 - Verifying the capabilities of your response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment. 254.45 Section 254.45 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED... testing of any spill-response equipment listed in your response plan to verify its capabilities if...

  3. Clinical results and pharmacokinetics of high-dose cytosine arabinoside (HD ARA-C).

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, H; Pralle, H; Eckhardt, T; von Hattingberg, M; Schick, J; Löffler, H

    1982-10-01

    Four patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia and one malignant teratoma refractory to conventional chemotherapy were treated with high doses of cytosine arabinoside (HD ARA-C). They received up to 12 cycles of 1.8 to 3 g/m2 every 12 hours applied by 2-hour infusions. A total of 55 HD ARA-C infusions was performed. All leukemic patients responded. A complete clearance of blasts from the bone marrow was observed in two patients following 8-12 cycles of 3 g/m2. However, relapses occurred after three and seven weeks, in one case with resistance to HD ARA-C. The patient with malignant teratoma did not respond. No severe toxicity emerged even after repeated applications. Adverse reactions included moderate nausea and vomiting (4 patients), diarrhea (2 patients), hepatic dysfunction (1 patient), bone pain (1 patient), blurred vision (1 patient), conjunctivitis (1 patient), and exanthema with partial epidermiolysis (1 patient). Granulocytopenia occurring between 3-8 days after having started the therapy, subsided within 4-25 days. Plasma levels of ARA-C and the metabolite uracil arabinoside (ARA-U) were monitored. At steady state plasma concentrations of ARA-C were 32-97 microM (8-24 micrograms/ml). ARA-C disappeared from the plasma mono- or biphasic with a terminal half-life (t50%) of 7.8-12.6 minutes. The total clearance (Cl) of ARA-C varied between 1.7 and 2.9 liters/kg . h, and the distribution volume (Vss) between 0.44 and 0.86 liters/kg. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ARA-C reached 10-15% of steady state concentrations in plasma. PMID:7104969

  4. Development, Verification and Validation of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes including the capabilities to account for radiative heating is a requirement. This paper presents the recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Furthermore, verification and validation of the code's radiation capabilities are demonstrated by comparing solutions to analytical results, to other codes, and to radiant test data.

  5. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report for Fiscal Year 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ege, Russell; Villani, James; Ritter, Paul

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the additions and modifications made to the Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1998 in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. this Document builds upon the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Responses System Report for Fiscal Year 1997.

  6. ARAC dispersion modeling of the July 26, 1993 oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III; Pobanz, B.M.

    1994-02-03

    This report presents the results from the real-time response on the day of the spill followed by a re-assessment of the spill. Worst-case source terms and readily available meteorological data (met data) were used for the real-time response. ARAC employs a three-dimensional, diagnostic, finite-difference dispersion modeling system for estimating the consequences from accidental atmospheric releases. MATHEW (Mass-Adjusted Three- Dimensional Wind field), a Eulerian wind field code, and ADPIC (Atmospheric Diffusion by Particle-In-Cell), a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian dispersion model, from the core of the system. For a particular incident a model grid is selected to encompass the area of concern and is generated using underlying terrain from on-line data. Meteorological data from multiple surface and upper air stations are automatically acquired in real time primarily from local airports and formatted to initialize the wind field model. Dispersion parameters are determined from meteorological data and the source term from available information. The system is designed to simulate releases from single or multiple radioactive releases, such as ventings, spills, fires, or explosions. Solid and liquid aerosols and neutrally-buoyant gases are modeled. Particle size distributions are input for each aerosol source and modeled using gravitational settling and wet and dry deposition, if applicable. The system can be readily applied to neutrally-bouyant, nonradioactive chemical releases which do not undergo significant physical or chemical conversion processes.

  7. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report Server User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen R.; Villani, James A.; Wingrove, Earl R., III

    1996-01-01

    This report is a user's guide for the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System (ASAC QRS) Report Server. The ASAC QRS is an automated online capability to access selected ASAC models and data repositories. It supports analysis by the aviation community. This system was designed by the Logistics Management Institute for the NASA Ames Research Center. The ASAC QRS Report Server allows users to obtain information stored in the ASAC Data Repositories.

  8. Development and Verification of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes, the capability to account for surface-to-surface radiation exchange in complex geometries is critical. This paper presents recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute geometric view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Verification of the code's radiation capabilities and results of a code-to-code comparison are presented. Finally, a demonstration case of a two-dimensional ablating cavity with enclosure radiation accounting for a changing geometry is shown.

  9. Directed evolution of AraC for improved compatibility of arabinose- and lactose-inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kuk; Chou, Howard H; Pfleger, Brian F; Newman, Jack D; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Keasling, Jay D

    2007-09-01

    Synthetic biological systems often require multiple, independently inducible promoters in order to control the expression levels of several genes; however, cross talk between the promoters limits this ability. Here, we demonstrate the directed evolution of AraC to construct an arabinose-inducible (P(BAD)) system that is more compatible with IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside) induction of a lactose-inducible (P(lac)) system. The constructed system is 10 times more sensitive to arabinose and tolerates IPTG significantly better than the wild type. Detailed studies indicate that the AraC dimerization domain and C terminus are important for the increased sensitivity of AraC to arabinose. PMID:17644634

  10. Atypical nuclear apoptosis downstream to caspase-3 activation in ara-C treated CCRF-CEM cells.

    PubMed

    Badran, Adel; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Inoue, Hitoshi; Ueda, Takanori

    2003-03-01

    The necessity of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation for the complete execution of apoptosis is still controversial. While investigating the apoptotic pathway induced by 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) in the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM (CEM) cells, we could easily retrieve high molecular weight (HMW) DNA fragments with a predominant size of 50 kb. However, under the same circumstances, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis was undetectable despite estimated heightened caspase-3 activity. Paradoxically, generation of low molecular weight DNA fragments was readily demonstrable by flow cytometric and immunohistochemical evidence in the absence of any detectable DNA ladder formation. These findings present a proof that, within certain contexts, small-sized DNA fragmentation occurring in apoptosis may not necessarily be of the ladder yielding internucleosomal integer multiples' pattern. Our data also add to the evidence that the machinery underlying HMW DNA fragmentation is distinct from that responsible for the internucleosomal one. PMID:12579303

  11. Responsibility, capability, and Active SETI: Policy, law, ethics, and communication with extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2011-02-01

    With recently growing interest in the Active Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), in which humankind would send intentional signals to extraterrestrial civilizations, there have been increased concerns about appropriate policy, as well as the role of space law and ethics in guiding such activities. Implicit in these discussions are notions of responsibility and capability that affect judgments about whether humans or other civilizations should initiate transmissions. Existing protocols that guide SETI research address transmissions from Earth, but there is debate over whether these guidelines should inform de novo transmissions as well. Relevant responsibilities to address include (1) looking out for the interests of humankind as a whole, (2) being truthful in interstellar messages, and (3) benefiting extraterrestrial civilizations. Our capabilities as a species and a civilization affect how well we can fulfill responsibilities, as seen when we consider whether we will be able to reach consensus about message contents (and whether that would be desirable), and whether we have the capacity to decode messages from beings that rely on different sensory modalities. The interplay of these responsibilities and capabilities suggests that humankind should place increased emphasis on Active SETI.

  12. A survey of pandemic influenza preparedness and response capabilities in Chicago area hospital security departments.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, David P

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary based on a December 2007 paper prepared by the author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree in business and organizational security management at Webster University. The project described was intended to assess Chicago-area healthcare organization security departments' preparedness and response capabilities for a potential influenza pandemic. While the author says healthcare organizations are learning from the pandemics of the past, little research has been conducted on the requirements necessary within hospital security departments. The article explores staffing, planning, preparation and response capabilities within a healthcare security context to determine existing resources available to the healthcare security community. Eleven completed surveys were received from hospital security managers throughout the geographical Chicago area. They reveal that hospital security managers are conscious of the risks of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Yet, it was found that several gaps existed within hospital security department staffing and response capabilities, as hospital security departments may not have the available resources necessary to adequately maintain their operations during a pandemic incident. PMID:19711787

  13. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Developing a Predictive Capability for Initiation and Reaction under Multiple Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols III, A L; Wallin, B K; Maienschein, J L; Reaugh, J E; Yoh, J J; McClelland, M E

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards--thermal and nonshock impact--response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the last two elements above, while a companion paper by Maienschein et al focuses on the first two elements. We outline models to describe the both the microscopic evolution of hot spots for detonation response and thermal kinetic models used to model slow heat environments. We show examples of application to both types of environments.

  14. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments. PMID:22383259

  15. 78 FR 24289 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Airman Testing Standards and Training Working Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... processes that create a structured means of safety risk management decision making to identify, assess, and... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo... ARAC Executive Committee accepted the FAA's assignment of a new task arising from recommendations...

  16. The International Space Station: New Capabilities for Disaster Response and Humanitarian Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been acquiring Earth imagery since 2000, primarily in the form of astronaut photography using hand-held film and digital cameras. Recent additions of more sophisticated multispectral and hyperspectral sensor systems have expanded both the capabilities and relevance of the ISS to basic research, applied Earth science, and development of new sensor technologies. Funding opportunities established within NASA, the US National Laboratories and the international partner organizations have generated instrument proposals that will further enhance these capabilities. With both internal and external sensor location options, and the availability of both automated and human-tended operational environments, the ISS is a unique platform within the constellation of Earth-observing satellites currently in orbit. Current progress and challenges associated with development of ISS terrestrial remote sensing capabilities in the area of disaster response and support of relief efforts will be presented. The ISS orbit allows for imaging of the Earth's surface at varying times of day and night, providing opportunities for data collection over approximately 95% of the populated regions. These opportunities are distinct from--yet augment--the data collection windows for the majority of sensors on polar-orbiting satellites. In addition to this potential for "being in the right place at the right time" to collect critical information on an evolving disaster, the presence of a human crew also allows for immediate recognition of an event from orbit, notification of relevant organizations on the ground, and re-tasking of available remote sensing resources to support humanitarian response and relief efforts. Challenges to establishing an integrated response capability are both technical (coordination of sensor targeting and data collection, rapid downlink and posting of data to a central accessible hub, timely generation and distribution of relevant data

  17. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  18. A Comprehensive Evaluation System for Military Hospitals' Response Capability to Bio-terrorism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Nan; Shao, Sicong; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Literature research and Delphi method were utilized to establish the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Questionnaires were designed and used to survey the status quo of 134 military hospitals' response capability to bio-terrorism. Survey indicated that factor analysis method was suitable to for analyzing the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. The constructed evaluation system was consisted of five first-class and 16 second-class indexes. Among them, medical response factor was considered as the most important factor with weight coefficient of 0.660, followed in turn by the emergency management factor with weight coefficient of 0.109, emergency management consciousness factor with weight coefficient of 0.093, hardware support factor with weight coefficient of 0.078, and improvement factor with weight coefficient of 0.059. The constructed comprehensive assessment model and system are scientific and practical. PMID:25605265

  19. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Initiation Mechanisms, Experimental Characterization, and Development of Predictive Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J; Nichols III, A; Reaugh, J; McClelland, M; Hsu, P C

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards -- thermal and non-shock impact -- response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the first two elements above, while a companion paper by Nichols et al focuses on the final two elements. We outline the underlying mechanisms of hazards response and their interactions, and present our experimental work to characterize the necessary material parameters, including thermal ignition, thermal and mechanical properties, fracture/fragmentation behavior, deflagration rates, and the effect of material damage. We also describe our validation test, the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment. Finally, we integrate the entire collection of data into a qualitative understanding that is useful until such time as the predictive models become available.

  20. Reduction-responsive multifunctional hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides with excellent antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and gene transfection capability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yajun; Ding, Xiaokang; Qi, Yu; Yu, Bingran; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-11-01

    There is an increasing demand in developing of multifunctional materials with good antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and drug/gene delivery capability for next-generation biomedical applications. To achieve this purpose, in this work series of hydroxyl-rich hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides of gentamicin, tobramycin, and neomycin (HP and SS-HP with redox-responsive disulfide bonds) were readily synthesized via ring-opening reactions in a one-pot manner. Both HP and SS-HP exhibit high antibacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Meanwhile, the hemolysis assay of the above materials shows good biocompatibility. Moreover, SS-HPs show excellent gene transfection efficiency in vitro due to the breakdown of reduction-responsive disulfide bonds. For an in vivo anti-tumor assay, the SS-HP/p53 complexes exhibit potent inhibition capability to the growth of tumors. This study provides a promising approach for the design of next-generation multifunctional biomedical materials. PMID:27561884

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the

  2. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  3. Targeting Antigen to Clec9A Primes Follicular Th Cell Memory Responses Capable of Robust Recall.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yu; Zaid, Ali; Davey, Gayle M; Mueller, Scott N; Nutt, Stephen L; Zotos, Dimitra; Tarlinton, David M; Shortman, Ken; Lahoud, Mireille H; Heath, William R; Caminschi, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Targeting Ags to dendritic cell (DC) surface receptors can induce a variety of responses depending on the DC type targeted, the receptor targeted, and the adjuvant used. Clec9A (DNGR-1), which is expressed by CD8(+) DCs, has been shown to bind F-actin exposed on damaged cells. Targeting Ag to this receptor in mice and nonhuman primates induces strong humoral immunity even in the absence of adjuvant, a process seen for a few select DC receptors. In contrast with other receptors, however, targeting Clec9A induces long-lived, affinity-matured Ab responses that are associated with efficient CD4(+) T cell responses shown to possess properties of follicular Th cells (TFH). In this article, we provide definitive evidence that Clec9A targeting promotes the development of TFH by showing that responding CD4 T cells express CXCR5, PD1, the TFH transcription factor Bcl6, and the cytokine IL-21, and that these cells localize to germinal centers. Furthermore, we extend studies from the model Ag OVA to the viral Ag glycoprotein D of HSV-1 and examine the capacity of primed TFH to form functional memory. We show that targeting glycoprotein D to Clec9A even in the absence of adjuvant induced long-lived memory CXCR5(+) PD1(hi) CD4(+) T cells that proliferated extensively upon secondary challenge and rapidly developed into effector TFH. This was associated with enhanced germinal center B cell responses and accelerated Ab production. Our study indicates that targeting Ags to Clec9A in the absence of adjuvant routinely generates TFH responses that form long-lived memory capable of robust secondary TFH responses. PMID:26101322

  4. FLT3-ITD drives Ara-C resistance in leukemic cells via the induction of RUNX3.

    PubMed

    Damdinsuren, Anar; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ito, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Jin, Guilan; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Asai, Satomi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITD) are well known to correlate with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously reported that FLT3-ITD confers resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a key cytotoxic agent in AML treatments. In order to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the Ara-C resistance induced by FLT3-ITD, we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of the human leukemic cell line K562 transduced with FLT3-ITD (K562/FLT3-ITD) and identified RUNX3 as a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. The transcriptional induction of the RUNX3 expression by FLT3-ITD was noted on a Luciferase assay. The knockdown of the RUNX3 expression in the K562/FLT3-ITD cells increased the sensitivity to Ara-C, and the exogenous expression of RUNX3 per se resulted in the enhancement of Ara-C resistance in the K562 cells. A relationship between the FLT3-ITD-induced RUNX3 expression and Ara-C resistance was also observed in AML cells with an endogenous FLT3-ITD expression. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that RUNX3 is a prerequisite for Ara-C resistance via FLT3-ITD signaling. PMID:26475207

  5. Unclassified Computing Capability: User Responses to a Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Kissel, L

    2002-01-29

    We are experimenting with a new computing model to be applied to a new computer dedicated to that model. Several LLNL science teams now have computational requirements, evidenced by the mature scientific applications that have been developed over the past five plus years, that far exceed the capability of the institution's computing resources. Thus, there is increased demand for dedicated, powerful parallel computational systems. Computation can, in the coming year, potentially field a capability system that is low cost because it will be based on a model that employs open source software and because it will use PC (IA32-P4) hardware. This incurs significant computer science risk regarding stability and system features but also presents great opportunity. We believe the risks can be managed, but the existence of risk cannot be ignored. In order to justify the budget for this system, we need to make the case that it serves science and, through serving science, serves the institution. That is the point of the meeting and the White Paper that we are proposing to prepare. The questions are listed and the responses received are in this report.

  6. Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This document is the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the QRS unit and system tests in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope, defines the QRS system and presents the additions made to the QRS this year, explains the assumptions, constraints, and approach used to conduct QRS Unit and System Testing, and presents the schedule used to perform QRS Testing. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) Test Facility and testing environment and summarizes the QRS Unit and System Test effort and results.

  7. Cloned, CD117 selected human amniotic fluid stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response.

    PubMed

    Moorefield, Emily C; McKee, Elizabeth E; Solchaga, Luis; Orlando, Guisseppe; Yoo, James J; Walker, Steve; Furth, Mark E; Bishop, Colin E

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells are broadly multipotent, can be expanded extensively in culture, are not tumorigenic and can be readily cryopreserved for cell banking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) show immunomodulatory activity and secrete a wide spectrum of cytokines and chemokines that suppress inflammatory responses, block mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and other immune reactions, and have proven therapeutic against conditions such as graft-versus-host disease. AFS cells resemble MSCs in many respects including surface marker expression and differentiation potential. We therefore hypothesized that AFS cells may exhibit similar immunomodulatory capabilities. We present data to demonstrate that direct contact with AFS cells inhibits lymphocyte activation. In addition, we show that cell-free supernatants derived from AFS cells primed with total blood monocytes or IL-1β, a cytokine released by monocytes and essential in mediation of the inflammatory response, also inhibited lymphocyte activation. Further investigation of AFS cell-free supernatants by protein array revealed secretion of multiple factors in common with MSCs that are known to be involved in immune regulation including growth related oncogene (GRO) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP) family members as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6). AFS cells activated by PBMCs released several additional cytokines as compared to BM-MSCs, including macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α), MIP-1α and Activin. AFS cells also released higher levels of MCP-1 and lower levels of MCP-2 compared to BM-MSCs in response to IL-1β activation. This suggests that there may be some AFS-specific mechanisms of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Our results indicate that AFS cells are able to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro and that soluble factors are an essential component in the communication between lymphocytes and AFS cells. Their extensive self-renewal capacity, possibility for banking and absence of

  8. Comparison of the antitumor activity of gemcitabine and ara-C in a panel of human breast, colon, lung and pancreatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Merriman, R L; Hertel, L W; Schultz, R M; Houghton, P J; Houghton, J A; Rutherford, P G; Tanzer, L R; Boder, G B; Grindey, G B

    1996-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a new deoxycytidine analog that exhibits significant cytotoxicity against a variety of cultured murine and human tumor cells. The cytotoxic action of gemcitabine appears to be due to the inhibition of DNA synthesis by inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase and by competition with dCTP for incorporation into DNA. We have previously shown that gemcitabine, but not cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), has a broad spectrum of antitumor activity against 7 different types of murine solid tumors. The activity of gemcitabine was schedule dependent. To further characterize its activity, gemcitabine was tested against 12 human carcinoma xenografts. When given on an every 3 day x 4 schedule, the following percent inhibitions (at maximally tolerated doses [MTD]; MTD/2) in tumor growth were seen: MX-1 mammary (93%; 80%), CX-1 colon (92%; 82%), HC-1 colon (96%; 92%), GC3 colon (98%; 94%), VRC5 colon (99%; 100%), LX-1 lung (76%; 61%), CALU-6 lung (75%; 38%), NCI-H460 lung (45%; 46%), HS766T pancreatic (73%; not tested), PaCa-2 pancreatic (69%; 40%), PANC-1 pancreatic (70%; 60%), and BxPC-3 pancreatic (9%; 19%). In contrast, only the LX-1 lung carcinoma xenograft was responsive to ara-C treatment, which inhibited tumor growth by a marginal 62 percent. Thus, like its activity against murine solid tumors, gemcitabine has excellent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human solid tumors. PMID:8958178

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  10. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power

  11. Pre-PCR processing in bioterrorism preparedness: improved diagnostic capabilities for laboratory response networks.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Knutsson, Rickard; Ansell, Ricky; Rådström, Peter; Rasmusson, Birgitta

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic DNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a valuable tool for rapid detection of biothreat agents. However, analysis is often challenging because of the limited size, quality, and purity of the biological target. Pre-PCR processing is an integrated concept in which the issues of analytical limit of detection and simplicity for automation are addressed in all steps leading up to PCR amplification--that is, sampling, sample treatment, and the chemical composition of PCR. The sampling method should maximize target uptake and minimize uptake of extraneous substances that could impair the analysis--so-called PCR inhibitors. In sample treatment, there is a trade-off between yield and purity, as extensive purification leads to DNA loss. A cornerstone of pre-PCR processing is to apply DNA polymerase-buffer systems that are tolerant to specific sample impurities, thereby lowering the need for expensive purification steps and maximizing DNA recovery. Improved awareness among Laboratory Response Networks (LRNs) regarding pre-PCR processing is important, as ineffective sample processing leads to increased cost and possibly false-negative or ambiguous results, hindering the decision-making process in a bioterrorism crisis. This article covers the nature and mechanisms of PCR-inhibitory substances relevant for agroterrorism and bioterrorism preparedness, methods for quality control of PCR reactions, and applications of pre-PCR processing to optimize and simplify the analysis of various biothreat agents. Knowledge about pre-PCR processing will improve diagnostic capabilities of LRNs involved in the response to bioterrorism incidents. PMID:23971826

  12. [Information capability of the test with radioadaptive response in functiional evaluation of pilots].

    PubMed

    Alchinova, I B; Khlebnikova, N N; Karganov, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    Information capability of the radioadaptive response test was assessed during functional evaluation of pilots in the course of adaptation to fight factors. Functional evaluation was made on the system level, i.e., by cardiorespiratory parameters (spirometry and arteriorcardiography), the cellular level by individual sensitivity to ionized radiatiin of metabolic shifts (laser correlation spectroscopy of biological liquids). Changes in molecular composition of blood serum and cardiorespiratory functions were compared with individual radiosensitivity of pilots with varying fight time. Incidence of and strength of lymphocytes' RAR decreased with increasing flight hours. In light scattering spectra the input of particles with small hydrodynamic radius (no more than 11 nm) reduced and that of large particles (more than 200 nm) increased. Total power of the cardiac rhythm variability (CRV) spectrum decreased whereas stress-index grew in value. Breathing test raised peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure in masked pilots w/o RAR. Besides, it reduced total spectrum of systolic pressure variability and input of very low frequencies. In the group of RAR pilots, relative input of low frequencies into CRV grew and of high frequencies decreased; blood pressure did not alter Decreased input of small particles and increased input of large particles in light scattering as compared with baseline values were found only in RAR pilots suggesting shifts in metabolism and humoral immunity. It can be hypothesized that level of individual radiosensitivity reflects general resistance of organism to negative factors of environment. PMID:23074953

  13. Caring and Capable Kids: An Activity Guide for Teaching Kindness, Tolerance, Self-Control and Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Linda K.; And Others

    With the purpose of developing caring and capable children, this book offers teachers and counselors a collection of over 75 activities as teaching and guidance tools. Characteristics of caring and capable children, which reflect the development of empathy, compassion, assertiveness, and self-discipline, are described. The activities are grouped…

  14. Stimulus responsive nanogel with innate near IR fluorescent capability for drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vineeth M; Shenoy, Sachin J; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-10-01

    A brighter, non toxic and biocompatible optical imaging agent is one of the major quests of biomedical research. Here in, we report a photoluminescent comacromer [PEG-poly(propylene fumarate)-citric acid-glycine] and novel stimulus (pH) responsive nanogel endowed with excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (EDF) for combined drug delivery and bioimaging applications. The comacromer when excited at different wavelengths in visible region from 400nm to 640nm exhibits fluorescent emissions from 510nm to 718nm in aqueous condition. It has high Stokes shift (120nm), fluorescent lifetime (7 nanoseconds) and quantum yield (50%). The nanogel, C-PLM-NG, prepared with this photoluminescent comacromer and N,N-dimethyl amino ethylmethacrylate (DMEMA) has spherical morphology with particle size around 100nm and 180nm at pH 7.4 (physiological) and 5.5 (intracellular acidic condition of cancer cells) respectively. The studies on fluorescence characteristics of C-PLM NG in aqueous condition reveal large red-shift with emissions from 523nm to 700nm for excitations from 460nm to 600nm ascertaining the EDF characteristics. Imaging the near IR emission with excitation at 535nm was accomplished using cut-off filters. The nanogel undergoes pH responsive swelling and releases around 50% doxorubicin (DOX) at pH 5.5 in comparison with 15% observed at pH 7.4. The studies on in vitro cytotoxicity with MTT assay and hemolysis revealed that the present nanogel is non-toxic. The DOX-loaded C-PLM-NG encapsulated in Hela cells induces lysis of cancer cells. The inherent EDF characteristics associated with C-PLM NG enable cellular imaging of Hela cells. The studies on biodistribution and clearance mechanism of C-PLM-NG from the body of mice reveal bioimaging capability and safety of the present nanogel. This is the first report on a polymeric nanogel with innate near IR emissions for bioimaging applications. PMID:27262258

  15. Arac/XylS family of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, M T; Schleif, R; Bairoch, A; Hofmann, K; Ramos, J L

    1997-01-01

    The ArC/XylS family of prokaryotic positive transcriptional regulators includes more than 100 proteins and polypeptides derived from open reading frames translated from DNA sequences. Members of this family are widely distributed and have been found in the gamma subgroup of the proteobacteria, low- and high-G + C-content gram-positive bacteria, and cyanobacteria. These proteins are defined by a profile that can be accessed from PROSITE PS01124. Members of the family are about 300 amino acids long and have three main regulatory functions in common: carbon metabolism, stress response, and pathogenesis. Multiple alignments of the proteins of the family define a conserved stretch of 99 amino acids usually located at the C-terminal region of the regulator and connected to a nonconserved region via a linker. The conserved stretch contains all the elements required to bind DNA target sequences and to activate transcription from cognate promoters. Secondary analysis of the conserved region suggests that it contains two potential alpha-helix-turn-alpha-helix DNA binding motifs. The first, and better-fitting motif is supported by biochemical data, whereas existing biochemical data neither support nor refute the proposal that the second region possesses this structure. The phylogenetic relationship suggests that members of the family have recruited the nonconserved domain(s) into a series of existing domains involved in DNA recognition and transcription stimulation and that this recruited domain governs the role that the regulator carries out. For some regulators, it has been demonstrated that the nonconserved region contains the dimerization domain. For the regulators involved in carbon metabolism, the effector binding determinants are also in this region. Most regulators belonging to the AraC/XylS family recognize multiple binding sites in the regulated promoters. One of the motifs usually overlaps or is adjacent to the -35 region of the cognate promoters. Footprinting

  16. Cellular Intrinsic Mechanism Affecting the Outcome of AML Treated with Ara-C in a Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dongming; Su, Guangsong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei J.; Singleton, Timothy P.; Yin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. PMID:25314317

  17. Ara-C increases gastric cancer cell invasion by upregulating CD-147-MMP-2/MMP‑9 via the ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Lin; Tao, Hai-Rong; Wang, Han-Wei; Sun, Yun; Zhang, Li-Di; Zhang, Chao; He, Wei; Xu, Mang-Hua; Zhao, Jiang-Min; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2015-04-01

    Gastric cancer cell are not particularly sensitive to Ara-C, a deoxycytidine analog that affects DNA synthesis. In the present study, AGS and MKN-45 gastric cancer cell lines were treated with Ara-C to determine its role in cell prolife-ration and apoptosis. The antiproliferative effect of Ara-C was assessed using the Cell Counting kit-8. Gelatinase zymography was utilized to detect the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and an in vitro invasion assay was performed. Using RT-PCR, CD-147, MMP-2 and MPP-9 mRNA levels were assessed in AGS cells with various doses of Ara-C treatment. CD-147, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels were analysed in Ara-C‑treated AGS and MKN-45 cells. AGS cells were treated with or without U-0126 or siRNA-CD147 and/or Ara-C for 24 h, and an in vitro invasion assay was performed. Although low-dose Ara-C had no obvious effect on cell proliferation, it upregulated the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and CD-147 and ERK activation. Low-dose Ara-C increased gastric cancer cell invasion. U-0126 and siRNA-CD-147 inhibited the induction of Ara-C in gastric cancer cell invasion. Therefore, Ara-C enhances the invasiveness of gastric cancer cells by expression of CD-147 /MMP-2 and MMP-9 via the ERK signaling pathway. The results are therefore useful in the prevention of Ara-C collateral damage associated with standard, conventional protocols of chemotherapy administration. PMID:25625234

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE CAPABILITIES FOR CONDUCTING INGESTION PATHWAY CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-11

    Potential airborne releases of radioactivity from facilities operated for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site could pose significant consequences to the public through the ingestion pathway. The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a suite of technologies needed to conduct assessments of ingestion dose during emergency response, enabling emergency manager at SRS to develop initial protective action recommendation for state agencies early in the response and to make informed decisions on activation of additional Federal assets that would be needed to support long-term monitoring and assessment activities.

  19. Psychological Factors Capable of Preventing the Inhibition of Antibody Responses in Separated Infant Monkeys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Christopher L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Capacity of infant monkeys to mount an antibody response to viral challenge was evaluated after monkeys' removal from their mothers in several social and physical environments. Results indicated that trauma of separation was reduced when infants were familiar with the separation environment or familiar social companions were available. (PCB)

  20. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, Peter Donald; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  1. Sound localization and auditory response capabilities in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollo, Audrey K.; Higgs, Dennis M.

    2005-04-01

    A fundamental role in vertebrate auditory systems is determining the direction of a sound source. While fish show directional responses to sound, sound localization remains in dispute. The species used in the current study, Neogobius melanostomus (round goby) uses sound in reproductive contexts, with both male and female gobies showing directed movement towards a calling male. The two-choice laboratory experiment was used (active versus quiet speaker) to analyze behavior of gobies in response to sound stimuli. When conspecific male spawning sounds were played, gobies moved in a direct path to the active speaker, suggesting true localization to sound. Of the animals that responded to conspecific sounds, 85% of the females and 66% of the males moved directly to the sound source. Auditory playback of natural and synthetic sounds showed differential behavioral specificity. Of gobies that responded, 89% were attracted to the speaker playing Padogobius martensii sounds, 87% to 100 Hz tone, 62% to white noise, and 56% to Gobius niger sounds. Swimming speed, as well as mean path angle to the speaker, will be presented during the presentation. Results suggest a strong localization of the round goby to a sound source, with some differential sound specificity.

  2. Highly Lewis Acidic Arylboronate Esters Capable of Colorimetric Turn-On Response.

    PubMed

    Oehlke, Alexander; Auer, Alexander A; Schreiter, Katja; Friebe, Nadine; Spange, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    A series of boronate-π-acceptor compounds containing different types of π bridges (1,4-phenylen or thien-2,5-diyl or furan-2,5-diyl) that link the switchable boronate ester group with the efficient TCF acceptor group (TCF=2-dicyanomethylen-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran) has been synthesized. A TCF chromophore of this type undergoes transition to a donor-π-acceptor compound upon coordination of Lewis bases at the Lewis acidic boron center, which is accompanied by an enhanced intramolecular charge-transfer interaction. The Lewis acid character has been investigated by spectroscopic measurements (UV/Vis, NMR spectroscopies) as well as DFT and ab initio-based calculations. It is shown that the TCF acceptor group and thiophene or furan π-bridges directly bound to the boron atom cooperatively increase the Lewis acidity. UV/Vis titration experiments confirm fluoride binding constants in the range of up to 10(8)  M(-1) in CH2 Cl2 . In addition to the strong boron fluoride binding motif, Lewis interactions also occur with weaker Lewis bases, such as pyridine or aliphatic alcohols. The unique combination of chromophoric and Lewis acidic properties is responsible for the intense colorimetric turn-on response detectable after complex formation. PMID:26489784

  3. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  4. The high dose response and functional capability of the DT-702/Pd lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Tyler M; Talmadge, Molly D; Murray, Mark M; Nelson, Martin E; Mueller, Andrew C; Romanyukha, Alexander A; Fairchild, Gregory R; Grypp, Matthew D; Williams, Anthony S

    2015-05-01

    The United States Navy monitors the dose its radiation workers receive using the DT-702/PD thermoluminescent dosimeter, which consists of the Harshaw 8840 holder and the four-element Harshaw 8841 card. There were two main objectives of this research. In the first objective, the dosimeters were exposed to 100 Gy using electron and x-ray beams and found to respond approximately 30-40% lower than the delivered dose. No significant effect on the under-response was found when dose rate, radiation type, dosimeter position on the phantom, and dosimeter material were varied or when the card was irradiated while enclosed in its holder. Since the current naval policy is to remove from occupational use any thermoluminescent dosimeter with an accumulated deep dose equivalent of 0.05 Sv or greater, the functionality of the dosimeter was also investigated at deep dose equivalents of 0.05, 0.15, and 0.25 Sv using 60Co and 137Cs sources as the second main objective. All dosimeters were annealed following exposure and then exposed to 5.0 mSv from a 90Sr source. In all cases, the dosimeters responded within 3% of the delivered dose, indicating that the dosimeters remained functional as defined by naval dosimetry requirements. However, the anneal time required to clear the thermoluminescent dosimeter's reading was found to increase approximately as the cube root with the delivered dose. PMID:25811149

  5. Increased antioxidant response and capability to produce ROS in hemocytes of Pinna nobilis L. exposed to anthropogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Antoni; Natalotto, Antonino; Alvarez, Elvira; Deudero, Salud

    2013-10-01

    Environmental pollutants exert immunotoxical effects on aquatic organisms. The aim was to determine the antioxidant response, markers of oxidative damage and reactive oxygen species production in hemocytes of Pinna nobilis, the largest endemic bivalve in the Mediterranean Sea, under anthropogenic pressure. P. nobilis individuals were collected from two locations along Mallorca Island waters attending to different degree of human impact and the hemocytes were obtained. Specimens from the impacted area showed increased activities of the antioxidant enzymes - catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase -, myeloperoxidase activity and reduced glutathione levels. No differences in oxidative damage markers - malondiahdehyde and carbonyl index - were evidenced between the pristine and polluted areas. Hemocytes from the polluted area presented increased capability to generate reactive oxygen species and nitrite/nitrate when activated. In conclusion, the human activities primed hemocytes for oxidative burst and increased the antioxidant mechanism without evidence of oxidative damage. PMID:23871388

  6. Synthesis of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Janus Microhydrogels for Anisotropic Thermo-responsiveness and Organophilic/Hydrophilic Loading Capability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung Duck; Choi, Andrew; Doh, Junsang; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    Janus microparticles are compartmentalized particles with differing molecular structures and/or functionality on each of their two sides. Because of this unique property, Janus microparticles have been recognized as a new class of materials, thereby attracting a great deal of attention from various research fields. The versatility of these microparticles has been exemplified through their uses as building blocks for self-assembly, electrically responsive actuators, emulsifiers for painting and cosmetics, and carriers for drug delivery. This study introduces a detailed protocol that explicitly describes a synthetic method for designing novel Janus microhydrogels composed of a single base material, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). Janus microdroplets are firstly generated via a hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device (HFMD) based on the separation of a supersaturated aqueous NIPAAm monomer solution and subsequently polymerized through exposure to UV irradiation. The resulting Janus microhydrogels were found to be entirely composed of the same base material, featured an easily identifiable compartmentalized morphology, and exhibited anisotropic thermo-responsiveness and organophilic/hydrophilic loading capability. We believe that the proposed method introduces a novel hydrogel platform with the potential for advanced synthesis of multi-functional Janus microhydrogels. PMID:26966860

  7. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Peculiar Alternatively Activated Macrophages Capable of Dampening Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Conte, Romana; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Serra, Martina; Romei, Cristina; Bellora, Francesca; Becchetti, Flavio; Andaloro, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support hematopoiesis and exert immunoregulatory activities. Here, we analyzed the functional outcome of the interactions between MSCs and monocytes/macrophages. We showed that MSCs supported the survival of monocytes that underwent differentiation into macrophages, in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. However, MSCs skewed their polarization toward a peculiar M2-like functional phenotype (M(MSC) ), through a prostaglandin E2-dependent mechanism. M(MSC) were characterized by high expression of scavenger receptors, increased phagocytic capacity, and high production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β. These cytokines contributed to the immunoregulatory properties of M(MSC) , which differed from those of typical IL-4-induced macrophages (M2). In particular, interacting with activated natural killer (NK) cells, M(MSC) inhibited both the expression of activating molecules such as NKp44, CD69, and CD25 and the production of IFNγ, while M2 affected only IFNγ production. Moreover, M(MSC) inhibited the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in response to allogeneic stimuli and induced the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Toll-like receptor engagement reverted the phenotypic and functional features of M(MSC) to those of M1 immunostimulatory/proinflammatory macrophages. Overall our data show that MSCs induce the generation of a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages capable of suppressing both innate and adaptive immune responses. These findings may help to better understand the role of MSCs in healthy tissues and inflammatory diseases including cancer, and provide clues for novel therapeutic approaches. Stem Cells 2016;34:1909-1921. PMID:27015881

  8. Galleria mellonella larvae are capable of sensing the extent of priming agent and mounting proportionatal cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Xu, Li; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-06-01

    Larvae of Galleria mellonella are useful models for studying the innate immunity of invertebrates or for evaluating the virulence of microbial pathogens. In this work, we demonstrated that prior exposure of G. mellonella larvae to high doses (1×10(4), 1×10(5) or 1×10(6) cells/larva) of heat-killed Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 increases the resistance of larvae to a lethal dose (50 cells/larva) of viable P. luminescens TT01 infection administered 48h later. We also found that the changes in immune protection level were highly correlated to the changes in levels of cellular and humoral immune parameters when priming the larvae with different doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01. Priming the larvae with high doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01 resulted in significant increases in the hemocytes activities of phagocytosis and encapsulation. High doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01 also induced an increase in total hemocyte count and a reduction in bacterial density within the larval hemocoel. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that genes coding for cecropin and gallerimycin and galiomycin increased in expression after priming G. mellonella with heat-killed P. luminescens TT01. All the immune parameters changed in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that the insect immune system is capable of sensing the extent of priming agent and mounting a proportionate immune response. PMID:27107784

  9. Doxorubicin loaded pH-responsive micelles capable of rapid intracellular drug release for potential tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wu, Wei; Xiu, Kemao; Xu, Fujian; Li, Zhongming; Li, Jianshu

    2014-08-01

    Amphiphilic copolymers have been paid much attention for controlled drug release for many years due to their obvious advantages. In this study, an acid-triggered drug carrier system capable of rapid intracellular drug release is investigated for potential tumor therapy. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(2-diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) (PDPA-b-PAMA) is prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The molecular structure of the copolymer is confirmed by 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of the PDPA-b-PAMA is 0.005 mg/mL, which can ensure the thermodynamical stability of micelles even after significant dilution. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiencies of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles are 9.96% and 55.31%, respectively. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) show that the amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into spherical micelles with narrow polydispersity indexes (PDLs) at pH 7.4 and 6.8, but disassemble into random chain aggregations at pH 5.0. The DOX-loaded PDPA-b-PAMA shows obvious pH-responsive drug release profile when the pH value changes from 7.4 to 5.0, since it transforms from amphiphilicity to double hydrophilicity through the protonation of PDPA block (pK(a) - 6.2) in a relatively low pH condition, thus the loaded DOX can be rapidly released from the disassembling micelles. In addition, the micellar system also exhibits relatively low cytotoxicity and rapid drug release behaviour in tumor cells, which make it promising for tumor therapy. PMID:25016648

  10. Distributed emergency response system to model dispersion and deposition of atmospheric releases

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.S.

    1985-04-01

    Aging hardware and software and increasing commitments by the Departments of Energy and Defense have led us to develop a new, expanded system to replace the existing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) system. This distributed, computer-based, emergency response system is used by state and federal agencies to assess the environmental health hazards resulting from an accidental release of radioactive material into the atmosphere. Like its predecessor, the expanded system uses local meteorology (e.g., wind speed and wind direction), as well as terrain information, to simulate the transport and dispersion of the airborne material. The system also calculates deposition and dose and displays them graphically over base maps of the local geography for use by on-site authorities. This paper discusses the limitations of the existing ARAC system. It also discusses the components and functionality of the new system, the technical difficulties encountered and resolved in its design and implementation, and the software methodologies and tools employed in its development.

  11. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  12. Meteorological data assimilation for real-time emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G.; Chan, S.T.

    1996-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. Diverse data assimilation techniques are required to meet the needs of a new generation of ARAC models and to take advantage of the rapidly expanding availability of meteorological data. We are developing a hierarchy of algorithms to provide gridded meteorological fields which can be used to drive dispersion codes or to provide initial fields for mesoscale models. Data to be processed include winds, temperature, moisture, and turbulence.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  14. Space station capability for research in rotational hypogravity. [to study human physiological responses to rotational acceleration stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, G.

    1973-01-01

    Certain capabilities provided in preliminary designs of orbital space stations for research in rotational hypogravity are outlined. Also indicated are alternative configurations that are being considered. Principal addresses are members of an international community of physiologists whose work in earth oriented, as well as space oriented, physiology can be supported through observation under the background environment of null gravity. Their participation in originating and devising advanced experiments and in developing requirements is expected to enhance final design of the selected space station and to make the research program more meaningful.

  15. Dual-mass vibratory rate gyroscope with suppressed translational acceleration response and quadrature-error correction capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William A. (Inventor); Juneau, Thor N. (Inventor); Lemkin, Mark A. (Inventor); Roessig, Allen W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated vibratory rate gyroscope to measure rotation includes two proof-masses mounted in a suspension system anchored to a substrate. The suspension has two principal modes of compliance, one of which is driven into oscillation. The driven oscillation combined with rotation of the substrate about an axis perpendicular to the substrate results in Coriolis acceleration along the other mode of compliance, the sense-mode. The sense-mode is designed to respond to Coriolis accelerationwhile suppressing the response to translational acceleration. This is accomplished using one or more rigid levers connecting the two proof-masses. The lever allows the proof-masses to move in opposite directions in response to Coriolis acceleration. The invention includes a means for canceling errors, termed quadrature error, due to imperfections in implementation of the sensor. Quadrature-error cancellation utilizes electrostatic forces to cancel out undesired sense-axis motion in phase with drive-mode position.

  16. A critical examination of the predictive capabilities of a new type of general laminated plate theory in the inelastic response regime

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Todd O

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a new type of general, multiscale plate theory was developed for application to the analysis of the history-dependent response of laminated plates (Williams). In particular, the history-dependent behavior in a plate was considered to arise from both delamination effects as well as history-dependent material point responses (such as from viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, damage, etc.). The multiscale nature of the theoretical framework is due to the use of a superposition of both general global and local displacement effects. Using this global-local displacement field the governing equations of the theory are obtained by satisfying the governing equations of nonlinear continuum mechanics referenced to the initial configuration. In order to accomplish the goal of conducting accurate analyses in the history-dependent response regimes the formulation of the theory has been carried out in a sufficiently general fashion that any cohesive zone model (CZM) and any history-dependent constitutive model for a material point can be incorporated into the analysis without reformulation. Recently, the older multiscale theory of Williams has been implemented into the finite element (FE) framework by Mourad et al. and the resulting capabilities where used to shown that in a qualitative sense it is important that the local fields be accurately obtained in order to correctly predict even the overall response characteristics of a laminated plate in the inelastic regime. The goal of this work is to critically examine the predictive capabilities of this theory, as well as the older multiscale theory of Williams and other types of laminated plate theories, with recently developed exact solutions for the response of inelastic plates in cylindrical bending (Williams). These exact solutions are valid for both nonlinear CZMs as well as inelastic material responses obtained from different constitutive theories. In particular, the accuracy with which the different plate theories

  17. Alizarin Complexone Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Smart System Integrating Glucose-Responsive Double-Drugs Release and Real-Time Monitoring Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhen; He, Dinggeng; Cai, Linli; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xue; Li, Liling; Li, Siqi; Su, Xiaoya

    2016-04-01

    The outstanding progress of nanoparticles-based delivery systems capable of releasing hypoglycemic drugs in response to glucose has dramatically changed the outlook of diabetes management. However, the developed glucose-responsive systems have not offered real-time monitoring capabilities for accurate quantifying hypoglycemic drugs released. In this study, we present a multifunctional delivery system that integrates both delivery and monitoring issues using glucose-triggered competitive binding scheme on alizarin complexone (ALC) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). In this system, ALC is modified on the surface of MSN as the signal reporter. Gluconated insulin (G-Ins) is then introduced onto MSN-ALC via benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BA) mediated esterification reaction, where G-Ins not only blocks drugs inside the mesopores but also works as a hypoglycemic drug. In the absence of glucose, the sandwich-type boronate ester structure formed by BA binding to the diols of ALC and G-Ins remains intact, resulting in an fluorescence emission peak at 570 nm and blockage of pores. Following a competitive binding, the presence of glucose cause the dissociation of boronate ester between ALC and BA, which lead to the pores opening and disappearance of fluorescence. As proof of concept, rosiglitazone maleate (RSM), an insulin-sensitizing agent, was doped into the MSN to form a multifunctional MSN (RSM@MSN-ALC-BA-Ins), integrating with double-drugs loading, glucose-responsive performance, and real-time monitoring capability. It has been demonstrated that the glucose-responsive release behaviors of insulin and RSM in buffer or in human serum can be quantified in real-time through evaluating the changes of fluorescence signal. We believe that this developed multifunctional system can shed light on the invention of a new generation of smart nanoformulations for optical diagnosis, individualized treatment, and noninvasive monitoring of diabetes management. PMID

  18. Effects of Control-Response Characteristics on the Capability of Helicopter for Use as a Gun Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, Robert J.; Connor, Andrew B.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation with a variable-stability helicopter was undertaken to ascertain the steadiness and ability to "hold on" to the target of a helicopter employed as a gun platform. Simulated tasks were per formed under differing flight conditions with the control-response characteristics of the helicopter varied for each task. The simulated gun-platform mission included: Variations of headings with respect to wind, constant altitude and "swing around" to a wind heading of 0 deg, and increases in altitude while performing a swing around to a wind heading of 0 deg. The results showed that increases in control power and damping increased pilot ability to hold on to the target with fewer yawing oscillations and in a shorter time. The results also indicated that wind direction must be considered in accuracy assessment. Greatest accuracy throughout these tests was achieved by aiming upwind.

  19. Characterization of a cancer/testis (CT) antigen gene family capable of eliciting humoral response in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Lopes, Marilene H.; Martins, Waleska K.; Cunha, Isabela W.; Soares, Fernando A.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are immunogenic proteins expressed in normal gametogenic tissues and in different types of tumors. CT antigens are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy, and the identification of novel CT antigens is a prerequisite for the development of cancer vaccines. We have identified a CT antigen, named CTSP-1, with partial similarity to the breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1. CTSP-1 presents several splicing and polyadenylation variants and has a very restricted expression pattern among normal tissues. CTSP-1 is exclusively expressed in normal testis and is aberrantly expressed in 47.6% (10 of 21) of tumor cell lines and in 44.4% (75 of 169) of tumors from different histological types. The highest percentages of positive expression were observed in melanomas (59.0%) followed by prostate (58.0%) and lung (57.0%) tumors. CTSP-1 is part of a highly conserved gene family, and members of this family also have a restricted expression pattern and similar protein structure. Antibodies against members of this gene family were detected in 10% (14 of 141) of plasma samples from patients with a wide spectrum of tumors. The highest percentages of antibody response were observed in patients with prostate (20.8%), thyroid (20.0%), and breast (16.6%) tumors. Because of its very restricted expression pattern in normal tissues and immunogenicity in different types of tumors, CTSP-1 should be considered a promising candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17114284

  20. Blockade of adaptive defensive changes in cholesterol uptake and synthesis in AML by the addition of pravastatin to idarubicin + high-dose Ara-C: a phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Deborah E.; Stirewalt, Derek; Shen, Danny; Lemker, Elizabeth; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Cortes, Jorge; Beran, Miloslav; Jackson, C. Ellen; Chen, Wenjing; Estey, Elihu; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2007-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts elevate cellular cholesterol in a defensive adaptation that increases chemoresistance, but blockade of HMG-CoA reductase with statins restores chemosensitivity in vitro. This phase 1 study evaluated adding pravastatin (PV) (40-1680 mg/day, days 1-8) to idarubicin (Ida) ([12 mg/(M2 · day), days 4-6]) + high-dose cytarabine (Ara-C; HDAC) [1.5 g/(M2 · day) by CI, days 4-7] in 15 newly diagnosed and 22 salvage patients with unfavorable (n = 26) or intermediate (n = 10) prognosis cytogenetics. Compared with historical experience with Ida-HDAC, the duration of neutropenia and throbmbocytopenia and the toxicity profile were unaffected by the addition of PV. During PV loading (day 0-4) serum triglyceride and total and LDL cholesterol levels decreased in nearly all patients. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated higher and more sustained serum PV levels with PV doses above 1280 mg/day. CR/CRp was obtained in 11 of 15 new patients, including 8 of 10 with unfavorable cytogenetics, and 9 of 22 salvage patients. An MTD for PV + Ida-HDAC was not reached. Addition of PV to Ida-HDAC was safe, and the encouraging response rates support conducting further trials evaluating the effect of cholesterol modulation on response in AML. PMID:17158228

  1. Hitchhiker capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C.

    1988-01-01

    A carrier system has been developed for economical and quick response flight of small attached payloads on the space shuttle. Hitchhiker can accommodate up to 750 lb of customer payloads in canisters or mounted to an exposed side-mount plate, or up to 1200 lb mounted on a cross-bay structure. The carrier connects to the orbiter's electrical systems and provides up to six customers with standard electrical services including power, real time telemetry and commands. A transparent data and command system concept is employed to allow the customer to easily use his own ground support equipment and personnel to control his payload during integration and flight operations. A general description of the Hitchhiker program and the Shuttle Payload of Opportunity Carrier (SPOC) is given and future enhancements are outlined.

  2. Primary cultured astrocytes from old rats are capable to activate the Nrf2 response against MPP+ toxicity after tBHQ pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Aguilar, Adriana; Luna-López, Armando; Ventura-Gallegos, José L; Lazzarini, Roberto; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; González-Puertos, Viridiana Y; Morán, Julio; Santamaría, Abel; Königsberg, Mina

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes are key players for brain physiology, protecting neurons by releasing antioxidant enzymes; however, they are also susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a central regulator of the antioxidant response, and therefore, pharmacologic inducers are often used to activate this transcription factor to induce cellular protection. To date, it still remains unknown if cells from aged animals are capable of developing this response. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine if cortical astrocytes derived from old rats are able to respond to tertbuthyl-hydroquinene (tBHQ) pretreatment and stimulate the Nrf2-antioxidant response pathway to induce an antioxidant strategy against MPP+ toxicity, one of the most used molecules to model Parkinson's disease. Our results show that, although astrocytes from adult and old rats were more susceptible to MPP+ toxicity than astrocytes from newborn rats, when pretreated with tertbuthyl-hydroquinene, they were able to transactivate Nrf2, increasing antioxidant enzymes and developing cellular protection. These results are discussed in terms of the doses used to create protective responses. PMID:24650792

  3. Mechanism of Hb F stimulation by S-stage compounds. In vitro studies with bone marrow cells exposed to 5-azacytidine, Ara-C, or hydroxyurea.

    PubMed Central

    Galanello, R; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Papayannopoulou, T

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro effect of S-stage-specific drugs on the fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) potential of erythroid precursors and progenitors was tested by exposing bone marrow cells to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, Ara-C, or hydroxyurea in suspension cultures and reculturing the cells in drug-free clonal cultures. Analysis of Hb F in the erythroblasts present at the end of suspension cultures and in the erythroid colonies formed from treated progenitors showed that 1 X 10(-9)-5 X 10(-8) M 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine produced a concentration-related increase in the proportion of Hb F-positive erythroblasts, of Hb F-positive erythroid CFU (CFUe) colonies, and at the higher doses used, an increased Hb F expression in erythroid burst-forming unit (BFUe)-derived colonies. Preincubation of bone marrow cells with Ara-C produced significant megaloblastic changes by the end of the 2-d incubation and increased the proportion of Hb F-positive erythroblasts, CFUe colonies, and e-clusters, but BFUe-derived progeny was unaffected. Hydroxyurea failed to produce significant changes in Hb F at the range of concentrations used. The data raise the possibility of more than one mechanism underlying the stimulation of Hb F by S-stage drugs. PMID:2450894

  4. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  5. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  6. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  7. Comparison of the estimation capabilities of response surface methodology and artificial neural network for the optimization of recombinant lipase production by E. coli BL21.

    PubMed

    Nelofer, Rubina; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Basri, Mahiran; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2012-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to optimize the effect of four independent variables, viz. glucose, sodium chloride (NaCl), temperature and induction time, on lipase production by a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21. The optimization and prediction capabilities of RSM and ANN were then compared. RSM predicted the dependent variable with a good coefficient of correlation determination (R² and adjusted R² values for the model. Although the R (2) value showed a good fit, absolute average deviation (AAD) and root mean square error (RMSE) values did not support the accuracy of the model and this was due to the inferiority in predicting the values towards the edges of the design points. On the other hand, ANN-predicted values were closer to the observed values with better R², adjusted R², AAD and RMSE values and this was due to the capability of predicting the values throughout the selected range of the design points. Similar to RSM, ANN could also be used to rank the effect of variables. However, ANN could not predict the interactive effect between the variables as performed by RSM. The optimum levels for glucose, NaCl, temperature and induction time predicted by RSM are 32 g/L, 5 g/L, 32°C and 2.12 h, and those by ANN are 25 g/L, 3 g/L, 30°C and 2 h, respectively. The ANN-predicted optimal levels gave higher lipase activity (55.8 IU/mL) as compared to RSM-predicted levels (50.2 IU/mL) and the predicted lipase activity was also closer to the observed data at these levels, suggesting that ANN is a better optimization method than RSM for lipase production by the recombinant strain. PMID:21833714

  8. Capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the response to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough: a prospective, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic cough respond to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids but it is difficult to predict which patients are likely to respond. The primary aim of the present study was to define the capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough. The secondary aim was to assess the ability of the saline test to monitor the healing of cough during corticosteroid treatment. Methods Forty-three patients with chronic cough were recruited. Before therapy, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, histamine airway challenge, and saline test were performed. Those responding to the first saline test repeated it and the nitric oxide measurement during the subsequent visits. The patients used inhaled budesonide, 400 ug twice daily, for twelve weeks. The treatment response was assessed by Leicester Cough Questionnaire at baseline, and at one, four, and twelve weeks. Results Seventy-seven % of the patients demonstrated the minimal important difference in the Leicester Cough Questionnaire indicating a symptomatic response. Neither the response magnitude nor the speed was predicted by the saline test. Histamine challenge showed the strongest predictive ability: The maximal improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score was 5.08 (3.76 – 6.40) points in the histamine positive and 2.78 (1.55 – 4.01) points in the histamine negative subjects (p = 0.006). Baseline nitric oxide level also associated with the improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.02). During the treatment, the cough sensitivity to saline gradually decreased among the budesonide responders but not in the non-responders. Nitric oxide levels decreased very rapidly among the responders. Conclusions Saline test cannot predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough but it may be utilized to monitor the effect of this

  9. Comparison of estimation capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) with artificial neural network (ANN) in lipase-catalyzed synthesis of palm-based wax ester

    PubMed Central

    Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Gunawan, Erin Ryantin; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin Abd

    2007-01-01

    Background Wax esters are important ingredients in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, lubricants and other chemical industries due to their excellent wetting property. Since the naturally occurring wax esters are expensive and scarce, these esters can be produced by enzymatic alcoholysis of vegetable oils. In an enzymatic reaction, study on modeling and optimization of the reaction system to increase the efficiency of the process is very important. The classical method of optimization involves varying one parameter at a time that ignores the combined interactions between physicochemical parameters. RSM is one of the most popular techniques used for optimization of chemical and biochemical processes and ANNs are powerful and flexible tools that are well suited to modeling biochemical processes. Results The coefficient of determination (R2) and absolute average deviation (AAD) values between the actual and estimated responses were determined as 1 and 0.002844 for ANN training set, 0.994122 and 1.289405 for ANN test set, and 0.999619 and 0.0256 for RSM training set respectively. The predicted optimum condition was: reaction time 7.38 h, temperature 53.9°C, amount of enzyme 0.149 g, and substrate molar ratio 1:3.41. The actual experimental percentage yield was 84.6% at optimum condition, which compared well to the maximum predicted value by ANN (83.9%) and RSM (85.4%). The order of effective parameters on wax ester percentage yield were; respectively, time with 33.69%, temperature with 30.68%, amount of enzyme with 18.78% and substrate molar ratio with 16.85%, whereas R2 and AAD were determined as 0.99998696 and 1.377 for ANN, and 0.99991515 and 3.131 for RSM respectively. Conclusion Though both models provided good quality predictions in this study, yet the ANN showed a clear superiority over RSM for both data fitting and estimation capabilities. PMID:17760990

  10. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA

    PubMed Central

    Brimacombe, Cedric A.; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in <1% of a cell population, CtrA, which is also required for gene acquisition in recipient cells, is expressed in the vast majority of the population. Our results indicate that RcGTA-mediated gene transfer combines key aspects of two bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. IMPORTANCE Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of

  11. The Flt3 Internal Tandem Duplication Alters Chemotherapy Response In Vitro and In Vivo in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The FLT3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3-ITD) confers a worse prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. As AML is treated with cytarabine (Ara-C) and an anthracycline we sought to determine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to these agents. Methods A genetically defined mouse model of AML was used to examine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to cytarabine and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, the Flt3-ITD conferred resistance to doxorubicin and doxorubicin plus Ara-C, but sensitivity to Ara-C alone. This resistance was reversible by the Flt3-ITD inhibitor sorafenib. The Flt3-ITD did not affect DNA damage levels following treatment but was associated with increased levels of p53. The p53 response was critical to the observed changes as the Flt3-ITD had no effect on chemotherapy response in the setting of p53 null AML. In vivo, the Flt3-ITD accelerated engraftment that was partially reversible by Ara-C but not doxorubicin. Additionally, Ara-C provided a significant reduction in disease burden and a survival advantage that was not increased by the addition of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin alone lead to only minimal disease reduction and no survival benefit. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the Flt3-ITD confers sensitivity to cytarabine, but resistance to doxorubicin in a manner that depends on p53. Thus, patients with Flt3-ITD positive AML may not benefit from treatment with an anthracycline. PMID:21288478

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  13. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  14. Capability and Deliberation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of deliberation in the context of the capability approach to human well-being from the standpoint of the individual doing the reflecting. The concept of a "strong evaluator" is used develop a concept of the agent of capability. The role of values is discussed in the process of deliberating, particularly the nature of…

  15. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  16. Widening Participation; Widening Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that widening participation in higher education might distinctively be conceptualised beyond economically driven human capital outcomes, as a matter of widening capability. Specifically, the paper proposes forming the capability of students to become and to be "strong evaluators", able to make reflexive and informed choices…

  17. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  18. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  19. MiR-381-3p Regulates the Antigen-Presenting Capability of Dendritic Cells and Represses Antituberculosis Cellular Immune Responses by Targeting CD1c.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Zhou, Chaoying; Xiong, Wenjing; Su, Jing; He, Jianchun; Zhang, Shimeng; Du, Xialin; Liu, Sudong; Wang, Juanjuan; Ma, Li

    2016-07-15

    Tuberculosis is still the widest spread infectious disease in the world, and more in-depth studies are needed on the interaction between the pathogen and the host. Due to the highest lipid components in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the CD1 family that specifically presents antigenic lipids plays important roles in the antituberculosis immunity, especially CD1c, which functions as the intracellular Ag inspector at the full intracellular range. However, downregulation of the CD1c mRNA level has been observed in M. tuberculosis-infected cells, which is consistent with the regulatory mechanism of miRNA on gene expression. In this study, through combinatory analysis of previous miRNA transcriptomic assays and bioinformatic predictions by web-based algorithms, miR-381-3p was predicted to bind the 3'-untranslated region of CD1c gene. In vivo expression of miR-381-3p in dendritic cells (DCs) of TB patients is higher than in DCs of healthy individuals, inversely related to CD1c. Suppression of CD1c expression in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected DCs was accompanied with upregulation of miR-381-3p, whereas inhibition of miR-381-3p could reverse suppression of CD1c expression and promote T cell responses against BCG infection. Further study indicated that miR-381-3p is also one of the mediators of the immune suppressor IL-10. Collectively, these results demonstrated the mechanism that suppression of CD1c by BCG infection is mediated by miR-381-3p. This finding may provide a novel approach to boost immune responses to M. tuberculosis. PMID:27296666

  20. Responses of Mikania micrantha, an invasive weed to elevated CO₂: induction of β-caryophyllene synthase, changes in emission capability and allelopathic potential of β-caryophyllene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Long; Staehelin, Christian; Peng, Shao-Lin; Wang, Wen-Tian; Xie, Xi-Mei; Lu, Hui-Ning

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the effect of predicted elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) on an invasive weed Mikania micrantha, we constructed a suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library from the leaves of M. micrantha exposed to CO₂ at 350 and 750 ppm for 6 d, and isolated a novel gene named β-caryophyllene synthase. β-Caryophyllene synthase catalyses the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate to β-caryophyllene, a volatile sesquiterpene with allelopathic potential. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that gene expression of β-caryophyllene synthase in M. micrantha leaves was strongly induced in response to elevated CO₂. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses showed that emission levels of β-caryophyllene from leaves of M. micrantha increased when exposed to 750 ppm CO₂. Bioassays showed that phytotoxicity of β-caryophyllene against Raphanus sativus, Brassica campestris, Lactuca sativa, and M. micrantha was dose-dependent and varied with the receptor plants and concentrations of CO₂. β-Caryophyllene displayed higher phytotoxic effects at 750 ppm than those at 350 ppm CO₂, especially on R. sativus. These results suggest that elevated atmospheric CO₂ levels may enhance biosynthesis and phytotoxicity of allelochemicals in M. micrantha, one of the worst invasive weeds in the world, which in turn might enhance its potential allelopathic effect on neighboring native plants if released in bioactive concentrations. Further investigations are required to determine the adaptive responses of both invasive and native plants to a gradual increase of atmospheric CO₂ to 750 ppm predicted over a 100 year period. PMID:20821346

  1. Equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells are heterogeneous in MHC class II expression and capable of inciting an immune response in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The horse is a valuable species to assess the effect of allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in regenerative treatments. No studies to date have examined recipient response to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched equine MSCs. The purposes of this study were to immunophenotype MSCs from horses of known MHC haplotype and to compare the immunogenicity of MSCs with differing MHC class II expression. Methods MSCs and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) were obtained from Thoroughbred horses (n = 10) of known MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -A3, and -A9 homozygotes). MSCs were cultured through P8; cells from each passage (P2 to P8) were cryopreserved until used. Immunophenotyping of MHC class I and II, CD44, CD29, CD90, LFA-1, and CD45RB was performed by using flow cytometry. Tri-lineage differentiation assays were performed to confirm MSC multipotency. Recombinant equine IFN-γ was used to stimulate MHC class II negative MSCs in culture, after which expression of MHC class II was re-examined. To assess the ability of MHC class II negative or positive MSCs to stimulate an immune response, modified one-way mixed leukocyte reactions (MLRs) were performed by using MHC-matched and mismatched responder PBLs and stimulator PBLs or MSCs. Proliferation of gated CFSE-labeled CD3+ responder T cells was evaluated via CFSE attenuation by using flow cytometry and reported as the number of cells in the proliferating T-cell gate. Results MSCs varied widely in MHC class II expression despite being homogenous in terms of “stemness” marker expression and ability to undergo trilineage differentiation. Stimulation of MHC class II negative MSCs with IFN-γ resulted in markedly increased expression of MHC class II. MLR results revealed that MHC-mismatched MHC class II-positive MSCs caused significantly increased responder T-cell proliferation compared with MHC-mismatched MHC class II-negative and MHC-matched MSCs, and equivalent to that of the positive control of

  2. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  3. Adaptive capability as indicated by endocrine and biochemical responses of Malpura ewes subjected to combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) in a semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Sayeed M. K.

    2010-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on endocrine and biochemical responses in Malpura ewes. Twenty eight adult Malpura ewes (average body weight 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups viz., GI ( n = 7; control), GII ( n = 7; thermal stress), GIII ( n = 7; nutritional stress) and GIV ( n = 7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 1000 hours and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were Hb, PCV, glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, ACP, ALP, cortisol, T4, T3, and insulin. Combined stress significantly ( P < 0.05) affected all parameters studied. Furthermore, the results revealed that, compared to thermal stress, nutritional stress had a less significant effect on the parameters studied. However, when both these stresses were coupled, they had a severe impact on all the parameters studied in these ewes. It can be concluded from this study that two stressors occurring simultaneously may impact severely on the biological functions necessary to maintain homeostasis in sheep.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ghosts carrying the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit are capable of inducing enhanced protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) is a potent vaccine adjuvant. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ghosts carrying LTB (S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts) were genetically constructed using a novel plasmid, pJHL187-LTB, designed for the coexpression of the LTB and E lysis proteins. S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts were characterized using scanning electron microscopy to visualize their transmembrane tunnel structures. The expression of LTB in S. Enteritidis-LTB ghost preparations was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The parenteral adjuvant activity of LTB was demonstrated by immunizing chickens with either S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts or S. Enteritidis ghosts. Chickens were intramuscularly primed at 5 weeks of age and subsequently boosted at 8 weeks of age. In total, 60 chickens were equally divided into three groups (n = 20 for each): group A, nonvaccinated control; group B, immunized with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts; and group C, immunized with S. Enteritidis ghosts. Compared with the nonimmunized chickens (group A), the immunized chickens (groups B and C) exhibited increased titers of plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA antibodies. The CD3(+) CD4(+) subpopulation of T cells was also significantly increased in both immunized groups. Among the immunized chickens, those in group B exhibited significantly increased titers of specific plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies compared with those in group C, indicating the immunomodulatory effects of the LTB adjuvant. Furthermore, both immunized groups exhibited decreased bacterial loads in their feces and internal organs. These results indicate that parenteral immunization with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts can stimulate superior induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to immunization with S. Enteritidis ghosts alone, thus conferring efficient protection against salmonellosis. PMID:24671556

  5. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  6. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  7. 3-Substituted Biquinolinium Inhibitors of AraC Family Transcriptional Activator VirF from S. flexneri Obtained Through In Situ Chemical Ionization of 3,4-Disubstituted Dihydroquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Prashi; Li, Jiaqin; Porubsky, Patrick; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Egan, Susan M.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    During a structure–activity relationship optimization campaign to develop an inhibitor of AraC family transcriptional activators, we discovered an unexpected transformation of a previously reported inhibitor that occurs under the assay conditions. Once placed in the assay media, the 3, 4-disubstituted dihydroquinoline core of the active analogue rapidly undergoes a decomposition reaction to a quaternary 3-substituted biquinolinium. Further examination established an SAR for this chemotype while also demonstrating its resilience to irreversible binding of biologically relevant nucleophiles. PMID:25258678

  8. Metrology measurement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division's (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  9. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: mechanical; environmental, gas, liquid; electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/microwave); and optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. FM and T Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Department of energy`s Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 16 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in this report.

  10. Metrology measurement capability

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division`s (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  11. A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project.

  12. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  13. 78 FR 63901 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ....regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2012-0031. Address questions about NRC dockets to Carol Gallagher; telephone: 301-287-3422; email: Carol.Gallagher@nrc.gov . For technical questions, please contact...

  14. 78 FR 68774 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... approval of the staff's recommendation, the NRC issued the ANPR on April 18, 2012 (77 FR 23161), as the... published on October 25, 2013 (78 FR 63901), at which time, the proposed rule stage of the rulemaking... discussion of a petition for rulemaking (PRM), PRM-50-102 (76 FR 58165; ] September 20, 2011), submitted...

  15. 77 FR 23161 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... formalized in the Power Reactor Security Requirements final rule (74 FR 13926; March 27, 2009) in 10 CFR 50... Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in a petition for rulemaking (PRM), PRM-50-102 (76 FR 58165; September 20... Examination Process''. August 28, 2007 Appendix A to 10 CFR 72 FR 49505 part 50--General Design Criteria...

  16. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  17. Project CAPABLE: Model Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madawaska School District, ME.

    Project CAPABLE (Classroom Action Program: Aim: Basic Learning Effectiveness) is a classroom approach which integrates the basic learning skills with content. The goal of the project is to use basic learning skills to enhance the learning of content and at the same time use the content to teach basic learning skills. This manual illustrates how…

  18. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  19. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  20. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths. PMID:15202293

  1. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties in laboratories that conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM and T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. These parameters are summarized.

  2. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  3. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  4. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  5. Integrated Analysis Capability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Greg, J.; Frisch, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) software system intended to provide highly effective, interactive analysis tool for integrated design of large structures. Supports needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems. Developed to serve as software interface between computer programs from fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and dynamics of systems on one hand and executive software system and data base on other hand to yield highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention given to such users' requirements as handling data and online assistance with operational features and ability to add new modules of user's choice at future date. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  7. Seismic Analysis Capability in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Seismic analysis is a technique which pertains to loading described in terms of boundary accelerations. Earthquake shocks to buildings is the type of excitation which usually comes to mind when one hears the word seismic, but this technique also applied to a broad class of acceleration excitations which are applied at the base of a structure such as vibration shaker testing or shocks to machinery foundations. Four different solution paths are available in NASTRAN for seismic analysis. They are: Direct Seismic Frequency Response, Direct Seismic Transient Response, Modal Seismic Frequency Response, and Modal Seismic Transient Response. This capability, at present, is invoked not as separate rigid formats, but as pre-packaged ALTER packets to existing RIGID Formats 8, 9, 11, and 12. These ALTER packets are included with the delivery of the NASTRAN program and are stored on the computer as a library of callable utilities. The user calls one of these utilities and merges it into the Executive Control Section of the data deck to perform any of the four options are invoked by setting parameter values in the bulk data.

  8. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility; and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options: the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase 2 study are described in the present report.

  9. Adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma HSP70 level, and PBMC HSP70 mRNA expression in Osmanabadi goats subjected to combined (heat and nutritional) stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilja, Shaji; Sejian, V.; Bagath, M.; Mech, A.; David, C. G.; Kurien, E. K.; Varma, Girish; Bhatta, Raghavendra

    2015-12-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of heat and nutritional stress simultaneously on the adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) HSP70 gene expression in goats. Twenty-four adult Osmanabadi bucks (average body weight (BW) 16.0 kg) were used in the present study. The bucks were divided into four groups viz., C (n = 6; control), HS (n = 6; heat stress), NS (n = 6; nutritional stress), and CS (n = 6; combined stress). The study was conducted for a period of 45 days. C and HS bucks had ad libitum access to their feed while NS and CS bucks were under restricted feed (30 % intake of C bucks) to induce nutritional stress. The HS and CS bucks were exposed to solar radiation for 6 h a day between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to induce heat stress. The data was analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. The standing time differed significantly (P < 0.01) between ad libitum fed groups (C and HS) and restricted feeding groups (NS and CS). The highest (P < 0.01) lying time was recorded in the CS group while the lowest in the C and HS groups. The highest (P < 0.01) drinking frequency was also recorded in the CS group. Water intake recorded was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in both the HS and CS groups. The highest respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and rectal temperature (RT) during the afternoon were also recorded in the CS group. Further, skin temperature of the head, flank, and scrotum during the afternoon was also higher (P < 0.01) in the CS group. In addition, both plasma HSP70 concentration and PBMC HSP70 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript expression were also significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the CS group. It can be concluded from this study that when two stressors occur simultaneously, they may have severe impact on adaptive capabilities of Osmanabadi bucks as compared to that would occur individually. Further, the study

  10. Adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma HSP70 level, and PBMC HSP70 mRNA expression in Osmanabadi goats subjected to combined (heat and nutritional) stressors.

    PubMed

    Shilja, Shaji; Sejian, V; Bagath, M; Mech, A; David, C G; Kurien, E K; Varma, Girish; Bhatta, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of heat and nutritional stress simultaneously on the adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) HSP70 gene expression in goats. Twenty-four adult Osmanabadi bucks (average body weight (BW) 16.0 kg) were used in the present study. The bucks were divided into four groups viz., C (n = 6; control), HS (n = 6; heat stress), NS (n = 6; nutritional stress), and CS (n = 6; combined stress). The study was conducted for a period of 45 days. C and HS bucks had ad libitum access to their feed while NS and CS bucks were under restricted feed (30 % intake of C bucks) to induce nutritional stress. The HS and CS bucks were exposed to solar radiation for 6 h a day between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to induce heat stress. The data was analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. The standing time differed significantly (P < 0.01) between ad libitum fed groups (C and HS) and restricted feeding groups (NS and CS). The highest (P < 0.01) lying time was recorded in the CS group while the lowest in the C and HS groups. The highest (P < 0.01) drinking frequency was also recorded in the CS group. Water intake recorded was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in both the HS and CS groups. The highest respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and rectal temperature (RT) during the afternoon were also recorded in the CS group. Further, skin temperature of the head, flank, and scrotum during the afternoon was also higher (P < 0.01) in the CS group. In addition, both plasma HSP70 concentration and PBMC HSP70 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript expression were also significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the CS group. It can be concluded from this study that when two stressors occur simultaneously, they may have severe impact on adaptive capabilities of Osmanabadi bucks as compared to that would occur individually

  11. PHOBICS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center of mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, we outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, we then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that we plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{zeta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi}{r_arrow} K{sup +}K{sup -} decays.

  12. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  13. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  14. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  15. Practitioner Perspectives on Foundational Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the “foundational capabilities” (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. Objective: To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. Design: In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term “foundational capabilities,” as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Setting: Telephone-based interviews. Participants: Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Main Outcome Measures: Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Results: Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Conclusions: Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational

  16. Türk Lise Öğrencilerinde Okul Terkinin Yordanması: Aracı ve Etkileşim Değişkenleri ile Bir Model Testi

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Arif; Gençtanirim, Dilek; Ergene, Tuncay

    2011-01-01

    Bu araştırmada ilk olarak, dürtüsel davranma ile okulu terk etme riski arasındaki ilişkiye disiplin cezası almanın, antisosyal davranışların ve sigara-alkol kullanımının aracılık edip etmediği incelenmiştir. İkinci olarak, öğretmen desteği ve antisosyal davranış etkileşiminin okulu terk etme riski üzerindeki etkisi test edilmiştir. Araştırma grubunu 2009-2010 yılında Ankara İlinde genel liselere devam eden 478 öğrenci oluşturmuştur. Sonuçlar okulu terk etme riskini aile ve arkadaş desteğinin azalttığını, dürtüsel davranmanın ise artırdığını göstermiştir. Ayrıca disiplin cezası, alkol-sigara kullanma ve antisosyal davranışlar okulu terk etme riskini artıran aracı değişkenlerdir. Antisosyal davranışlarla okulu terk etme arasındaki ilişki öğretmen desteğine bağlı olarak değişmektedir. Öğrencilerin cinsiyet ve başarıları ile okulu terk etme riskleri arasında anlamlı bir ilişki bulunmamaktadır. PMID:22003257

  17. Capability 9.4 Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Rud

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on capability structure 9.4 servicing. The topics include: 1) Servicing Description; 2) Benefits of Servicing; 3) Drivers & Assumptions for Servicing; 4) Capability Breakdown Structure 9.4 Servicing; 5) Roadmap for Servicing; 6) 9.4 Servicing Critical Gaps; 7) Capability 9.4 Servicing; 8) Capability 9.4.1 Inspection; 9) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.1 Inspection; 10) Capability 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 11) State-of-the-Art/Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 12) Capability 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 13) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 14) Capability 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 15) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 16) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 17) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 18) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 19) Capability 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, Training; and 20) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, & Training;

  18. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  19. Advanced CLIPS capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1991-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language developed by NASA. CLIPS was designed specifically to provide high portability, low cost, and easy integration with external systems. The current release of CLIPS, version 4.3, is being used by over 2500 users throughout the public and private community. The primary addition to the next release of CLIPS, version 5.0, will be the CLIPS Object Oriented Language (COOL). The major capabilities of COOL are: class definition with multiple inheritance and no restrictions on the number, types, or cardinality of slots; message passing which allows procedural code bundled with an object to be executed; and query functions which allow groups of instances to be examined and manipulated. In addition to COOL, numerous other enhancements were added to CLIPS including: generic functions (which allow different pieces of procedural code to be executed depending upon the types or classes of the arguments); integer and double precision data type support; multiple conflict resolution strategies; global variables; logical dependencies; type checking on facts; full ANSI compiler support; and incremental reset for rules.

  20. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.

  1. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  2. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  3. Advanced capability RFID system

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2007-09-25

    A radio-frequency transponder device having an antenna circuit configured to receive radio-frequency signals and to return modulated radio-frequency signals via continuous wave backscatter, a modulation circuit coupled to the antenna circuit for generating the modulated radio-frequency signals, and a microprocessor coupled to the antenna circuit and the modulation circuit and configured to receive and extract operating power from the received radio-frequency signals and to monitor inputs on at least one input pin and to generate responsive signals to the modulation circuit for modulating the radio-frequency signals. The microprocessor can be configured to generate output signals on output pins to associated devices for controlling the operation thereof. Electrical energy can be extracted and stored in an optional electrical power storage device.

  4. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  5. LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-07-27

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

  6. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  7. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

  8. On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew; Allman, Mark; Taylor, Curtis R

    2011-01-01

    There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

  9. Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The technical and programmatic aspects of the integrated analysis capability (IAC) are described. The (IAC) is an interdisciplinary analysis system containing a wide range of general purpose analysis programs that are interfaced via a common data base and a unified executive. The system is designed with significant interactive capability as well as the capability to support the entire range of design phases from the definition phase to the verification phase. The system functions as a standalone or interfaced with IPAD.

  10. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant. PMID:22317513

  11. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. ); Pope, R.B. )

    1992-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

  12. Indigenous Research Capability in Aotearoa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormond, Adreanne; Williams, Les R. Tumoana

    2013-01-01

    This article begins by considering the general nature of capability, from some dictionary meanings, then extends to theoretical perspectives related to the capability approach. As a consequence, we arrive at an operational definition that emphasises the ability to solve problems in a systematic way that brings transformation. In these terms,…

  13. Identifying 21st Century Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert

    2012-01-01

    What are the capabilities necessary to meet 21st century challenges? Much of the literature on 21st century skills focuses on skills necessary to meet those challenges associated with future work in a globalised world. The result is a limited characterisation of those capabilities necessary to address 21st century social, health and particularly…

  14. Modeling the wind-fields of accidental releases with an operational regional forecast model

    SciTech Connect

    Albritton, J.R.; Lee, R.L.; Sugiyama, G.

    1995-09-11

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency preparedness and response organization supported primarily by the Departments of Energy and Defense. ARAC can provide real-time assessments of atmospheric releases of radioactive materials at any location in the world. ARAC uses robust three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data-acquisition systems, and an experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has been adapted to also simulate non-radiological hazardous releases. For example, in 1991 ARAC responded to three major events: the oil fires in Kuwait, the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and the herbicide spill into the upper Sacramento River in California. ARAC`s operational simulation system, includes two three-dimensional finite-difference models: a diagnostic wind-field scheme, and a Lagrangian particle-in-cell transport and dispersion scheme. The meteorological component of ARAC`s real-time response system employs models using real-time data from all available stations near the accident site to generate a wind-field for input to the transport and dispersion model. Here we report on simulation studies of past and potential release sites to show that even in the absence of local meteorological observational data, readily available gridded analysis and forecast data and a prognostic model, the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System, applied at an appropriate grid resolution can successfully simulate complex local flows.

  15. NASA Capability Roadmaps Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willcoxon, Rita; Thronson, Harley; Varsi, Guilio; Mueller, Robert; Regenie, Victoria; Inman, Tom; Crooke, Julie; Coulter, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This document is the result of eight months of hard work and dedication from NASA, industry, other government agencies, and academic experts from across the nation. It provides a summary of the capabilities necessary to execute the Vision for Space Exploration and the key architecture decisions that drive the direction for those capabilities. This report is being provided to the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) team for consideration in development of an architecture approach and investment strategy to support NASA future mission, programs and budget requests. In addition, it will be an excellent reference for NASA's strategic planning. A more detailed set of roadmaps at the technology and sub-capability levels are available on CD. These detailed products include key driving assumptions, capability maturation assessments, and technology and capability development roadmaps.

  16. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  17. Capability 9.2 Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrasjek, June

    2005-01-01

    Modern operational concepts require significant bandwidths and multipoint communication capabilities. Provide voice, video and data communications among vehicles moving along the surface, vehicles in suborbital transport or reconnaissance, surface elements, and home planet facilities.

  18. SD46 Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The displays for the Materials Conference presents some of the facilities and capabilities in SD46 that can be useful to a prospective researcher from University, Academia or other government labs. Several of these already have associated personnel as principal and co-investigators on NASA peer reviewed science investigations. 1. SCN purification facility 2. ESL facility 3. Static and Dynamic magnetic field facility 4. Microanalysis facility 5. MSG Investigation - PFMI 6. Thermo physical Properties Measurement Capabilities.

  19. Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation reviewing the Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project is shown. The contents include: 1) ESCD Project; 2) Available Flight Assets; 3) Ikhana Procurement; 4) GCS Layout; 5) Baseline Predator B Architecture; 6) Ikhana Architecture; 7) UAV Capability Assessment; 8) The Big Picture; 9) NASA/NOAA UAV Demo (5/05 to 9/05); 10) NASA/USFS Western States Fire Mission (8/06); and 11) Suborbital Telepresence.

  20. Kernel CMAC with improved capability.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Szabó, Tamás

    2007-02-01

    The cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) has some attractive features, namely fast learning capability and the possibility of efficient digital hardware implementation. Although CMAC was proposed many years ago, several open questions have been left even for today. The most important ones are about its modeling and generalization capabilities. The limits of its modeling capability were addressed in the literature, and recently, certain questions of its generalization property were also investigated. This paper deals with both the modeling and the generalization properties of CMAC. First, a new interpolation model is introduced. Then, a detailed analysis of the generalization error is given, and an analytical expression of this error for some special cases is presented. It is shown that this generalization error can be rather significant, and a simple regularized training algorithm to reduce this error is proposed. The results related to the modeling capability show that there are differences between the one-dimensional (1-D) and the multidimensional versions of CMAC. This paper discusses the reasons of this difference and suggests a new kernel-based interpretation of CMAC. The kernel interpretation gives a unified framework. Applying this approach, both the 1-D and the multidimensional CMACs can be constructed with similar modeling capability. Finally, this paper shows that the regularized training algorithm can be applied for the kernel interpretations too, which results in a network with significantly improved approximation capabilities. PMID:17278566

  1. Capabilities of electrodynamic shakers when used for mechanical shock testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a research task to investigate the capabilities of electrodynamic vibrators (shakers) to perform mechanical shock tests are presented. The simulation method employed was that of developing a transient whose shock response spectrum matched the desired shock response spectrum. Areas investigated included the maximum amplitude capabilities of the shaker systems, the ability to control the shape of the resultant shock response spectrum, the response levels induced at frequencies outside the controlled bandwidth, and the nonlinearities in structural response induced by a change in test level.

  2. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  3. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  4. Natural Environment Capabilities at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Willis, Emily M.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is integral in developing, maintaining, and investigating NASA missions such as Space Launch Systems (SLS), currently under development, as well as many NASA and other agency satellite missions. We present the space environment capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at MSFC. These in-house capabilities include model development, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface charging modeling including Nascap-2k, space environment definition and radiation parts assessment. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions to be successful at launch and in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits. In this poster, we show examples of recent applications of branch capabilities to NASA missions.

  5. Expression of the melC Operon in Several Streptomyces Strains Is Positively Regulated by AdpA, an AraC Family Transcriptional Regulator Involved in Morphological Development in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongqing; He, Xinyi; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin

    2005-01-01

    Dark brown haloes of melanin around colonies are an easily visualized phenotype displayed by many Streptomyces strains harboring plasmid pIJ702 carrying the melC operon of Streptomyces antibioticus IMRU3270. Spontaneous melanin-negative mutants of pIJ702 occur with a frequency of ca. 1%, and often mutation occurs in the melC operon, which removes the BglII site as part of an inverted repeat. Other melanin-negative mutations seem to occur spontaneously in Streptomyces lividans, resulting in white colonies from which intact, melanin-producing pIJ702 can be isolated by introduction into a new host. S. lividans ZX66 was found to be such a mutant and to have a secondary mutation influencing expression of the melC operon on the chromosome. A 3.3-kb DNA fragment was isolated from its progenitor strain, JT46, and a gene able to restore melC operon expression was found to encode a member of an AraC family of transcriptional regulators, which was equivalent to AdpAc in Streptomyces coelicolor and therefore was designated AdpAl. Lack of melC operon expression was correlated with a single A-to-C transversion, which altered a single key amino acid residue from Thr to Pro. The transcription of the melC operon was found to be greatly reduced in the adpA mutant background. The counterpart gene (adpAa) in the S. antibioticus strain in which the melC operon carried on pIJ702 originated was also isolated and was found to have an identical regulatory role. Thus, we concluded that the melC operon is under general direct positive control by AdpA family proteins, perhaps at the transcriptional level and certainly at the translational level via bldA, in Streptomyces. PMID:15838045

  6. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  7. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  8. Capability and Learning to Choose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBmann, Ortrud

    2009-01-01

    The Capability Approach (henceforth CA) is in the first place an approach to the evaluation of individual well-being and social welfare. Many disciplines refer to the CA, first and foremost welfare economics, development studies and political philosophy. Educational theory was not among the first disciplines that took notice of the CA, but has a…

  9. Demonstration of new PCSD capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    The new, more flexible and more friendly graphics capabilities to be available in later releases of the Pilot Climate Data System were demonstrated. The LIMS-LAMAT data set was chosen to illustrate these new capabilities. Pseudocolor and animation were used to represent the third and fourth dimensions, expanding the analytical capabilities available through the traditional two-dimensional x-y plot. In the new version, variables for the axes are chosen by scrolling through viable selections. This scrolling feature is a function of the new user interface customization. The new graphics are extremely user friendly and should free the scientist to look at data and converse with it, without doing any programming. The system is designed to rapidly plot any variable versus any other variable and animate by any variable. Any one plot in itself is not extraordinary; however, the fact that a user can generate the plots instead of a programmer distinguishes the graphics capabilities of the PCDS from other software packages. In addition, with the new CDF design, the system will become more generic, and the new graphics will become much more rigorous in the area of correlative studies.

  10. Research for new UAV capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

  11. Medical vest broadens treatment capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. S.

    1970-01-01

    Universal sized vest, with specially tailored pockets designed to hold medical supplies, provides first aid/first care medical teams with broadened on-site capability. Vest is made of nylon, tough fibrous materials, and polyvinyl chloride. Design facilitates rapid donning, doffing, and adjustment.

  12. NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

    2011-04-18

    The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into

  13. Improving the RPC rate capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Stante, L.; Iuppa, R.; Liberti, B.; Paolozzi, L.; Pastori, E.; Santonico, R.; Toppi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper has the purpose to study the rate capability of the Resistive Plate Chamber, RPC, starting from the basic physics of this detector. The effect of different working parameters determining the rate capability is analysed in detail, in order to optimize a new family of RPCs for applications to heavy irradiation environments and in particular to the LHC phase 2. A special emphasis is given to the improvement achievable by minimizing the avalanche charge delivered in the gas. The paper shows experimental results of Cosmic Ray tests, performed to study the avalanche features for different gas gap sizes, with particular attention to the overall delivered charge. For this purpose, the paper studies, in parallel to the prompt electronic signal, also the ionic signal which gives the main contribution to the delivered charge. Whenever possible the test results are interpreted on the basis of the RPC detector physics and are intended to extend and reinforce our physical understanding of this detector.

  14. Advanced Power System Analysis Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As a continuing effort to assist in the design and characterization of space power systems, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power and Propulsion Office developed a powerful computerized analysis tool called System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE). This year, SPACE was used extensively in analyzing detailed operational timelines for the International Space Station (ISS) program. SPACE was developed to analyze the performance of space-based photovoltaic power systems such as that being developed for the ISS. It is a highly integrated tool that combines numerous factors in a single analysis, providing a comprehensive assessment of the power system's capability. Factors particularly critical to the ISS include the orientation of the solar arrays toward the Sun and the shadowing of the arrays by other portions of the station.

  15. Fan Flutter Analysis Capability Enhanced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Stefko, George L.

    2001-01-01

    The trend in the design of advanced transonic fans for aircraft engines has been toward the use of complex high-aspect-ratio blade geometries with a larger number of blades and higher loading. In addition, integrally bladed disks or blisks are being considered in fan designs for their potential to reduce manufacturing costs, weight, and complexity by eliminating attachments. With such design trends, there is an increased possibility within the operating region of part-speed stall flutter (self-excited vibrations) that is exacerbated by the reduced structural damping of blisk fans. To verify the aeroelastic soundness of the design, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and validating an accurate aeroelastic prediction and analysis capability. Recently, this capability was enhanced significantly as described here.

  16. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  17. Diamond Machining Applications And Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Roland J.

    1983-12-01

    Aspheric surface generation and precision machining have been important technologies at Hughes Optical Products, Inc. (formerly Optical Division, Bell & Howell Company) for over twenty years. Present machining capabilities and supporting services which are available on a custom basis are described. A variety of applications of diamond machining are illustrated, involving not only the usual reflective materials such as aluminum, copper, and electroless nickel but also such IR refractive materials as germanium, silicon, and chalcogenide glasses.

  18. Instrumentation: Analytical Capabilities on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westall, Frances; Allen, Carl; Braiser, Martin; Farmer, Jack; Massell, Wulf; Agee, Carl B.; Steele, Andrew; Fortson, Russ

    1998-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will consist of a series of long-term missions, with early missions focusing upon establishing the Mars base, and undertaking basic field reconnaissance. A capable laboratory on Mars is an essential element in the exploration strategy. Analytical equipment both in the field and in the laboratory serves to extend the senses of the crew and help them sharpen their sampling skills as they learn to recognize rocks in the field and understand their geologic context and significance. On-site sample analyses allow results to be incorporated into evolving surface exploration plans and strategies, which will be developing in real-time as we learn more about Mars. Early Mars missions will focus on reconnaissance EVAs to collect rock and soil samples, maximizing the amount of Mars material returned to Earth. Later missions will be increasingly devoted to both extensive field campaigns and laboratory analyses. The capabilities and equipment described below will be built up at the Mars base incrementally over many missions, with science payloads and investigative infrastructure being partitioned among launch opportunities. This discussion considers what we require to measure, observe, and explore on a new planetary territory. Alternatively, what do we need to know and how do we equip ourselves to provide ample capabilities to acquire these data? Suggestions follow describing specific instruments that we could use. Appendix 5 lists a strawman science instrument payload, and a feasibility study of equipment transportation into the field on pressurized or unpressurized rovers.

  19. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  20. DOE's Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, E.

    1990-09-01

    Computer security is essential in maintaining quality in the computing environment. Computer security incidents, however, are becoming more sophisticated. The DOE Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) team was formed primarily to assist DOE sites in responding to computer security incidents. Among CIAC's other responsibilities are gathering and distributing information to DOE sites, providing training workshops, coordinating with other agencies, response teams, and vendors, creating guidelines for incident handling, and developing software tools. CIAC has already provided considerable assistance to DOE sites faced with virus infections and worm and hacker attacks, has issued over 40 information bulletins, and has developed and presented a workshop on incident handling. CIAC's experience in helping sites has produced several lessons learned, including the need to follow effective procedures to avoid virus infections in small systems and the need for sound password management and system administration in networked systems. CIAC's activity and scope will expand in the future. 4 refs.

  1. Stability and control of VTOL capable airships in hovering flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Sumantran, V.

    1985-01-01

    The stability and control characteristics of an airship equipped with lifting rotors to provide a modest VTOL capability are discussed. The rotors are used for control and maneuvering in near-hovering flight. Configurations with two, three, and four lifting rotors are examined and compared with respect to control capabilities and dynamic response characteristics. Linearized models of the dynamics are employed for this study. A new approach to the prediction of rotor derivatives for operation near zero thrust in hover is presented. It is found that all three configurations have similar control and response characteristics. The responses are characterized by long time constants and low levels of angular damping.

  2. The Capabilities of Space Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Over the past two years the U.S. space station program has evolved to a three-phased international program, with the first phase consisting of the use of the U.S. Space Shuttle and the upgrading and use of the Russian Mir Space Station, and the second and third phases consisting of the assembly and use of the new International Space Station. Projected capabilities for research, and plans for utilization, have also evolved and it has been difficult for those not directly involved in the design and engineering of these space stations to learn and understand their technical details. The Committee on the Space Station of the National Research Council, with the concurrence of NASA, undertook to write this short report in order to provide concise and objective information on space stations and platforms -- with emphasis on the Mir Space Station and International Space Station -- and to supply a summary of the capabilities of previous, existing, and planned space stations. In keeping with the committee charter and with the task statement for this report, the committee has summarized the research capabilities of five major space platforms: the International Space Station, the Mir Space Station, the Space Shuttle (with a Spacelab or Spacehab module in its cargo bay), the Space Station Freedom (which was redesigned to become the International Space Station in 1993 and 1994), and Skylab. By providing the summary, together with brief descriptions of the platforms, the committee hopes to assist interested readers, including scientists and engineers, government officials, and the general public, in evaluating the utility of each system to meet perceived user needs.

  3. GLAST GRB Observations and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is schedule to launch on May 16, 2008. GLAST consists of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will detect gamma rays above 20 MeV with unprecedented sensitivity, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), which will provide all-sky monitoring of GRBS in the 10 kev to 30 MeV range. Predicted GRB capabilities of GLAST will be described. The on-orbit performance of the instruments and preliminary GRB observations will be presented.

  4. ITER EDA design confinement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, N. A.

    Major device parameters for ITER-EDA and CDA are given in this paper. Ignition capability of the EDA (and CDA) operational scenarios is evaluated using both the 1 1/2-D time-dependent transport simulations and 0-D global models under different confinement ((chi((gradient)(T)(sub e)(sub crit)), empirical global energy confinement scalings, chi(empirical), etc.) assumptions. Results from some of these transport simulations and confinement assessments are summarized in and compared with the ITER CDA results.

  5. Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM).

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Urbina, Angel

    2010-10-01

    Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a communication tool that must include a dicussion of the supporting evidence. PCMM is a tool for managing risk in the use of modeling and simulation. PCMM is in the service of organizing evidence to help tell the modeling and simulation (M&S) story. PCMM table describes what activities within each element are undertaken at each of the levels of maturity. Target levels of maturity can be established based on the intended application. The assessment is to inform what level has been achieved compared to the desired level, to help prioritize the VU activities & to allocate resources.

  6. Determining your organization's 'risk capability'.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Bill; Hancock, Melinda

    2014-05-01

    An assessment of a provider's level of risk capability should focus on three key elements: Business intelligence, including sophisticated analytical models that can offer insight into the expected cost and quality of care for a given population. Clinical enterprise maturity, marked by the ability to improve health outcomes and to manage utilization and costs to drive change. Revenue transformation, emphasizing the need for a revenue cycle platform that allows for risk acceptance and management and that provides incentives for performance against defined objectives. PMID:24851456

  7. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  8. Tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marios Karagiannis, Georgios; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-04-01

    Greece is vulnerable to tsunamis, due to the length of the coastline, its islands and its geographical proximity to the Hellenic Arc, an active subduction zone. Historically, about 10% of all world tsunamis occur in the Mediterranean region. Here we review existing tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece. We analyze capabilities across the disaster management continuum, including prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Specifically, we focus on issues like legal requirements, stakeholders, hazard mitigation practices, emergency operations plans, public awareness and education, community-based approaches and early-warning systems. Our research is based on a review of existing literature and official documentation, on previous projects, as well as on interviews with civil protection officials in Greece. In terms of tsunami disaster prevention and hazard mitigation, the lack of tsunami inundation maps, except for some areas in Crete, makes it quite difficult to get public support for hazard mitigation practices. Urban and spatial planning tools in Greece allow the planner to take into account hazards and establish buffer zones near hazard areas. However, the application of such ordinances at the local and regional levels is often difficult. Eminent domain is not supported by law and there are no regulatory provisions regarding tax abatement as a disaster prevention tool. Building codes require buildings and other structures to withstand lateral dynamic earthquake loads, but there are no provisions for resistance to impact loading from water born debris Public education about tsunamis has increased during the last half-decade but remains sporadic. In terms of disaster preparedness, Greece does have a National Tsunami Warning Center (NTWC) and is a Member of UNESCO's Tsunami Program for North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAM) region. Several exercises have been organized in the framework of the NEAM Tsunami Warning

  9. Cyberinfrastructure for Rapid Prototyping Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, T. A.; Kalyanasundaram, A.; Zhuk, I.; Goli, V.

    2007-12-01

    The overall goal of the NASA Rapid Prototyping Capability is to speed the evaluation of potential uses of NASA research products and technologies to improve future operational systems by reducing the time to access, configure, and assess the effectiveness of NASA products and technologies. The infrastructure to support the RPC is thus expected to provide the capability to rapidly evaluate innovative methods of linking science observations. The RPC infrastructure supports two major categories of experiments (and subsequent analysis): comparing results of a particular model as fed with data coming from different sources, and comparing different models using the data coming from the same source. In spite of being conceptually simple, two use cases in fact entail a significant technical challenge. Enabling RPC experiments requires thus a radical simplification of access to both actual and simulated data, as well as tools for data pre- and post-processing. The tools must be interoperable, allowing the user to create computational workflows with the data seamlessly transferred as needed, including third-party transfers to high-performance computing platforms. In addition, the provenance of the data must be preserved in order to document results of different what-if scenarios and to enable collaboration and data sharing between users. The functionality of the RPC splits into several independent modules such as interactive Web site, data server, tool's interfaces, or monitoring service. Each such module is implemented as an independent portlet. The RPC Portal aggregates the different contents provided by the portlets into a single interface employing a popular GridSphere portlet container. The RPC data access is based on Unidata's THREDDS Data server (TDS) extended to support, among others, interactive creation of containers for new data collections and uploading new data sets, downloading the data either to the user desktop or transferring it to a remote location using

  10. Social policies related to parenthood and capabilities of Slovenian parents.

    PubMed

    Mrčela, Aleksandra Kanjuo; Sadar, Nevenka Černigoj

    2011-01-01

    We apply Sen's capability approach to evaluate the capabilities of Slovenian parents to reconcile paid work and family in the context of the transition to a market economy. We examine how different levels of capabilities together affect the work–life balance (WLB) of employed parents. We combine both quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches. The results of our quantitative and qualitative research show that increased precariousness of employment and intensification of work create gaps between the legal and normative possibilities for successful reconciliation strategies and actual use of such arrangements in Slovenia. The existing social policies and the acceptance of gender equality in the sphere of paid work enhance capabilities for reconciliation of paid work and parenthood, whereas the intensification of working lives, the dominance of paid work over other parts of life, and the acceptance of gender inequalities in parental and household responsibilities limit parents’ capabilities to achieve WLB. PMID:21966698

  11. Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Sean

    2015-01-01

    While at the KSC, I was given the opportunity of assisting the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) specifically the Propellant Transfer System (PTS) lead by my mentor, Brian Nufer. While waiting to test different components in the PTS, I was able to assist with testing for the Hose Management Assembly (HMA) and was able to work on a simulation in Labview. For the HMA, I was able to help with testing of a coating as well as to help test the durability of the pinch rollers in space. In Labview, I experimented with building a simulation for the PTS, to show where fluids and gases were flowing depending on which valves in the PTS were opened. Not all of the integrated parts required assembly level testing, which allowed me to test these parts individually by myself and document the results. I was also able to volunteer to assist project NEO, allowing me to gain some knowledge of cryogenic fluid systems.

  12. The polarimetric capabilities of NICMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, D. C.; Schmidt, G. D.; Lytle, Dyer

    1997-01-01

    The polarimetric capabilities of Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) are demonstrated from data obtained during the Early Release Observations of IRC+10216 and CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula). Preflight Thermal Vacuum tests revealed that each polarizer has a unique polarizing efficiency, and that the position angle offsets differ from the nominal positions of O deg, 120 deg and 240 deg. Therefore an algorithm different from that of an ideal polarizer is required for proper reduction of astronomical polarimetry data. We discuss this new algorithm and the results of its application to NICMOS data. We also present preliminary estimates of the Instrumental Polarization, the sensitivity of the grisms to polarized light, and the accuracy of NICMOS imaging polarimetry for faint and low polarization objects. Finally, we suggest strategies for maximizing the success of NICMOS polarimetry observations.

  13. Rhodobacter capsulatus DprA is essential for RecA-mediated gene transfer agent (RcGTA) recipient capability regulated by quorum-sensing and the CtrA response regulator.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Beatty, J Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are genetic exchange elements that resemble small DNA bacteriophages that transfer random pieces of the producing cell's genome to recipient cells. The best-studied GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that the putative response regulator CtrA, which is essential for RcGTA production, is required for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition, and confirmed that a RecA homologue is required. It was also discovered that a DprA (DNA-protecting protein A) homologue is essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition, and that dprA expression is induced by gtaI-dependent quorum-sensing and non-phosphorylated CtrA. Modelling of the R. capsulatus DprA structure indicated the presence of a C-terminal region that resembles a dsDNA-binding protein domain. Purified His-tagged R. capsulatus DprA protein bound to both single-stranded (ss)DNA and double-stranded (ds)DNA, but with a greater affinity for ssDNA. Additionally, DprA protected dsDNA from endonuclease digestion, and increased the rate of nucleation of Escherichia coli RecA onto ssDNA. Single-cell expression analyses revealed that dprA is expressed in the majority of cells throughout a population. Overall, the results suggest that incorporation of RcGTA DNA into the recipient cell genome proceeds through a homologous recombination pathway resembling DNA recombination in natural transformation. PMID:24784901

  14. Programmatic mission capabilities - chemistry and metallurgy research replacement (CMRR) project

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L Nguyen; Kornreich, Drew E; Wong, Amy S

    2011-01-04

    CMRR will have analysis capabilities that support all the nuclear-material programs and national security needs. CMRR will replace the aging CMR Building and provide a key component responsive infrastructure necessary to sustain all nuclear programs and the nuclear-weapons complex. Material characterization capabilities - evaluate the microstructures and properties of nuclear materials and provide experimental data to validate process and performance models. Analytical chemistry capabilities - provide expertise in chemical and radiochemical analysis of materials where actinide elements make up a significant portion of the sample.

  15. Amartya Sen's Capability Approach and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2005-01-01

    The human capabilities approach developed by the economist Amartya Sen links development, quality of life and freedom. This article explores the key ideas in the capability approach of: capability, functioning, agency, human diversity and public participation in generating valued capabilities. It then considers how these ideas relate specifically…

  16. Enhancing capabilities in health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susan J.; Siddiqui, Zarrin S.; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals. Methods Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs. Results The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project.  Conclusions These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions. PMID:26590857

  17. NASA Dryden's UAS Service Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The vision of NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is to "fly what others only imagine." Its mission is to advance technology and science through flight. Objectives supporting the mission include performing flight research and technology integration to revolutionize aviation and pioneer aerospace technology, validating space exploration concepts, conducting airborne remote sensing and science missions, and supporting operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. A significant focus of effort in recent years has been on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), both in support of the Airborne Science Program and as research vehicles to advance the state of the art in UAS. Additionally, the Center has used its piloted aircraft in support of UAS technology development. In order to facilitate greater access to the UAS expertise that exists at the Center, that expertise has been organized around three major capabilities. The first is access to high-altitude, long-endurance UAS. The second is the establishment of a test range for small UAS. The third is safety case assessment support.

  18. OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.

    SciTech Connect

    Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2011-08-01

    Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  19. JEM/SMILES observation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko J.; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Mendrok, Jana; Urban, Joachim; Murtagh, Donal; Moller, Joakim; Manabe, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki

    2009-09-01

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise passive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be onbord the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). SMILES scheduled to be launch in September 11, 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limb emission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents. JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37 Cl, ClO, BrO, HOCl, HO2, and HNO3, CH3CN, and Ozone isotope species with the precisions in a few to several tens percents from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. We have estimated the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES. This new technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  20. The role of military dental capabilities in mass fatality situations.

    PubMed

    Trengrove, Hugh G; Gray, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Recent experience with the New Zealand Defence Force in supporting the national disaster victim identification operation following destructive earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, highlights the important role military forensic odontology capabilities can provide in supporting a national disaster response. Military dental personnel are well-trained, practiced, and prepared to support short-notice contingencies and can provide important immediate response augmentation to Disaster Victim Identification teams following a multiple-fatality event. The role of military forensic odontology capabilities in multiple-fatality incidents is reviewed. PMID:23756011

  1. FLUKA capabilities for microdosimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Northum, J D; Guetersloh, S B; Braby, L A

    2012-01-01

    Delta-ray transport is important in microdosimetric studies, and how Monte Carlo models handle delta electrons using condensed histories is important for accurate simulation. The purpose of this study was to determine how well FLUKA can simulate energy deposition spectra in a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and produce a reliable estimate of delta-ray events produced when a TEPC is exposed to high-energy heavy ions (HZE) like those in the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) environment. A 1.27-cm spherical TEPC with a low-pressure gas simulating a 1-μm site, typical of the one flown on the ISS, was constructed in FLUKA, and its response was compared to experimental data for an (56)Fe-ion beam at 360 MeV/nucleon. Several narrow beams at different impact parameters were used to explain the response of the same detector exposed to a uniform field of radiation. Additionally, the effect that wall thickness had on the response of the TEPC and the range of delta rays in the tissue-equivalent (TE) wall material was investigated, and FLUKA produced the expected wall effect for primary particles passing outside the sensitive volume. A final comparison to experimental data was made for the simulated TEPCs exposed to various broad beams in the energy range of 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. FLUKA overestimated energy deposition in the gas volume in all cases. The FLUKA results differed from the experimental data by an average of 25.2% for y(F) and 12.4% for y(D). It is suggested that this difference can be reduced by adjusting the FLUKA default ionization potential and density correction factors. Accurate transport codes are desirable because of the high cost of beam time for experimental evaluation of energy deposition spectra produced by HZE ions and the flexibility that calculations offer in the TEPC engineering and design process. PMID:22050453

  2. Extension of TRIGA reactor capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gietzen, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    The first TRIGA reactor went into operation at 10 kW about 22 years ago. Since that time 55 TRIGAs have been put into operation including steady-state powers up to 14,000 kW and pulsing reactors that pulse to 20,000,000 kW. Five more are under construction and a proposal will soon be submitted for a reactor of 25,000 kW. Along with these increases in power levels (and the corresponding fluxes) the experimental facilities have also been expanded. In addition to the installation of new TRIGA reactors with enhanced capabilities many of the older reactors have been modified and upgraded. Also, a number of reactors originally fueled with plate fuel were converted to TRIGA fuel to take advantage of the improved technical and safety characteristics, including the ability for pulsed operation. In order to accommodate increased power and performance the fuel has undergone considerable evolution. Most of the changes have been in the geometry, enrichment and cladding material. However, more recently further development on the UZrH alloy has been carried out to extend the uranium content up to 45% by weight. This increased U content is necessary to allow the use of less than 20% enrichment in the higher powered reactors while maintaining longer core lifetime. The instrumentation and control system has undergone remarkable improvement as the electronics technology has evolved so rapidly in the last two decades. The information display and the circuitry logic has also undergone improvements for enhanced ease of operation and safety. (author)

  3. Capability engineering: transforming defence acquisition in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagotto, Jack; Walker, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    Capability engineering, a new methodology with the potential to transform defence planning and acquisition, is described. The impact of capability engineering on existing defence business processes and organizations is being explored in Canada during the course of a four-year Technology Demonstration Project called Collaborative Capability Definition, Engineering and Management (CapDEM). Having completed the first of three experimentation spirals within this project, a high-level capability engineering process model has been defined. The process begins by mapping strategic defence guidance onto defence capabilities, using architectural models that articulate the people, process and materiel requirements of each capability when viewed as a system-of-systems. For a selected capability, metrics are rigorously applied to these models to assess their ability to deliver the military capability outcomes required by a set of predefined tasks and force planning scenarios. By programming the modification of these tasks and planning scenarios over time according to evolving capability objectives, quantifiable capability gaps are identified, that in turn drive the process towards options to close these gaps. The implementation plan for these options constitutes a capability evolution roadmap to support defence-investment decisions. Capability engineering is viewed as an essential enabler to meeting the objective of improved capability management, subsuming the functions of capability generation, sustainment and employment.

  4. Researching pharmacist managerial capability: philosophical perspectives and paradigms of inquiry.

    PubMed

    Woods, Phillip; Gapp, Rod; King, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    In successful community pharmacy business enterprises suitably responsive actions to meet ever-increasing change require capable pharmacy managers who readily learn and adapt. Capability as a concept is generally understood to be the ability of a manager to identify and act to solve unfamiliar problems in unfamiliar situations. Capability is characterized by adaptability and flexibility. However, different understandings of the concept 'capability' and what it means to be 'capable' are indirect and incomplete. This paper aims to clarify current theories regarding the concept of 'capability' at the level of the individual, and through this to make more explicit what is known about the phenomenon, but more particularly, how we know what we know. The analysis includes the concept of 'competence' because explanations of capability include competence, and the two concepts are not clearly separated in the literature. By probing the epistemological origins of current theory concerning both concepts, the limiting taken for granted assumptions are revealed. Assumptions about context and time, and the psychological theory through which individuals are assumed to perceive, know and learn, are illuminated. The analysis, in connection with the literature, shows how the interpretive philosophic research approach may reveal a different and useful theoretical perspective for explaining capability as a dynamic performance. It is suggested that such a perspective may narrow the gap between the theory of capability and its practice. The interpretive perspective holds potential to reveal how capability, as performed by successful community pharmacy managers, might be further researched and strengthened. This paper supports the challenging suggestion that pharmacy social research needs to rebalance the dominance of purely empirical research by exploring interpretive methodologies to better understand human actions and relations in the context of pharmacy. PMID:25169620

  5. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  6. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Massaglia, J.L.; Williamson, D.A.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is describe the FICA computer software and to provide the FICA user with a guide on how to use the FICA system. The FICA computer software consists of two executable programs: the FICA Reactor Report program and the FICA Summary Report program (written in the Ca-Clipper version 5.2 development system). The complete FICA software system is contained on either a 3.5 in. (double density) or a 5.25 in. (high density) diskette and consists of the two FICA programs and all the database files (generated using dBASE III). The FICA programs are provided as ``stand alone`` systems and neither the Ca-Clipper compiler nor dBASE III is required to run the FICA programs. The steps for installing the FICA software system and executing the FICA programs are described in this report. Instructions are given on how to install the FICA software system onto the hard drive of the PC and how to execute the FICA programs from the FICA subdirectory on the hard drive. Both FICA programs are menu driven with the up-arrow and down-arrow keys used to move the cursor to the desired selection.

  7. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  8. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  9. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  10. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  11. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  12. Selecting Capabilities for Quality of Life Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    The capability approach advocates that interpersonal comparisons be made in the space of functionings and capabilities. However, Amartya Sen has not specified which capabilities should be selected as the relevant ones. This has provoked two types of criticism. The stronger critique is Martha Nussbaum's claim that Sen should endorse one specific…

  13. Polymers with integrated sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunzelman, Jill Nicole

    This dissertation is focused on the creation and characterization of new types of chromogenic polymers, which change their absorption and/or fluorescence characteristics in response to an external stimulus. These optical sensor materials rely on chromophores that display pronounced color changes upon self-assembly as a result of charge-transfer interactions and/or conformational changes. When these chromophores are incorporated into a polymer of interest, the relative amounts of dispersed and aggregated molecules (and therefore their optical appearance) can be initially tuned by controlling the extent of aggregation via the materials composition and the processing protocol employed; the phase-behavior is changed in a predefined manner upon exposure to a specific stimulus. This sensing scheme was exploited in a number of different polymer matrices, leading to a variety of sensor types including mechanochromic, thermochromic, moisture-sensing, and shape-memory materials that allow visualization of the set/release temperature. Important design fundamentals of "aggregachromic" sensor dyes are discussed and chemical structure is related to type of interactions (hydrophobic, pi-pi, charge-transfer) and self-assembly/color relationships. The knowledge is used to control behavior such as piezochromism, aggregation rate, and intramolecular-excimer-formation.

  14. Low Cost Sensors-Current Capabilities and Gaps

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Present the findings from the a recent technology review of gas and particulate phase sensors 2. Focus on the lower-cost sensors 3. Discuss current capabilities, estimated range of measurement, selectivity, deployment platforms, response time, and expected range of acceptabl...

  15. Purine Analog-Like Properties of Bendamustine Underlie Rapid Activation of DNA Damage Response and Synergistic Effects with Pyrimidine Analogues in Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Nobuya; Kikuchi, Jiro; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Taeko; Uesawa, Mitsuyo; Akutsu, Miyuki; Mori, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Yuichi; Ueda, Takanori; Kano, Yasuhiko; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Bendamustine has shown considerable clinical activity against indolent lymphoid malignancies as a single agent or in combination with rituximab, but combination with additional anti-cancer drugs may be required for refractory and/or relapsed cases as well as other intractable tumors. In this study, we attempted to determine suitable anti-cancer drugs to be combined with bendamustine for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, aggressive lymphomas and multiple myeloma, all of which are relatively resistant to this drug, and investigated the mechanisms underlying synergism. Isobologram analysis revealed that bendamustine had synergistic effects with alkylating agents (4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil and melphalan) and pyrimidine analogues (cytosine arabinoside, gemcitabine and decitabine) in HBL-2, B104, Namalwa and U266 cell lines, which represent the above entities respectively. In cell cycle analysis, bendamustine induced late S-phase arrest, which was enhanced by 4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, and potentiated early S-phase arrest by cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), followed by a robust increase in the size of sub-G1 fractions. Bendamustine was able to elicit DNA damage response and subsequent apoptosis faster and with shorter exposure than other alkylating agents due to rapid intracellular incorporation via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). Furthermore, bendamustine increased the expression of ENT1 at both mRNA and protein levels and enhanced the uptake of Ara-C and subsequent increase in Ara-C triphosphate (Ara-CTP) in HBL-2 cells to an extent comparable with the purine analog fludarabine. These purine analog-like properties of bendamustine may underlie favorable combinations with other alkylators and pyrimidine analogues. Our findings may provide a theoretical basis for the development of more effective bendamustine-based combination therapies. PMID:24626203

  16. Requirements Development for Interoperability Simulation Capability for Law Enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, Gregory M.

    2004-05-19

    The National Counterdrug Center (NCC) was initially authorized by Congress in FY 1999 appropriations to create a simulation-based counterdrug interoperability training capability. As the lead organization for Research and Analysis to support the NCC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was responsible for developing the requirements for this interoperability simulation capability. These requirements were structured to address the hardware and software components of the system, as well as the deployment and use of the system. The original set of requirements was developed through a process of conducting a user-based survey of requirements for the simulation capability, coupled with an analysis of similar development efforts. The user-based approach ensured that existing concerns with respect to interoperability within the law enforcement community would be addressed. Law enforcement agencies within the designated pilot area of Cochise County, Arizona, were surveyed using interviews and ride-alongs during actual operations. The results of this survey were then accumulated, organized, and validated with the agencies to ensure the accuracy of the results. These requirements were then supplemented by adapting operational requirements from existing systems to ensure system reliability and operability. The NCC adopted a development approach providing incremental capability through the fielding of a phased series of progressively more capable versions of the system. This allowed for feedback from system users to be incorporated into subsequent revisions of the system requirements, and also allowed the addition of new elements as needed to adapt the system to broader geographic and geopolitical areas, including areas along the southwest and northwest U.S. borders. This paper addresses the processes used to develop and refine requirements for the NCC interoperability simulation capability, as well as the response of the law enforcement community to the use of

  17. The Nike Laser Facility and its Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlin, V.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Chan, L. Y.; Karasik, M.; Kehne, D. M.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Weaver, J. L.

    2013-10-01

    The Nike laser is a 56-beam krypton fluoride (KrF) system that provides 3 to 4 kJ of laser energy on target. The laser uses induced spatial incoherence to achieve highly uniform focal distributions. 44 beams are overlapped onto target with peak intensities up to 1016 W/cm2. The effective time-averaged illumination nonuniformity is < 0 . 2 %. Nike produces highly uniform ablation pressures on target allowing well-controlled experiments at pressures up to 20 Mbar. The other 12 laser beams are used to generate diagnostic x-rays radiographing the primary laser-illuminated target. The facility includes a front end that generates the desired temporal and spatial laser profiles, two electron-beam pumped KrF amplifiers, a computer-controlled optical system, and a vacuum target chamber for experiments. Nike is used to study the physics and technology issues of direct-drive laser fusion, such as, hydrodynamic and laser-plasma instabilities, studies of the response of materials to extreme pressures, and generation of X rays from laser-heated targets. Nike features a computer-controlled data acquisition system, high-speed, high-resolution x-ray and visible imaging systems, x-ray and visible spectrometers, and cryogenic target capability. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  18. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-12-15

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

  19. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy Clifford; Jones, Cecil Roy

    1998-01-01

    A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

  20. Fused Reality for Enhanced Flight Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Ed; Klyde, David

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using Fused Reality-based simulation technology to enhance flight test capabilities has been investigated. In terms of relevancy to piloted evaluation, there remains no substitute for actual flight tests, even when considering the fidelity and effectiveness of modern ground-based simulators. In addition to real-world cueing (vestibular, visual, aural, environmental, etc.), flight tests provide subtle but key intangibles that cannot be duplicated in a ground-based simulator. There is, however, a cost to be paid for the benefits of flight in terms of budget, mission complexity, and safety, including the need for ground and control-room personnel, additional aircraft, etc. A Fused Reality(tm) (FR) Flight system was developed that allows a virtual environment to be integrated with the test aircraft so that tasks such as aerial refueling, formation flying, or approach and landing can be accomplished without additional aircraft resources or the risk of operating in close proximity to the ground or other aircraft. Furthermore, the dynamic motions of the simulated objects can be directly correlated with the responses of the test aircraft. The FR Flight system will allow real-time observation of, and manual interaction with, the cockpit environment that serves as a frame for the virtual out-the-window scene.

  1. Business Systems Branch Abilities, Capabilities, and Services Web Page

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortes-Pena, Aida Yoguely

    2009-01-01

    During the INSPIRE summer internship I acted as the Business Systems Branch Capability Owner for the Kennedy Web-based Initiative for Communicating Capabilities System (KWICC), with the responsibility of creating a portal that describes the services provided by this Branch. This project will help others achieve a clear view ofthe services that the Business System Branch provides to NASA and the Kennedy Space Center. After collecting the data through the interviews with subject matter experts and the literature in Business World and other web sites I identified discrepancies, made the necessary corrections to the sites and placed the information from the report into the KWICC web page.

  2. Robotic Access to Planetary Surfaces Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A set of robotic access to planetary surfaces capability developments and supporting infrastructure have been identified. Reference mission pulls derived from ongoing strategic planning. Capability pushes to enable broader mission considerations. Facility and flight test capability needs. Those developments have been described to the level of detail needed for high-level planning. Content and approach. Readiness and metrics. Rough schedule and cost. Connectivity to mission concepts.

  3. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  4. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2007-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  5. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  6. Presto 4.20 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-06-01

    This is an addendum to the Presto 4.20 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Presto. Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Presto that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Presto User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  7. The Renovation and Future Capabilities of the Thacher Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Katie; Osuna, Natalie; Edwards, Nick; Klink, Douglas; Swift, Jonathan; Vyhnal, Chris; Meyer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The Thacher School is in the process of renovating the campus observatory with a new meter class telescope and full automation capabilities for the purpose of scientific research and education. New equipment on site has provided a preliminary site characterization including seeing and V-band sky brightness measurements. These data, along with commissioning data from the MINERVA project (which uses comparable hardware) are used to estimate the capabilities of the observatory once renovation is complete. Our V-band limiting magnitude is expected to be better than 21.3 for a one minute integration time, and we estimate that milli-magnitude precision photometry will be possible for a V=14.5 point source over approximately 5 min timescales. The quick response, autonomous operation, and multi-band photometric capabilities of the renovated observatory will make it a powerful follow-up science facility for exoplanets, eclipsing binaries, near-Earth objects, stellar variability, and supernovae.

  8. Capability and Health Functioning in Ethiopian Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabsout, Ramzi

    2011-01-01

    From a recent Ethiopian representative household survey this paper empirically operationalizes concepts from the capability approach to shed light on the relationship between conversion factors, capability inputs and health functionings. The subjects of the study are women in partnership. The results suggest their health functionings are…

  9. A framework for offshore vendor capability development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf Wibisono, Yogi; Govindaraju, Rajesri; Irianto, Dradjad; Sudirman, Iman

    2016-02-01

    Offshore outsourcing is a common practice conducted by companies, especially in developed countries, by relocating one or more their business processes to other companies abroad, especially in developing countries. This practice grows rapidly owing to the ease of accessing qualified vendors with a lower cost. Vendors in developing countries compete more intensely to acquire offshore projects. Indonesia is still below India, China, Malaysia as main global offshore destinations. Vendor capability is among other factors that contribute to the inability of Indonesian vendor in competing with other companies in the global market. Therefore, it is essential to study how to increase the vendor's capability in Indonesia, in the context of global offshore outsourcing. Previous studies on the vendor's capability mainly focus on capabilities without considering the dynamic of capabilities due to the environmental changes. In order to be able to compete with competitors and maintain the competitive advantage, it is necessary for vendors to develop their capabilities continuously. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework that describes offshore vendor capability development along the client-vendor relationship stages. The framework consists of three main components, i.e. the stages of client-vendor relationship, the success of each stage, and the capabilities of vendor at each stage.

  10. Capabilities and Contributions of Unwed Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    Young, minority, and poorly educated fathers in fragile families have little capacity to support their children financially and are hard-pressed to maintain stability in raising those children. In this article, Robert Lerman examines the capabilities and contributions of unwed fathers, how their capabilities and contributions fall short of those…

  11. Space Communications Capability Roadmap Interim Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, Robert; Regan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Identify the need for a robust communications and navigation architecture for the success of exploration and science missions. Describe an approach for specifying architecture alternatives and analyzing them. Establish a top level architecture based on a network of networks. Identify key enabling technologies. Synthesize capability, architecture and technology into an initial capability roadmap.

  12. Remote manipulator system steering capability for SVDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    Details of the remote manipulator system steering capability to be implemented into the space vehicle dynamics simulator are reported. The resolve rate law is included as part of the overall steering capability. The steering model includes three automatic modes, four manual augmented modes, and a single joint rate mode.

  13. Curriculum Mapping to Embed Graduate Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, David; Riddle, Matthew; Knewstubb, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    Graduate capabilities are an essential aspect of undergraduate development in higher education. Accordingly, La Trobe University's "Design for learning" has identified particular university-wide graduate capabilities and required all faculties to explicitly embed these in their curricula. The Faculty of Law and Management developed an approach to…

  14. Cultivating Human Capabilities in Venturesome Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    The notion of competencies has been a familiar feature of educational reform policies for decades. In this essay, Padraig Hogan begins by highlighting the contrasting notion of capabilities, pioneered by the research of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. An educational variant of the notion of capabilities then becomes the basis for exploring…

  15. Defining and Assessing Enterprise Capability in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Hughes, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an instrument for assessing enterprise capability in schools. The approach to assessing enterprise capability builds on previous work by including three dimensions: self-efficacy, aspirations and knowledge and awareness. We find significant but weak associations between these three constructs suggesting that…

  16. Building Organisational Capability the Private Provider Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Organisational capability is recognised as a key to organisational success. The combination of human capital (peoples' skills and knowledge), social capital (relationships between people) and organisational capital (the organisation's processes), is central to building an organisation's capability. This paper, presented at the 2008 annual…

  17. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  18. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  19. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  20. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  1. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  2. Adult Financial Capability Framework. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Both the Financial Services Authority and the Basic Skills Agency are committed to supporting those individuals and organisations working to improve the financial capability of themselves and others. The development of the National Strategy for Financial Capability, coordinated by the Financial Services Authority, and the commissioning of a…

  3. Action Learning, Performativity and Negative Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonstone, John

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines the concept of negative capability as a human capacity for containment and contrasts it with well-valued positive capability as expressed through performativity in organisations and society. It identifies the problem of dispersal--the complex ways we behave in order to avoid the emotional challenges of living with uncertainty.…

  4. THE MORE CAPABLE LEARNER, GRADE 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANSEN, WILLIAM; AND OTHERS

    ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHER USE WITH CAPABLE LEARNERS ARE DISCUSSED. THE TEACHER'S SECTION CONTAINS--SUGGESTIONS FOR USING PUPIL MATERIALS, CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MORE ABLE STUDENT, A CHECKLIST FOR IDENTIFYING THE MORE ABLE STUDENTS, A CHART OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE CAPABLE LEARNER, AND A LIST OF MATERIALS AVAILABLE FROM THE CURRICULUM…

  5. 77 FR 56251 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); New Task Assignment for the ARAC: Establishment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... fatal general aviation accidents. The new task is to integrate 14 CFR part 61 aeronautical knowledge and... Standards documents; and to propose knowledge test item bank questions consistent with the integrated Airman... effective training and testing in the areas of aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency required...

  6. Towards an automated intelligence product generation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alison M.; Hawes, Timothy W.; Nolan, James J.

    2015-05-01

    Creating intelligence information products is a time consuming and difficult process for analysts faced with identifying key pieces of information relevant to a complex set of information requirements. Complicating matters, these key pieces of information exist in multiple modalities scattered across data stores, buried in huge volumes of data. This results in the current predicament analysts find themselves; information retrieval and management consumes huge amounts of time that could be better spent performing analysis. The persistent growth in data accumulation rates will only increase the amount of time spent on these tasks without a significant advance in automated solutions for information product generation. We present a product generation tool, Automated PrOduct Generation and Enrichment (APOGEE), which aims to automate the information product creation process in order to shift the bulk of the analysts' effort from data discovery and management to analysis. APOGEE discovers relevant text, imagery, video, and audio for inclusion in information products using semantic and statistical models of unstructured content. APOGEEs mixed-initiative interface, supported by highly responsive backend mechanisms, allows analysts to dynamically control the product generation process ensuring a maximally relevant result. The combination of these capabilities results in significant reductions in the time it takes analysts to produce information products while helping to increase the overall coverage. Through evaluation with a domain expert, APOGEE has been shown the potential to cut down the time for product generation by 20x. The result is a flexible end-to-end system that can be rapidly deployed in new operational settings.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Mary E.; Farish, Thomas J.

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be

  8. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  9. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  10. CTH reference manual : composite capability and technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.

    2009-02-01

    The composite material research and development performed over the last year has greatly enhanced the capabilities of CTH for non-isotropic materials. The enhancements provide the users and developers with greatly enhanced capabilities to address non-isotropic materials and their constitutive model development. The enhancements to CTH are intended to address various composite material applications such as armor systems, rocket motor cases, etc. A new method for inserting non-isotropic materials was developed using Diatom capabilities. This new insertion method makes it possible to add a layering capability to a shock physics hydrocode. This allows users to explicitly model each lamina of a composite without the overhead of modeling each lamina as a separate material to represent a laminate composite. This capability is designed for computational speed and modeling efficiency when studying composite material applications. In addition, the layering capability also allows a user to model interlaminar mechanisms. Finally, non-isotropic coupling methods have been investigated. The coupling methods are specific to shock physics where the Equation of State (EOS) is used with a nonisotropic constitutive model. This capability elastically corrects the EOS pressure (typically isotropic) for deviatoric pressure coupling for non-isotropic materials.

  11. Community psychology and the capabilities approach.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Marybeth

    2015-06-01

    What makes for a good life? The capabilities approach to this question has much to offer community psychology, particularly with respect to marginalized groups. Capabilities are freedoms to engage in valued social activities and roles-what people can do and be given both their capacities, and environmental opportunities and constraints. Economist Amartya Sen's focus on freedoms and agency resonates with psychological calls for empowerment, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum's specification of requirements for a life that is fully human provides an important guide for social programs. Community psychology's focus on mediating structures has much to offer the capabilities approach. Parallels between capabilities, as enumerated by Nussbaum, and settings that foster positive youth development, as described in a National Research Council Report (Eccles and Gootman (Eds) in Community programs to promote youth development. National Academy Press, Washington, 2002) suggest extensions of the approach to children. Community psychologists can contribute to theory about ways to create and modify settings to enhance capabilities as well as empowerment and positive youth development. Finally, capabilities are difficult to measure, because they involve freedoms to choose but only choices actually made or enacted can be observed. The variation in activities or goals across members of a setting provides a measure of the capabilities that the setting fosters. PMID:25822113

  12. Demonstration of capabilities of high temperature composites analyzer code HITCAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Lackney, Joseph J.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities a high temperature composites analyzer code, HITCAN which predicts global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered metal matrix composite structures, are demonstrated. The response can be determined both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structure level and includes the fabrication process effects. The thermo-mechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interactive constituent material behavior model. Various features of the code are demonstrated through example problems for typical structures.

  13. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  14. International Space Station Capabilities and Payload Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kugler, Justin; Jones, Rod; Edeen, Marybeth

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the research facilities and capabilities of the International Space Station. The station can give unique views of the Earth, as it provides coverage of 85% of the Earth's surface and 95% of the populated landmass every 1-3 days. The various science rack facilities are a resource for scientific research. There are also external research accom0dations. The addition of the Japanese Experiment Module (i.e., Kibo) will extend the science capability for both external payloads and internal payload rack locations. There are also slides reviewing the post shuttle capabilities for payload delivery.

  15. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  16. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-03-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  17. Core Technical Capability Laboratory Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda; Dugger, Curtis; Griffin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The Core Technical Capability Lab - oratory Management System (CTCLMS) consists of dynamically generated Web pages used to access a database containing detailed CTC lab data with the software hosted on a server that allows users to have remote access.

  18. Benefits to society of bioinspired flight capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Zornetzer, S.; Lay, N.; Chahl, J.; Hine, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper highlights how in just about 100 years since the first successful flight took place at Kitty Hawk, our recent developments using inspiration from biology are enabling us to demonstrate flight capability for Mars exploration.

  19. Shear-Joint Capability Versus Bolt Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Technical Memorandum presents theoretical study of relationships between load-bearing capabilities of shear joints that comprise plates clamped together by multiple bolts and clearances between bolts and boltholes in those joints.

  20. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  1. Systems test facilities existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.

    1981-01-01

    Systems test facilities (STFS) to test total photovoltaic systems and their interfaces are described. The systems development (SD) plan is compilation of existing and planned STFs, as well as subsystem and key component testing facilities. It is recommended that the existing capabilities compilation is annually updated to provide and assessment of the STF activity and to disseminate STF capabilities, status and availability to the photovoltaics program.

  2. Expanding Lookout Capabilities for Architectural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shick, B.

    SMC/SYSW/ENY's Lookout tool provides a M&S capability for architectural analysis. It models the contributions of ground and space-based assets in several mission threads and scenarios to quantify overall Space Situational Awareness (SSA) capability. Plotting performance results versus costs enables decision makers to identify and evaluate Best Value families of systems and combinations of architectures. Currently, SMC intends to use Lookout to impact the Fiscal Year 2012 budget programming cycle, the National SSA Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) and Architecture definition effort, planning for programs of record, and AFSPC & SMC leadership. Ultimately, Lookout will enable additional space superiority analysis. Previous Lookout work focused on modeling the metric tracking capabilities of the Space Surveillance Network (detecting and tracking) and proposed concepts to close identified collection shortfalls. SMC/SYSW/ENY leveraged some of the lessons learned in developing and implementing the metric tracking models to expand Lookout to develop an initial characterization capability, including non-resolved space object identification (SOI), imaging, and Foreign Instrumentation and Signals (FIS) Intelligence. Characterization collection phenomenologies added in FY08 and FY09 include mechanical tracking and phased array radars, visible telescopes, and signals collection. Lookout enables evaluating the characterization collections for quantity, quality, and timeliness. Capturing the Tasking, Collection, Processing, Exploitation, and Dissemination processes represent one of the biggest challenges in including characterization capabilities in mission thread and scenario-based analysis. The SMC/SYSW/ENY team met with several representatives of the community and held community-wide Technical Interchange Meetings. Based on feedback from these meetings, SMC created an infrastructure for modeling the tasking processes and scales to relate collection quality to intelligence

  3. Evolutionary Algorithm for Calculating Available Transfer Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šošić, Darko; Škokljev, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents an evolutionary algorithm for calculating available transfer capability (ATC). ATC is a measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. In this paper, MATLAB software is used to determine the ATC between any bus in deregulated power systems without violating system constraints such as thermal, voltage, and stability constraints. The algorithm is applied on IEEE 5 bus system and on IEEE 30 bus system.

  4. The challenge for improved air cargo capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J.

    1976-01-01

    Requirements for a strategic air cargo capability are considered. Practical national resource investment considerations dictate that future military strategic airlift planners regard civil capabilities as an integral part of the solution. Attention is given to the military needs for airlift, the civil-military airlift commonality, the present air cargo business, growth projections for civil air cargo, future air cargo business, the introduction date for a dedicated airfreighter, and the demands for transport aircraft.

  5. Open architecture for rapid deployment of capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Modern warfare has drastically changed from conventional to non-conventional and from fixed threats to dynamic ones over the past several decades. This unprecedented fundamental shift has now made our adversaries and their weapons more nebulous and ever changing. Our current acquisition system however is not suited to develop, test and deploy essential capability to counter these dynamic threats in time to combat them. This environment requires a new infrastructure in our system design to rapidly adopt capabilities that we do not currently plan for or even know about. The key to enabling this rapid implementation is Open Architecture in acquisition. The DoD has shown it can rapidly prototype capabilities such as unmanned vehicles but has severely struggled in moving from the prototyping to deployment. A major driver of this disconnect is the lack of established infrastructure to employ said capability such as launch and recovery systems and command and control. If we are to be successful in transitioning our rapid capability to the warfighter we must implement established well defined interfaces and enabling technologies to facilitate the rapid adoption of capability so the warfighter has the tools to effectively counter the threat.

  6. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  7. HEALTH, VITAL GOALS, AND CENTRAL HUMAN CAPABILITIES

    PubMed Central

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or ‘central human capabilities and functionings’. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings—or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings. PMID:22420910

  8. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  9. Competing on capabilities: the new rules of corporate strategy.

    PubMed

    Stalk, G; Evans, P; Shulman, L E

    1992-01-01

    In the 1980s, companies discovered time as a new source of competitive advantage. In the 1990s, they will discover that time is only one piece of a more far-reaching transformation in the logic of competition. Using examples from Wal-Mart and other highly successful companies, Stalk, Evans, and Shulman of the Boston Consulting Group provide managers with a guide to the new world of "capabilities-based competition." In today's dynamic business environment, strategy too must become dynamic. Competition is a "war of movement" in which success depends on anticipation of market trends and quick response to changing customer needs. In such an environment, the essence of strategy is not the structure of a company's products and markets but the dynamics of its behavior. To succeed, a company must weave its key business processes into hard-to-imitate strategic capabilities that distinguish it from its competitors in the eyes of customers. A capability is a set of business processes strategically understood--for example, Wal-Mart's expertise in inventory replenishment, Honda's skill at dealer management, or Banc One's ability to "out-local the national banks and out-national the local banks." Such capabilities are collective and cross-functional--a small part of many people's jobs, not a large part of a few. Finally, competing on capabilities requires strategic investments in support systems that span traditional SBUs and functions and go far beyond what traditional cost-benefit metrics can justify. A CEO's success in building and managing a company's capabilities will be the chief test of management skill in the 1990s. The prize: companies that combine scale and flexibility to outperform the competition. PMID:10117369

  10. Resourcing interventions enhance psychology support capabilities in special operations forces.

    PubMed

    Myatt, Craig A; Auzenne, J W

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an examination of approaches to United States Government (USG) resourcing interventions on a national scale that enhance psychology support capabilities in the Special Operations Forces (SOF) community. A review of Congressional legislation and resourcing trends in the form of authorizations and appropriations since 2006 demonstrates how Congress supported enhanced psychology support capabilities throughout the Armed Forces and in SOF supporting innovative command interests that address adverse affects of operations tempo behavioral effects (OTBE). The formulation of meaningful metrics to address SOF specific command interests led to a personnel tempo (PERSTEMPO) analysis in response to findings compiled by the Preservation of the Force and Families (POTFF) Task Force. The review of PERSTEMPO data at subordinate command and unit levels enhances the capability of SOF leaders to develop policy and guidance on training and operational planning that mitigates OTBE and maximizes resourcing authorizations. A major challenge faced by the DoD is in providing behavioral healthcare that meets public and legislative demands while proving suitable and sustainable at all levels of military operations: strategic, operational, and tactical. Current legislative authorizations offer a mechanism of command advocacy for resourced multi-functional program development that enhances psychology support capabilities while reinforcing SOF readiness and performance. PMID:23536458

  11. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  12. Dolphin sonar detection and discrimination capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2001-05-01

    Dolphins have a very sophisticated short range sonar that surpasses all technological sonar in its capabilities to perform complex target discrimination and recognition tasks. The system that the U.S. Navy has for detecting mines buried under ocean sediment is one that uses Atlantic bottlenose dolphins. However, close examination of the dolphin sonar system will reveal that the dolphin acoustic hardware is fairly ordinary and not very special. The transmitted signals have peak-to-peak amplitudes as high as 225-228 dB re 1 μPa which translates to an rms value of approximately 210-213 dB. The transmit beamwidth is fairly broad at about 10o in both the horizontal and vertical planes and the receiving beamwidth is slightly broader by several degrees. The auditory filters are not very narrow with Q values of about 8.4. Despite these fairly ordinary features of the acoustic system, these animals still demonstrate very unusual and astonishing capabilities. Some of the capabilities of the dolphin sonar system will be presented and the reasons for their keen sonar capabilities will be discussed. Important features of their sonar include the broadband clicklike signals used, adaptive sonar search capabilities and large dynamic range of its auditory system.

  13. Machine Process Capability Information Through Six Sigma

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, M.F.

    1998-03-13

    A project investigating details concerning machine process capability information and its accessibility has been conducted. The thesis of the project proposed designing a part (denoted as a machine capability workpiece) based on the major machining features of a given machine. Parts are machined and measured to gather representative production, short-term variation. The information is utilized to predict the expected defect rate, expressed in terms of a composite sigma level process capability index, for a production part. Presently, decisions concerning process planning, particularly what machine will statistically produce the minimum amount of defects based on machined features and associated tolerances, are rarely made. Six sigma tools and methodology were employed to conduct this investigation at AlliedSignal FM and T. Tools such as the thought process map, factor relationship diagrams, and components of variance were used. This study is progressing toward completion. This research study was an example of how machine process capability information may be gathered for milling planar faces (horizontal) and slot features. The planning method used to determine where and how to gather variation for the part to be designed is known as factor relationship diagramming. Components-of-variation is then applied to the gathered data to arrive at the contributing level of variation illustrated within the factor relationship diagram. The idea of using this capability information beyond process planning to the other business enterprise operations is proposed.

  14. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

  15. Geometry and gravity influences on strength capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poliner, Jeffrey; Wilmington, Robert P.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1994-01-01

    Strength, defined as the capability of an individual to produce an external force, is one of the most important determining characteristics of human performance. Knowledge of strength capabilities of a group of individuals can be applied to designing equipment and workplaces, planning procedures and tasks, and training individuals. In the manned space program, with the high risk and cost associated with spaceflight, information pertaining to human performance is important to ensuring mission success and safety. Knowledge of individual's strength capabilities in weightlessness is of interest within many areas of NASA, including workplace design, tool development, and mission planning. The weightless environment of space places the human body in a completely different context. Astronauts perform a variety of manual tasks while in orbit. Their ability to perform these tasks is partly determined by their strength capability as demanded by that particular task. Thus, an important step in task planning, development, and evaluation is to determine the ability of the humans performing it. This can be accomplished by utilizing quantitative techniques to develop a database of human strength capabilities in weightlessness. Furthermore, if strength characteristics are known, equipment and tools can be built to optimize the operators' performance. This study examined strength in performing a simple task, specifically, using a tool to apply a torque to a fixture.

  16. Detection capability analysis of lunar retroreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Zhao, You; Fan, Zhongwei; Yu, Jin; Ma, Yunfeng

    2011-11-01

    The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) System is a part of the Lunar Exploration. It is used to detect the photons reflected by the retroreflector on the moon, and to accurately calculate range from the earth to the moon at a certain time, so as to improve the pointing precision of the telescope and correct the lunar orbit. The data is indispensable for other research about the moon. This paper not only analyses the main factors (the performance of chosen telescope, the power of laser used in LLR, the capability of detector) in affecting the detection capability of the Lunar Laser Ranging system, but also analyses the whole detection capability under the situation of all parts of an apparatus that could be attainable around the international areas. At last, the economic, feasible, with high performance-to-price ratio supporting programs are presented.

  17. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  18. MSFC/EV44 Natural Environment Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Willis, E. M.; Minow, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is an integral part of many NASA satellite and launch vehicle programs, providing analyses of the space and terrestrial environments that are used for program development efforts, operational support, and anomaly investigations. The space environment capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at MSFC will be presented. These capabilities include model development, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface charging modeling (e.g., Nascap-2k), space environment definition and radiation assessments for electronic parts. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions that are successful from launch to operations in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits. We will show examples of recent applications of branch capabilities to NASA missions.

  19. START Analysis for ESAS Capability Needs Prioritization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William; Mrozinski, Joe; Hua, Hook; Merida, Sofia; Shelton, Kacie; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Weisbin, Charles R.; Derleth, Jason

    2006-01-01

    START is a tool to optimize research and development primarily for NASA missions. It was developed within the Strategic Systems Technology Program Office, a division of the Office of the Chief Technologist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. START is capable of quantifying and comparing the risks, costs, and potential returns of technologies that are candidates for funding. START can be enormously helpful both in selecting technologies for development -- within the constraints of budget, schedule, and other resources -- and in monitoring their progress. START's methods are applicable to everything from individual tasks to multiple projects comprising entire programs of investigation. They can address virtually any technology assessment and capability prioritization issue. In this report, START is used to analyze the capability needs using data from NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS).

  20. NPSS Overview to TAFW Multidisciplinary Simulation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    2002-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a concerted effort by NASA Glenn Research Center, the aerospace industry, and academia to develop an advanced engineering environment or integrated collection of software programs for the analysis and design of aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation components. NPSS is now being applied by GE ground power to ground power generation with the view of expanding the capability to nontraditional power plant applications (example: fuel cells) and NPSS has an interest in in-space power and will be developing those simulation capabilities.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Capability for T2VOC

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-09-19

    Atmospheric transport by variable-K theory dispersion has been added to T2VOC. The new code, T2VOCA, models flow and transport in the subsurface identically to T2VOC, but includes also the capability for modeling passive multicomponent variable-K theory dispersion in an atmospheric region assumed to be flat, horizontal, and with a logarithmic wind profile. The specification of the logarithmic wind profile in the T2VOC input file is automated through the use of a build code called ATMDISPV. The new capability is demonstrated on 2-D and 3-D example problems described in this report.

  2. Future capabilities for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, J. B.; Bryant, S. H.; Andrews, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will look at three new capabilities that are in different stages of development. First, turbo decoding, which provides improved telemetry performance for data rates up to about 1 Mbps, will be discussed. Next, pseudo-noise ranging will be presented. Pseudo-noise ranging has several advantages over the current sequential ranging, anmely easier operations, improved performance, and the capability to be used in a regenerative implementation on a spacecraft. Finally, Low Density Parity Check decoding will be discussed. LDPC codes can provide performance that matches or slightly exceed turbo codes, but are designed for use in the 10 Mbps range.

  3. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Anthony L.; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun F.

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  4. Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vang, Leng; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis

    2014-09-01

    In collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared of information documents, software tools and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. A new cloud-based environment would be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available of Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report reviews development of a Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities (CAC) as a web portal for PRA tools.

  5. Physics capabilities of the DO upgrade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.

    1994-11-01

    The D0 detector at Fermilab is being upgraded to meet the demands imposed by high luminosity Tevatron running planned to begin in 1998. The central tracking detectors will be replaced with silicon and scintillating fiber tracking systems inside a solenoidal magnetic field and a preshower detector will be added to aid in electron identification. The design and performance of these systems are described and detailed simulations of the physics capabilities of the upgraded detector are presented. In particular the authors focus on the study of electroweak boson properties and top quark physics and briefly describe the b-physics capabilities.

  6. CCSDS Mission Operations Action Service Core Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Walter F.; Lucord, Steven A.; Stevens, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the operations concepts of the command (action) services. Since the consequences of sending the wrong command are unacceptable, the command system provides a collaborative and distributed work environment for flight controllers and operators. The system prescribes a review and approval process where each command is viewed by other individuals before being sent to the vehicle. The action service needs additional capabilities to support he operations concepts of manned space flight. These are : (1) Action Service methods (2) Action attributes (3) Action parameter/argument attributes (4 ) Support for dynamically maintained action data. (5) Publish subscri be capabilities.

  7. Servicing Capability for the Evolutionary Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, George; Corbo, Jim; Martin, Deborah; Levin, Lenny

    1990-01-01

    User servicing for Space Station Freedom (SSF) will span an evolutionary period paralleling that of the station's growth plan. This will include a baseline servicing configuration followed by a final growth phase in which all user servicing requirements are satisfied. Although the basic requirements for user servicing are not station configuration dependent, the emphasis placed on different aspects of servicing may change with the eventual SSF growth objectives. This paper will discuss the servicing requirements and how they will be satisfied by Freedom baseline and growth capabilities. The accomodation of the growth servicing elements will be addressed, including the required hooks and scars to implement these growth servicing capabilities.

  8. Improving Social Security's Financial Capability Assessments.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S; Birkenmaier, Julie; Norman, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When Social Security beneficiaries are incapable of managing their benefits, the agency can appoint a representative payee to administer benefits on their behalf. A committee of the Institute of Medicine was asked by the Social Security Administration to review the process by which financial capability determinations are made and to recommend improvements. The committee's conclusions and recommendations include the following: giving priority to real-world financial performance in assessing capability, providing clearer instructions to informants, developing systematic approaches to identifying beneficiaries at risk of incapability, exploring the use of a supervised direct payment option, and instituting regular data collection to assist in improving operations. PMID:27363351

  9. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  10. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  11. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  12. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  13. Human Exploration Systems and Mobility Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Taylor, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Capability Roadmap Team. Capability Description and Capability Breakdown Structure. Benefits of the Human Systems and Mobility Capability. Roadmap Process and Approach. Drivers and Assumptions for the whole team. Current State-of-the-Art, Assumptions and Requirements will be covered in the appropriate sections. Capability Presentations by Leads under Roadmap (Repeated for each capability under roadmap). Capability Description, Benefits, Current State-of-the-Art. Capability Requirements and Assumptions. Roadmap for Capability. Capability Readiness Level. Technology Readiness Level. Figures of Merit. Summary of Top Level Capability. Significant Technical Challenges. Summary and Forward Work.

  14. Capability Development at Imperial Oil Resources Ltd.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerington, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Striving to be learning organization, Imperial Oil of Canada focused on organizational, divisional, and individual capability development. Lessons learned include the following: (1) all levels of employees are potential professionals; (2) learning must be continuous; (3) intrinsic motivation and commitment are essential; and (4) organizational…

  15. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the analyses that may be incorporated into the Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant. The document will be used as a discussion tool to enable NASA and other integrated aviation system entities to evaluate, discuss, and prioritize analyses.

  16. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  17. NASA long duration balloon capability development project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlik, D.; Craddock, W.

    1993-02-01

    The potential benefits of a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) capability have long been recognized and some modest efforts have previously been undertaken by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF), et. al., going back to the late 1960's. In 1988, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) made a decision to dedicate significant resources toward this effort and a technical and management approach was established. The objective of the project is to develop a near global LDB capability for both Antarctic and mid-latitude applications, including the required telecommunications, navigation and positioning, power, data processing and control systems necessary to conduct flights of scientific experiments weighing 1500 pounds or more on conventional balloons for periods of up to three weeks. The first operational use of the new capability is planned in support of Solar Max experiments in Antarctica during the 1991-1992 austral summer. Development of the Antarctica support system configuration has been initiated and the first test flight was conducted from McMurdo Station in December 1989 - January 1990. The progress, status and future plans for development of the new LDB capability will be discussed.

  18. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities ... New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of an Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI & DoD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  19. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities - New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel; Smith, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of a Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI and DOD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  20. Roofing shingle assembly having solar capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.A.

    1982-03-16

    A roofing shingle assembly having solar capabilities comprising a flat main portion having upper and lower surfaces, and curved segments integral with the upper and lower edges of said shingle. The roofing shingles are mounted in overlapping parallel array with the curved segments interconnected to define a fluid conduit enclosure. Mounting brackets for the shingles are secured on the roof rafters.

  1. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  2. Cosmopolitan Capabilities in the HE Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This study, concerning the development of cosmopolitan citizenship, draws on theories of human development and capabilities (Sen 1999; Nussbaum 2000) from a social justice perspective, where individual wellbeing is articulated as having the freedom to live a life of one's choosing. In the context of an English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)…

  3. The Assessment of Children's Cognitive Processing Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Thomas A.; Collis, Kevin F.

    This paper reports the results of the second of a series of collaborative studies examining how children acquire the skills to represent and solve verbal addition and subtraction problems. The purpose of this study was to identify the cognitive processing capabilities of a group of Tasmanian (Australian) children. Fifteen cognitive tests were…

  4. EB resolution capability with CP exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Masaki; Isobe, Hideaki; Abe, Kenji; Oae, Yoshihisa; Yamada, Akio; Narukawa, Shogo; Ishikawa, Mikio; Fujita, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya

    2011-05-01

    We are evaluating the resolution capability of character projection (CP) exposure method using a Multi Colum Cell Proof of Concept (MCC-POC) tool. Resolving of 14nm half pitch (HP) 1:1 line and space (LS) patterns are confirmed with fine openings of a DNP fabricated CP mask for 10:1 de-magnification ratio. CP exposure has been proven to exhibit high resolution capabilities even under the most challenging optimization conditions that are required for throughput enhancement. As a result of evaluating the resolution capability of CP technology, it became apparent that the CP technology has strong potentials to meet future challenges in two areas. One is where an increased number of CP with variable illumination technology gives a higher throughput which has been the main objective behind the development of this technology, and the other is to achieve higher resolution capability that is one of the strengths of CP exposure method. We also evaluated the resolution on Quartz mask blanks instead of Si wafers and obtained 18nm HP 1:1 resolution with CP exposure.

  5. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  6. Laser tracking system with automatic reacquisition capability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R E; Weiss, P F

    1968-06-01

    A laser based tracking system is described that has the capability of automatically performing an acquisition search to locate the target. This work is intended for precision launch phase tracking of the Saturn V launch vehicle. System tracking accuracies limited only by the atmosphere have been demonstrated, as has acquisition over a 1 degrees x 1 degrees field of view. PMID:20068746

  7. The Capability Approach: Enabling Musical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Amartya Sen's capability approach offers a new perspective for educators throughout the curriculum. This new insight has the potential to promote a music education that is inherently tailored to the individual. In essence it asks the question: What is music education going to offer to this student? This article represents an initial enquiry into…

  8. Critical Capability Pedagogies and University Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The article argues for an alliance of the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen with ideas from critical pedagogy for undergraduate university education which develops student agency and well being on the one hand, and social change towards greater justice on the other. The purposes of a university education in this article are taken to…

  9. Assessing Enterprise Capability: Guidance for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Foundation for Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document offers guidance to schools on how assessment can support enterprise education. It presents the interim findings from research carried out by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) for the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) in secondary schools in England. Enterprise capability is the key outcome of enterprise…

  10. Advanced capabilities for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1997-11-01

    Methods to extend the capabilities beyond those available from the current generation synchrotron radiation sources based on undulators in electron storage rings are discussed. Taking advantage of the radiation-particle interaction and/or the availability of high power, ultrashort, optical lasers, it is possible to develop sources with higher brightness, smaller temporal resolution, or higher photon energy.

  11. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications... exploration license, he must find that the applicant has demonstrated that, upon issuance or transfer of the... technological capability to engage in the proposed exploration. (b) In order for the Administrator to make...

  12. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications... exploration license, he must find that the applicant has demonstrated that, upon issuance or transfer of the... technological capability to engage in the proposed exploration. (b) In order for the Administrator to make...

  13. Truth and the Capability of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines learning as a capability, taking as its starting point the work of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. The paper is concerned to highlight the relation between learning and truth, and it does so by examining the idea of a genealogy of truth and also Donald Davidson's coherence theory. Thus the notion of truth is understood to be…

  14. TOMCAT: An Obsolescence Management Capability Assessment Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Rojo, F. J.; Baguley, P.; Shaikh, N.; Roy, R.; Kelly, S.

    2012-05-01

    As the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) moves away from the traditional support contracts to contracting for availability/capability, it is essential that the MoD has confidence in Industry's capability to manage the risk of obsolescence. For this purpose, it was necessary to develop a set of metrics to demonstrate it. The eight key elements identified are as follows: obsolescence management governance; supplier; design for obsolescence; risk assessment; obsolescence monitoring; communication; and obsolescence resolution process. Each one was assessed, ranked, and was further broken down into major constituents. They formed the basis of the final 25 metrics, which were then ranked and weighted accordingly. These metrics are embedded into the Total Obsolescence Management Capability Assessment Tool (TOMCAT), which provides a mean for contractors to perform self-assessment and for the MoD to set obsolescence management capability improvement targets. This tool was subjected to rigorous industry scrutiny through different means, including workshops and piloting sessions, which led to refining the TOMCAT tool and the way in which the metrics are formulated. This tool has been developed as a web based application. The MoD is planning to standardise its usage by incorporating it to the obsolescence management policy for defence contracting.

  15. Food product tracing technology capabilities and interoperability.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Tejas; Zhang, Jianrong Janet

    2013-12-01

    identify the supply-chain partner who provided the information prior to sharing this information with product tracing technology providers. The 9 traceability solution providers who agreed to participate in this project have their systems deployed in a wide range of sectors within the food industry including, but not limited to, livestock, dairy, produce, fruits, seafood, meat, and pork; as well as in pharmaceutical, automotive, retail, and other industries. Some have also been implemented across the globe including Canada, China, USA, Norway, and the EU, among others. This broad commercial use ensures that the findings of this work are applicable to a broad spectrum of the food system. Six of the 9 participants successfully completed the data entry phase of this test. To verify successful data entry for these 6, a demo or screenshots of the data set from each system's user interface was requested. Only 4 of the 6 were able to provide us with this evidence for verification. Of the 6 that completed data entry and moved on to the scenarios phase of the test, 5 were able to provide us with the responses to the scenarios. Time metrics were useful for evaluating the scalability and usability of each technology. Scalability was derived from the time it took to enter the nonstandardized data set into the system (ranges from 7 to 11 d). Usability was derived from the time it took to query the scenarios and provide the results (from a few hours to a week). The time was measured in days it took for the participants to respond after we supplied them all the information they would need to successfully execute each test/scenario. Two of the technology solution providers successfully implemented and participated in a proof-of-concept interoperable framework during Year 2 of this study. While not required, they also demonstrated this interoperability capability on the FSMA-mandated food product tracing pilots for the U.S. FDA. This has significant real-world impact since the

  16. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  17. Transferable Denitrification Capability of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Laura; Bricio, Carlos; Blesa, Alba; Hidalgo, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-adapted strains of Thermus spp. have been shown to require oxygen for growth, including the model strains T. thermophilus HB27 and HB8. In contrast, many isolates of this species that have not been intensively grown under laboratory conditions keep the capability to grow anaerobically with one or more electron acceptors. The use of nitrogen oxides, especially nitrate, as electron acceptors is one of the most widespread capabilities among these facultative strains. In this process, nitrate is reduced to nitrite by a reductase (Nar) that also functions as electron transporter toward nitrite and nitric oxide reductases when nitrate is scarce, effectively replacing respiratory complex III. In many T. thermophilus denitrificant strains, most electrons for Nar are provided by a new class of NADH dehydrogenase (Nrc). The ability to reduce nitrite to NO and subsequently to N2O by the corresponding Nir and Nor reductases is also strain specific. The genes encoding the capabilities for nitrate (nar) and nitrite (nir and nor) respiration are easily transferred between T. thermophilus strains by natural competence or by a conjugation-like process and may be easily lost upon continuous growth under aerobic conditions. The reason for this instability is apparently related to the fact that these metabolic capabilities are encoded in gene cluster islands, which are delimited by insertion sequences and integrated within highly variable regions of easily transferable extrachromosomal elements. Together with the chromosomal genes, these plasmid-associated genetic islands constitute the extended pangenome of T. thermophilus that provides this species with an enhanced capability to adapt to changing environments. PMID:24141123

  18. Capable Exascale and beyond Moore's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2014-04-01

    The development of an exascale computing capability with machines capable of executing O(1018) operations per second by the end of the decade will be characterized by significant and dramatic changes in computing hardware architecture from current (2014) petascale high-performance computers. From the perspective of computational science, this will be at least as disruptive as the transition from vector supercomputing to parallel supercomputing that occurred in the 1990s. This was one of the findings of a 2010 workshop on crosscutting technologies for exascale computing. The impact of these architectural changes on future applications development for the computational sciences community can now be anticipated in very general terms. While the community has been investigating the road to exascale worldwide in the last several years, there are still several barriers that need to be overcome to obtain general purpose exascale performance. Unfortunately there has been not as much progress been made, as one would have hope five or six years ago. In this presentation I will first address what is referred to as capable exascale computing and differentiate it from LINPACK exascale. I will repeat my assertion that LINPACK exascale will not be happening before 2020, and if it were, it would be inconsequential for progress in computational science. While the HPC community is working towards overcoming the barriers to capable exascale, there has been recently new progress in technologies and computational models that go beyond the CMOS based semiconductor devices and the traditional von Neumann architecture. I will highlight some recent results on these experimental machines, and assess their potential for HPC in the era past the "capable exascale".

  19. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D.

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  20. Threshold Capabilities: Threshold Concepts and Knowledge Capability Linked through Variation Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillie, Caroline; Bowden, John A.; Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2013-01-01

    The Threshold Capability Integrated Theoretical Framework (TCITF) is presented as a framework for the design of university curricula, aimed at developing graduates' capability to deal with previously unseen situations in their professional, social, and personal lives. The TCITF is a new theoretical framework derived from, and heavily dependent…

  1. Toward a US National Air Quality Forecast Capability: Current and Planned Capabilities

    EPA Science Inventory

    As mandated by Congress, NOAA is establishing a US national air quality forecast capability. This capability is being built with EPA, to provide air quality forecast information with enough accuracy and lead-time so that people can take actions to limit harmful effects of poor a...

  2. Shear joint capability versus bolt clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a conservative analysis approach into the determination of shear joint strength capability for typical space-flight hardware as a function of the bolt-hole clearance specified in the design are presented. These joints are comprised of high-strength steel fasteners and abutments constructed of aluminum alloys familiar to the aerospace industry. A general analytical expression was first arrived at which relates bolt-hole clearance to the bolt shear load required to place all joint fasteners into a shear transferring position. Extension of this work allowed the analytical development of joint load capability as a function of the number of fasteners, shear strength of the bolt, bolt-hole clearance, and the desired factor of safety. Analysis results clearly indicate that a typical space-flight hardware joint can withstand significant loading when less than ideal bolt hole clearances are used in the design.

  3. Westinghouse Hanford Company package testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hummer, J.H.; Mercado, M.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s Hanford Site is a 1,450-km{sup 2} (560-mi{sup 2}) installation located in southeastern Washington State. Established in 1943 as a plutonium production facility, Hanford`s role has evolved into one of environmental restoration and remediation. Many of these environmental restoration and remediation activities involve transportation of radioactive/hazardous materials. Packagings used for the transportation of radioactive/hazardous materials must be capable of meeting certain normal transport and hypothetical accident performance criteria. Evaluations of performance to these criteria typically involve a combination of analysis and testing. Required tests may include the free drop, puncture, penetration, compression, thermal, heat, cold, vibration, water spray, water immersion, reduced pressure, and increased pressure tests. The purpose of this paper is to outline the Hanford capabilities for performing each of these tests.

  4. NASA DOEPOD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. Although 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes is often stated as an inspection requirement in inspection documents, including NASA Standards, NASA critical aerospace applications have historically only accepted 0.978 POD or better with a 95% one-sided lower confidence bound exceeding 0.90 at critical flaw sizes, a90/95.

  5. Aeroheating Mapping to Thermal Model for Autonomous Aerobraking Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal modeling has been performed to evaluate the potential for autonomous aerobraking of a spacecraft in the atmosphere of a planet. As part of this modeling, the aeroheating flux during aerobraking must be applied to the spacecraft solar arrays to evaluate their thermal response. On the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, this was done via two separate thermal models and an extensive suite of mapping scripts. That method has been revised, and the thermal analysis of an aerobraking pass can now be accomplished via a single thermal model, using a new capability in the Thermal Desktop software. This capability, Boundary Condition Mapper, has the ability to input heating flux files that vary with time, position on the solar array, and with the skin temperature. A recently added feature to the Boundary Condition Mapper is that this module can also utilize files that describe the variation of aeroheating over the surface with atmospheric density (rather than time); this is the format of the MRO aeroheating files. This capability has allowed a huge streamlining of the MRO thermal process, simplifying the procedure for importing new aeroheating files and trajectory information. The new process, as well as the quantified time savings, is described.

  6. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  7. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  8. Servicers system demonstration plan and capability development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulboaca, M. A.; Cuseo, J. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Maples, R. W.; Reynolds, P. C.; Sterrett, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A plan for the demonstration of the exchange of Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) modules using the servicer mechanism Engineering Test Unit (ETU) was prepared and executed. The plan included: establishment of requirements, conceptual design, selection of MMS spacecraft mockup configuration, selection of MMS module mockup configuration, evaluation of adequacy of ETU load capability, and selection of a stowage rack arrangement. The MMS module exchange demonstration mockup equipment was designed, fabricated, checked out, shipped, installed, and demonstrated.

  9. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

  10. Present and future capabilities of MCNP

    PubMed

    Hendricks; Adam; Booth; Briesmeister; Carter; Cox; Favorite; Forster; McKinney; Prael

    2000-10-01

    Several new capabilities have been added to MCNP4C including: (1) macrobody surfaces; (2) the superimposed mesh importance functions, so that it is no longer necessary to subdivide geometries for variance reduction; and (3) Xlib graphics and DVF Fortran 90 for PCs. There are also improvements in neutron physics, electron physics, perturbations, and parallelization. In the more distant future we are working on adaptive Monte Carlo code modernization, more parallelization, visualization, and charged particles. PMID:11003531

  11. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Burnett, Rebeka; Charles, John; Cucinotta, Frank; Fullerton, Richard; Goodman, Jerry R.; Griffith, Anthony D., Sr.; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perchonok, Michele; Railsback, Jan; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Stilwell, Don; Thomas, Gretchen; Tri, Terry; Joshi, Jitendra; Wheeler, Ray; Rudisill, Marianne; Wilson, John; Mueller, Alyssa; Simmons, Anne

    2003-01-01

    These guidelines and capabilities identify the points of intersection between human spaceflight crews and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. In these chapters, we will provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that will address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies will consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  12. Graphical workstation capability for reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Haley, Pamela J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to computational capabilities, software tools for estimating the reliability of fault-tolerant digital computer systems must also provide a means of interfacing with the user. Described here is the new graphical interface capability of the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP), a software package that implements advanced reliability modeling techniques. The graphics oriented (GO) module provides the user with a graphical language for modeling system failure modes through the selection of various fault-tree gates, including sequence-dependency gates, or by a Markov chain. By using this graphical input language, a fault tree becomes a convenient notation for describing a system. In accounting for any sequence dependencies, HARP converts the fault-tree notation to a complex stochastic process that is reduced to a Markov chain, which it can then solve for system reliability. The graphics capability is available for use on an IBM-compatible PC, a Sun, and a VAX workstation. The GO module is written in the C programming language and uses the graphical kernal system (GKS) standard for graphics implementation. The PC, VAX, and Sun versions of the HARP GO module are currently in beta-testing stages.

  13. Jason 2: A Review of Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, R. L.; Bowen, A. D.; Heintz, M. C.; Naiman, M.; Taylor, C. L.; Sellers, W. J.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Howland, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The family of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) for the United States oceanographic research community through the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), represent some of the most advanced tools and technology available for accomplishing a wide variety of deep submergence science and operations. Over the past five years, research done using these vehicles has provided major contributions to the understanding of deep-sea geological, chemical and biological processes at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). The ROV systems have also contributed to successful deployment of ocean floor observatory monitors and various sensors that seek to understand the geophysical and geotechnical properties of young crust and provide an ability to make routine time series measurements. As a result of experience gained during over 25 cruises with Jason and its companion vehicles and input from the user community and the DEep Submergence Science Committee (DESSC) of UNOLS, WHOI has recently completed an upgrade to the Jason vehicle. This has resulted in substantive additions to the vehicle's capabilities, particularly in the area of propulsion power and manipulative capabilities. During its first complete year of operation, the vehicle has operated a cumulative total of approximately 60 days in the water at depths up to a maximum of 6,500 meters. This poster will describe the capabilities of the new Jason vehicle and briefly review if achievements.

  14. Satellite broadcasting - Capabilities for public service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsten, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Satellite broadcast services to support health-care and educational transmissions must work with small, low-cost terminals in allocated radio-frequency bands. The ATS-6 spacecraft has successfully demonstrated such capability in the bands of non-technical users. It supports interactive television broadcasting to simple, low-cost terminals in a nationwide series of experiments in the delivery of health-care and educational services. ATS-6 achieves this capability with a very large antenna and moderate transmitter power. The coverage limitations inherent in this approach will be overcome by the joint U.S.-Canadian Communications Technology Satellite to be launched in December 1975. The CTS will demonstrate broadcast capability with new, high-power technology in a newly-allocated radio-frequency band. This will make it possible to use smaller antennas, greatly enlarging the area coverage available to the many nontechnical experimenters using CTS for their own needs. A practical application of these technologies is now in development for operational broadcasting services in Japan.

  15. Evaluating scatterometry 3D capabilities for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Dasari, Prasad; Volkman, Catherine; Wallow, Tom; Hu, Jiangtao

    2013-04-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology using scatterometry has been demonstrated to be a viable solution for fast and non-destructive in-line process control and monitoring. As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is more widely adopted to fabricate smaller and smaller patterns for electronic devices, scatterometry faces new challenges due to several reasons. For 14nm node and beyond, the feature size is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the shortest wavelength used in scatterometry. In addition, thinner resist layer is used in EUVL compared with conventional lithography, which leads to reduced measurement sensitivity. Despite these difficulties, tolerance has reduced for smaller feature size. In this work we evaluate 3D capability of scatterometry for EUV process using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Three types of structures, contact holes, tip-to-tip, and tip-to-edge, are studied to test CD and end-gap metrology capabilities. The wafer is processed with focus and exposure matrix. Good correlations to CD-SEM results are achieved and good dynamic precision is obtained for all the key parameters. In addition, the fit to process provides an independent method to evaluate data quality from different metrology tools such as OCD and CDSEM. We demonstrate 3D capabilities of scatterometry OCD metrology for EUVL using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which provides valuable in-line metrology for CD and end-gap control in electronic circuit fabrications.

  16. Transportation capabilities of the existing cask fleet

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Wankerl, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a number of scenarios estimating the amount of spent nuclear fuel that could be transported to a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility by various combinations of existing cask fleets. To develop the scenarios, the data provided by the Transportation System Data Base (TSDB) were modified to reflect the additional time for cask turnaround resulting from various startup and transportation issues. With these more realistic speed and cask-handling assumptions, the annual transportation capability of a fleet consisting of all of the existing casks is approximately 46 metric tons of uranium (MTU). The most likely fleet of existing casks that would be made available to the Department of Energy (DOE) consists of two rail, three overweight truck, and six legal weight truck casks. Under the same transportation assumptions, this cask fleet is capable of approximately transporting 270 MTU/year. These ranges of capability is a result of the assumptions pertaining to the number of casks assumed to be available. It should be noted that this assessment assumes additional casks based on existing certifications are not fabricated. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  18. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  19. Walking capabilities of Gregor controlled through Walknet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca; Schilling, Malte; Schmitz, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Locomotion control of legged robots is nowadays a field in continuous evolution. In this work a bio-inspired control architecture based on the stick insect is applied to control the hexapod robot Gregor. The control scheme is an extension of Walknet, a decentralized network inspired by the stick insect, that on the basis of local reflexes generates the control signals needed to coordinate locomotion in hexapod robots. Walknet has been adapted to the specific mechanical structure of Gregor that is characterized by specialized legs and a sprawled posture. In particular an innovative hind leg geometry, inspired by the cockroach, has been considered to improve climbing capabilities. The performances of the new control architecture have been evaluated in dynamic simulation environments. The robot has been endowed with distance and contact sensors for obstacle detection. A heading control is used to avoid large obstacles, and an avoidance reflex, as can be found in stick insects, has been introduced to further improve climbing capabilities of the structure. The reported results, obtained in different environmental configurations, stress the adaptive capabilities of the Walknet approach: Even in unpredictable and cluttered environments the walking behaviour of the simulated robot and the robot prototype, controlled through a FPGA based board, remained stable.

  20. Nuclear Forensics: A Capability at Risk (Abbreviated Version)

    SciTech Connect

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear forensics is important to our national security. Actions, including provision of appropriate funding, are needed now to sustain and improve the nation's nuclear forensics capabilities. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), working with cooperating agencies and national laboratories, should plan and implement a sustainable, effective nuclear forensics program. Nuclear forensics is the examination and evaluation of discovered or seized nuclear materials and devices or, in cases of nuclear explosions or radiological dispersals, of detonation signals and post-detonation debris. Nuclear forensic evidence helps law enforcement and intelligence agencies work toward preventing, mitigating, and attributing a nuclear or radiological incident. This report, requested by DHS, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the Department of Defense, makes recommendations on how to sustain and improve U.S. nuclear forensics capabilities. The United States has developed a nuclear forensics capability that has been demonstrated in real-world incidents of interdicted materials and in exercises of actions required after a nuclear detonation. The committee, however, has concerns about the program and finds that without strong leadership, careful planning, and additional funds, these capabilities will decline. Major areas of concern include: Organization. The responsibility for nuclear forensics is shared by several agencies without central authority and with no consensus on strategic requirements to guide the program. This organizational complexity hampers the program and could prove to be a major hindrance operationally. Sustainability. The nation's current nuclear forensics capabilities are available primarily because the system of laboratories, equipment, and personnel upon which they depend was developed and funded by the nuclear weapons program. However, the weapons program's funds are declining. Workforce and Infrastructure. Personnel skilled in nuclear forensics

  1. Y-12 defense programs: Nuclear Packaging Systems testing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Nuclear Packaging Systems (NPS) Department can manage/accomplish any packaging task. The NPS organization is responsible for managing the design, testing, certification, procurement, operation, refurbishment, maintenance, and disposal of packaging used to transport radioactive materials, other hazardous materials, and general cargoes on public roads and within the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Additionally, the NPS Department has developed a Quality Assurance plan for all packaging, design and procurement of nonweapon shipping containers for radioactive materials, and design and procurement of performance-oriented packaging for hazardous materials. Further, the NPS Department is responsible for preparation and submittal of Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP). The NPS Department coordinates shipping container procurement and safety certification activities that have lead-times of up to two years. A Packaging Testing Capabilities Table at the Oak Ridge complex is included as a table.

  2. Capability Investment Strategy to Enable JPL Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William; Merida, Sofia; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) formulates and conducts deep space missions for NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The Chief Technologist of JPL has responsibility for strategic planning of the laboratory's advanced technology program to assure that the required technological capabilities to enable future missions are ready as needed. The responsibilities include development of a Strategic Plan (Antonsson, E., 2005). As part of the planning effort, a structured approach to technology prioritization, based upon the work of the START (Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology) (Weisbin, C.R., 2004) team, was developed. The purpose of this paper is to describe this approach and present its current status relative to the JPL technology investment.

  3. Capabilities Roadmap Briefings to the National Research Council

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    High energy power and propulsion capability roadmap - general background and introduction. Advanced telescopes and observatories and scientific instruments and sensors capability roadmaps - general background and introduction. Space communications capability roadmap interim review. Robotic access to planetary surface capability roadmap. Human health and support systems capability roadmap progress review.

  4. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  5. Expanding capabilities of the debris analysis workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.; Shubert, Ann J.; Gerhart, Charlotte M.; Yates, Ken W.; Leake, Michael

    1996-10-01

    Determining the hazards from debris-generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory (PL) Space Debris Research Program has developed a simulation software package called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW). This software provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris hazards. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for Department of Defense space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts who are not debris experts. The current version of DAW includes models for spacecraft breakup, debris orbital lifetime, collision hazard risk assessment, and collision dispersion, as well as a satellite catalog database manager, a drag inclusive propagator, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines. Together they provide capabilities to conduct several types of analyses, ranging from range safety assessments to satellite constellation risk assessment. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated system is an object oriented language layer scheduled to be added soon. Other candidate component models under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, other dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUNR workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  6. RHIC CRITICAL POINT SEARCH: ASSESSING STARs CAPABILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SORENSEN,P.

    2006-07-03

    In this report we discuss the capabilities and limitations of the STAR detector to search for signatures of the QCD critical point in a low energy scan at RHIC. We find that a RHIC low energy scan will cover a broad region of interest in the nuclear matter phase diagram and that the STAR detector--a detector designed to measure the quantities that will be of interest in this search--will provide new observables and improve on previous measurements in this energy range.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  8. Tagged neutron capabilities for detecting hidden explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Belichenko, S. G.; Bestaev, R. R.; Gavryuchenkov, A. V.; Karetnikov, M. D.

    2015-05-01

    The work is devoted to illegal materials detection via tagged neutron method (TNM). The detection of hazardous substances is based on recording of gamma radiation from a neutron-irradiated object and analysis of its elemental composition. As against other neutron radiation methods the TNM enables to obtain 3D distribution of elements in the inspected area. The results of experimental part of the research show operational capabilities (probabilities of missing and false alarm) of a portable TNM inspection system when inspecting small hand-luggage-type objects.

  9. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Anderson, Kevin; Book, Paul

    1999-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the development of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC) and Beta version. We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models in the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC and Beta system development. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has seven chapters, a bibliography, and two appendices.

  10. Status and capabilities of sonic boom simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The current status and capabilities of sonic boom simulators which might be used in future studies of the effects of sonic boom on people, animals, or structures is summarized. The list of candidate simulators is based on a literature search which was confined to the United States and Canada. Some of the simulators are fully operational, others could be made operational with a modest investment, and still others would require a major investment. For the sake of the completeness, some simulators which were the subject of a previous review, but which no longer exist, are also included herein.

  11. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  12. Space Shuttle capabilities, constraints, and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities, constraints, and costs of the Space Transportation System (STS), which combines reusable and expendable components, are reviewed, and an overview of the current planning activities for operating the STS in an efficient and cost-effective manner is presented. Traffic forecasts, performance constraints and enhancements, and potential new applications are discussed. Attention is given to operating costs, pricing policies, and the steps involved in 'getting on board', which includes all the interfaces between NASA and the users necessary to come to launch service agreements.

  13. Optical Data Storage Capabilities of Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Charles

    1998-01-01

    We present several measurements of the data storage capability of bacteriorhodopsin films to help establish the baseline performance of this material as a medium for holographic data storage. In particular, we examine the decrease in diffraction efficiency with the density of holograms stored at one location in the film, and we also analyze the recording schedule needed to produce a set of equal intensity holograms at a single location in the film. Using this information along with the assumptions about the performance of the optical system, we can estimate potential data storage densities in bacteriorhodopsin.

  14. Capabilities of the Amateur-Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheim, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Devoted non-professional astronomers can offer useful service to researchers by collecting data that can’t be fit into funded observing programs, pursuing low-probability-of-success projects, stretching the limits of commercial technology, and mentoring the next generation of scientists. These individuals are performing photometry of stars and asteroids, astrometry of visual binary systems, and spectroscopy of variable stars. This report will illustrate some of the activities being done by the small-telescope research community-of-practice, and offer suggestions on how to take advantage of their capabilities and enthusiasm.

  15. Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) conducts and coordinates research projects that provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Program is divided into 6 major elements, which a) Provide the Program s knowledge and capabilities to conduct research, addressing the human health and performance risks. b) Advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures to the point of transfer to the customer programs and organizations. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a partner with the HRP in developing a successful research program. 3

  16. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  18. MSFC/EV44 Natural Environment Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NeergaardParker, Linda; Willis, Emily M.; Minnow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Vic N.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Environments Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is an integral part of many NASA satellite and launch vehicle programs, providing analyses of the space and terrestrial environments that are used for program development efforts, operational support, and anomaly investigations. These capabilities include model development, instrument build and testing, analysis of space and terrestrial related data, spacecraft charging anomaly investigations, surface and internal charging modeling, space environment definition, and radiation assessments for electronic parts. All aspects of space and terrestrial design are implemented with the goal of devising missions that are successful from launch to operations in the space environment of LEO, polar, GEO, and interplanetary orbits.

  19. New multivariable capabilities of the INCA program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1989-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly, efficient environment for the design and analysis of control systems, specifically spacecraft control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. The (INCA) program was initially developed as a comprehensive classical design analysis tool for small and large order control systems. The latest version of INCA, expected to be released in February of 1990, was expanded to include the capability to perform multivariable controls analysis and design.

  20. Collaborative environments for capability-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2005-05-01

    Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology for the 21st century that will significantly change how business is conducted in the defense and commercial sectors. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed entities working together to create a "product" by sharing and exchanging data, information, and knowledge. A product is defined broadly to include, for example, writing a report, creating software, designing hardware, or implementing robust systems engineering and capability planning processes in an organization. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, domain specific tools, and virtual test beds to facilitate collaboration between the multiple disciplines needed in the enterprise. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is conducting a leading edge program in developing distributed collaborative technologies targeted to the Air Force's implementation of systems engineering for a simulation-aided acquisition and capability-based planning. The research is focusing on the open systems agent-based framework, product and process modeling, structural architecture, and the integration technologies - the glue to integrate the software components. In past four years, two live assessment events have been conducted to demonstrate the technology in support of research for the Air Force Agile Acquisition initiatives. The AFRL Collaborative Environment concept will foster a major cultural change in how the acquisition, training, and operational communities conduct business.

  1. SAPHIRE 8 New Features and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) software performs probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations. SAPHIRE is used in support of NRC’s risk-informed programs such as the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program, Management Directive 8.3, “NRC Incident Investigation Program,” or the Significance Determination Process (SDP). It is also used to develop and run the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. SAPHIRE Version 8 is a new version of the software with an improved interface and capabilities to support risk-informed programs. SAPHIRE Version 8 is designed to easily handle larger and more complex models. Applications of previous SAPHIRE versions indicated the need to build and solve models with a large number of sequences. Risk assessments that include endstate evaluations for core damage frequency and large, early release frequency evaluations have greatly increased the number of sequences required. In addition, the complexity of the models has increased since risk assessments evaluate both potential internal and external events, as well as different plant operational states. Special features of SAPHIRE 8 help create and run integrated models which may be composed of different model types. SAPHIRE 8 includes features and capabilities that are new or improved over the current Version 7 to address the new requirements for risk-informed programs and SPAR models. These include: • Improved User Interfaces • Model development • Methods • General Support Features

  2. Proton - Electron discrimination capabilities with CALET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Aaron J.; Ormes, Jonathan F.; Calet Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a space-borne observatory set to be deployed on the ISS-JEM (aka Kibo) by a Japanese led collaboration with Italy and the United States. The primary objective of the mission is to provide precise measurements of the flux of photons, electrons and nuclei in the cosmic radiation, with energies in excess of several TeV. The instrument consists of the three sub-detectors: The Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC); totaling 30 X0 and 1.3 λ on axis. The imaging capabilities and depth of the apparatus produces precise longitudinal and lateral profiles, as well as the energy loss of the electromagnetic particles, allowing for a discrimination factor of about 105 between electromagnetic and hadronic particles. We demonstrate the separation capabilities of the instrument and present a multivariate technique developed from both Monte Carlo simulations and test beam data to aid in the electron/hadron separation while maintaining a very high detection efficiency.

  3. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, J.A.

    2003-03-11

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a {sup 252}Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography measures the interior of an item by making transmission measurements from all angles around the item, whereas NMIS makes the measurements from a single angle. Figure 1 is a standard example of tomographic reconstruction, the Shepp-Logan human brain phantom. The measured quantity is attenuation so high values (white) are highly attenuating areas.

  4. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  5. Low background screening capability in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-01

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  6. NASA DOE POD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book, 3rd ed., NTIAC DB-97-02. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. The test methodology used in DOEPOD is based on the field of statistical sequential analysis founded by Abraham Wald. Sequential analysis is a method of statistical inference whose characteristic feature is that the number of observations required by the procedure is not determined in advance of the experiment. The decision to terminate the experiment depends, at each stage, on the results of the observations previously made. A merit of the sequential method, as applied to testing statistical hypotheses, is that test procedures can be constructed which require, on average, a substantially smaller number of observations than equally reliable test procedures based on a predetermined number of observations.

  7. MCNP capabilities for nuclear well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Little, R.C.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Hendricks, J.S. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1990-06-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. This paper discusses how the general-purpose continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP ({und M}onte {und C}arlo {und n}eutron {und p}hoton), part of the LARTCS, provides a computational predictive capability for many applications of interest to the nuclear well logging community. The generalized three-dimensional geometry of MCNP is well suited for borehole-tool models. SABRINA, another component of the LARTCS, is a graphics code that can be used to interactively create a complex MCNP geometry. Users can define many source and tally characteristics with standard MCNP features. The time-dependent capability of the code is essential when modeling pulsed sources. Problems with neutrons, photons, and electrons as either single particle or coupled particles can be calculated with MCNP. The physics of neutron and photon transport and interactions is modeled in detail using the latest available cross-section data.

  8. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  9. Small, Low Cost, Launch Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A recent explosion in nano-sat, small-sat, and university class payloads has been driven by low cost electronics and sensors, wide component availability, as well as low cost, miniature computational capability and open source code. Increasing numbers of these very small spacecraft are being launched as secondary payloads, dramatically decreasing costs, and allowing greater access to operations and experimentation using actual space flight systems. While manifesting as a secondary payload provides inexpensive rides to orbit, these arrangements also have certain limitations. Small, secondary payloads are typically included with very limited payload accommodations, supported on a non interference basis (to the prime payload), and are delivered to orbital conditions driven by the primary launch customer. Integration of propulsion systems or other hazardous capabilities will further complicate secondary launch arrangements, and accommodation requirements. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center has begun work on the development of small, low cost launch system concepts that could provide dedicated, affordable launch alternatives to small, high risk university type payloads and spacecraft. These efforts include development of small propulsion systems and highly optimized structural efficiency, utilizing modern advanced manufacturing techniques. This paper outlines the plans and accomplishments of these efforts and investigates opportunities for truly revolutionary reductions in launch and operations costs. Both evolution of existing sounding rocket systems to orbital delivery, and the development of clean sheet, optimized small launch systems are addressed.

  10. Improving the Agency's Software Acquisition Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankinson, Allen

    2003-01-01

    External development of software has oftc n led to unsatisfactory results and great frustration for the assurE 7ce community. Contracts frequently omit critical assuranc 4 processes or the right to oversee software development activitie: At a time when NASA depends more and more on software to in plement critical system functions, combination of three factors ex; cerbate this problem: I ) the ever-increasing trend to acquire rather than develop software in-house, 2) the trend toward performance based contracts, and 3) acquisition vehicles that only state softwar 2 requirements while leaving development standards and assur! ince methodologies up to the contractor. We propose to identify specific methods at d tools that NASA projects can use to mitigate the adverse el ects of the three problems. TWO broad classes of methoddt ols will be explored. The first will be those that provide NASA p ojects with insight and oversight into contractors' activities. The st cond will be those that help projects objectively assess, and thus i nprwe, their software acquisition capability. Of particular interest is the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) Software Acqt isition Capability Maturity Model (SA-CMMO).

  11. Dynamic Capability of an Operating Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodnight, Thomas W.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center and the US Department of Energy are currently developing a Stirling convertor for use as an advanced spacecraft power system for future NASA deep-space missions. NASA Headquarters has recently identified the Stirling technology generator for potential use as the spacecraft power system for two of NASA's new missions, the Europa Orbiter and the Solar Probe missions (planned for launch in 2006 and 2007 respectively). As part of the development of this power system, a Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor was vibration tested at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center to verify its survivability and capability of withstanding the harsh dynamic environment typically seen by the spacecraft when it is launched by an expendable launch vehicle. The Technology Demonstration Convertor was fully operational (producing power) during the random vibration testing. The output power of the convertor and other convertor performance indicators were measured during the testing, and these results are discussed in this paper. Numerous accelerometers and force gauges also were used to provide information on the dynamic characteristics of the Technology Demonstration Convertor and as an indication of any possible damage due to the vibration. These measurements will also be discussed in this paper. The vibration testing of the Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertor was extremely successful. The Technology Demonstration Convertor survived all its vibration testing with no structural damage or functional performance degradation. As a result of this testing, the Stirling convertor's capability to withstand vibration has been demonstrated, enabling its usage in future spacecraft power systems.

  12. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  13. Flexible integration of path-planning capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stobie, Iain C.; Tambe, Milind; Rosenbloom, Paul S.

    1993-05-01

    Robots pursuing complex goals must plan paths according to several criteria of quality, including shortness, safety, speed and planning time. Many sources and kinds of knowledge, such as maps, procedures and perception, may be available or required. Both the quality criteria and sources of knowledge may vary widely over time, and in general they will interact. One approach to address this problem is to express all criteria and goals numerically in a single weighted graph, and then to search this graph to determine a path. Since this is problematic with symbolic or uncertain data and interacting criteria, we propose that what is needed instead is an integration of many kinds of planning capabilities. We describe a hybrid approach to integration, based on experiments with building simulated mobile robots using Soar, an integrated problem-solving and learning system. For flexibility, we have implemented a combination of internal planning, reactive capabilities and specialized tools. We illustrate how these components can complement each other's limitations and produce plans which integrate geometric and task knowledge.

  14. Stennis Space Center Verification & Validation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; O'Neal, Duane; Knowlton, Kelly; Ross, Kenton; Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    Scientists within NASA#s Applied Research & Technology Project Office (formerly the Applied Sciences Directorate) have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site enables the in-flight characterization of satellite and airborne high spatial resolution remote sensing systems and their products. The smaller scale of the newer high resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the techniques used to characterize data from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists have used the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems. Enhancements are being considered to characterize active lidar systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. Similar techniques are used to characterize moderate spatial resolution sensing systems at selected nearby locations. The SSC Instrument Validation Lab is a key component of the V&V capability and is used to calibrate field instrumentation and to provide National Institute of Standards and Technology traceability. This poster presents a description of the SSC characterization capabilities and examples of calibration data.

  15. Stennis Space Center Verification & Validation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; ONeal, Duane; Knowlton, Kelly; Ross, Kenton; Blonski, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Scientists within NASA s Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site enables the in-flight characterization of satellite and airborne high spatial and moderate resolution remote sensing systems and their products. The smaller scale of the newer high resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the techniques used to characterize data from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists are also using the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems and active lidar systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. The SSC Instrument Validation Lab is a key component of the V&V capability and is used to calibrate field instrumentation and to provide National Institute of Standards and Technology traceability. This poster presents a description of the SSC characterization capabilities and examples of calibration data.

  16. Control Requirements to Support Manual Piloting Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Chevray, Kay; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Madsen, Jennifer; Spehar, Pete

    2013-01-01

    The manual piloting requirements specified under the NASA Constellation Program involved Cooper-Harper ratings, which are a qualitative and subjective evaluation from experienced pilots. This type of verification entails a significant investment of resources to assess a completed design and is not one that can easily or meaningfully be applied upfront in the design phase. The evolution of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Program to include an independently developed propulsion system from an international partner makes application of Cooper-Harper based design requirements inadequate. To mitigate this issue, a novel solution was developed to reformulate the necessary piloting capability into quantifiable requirements. A trio of requirements was designed which specify control authority, precision, and impulse residuals enabling propulsion design within specified guidance and control boundaries. These requirements have been evaluated against both the existing Orion design and the proposed ESA design and have been found to achieve the desired specificity. The requirement set is capable of being applied to the development of other spacecraft in support of manual piloting.

  17. China's ASAT Weapon: Capabilities and the Potential Threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forden, Geoffrey

    2008-04-01

    Much has been said about China's 11 January 2007 test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon but few analysts have based their comments on a scientific determination of the weapons capabilities. This paper presents such an analysis derived from the observed pattern of debris, as observed by NORAD and posted on-line by NASA. It is clear that this was a direct hit-to-kill weapon (as opposed to a fragmentation-type explosive warhead), it massed about 600 kg, and was capable of accelerations of at least 6 Gs. It can be inferred with a reasonable degree of confidence that it used an on-board optical tracker, most likely operating in visible light. Furthermore, since the closing speed between the target satellite and the interceptor was 8 km/s during the test, this weapon could be used to attack satellites at higher altitude orbits, such as NAVSTAR/GPS and geostationary satellites that include communications and early warning satellites. This test produced ten times as many pieces of debris as an earlier US hit-to-kill ASAT test which, because of their higher altitudes, will last thousands of years---hundreds of times longer than the debris in the US test. China's test increased the chances of some low earth orbit satellite being hit by a piece of debris by 50%, from about 12% to 18% each year. Given this weapon's capabilities, it is possible to ``war game'' what an all-out Chinese ASAT attack would look like and what responses the US could take. (It is important to emphasize that this is a capabilities-based exercise and not based on Chinese intentions.) If China did launch such an attack, it could eliminate a large fraction of US military satellites in low earth orbit including photo-reconnaissance and electronic intelligence satellites, but not all of them, in the first 24 hours; the requirement that the target satellites be illuminated by the sun limits the attack. Furthermore, the US could maneuver its LEO satellites in the first hours of the attack and greatly

  18. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place

  19. Capabilities and contributions of unwed fathers.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Robert I

    2010-01-01

    Young, minority, and poorly educated fathers in fragile families have little capacity to support their children financially and are hard-pressed to maintain stability in raising those children. In this article, Robert Lerman examines the capabilities and contributions of unwed fathers, how their capabilities and contributions fall short of those of married fathers, how those capabilities and contributions differ by the kind of relationship the fathers have with their child's mother, and how they change as infants grow into toddlers and kindergartners. Unwed fathers' employment and earnings vary widely among groups but generally rise over time. At the child's birth, cohabiting fathers earn nearly 20 percent more than noncohabiting unwed fathers, and the gap widens over time. Still, five years after an unwed birth, the typical unwed father is working full time for the full year. Although most unwed fathers spend considerable time with their children in the years soon after birth, explains Lerman, over time their involvement erodes. Men who lose touch with their children are likely to see their earnings stagnate, provide less financial support, and often face new obligations when they father children with another partner. By contrast, the unwed fathers who marry or cohabit with their child's mother earn considerably higher wages and work substantially more than unwed fathers who do not marry or cohabit. These results suggest that unwed fathers' earnings are affected by family relationships as well as their education and work experience. Lerman notes that several factors influence the extent to which unwed fathers stay involved with their children. Better-educated fathers, those who most identify with the father's role, and those with good relationships with the child's mother, are most likely to sustain a relationship with their children. Some studies even find that strong child support enforcement increases father involvement. For many years, policy makers approached

  20. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  1. Achieving a Launch on Demand Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to place payloads [satellites] into orbit as and when required, often referred to as launch on demand, continues to be an elusive and yet largely unfulfilled goal. But what is the value of achieving launch on demand [LOD], and what metrics are appropriate? Achievement of a desired level of LOD capability must consider transportation system thruput, alternative transportation systems that comprise the transportation architecture, transportation demand, reliability and failure recovery characteristics of the alternatives, schedule guarantees, launch delays, payload integration schedules, procurement policies, and other factors. Measures of LOD capability should relate to the objective of the transportation architecture: the placement of payloads into orbit as and when required. Launch on demand capability must be defined in probabilistic terms such as the probability of not incurring a delay in excess of T when it is determined that it is necessary to place a payload into orbit. Three specific aspects of launch on demand are considered: [1] the ability to recover from adversity [i.e., a launch failure] and to keep up with the steady-state demand for placing satellites into orbit [this has been referred to as operability and resiliency], [2] the ability to respond to the requirement to launch a satellite when the need arises unexpectedly either because of an unexpected [random] on-orbit satellite failure that requires replacement or because of the sudden recognition of an unanticipated requirement, and [3] the ability to recover from adversity [i.e., a launch failure] during the placement of a constellation into orbit. The objective of this paper is to outline a formal approach for analyzing alternative transportation architectures in terms of their ability to provide a LOD capability. The economic aspect of LOD is developed by establishing a relationship between scheduling and the elimination of on-orbit spares while achieving the desired level of on

  2. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  3. Intelsat VII communications capabilities and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Nabi, T.; Koh, E.; Kennedy, D.

    This paper describes the general characteristics of the Intelsat VII communications payload and analyzes the suitability of its design for digital transmission, for efficient incorporation of small earth stations into the Intelsat network, and for a relatively straightforward transition from the current Intelsat VA/VI configuration. An overview is presented of the comunications performance of the Intelsat VII satellite for the more important Intelsat digital and analog services, and earth stations standards. Specifically, the advantages, in terms of performance and capabilities, of the improved transponder linearity characteristics associated with the C-Band SSPA's and the K(u)-Band linearized TWTA's are addressed. The enhanced ability of this spacecraft to provide bandwidth where required from several possible orbital locations is discussed.

  4. The NICER mission: Status and technical capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith

    2016-07-01

    NASA's Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), in development for deployment to the International Space Station as an external attached payload, will address decades-old questions about the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of the soft X-ray emissions of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars. NICER's performance in timing, spectroscopy, and high-throughput sensitivity to 0.2-12 keV X-rays represents a substantial enhancement over existing capabilities, enabling a rich diversity of investigations in both neutron star science as well as broader X-ray astrophysics, the latter through an approved Guest Observer program. This talk briefly summarizes the NICER design and the status of hardware fabrication and testing, currently on pace to deliver the NICER payload for its planned launch in early 2017.

  5. Capability 9.3 Assembly and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John

    2005-01-01

    Large space systems are required for a range of operational, commercial and scientific missions objectives however, current launch vehicle capacities substantially limit the size of space systems (on-orbit or planetary). Assembly and Deployment is the process of constructing a spacecraft or system from modules which may in turn have been constructed from sub-modules in a hierarchical fashion. In-situ assembly of space exploration vehicles and systems will require a broad range of operational capabilities, including: Component transfer and storage, fluid handling, construction and assembly, test and verification. Efficient execution of these functions will require supporting infrastructure, that can: Receive, store and protect (materials, components, etc.); hold and secure; position, align and control; deploy; connect/disconnect; construct; join; assemble/disassemble; dock/undock; and mate/demate.

  6. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  7. Stable Isotope Enrichment Capabilities at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Egle, Brian; Aaron, W Scott; Hart, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Department of Energy Nuclear Physics Program have built a high-resolution Electromagnetic Isotope Separator (EMIS) as a prototype for reestablishing a US based enrichment capability for stable isotopes. ORNL has over 60 years of experience providing enriched stable isotopes and related technical services to the international accelerator target community, as well as medical, research, industrial, national security, and other communities. ORNL is investigating the combined use of electromagnetic and gas centrifuge isotope separation technologies to provide research quantities (milligram to several kilograms) of enriched stable isotopes. In preparation for implementing a larger scale production facility, a 10 mA high-resolution EMIS prototype has been built and tested. Initial testing of the device has simultaneously collected greater than 98% enriched samples of all the molybdenum isotopes from natural abundance feedstock.

  8. The Boeing plastic analysis capability for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The current BOPACE program is described as a nonlinear stress analysis program, which is based on a family of isoparametric finite elements. The theoretical, user, programmer, preprocessing aspects are discussed, and example problems are included. New features in the current program version include substructuring, an out-of-core Gauss wavefront equation solver, multipoint constraints, combined material and geometric nonlinearities, automatic calculation of inertia effects, provision for distributed as well as concentrated mechanical loads, follower forces, singular crack-tip elements, the SAIL automatic generation capability, and expanded user control over input quantity definition, output selection, and program execution. BOPACE is written in FORTRAN 4 and is currently available for both the IBM 360/370 and the UNIVAC 1108 machines.

  9. A database management capability for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Arvola; Danberg, SY; Fox, Stephen; Landers, Terry; Nori, Anil; Smith, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The data requirements of mission critical defense systems have been increasing dramatically. Command and control, intelligence, logistics, and even weapons systems are being required to integrate, process, and share ever increasing volumes of information. To meet this need, systems are now being specified that incorporate data base management subsystems for handling storage and retrieval of information. It is expected that a large number of the next generation of mission critical systems will contain embedded data base management systems. Since the use of Ada has been mandated for most of these systems, it is important to address the issues of providing data base management capabilities that can be closely coupled with Ada. A comprehensive distributed data base management project has been investigated. The key deliverables of this project are three closely related prototype systems implemented in Ada. These three systems are discussed.

  10. Delta capability for launch of communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Russell, W. A., Jr.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of capabilities and the current performance levels of the Delta launch vehicle are outlined. The first payload was the Echo I passive communications satellite, weighing 179 lb, and placed in GEO in 1960. Emphasis since then has been to use off-the-shelf hardware where feasible. The latest version in the 3924 first stage, 3920 second stage, and Pam D apogee kick motor third stage. The Delta is presently equipped to place 2800 lb in GEO, as was proven with the 2717 lb Anik-D1 satellite. The GEO payload placement performance matches the Shuttle's, and work is therefore under way to enhance the Delta performance to handle more massive payloads. Installation of the Castor-IV solid motor separation system, thereby saving mass by utilizing compressed nitrogen, rather than mechanical thrusters to remove the strap-on boosters, is indicated, together with use of a higher performance propellant and a wider nose fairing.

  11. Advanced Subsetter Capabilities for Atmospheric Science Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, W. E.; Perez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the last three years, the NASA Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has developed and deployed production provider-specific search and subset web applications for the CALIPSO, CERES, and TES missions. ASDC is now collaborating with the MOPITT science team to provide tailored subsetting for their level 2 satellite datasets leveraging the architecture of the recently deployed subsetting systems. This presentation explores the challenges encountered by the ASDC's development team and discusses solutions implemented for the following advanced subsetter capabilities: - On-the-fly conversion of subsetted HDF data granules to NetCDF - Generation of CF-Compliant subset results for non-gridded data (level2 swaths) - Parameter-specific filtering - Multi-dimensional spatial subsetting - Complex temporal subsetting (temporal filtering)

  12. Future capabilities of the Delta launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Design features and payload delivery capabilities of the Delta 3920 launch vehicle are presented. The 3920 is the 14th iteration in a series that was first launched in 1960 and has in recent years surpassed a 97 percent success rate. Capacity is 2800 lb to GEO. The second stage has a propellant capacity of 13,244 lb and a specific impulse of 319.2 sec and produces 9443 lb thrust. The first mission is the Landsat-D satellite and 27 more launches are scheduled through 1985, some associated with different upper stage configurations. The 3924 configuration delivers payload to GEO at a cost of $7500/lb. A fairing has been designed to provide back-up for Shuttle payloads, although the larger size reduces the GEO payload to 2715 lb. Performance enhancements may, however, be gained through pneumatic thrusters for the Castor IV engine separation, higher Castor IV thrust levels, increased booster thrust, and a cryogenic second stage.

  13. The Urbana MST radar, capabilities and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.; Goss, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    The 41-MHz coherent-scatter radar located northeast of the University of Illinois at Urbana is being used for studies of the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere regions. The antenna consists of 1008 halfwave dipoles with a physical aperture of 11000 sq m. Transmitted peak power is about 750 kW. Clear-air returns may be received from 6 km to 90 km altitude. Autocorrelation functions of the scattered signal are calculated on-line. From the autocorrelation functions the scattered power, line-of-sight velocity and signal correlation time are calculated. Some aspects of the troposphere/stratosphere and the mesosphere observations are discussed. Capabilities and limitations of the Urbana MST radar are pointed out, and recent and planned improvements to the radar are described.

  14. Semiconductor photon counter with nanosecond gating capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Lukas; Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel

    2007-05-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) based on various semiconductors have been developed at the Czech Technical University in Prague during the last 20 years. Much attention has been also paid to development of high-speed active quenching circuits for these detectors. Recently, we have performed a series of experiments to characterize our silicon-based photon counters and their capability of operation in a gated mode with the gate duration of single nanoseconds and the detector sensitivity rise time of hundreds of picoseconds. This performance has been achieved by optimizing the active quenching circuit and its components. The fast gating is needed in cases, when the photons of interest are generated short time after a strong optical signal, which cannot be suppressed in optical domain. The time dependence of detection sensitivity, detection delay and timing resolution within the nanosecond gates has been measured.

  15. Servicer system demonstration plan and capability development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    An orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) front end kit is defined which is capable of performing in-situ fluid resupply and modular maintenance of free flying spacecraft based on the integrated orbital servicing system (IOSS) concept. The compatibility of the IOSS to perform gas and fluid umbilical connect and disconnect functions utilizing connect systems currently available or in development is addressed. A series of tasks involving on-orbit servicing and the engineering test unit (ETU) of the on-orbit service were studied. The objective is the advancement of orbital servicing by expanding the Spacecraft Servicing Demonstration Plan (SSDP) to include detail demonstration planning using the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) and upgrading the ETU control.

  16. Space Station Freedom capabilities for users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Snyder, Robert S.; Willenberg, Harvey J.

    1991-01-01

    Space Station Freedom's major objectives are to prepare for human space exploration by providing a long-duration, continuously habitable spacecraft in low earth orbit for physiology studies and for development of systems to support human presence in space and to enable laboratory and observational research in space. As a result of restructuring and the preliminary design review, designs of Space Station Freedom architecture and systems have progressed to the point where the accommodations for users can be well described. These capabilities are enumerated, covering such important resources as power and cooling, rack volume and external accommodations, crew time, data and command rates, and acceleration environment. Related items such as total energy, data management systems, and interfaces, station attitude, payload transportation, and on board and ground facilities are considered.

  17. Cost, capability, and risk for planetary operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.; Deutsch, Marie J.; Miller, Lanny J.; Wolff, Donna M.; Zawacki, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    The three key factors for flight projects - cost, capability, and risk - are examined with respect to their interplay, the uplink process, cost drivers, and risk factors. Scientific objectives are translated into a computer program during the uplink process, and examples are given relating to the Voyager Interstellar Mission, Galileo, and the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby. The development of a multimission sequence system based on these uplinks is described with reference to specific subsystems such as the pointer and the sequence generator. Operational cost drivers include mission, flight-system, and ground-system complexity, uplink traffic, and work force. Operational risks are listed in terms of the mission operations, the environment, and the mission facilities. The uplink process can be analyzed in terms of software development, and spacecraft operability is shown to be an important factor from the initial stages of spacecraft development.

  18. Acoustical analysis capability for pusher propeller installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Donald S.; Marsan, Mehmet; Lyon, Craig

    1990-01-01

    A new capability to predict the noise from pusher propeller installations has been developed. The pylon flowfield is modeled by potential flow theory for the outer solution and boundary layer theory for the inner solution. This flowfield is added to the performance prediction for a propeller contained in the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). Predictions of the noise are made using Farassat's method in the ANOPP Subsonic Propeller Noise Module. Comparisons of the predictions are made with noise data from a model scale SR-2 propeller in both tractor and pusher configurations taken in the NASA Langley Research Center Quiet Flow Facility. The results show good agreement near the plane of the propeller, but the quality of the agreement decreases toward the propeller axis.

  19. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  20. SAGE III capabilities and global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the satellite-borne SAGE III are presented as they pertain to detecting global change. SAGE III is the proposed follow on and improved version of SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II which have measured stratospheric and, in some cases, tropospheric species since late 1978. Specifically, SAGE III will measure profiles of aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide and trioxide, neutral density, temperature, clouds, and chlorine dioxide using the solar and lunar occultation techniques. These techniques are inherently self-calibrating, provide high vertical resolution, and use well-behaved data retrievals making them ideal for trend detection and global change studies. The potential capabilities of SAGE III are illustrated by using data and results from SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II.

  1. Plant Pathogen Forensics: Capabilities, Needs, and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, J.; Bender, C.; Budowle, B.; Cobb, W. T.; Gold, S. E.; Ishimaru, C. A.; Luster, D.; Melcher, U.; Murch, R.; Scherm, H.; Seem, R. C.; Sherwood, J. L.; Sobral, B. W.; Tolin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    A biological attack on U.S. crops, rangelands, or forests could reduce yield and quality, erode consumer confidence, affect economic health and the environment, and possibly impact human nutrition and international relations. Preparedness for a crop bioterror event requires a strong national security plan that includes steps for microbial forensics and criminal attribution. However, U.S. crop producers, consultants, and agricultural scientists have traditionally focused primarily on strategies for prevention and management of diseases introduced naturally or unintentionally rather than on responding appropriately to an intentional pathogen introduction. We assess currently available information, technologies, and resources that were developed originally to ensure plant health but also could be utilized for postintroduction plant pathogen forensics. Recommendations for prioritization of efforts and resource expenditures needed to enhance our plant pathogen forensics capabilities are presented. PMID:16760310

  2. Plant pathogen forensics: capabilities, needs, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J; Bender, C; Budowle, B; Cobb, W T; Gold, S E; Ishimaru, C A; Luster, D; Melcher, U; Murch, R; Scherm, H; Seem, R C; Sherwood, J L; Sobral, B W; Tolin, S A

    2006-06-01

    A biological attack on U.S. crops, rangelands, or forests could reduce yield and quality, erode consumer confidence, affect economic health and the environment, and possibly impact human nutrition and international relations. Preparedness for a crop bioterror event requires a strong national security plan that includes steps for microbial forensics and criminal attribution. However, U.S. crop producers, consultants, and agricultural scientists have traditionally focused primarily on strategies for prevention and management of diseases introduced naturally or unintentionally rather than on responding appropriately to an intentional pathogen introduction. We assess currently available information, technologies, and resources that were developed originally to ensure plant health but also could be utilized for postintroduction plant pathogen forensics. Recommendations for prioritization of efforts and resource expenditures needed to enhance our plant pathogen forensics capabilities are presented. PMID:16760310

  3. Servicing capability for the evolutionary Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward F.; Grems, Edward G., III; Corbo, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program the concept of on-orbit servicing of user hardware has been an integral part of the program implementation. The user servicing system architecture has been divided into a baseline and a growth phase. The baseline system consists of the following hardware elements that will support user servicing - flight telerobotic servicer, crew and equipment translation aid, crew intravehicular and extravehicular servicing support, logistics supply system, mobile servicing center, and the special purpose dextrous manipulator. The growth phase incorporates a customer servicing facility (CSF), a station-based orbital maneuvering vehicle and an orbital spacecraft consumables resupply system. The requirements for user servicing were derived from the necessity to service attached payloads, free flyers and coorbiting platforms. These requirements include: orbital replacement units (ORU) and instrument changeout, National Space Transportation System cargo bay loading and unloading, contamination control and monitoring, thermal protection, payload berthing, storage, access to SSF distributed systems, functional checkout, and fluid replenishment. The baseline user servicing capabilities accommodate ORU and instrument changeout. However, this service is limited to attached payloads, either in situ or at a locally adjacent site. The growth phase satisfies all identified user servicing requirements by expanding servicing capabilities to include complex servicing tasks for attached payloads, free-flyers and coorbiting platforms at a dedicated, protected Servicing site. To provide a smooth evolution of user servicing the SSF interfaces that are necessary to accommodate the growth phase have been identified. The interface requirements on SSF have been greatly simplified by accommodating the growth servicing support elements within the CSF. This results in a single SSF interface: SSF to the CSF.

  4. Demonstration of Hazardous Hypervelocity Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) participated in a joint test program with NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Research Laboratory (HIRL) to determine if JSC was capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets. Seven pressurized vessels were evaluated under hypervelocity impact conditions. The vessels were tested with various combinations of liquids and gasses at various pressures. Results from the evaluation showed that vessels containing 100-percent pressurized gas sustained more severe damage and had a higher potential for damaging nearby equipment, than vessels containing 75-percent liquid, 25-percent inert pressurized gas. Two water-filled test vessels, one of which was placed behind an aluminum shield, failed by bulging and splitting open at the impact point; pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting or sustaining internal damage. An additional water-filled test vessel, placed a greater distance behind an aluminum shield, sustained damage that resembled a shotgun blast, but did not bulge or split open; again, pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting. Two test vessels containing volatile liquids (nitro methane and hydrazine) also failed by bulging and splitting open; neither liquid detonated under hypervelocity test conditions. A test vessel containing nitrogen gas failed by relieving pressure through a circular entry hole; multiple small penetrations opposite the point of entry provided high velocity target debris to surrounding objects. A high-pressure oxygen test vessel fragmented upon impact; the ensuing fire and high velocity fragments caused secondary damage to surrounding objects. The results from the evaluation of the pressurized vessels indicated that JSC is capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets.

  5. Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2015-05-27

    In July 2014, DOE NP carried out a review of the US Nuclear Data Program. This led to several recommendations, including that the USNDP should “devise effective and transparent mechanisms to solicit input and feedback from all stakeholders on nuclear data needs and priorities.” The review also recommended that USNDP pursue experimental activities of relevance to nuclear data; the revised 2014 Mission Statement accordingly states that the USNDP uses “targeted experimental studies” to address gaps in nuclear data. In support of these recommendations, DOE NP requested that USNDP personnel organize a Workshop on Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications (NDNCA). This Workshop was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on 27-29 May 2015. The goal of the NDNCA Workshop was to compile nuclear data needs across a wide spectrum of applied nuclear science, and to provide a summary of associated capabilities (accelerators, reactors, spectrometers, etc.) available for the required measurements. The first two days of the workshop consisted of 25 plenary talks by speakers from 16 different institutions, on nuclear energy (NE), national security (NS), isotope production (IP), and industrial applications (IA). There were also shorter “capabilities” talks that described the experimental facilities and instrumentation available for the measurement of nuclear data. This was followed by a third day of topic-specific “breakout” sessions and a final closeout session. The agenda and copies of these talks are available online at http://bang.berkeley.edu/events/NDNCA/agenda. The importance of nuclear data to both basic and applied nuclear science was reflected in the fact that while the impetus for the workshop arose from the 2014 USNDP review, joint sponsorship for the workshop was provided by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, a UC-Berkeley based organization funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  6. NIR daylight acquisition sensor improves mission capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesser, Douglas E.; Vunck, Darius; Born, Terry; Axelson, Wayne; Rehder, Karl; Medrano, Robert S.

    2003-08-01

    The US Air Force Maui Space Surveillance System includes a 1.6 meter telescope located at the summit of Haleakala. This telescope has long played a key role in Space Object Identification (SOI) and other scientific research projects. The unique configuration of the 1.6m telescope and its suite of instruments make it ideally suited for high speed, extra-atmospheric Satellite and Missile tracking. However, because of the uniquely designed narrow field of the 1.6m telescope, acquisition of daytime objects presents a challenge. In the past, the 1.6 meter system relied primarily on offsite radar handoffs to provide FOV object placement. This reliance on radar based handoffs increased system operational complexity and decreased system reliability. Recognizing the value of improving mission operational availability and success the US Air Force Research Laboratory and contractor Boeing worked together to design a low cost system to improve the wide field acquisition of daylight objects. This instrument, known as the Daylight Acquisition Sensor (DAS), was developed using a COTS NIR Camera with custom NIR optics assemblies controlled with an integrated COTS embedded computer interface. The design that was implemented is a modification to the existing 0.56 meter nighttime only acquisition telescope, which now, because of the new NIR imaging sensor is capable of both daytime and nighttime acquisition. The system has been in operation for over 1 year and has significantly improved the acquisition capabilities of the 1.6m telescope while at the same time greatly reducing dependency on radar handoff. This paper discusses the design of the NIR Daylight Acquisition Sensor and some of the results from missions it has supported.

  7. RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, Richard C.; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua

    2014-12-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the ''7-Equation model'' for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

  8. Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.M.; Byrd, E.R.; Decker, M.W.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

  9. Verification of New Floating Capabilities in FAST v8: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, F.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Hayman, G.

    2015-01-01

    In the latest release of NREL's wind turbine aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation software, FAST v8, several new capabilities and major changes were introduced. FAST has been significantly altered to improve the simulator's modularity and to include new functionalities in the form of modules in the FAST v8 framework. This paper is focused on the improvements made for the modeling of floating offshore wind systems. The most significant change was to the hydrodynamic load calculation algorithms, which are embedded in the HydroDyn module. HydroDyn is now capable of applying strip-theory (via an extension of Morison's equation) at the member level for user-defined geometries. Users may now use a strip-theory-only approach for applying the hydrodynamic loads, as well as the previous potential-flow (radiation/diffraction) approach and a hybrid combination of both methods (radiation/diffraction and the drag component of Morison's equation). Second-order hydrodynamic implementations in both the wave kinematics used by the strip-theory solution and the wave-excitation loads in the potential-flow solution were also added to HydroDyn. The new floating capabilities were verified through a direct code-to-code comparison. We conducted a series of simulations of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) floating semisubmersible model and compared the wind turbine response predicted by FAST v8, the corresponding FAST v7 results, and results from other participants in the OC4 project. We found good agreement between FAST v7 and FAST v8 when using the linear radiation/diffraction modeling approach. The strip-theory-based approach inherently differs from the radiation/diffraction approach used in FAST v7 and we identified and characterized the differences. Enabling the second-order effects significantly improved the agreement between FAST v8 and the other OC4 participants.

  10. Overview of ASC Capability Computing System Governance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, Scott W.

    2012-07-11

    This document contains a description of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program's Capability Computing System Governance Model. Objectives of the Governance Model are to ensure that the capability system resources are allocated on a priority-driven basis according to the Program requirements; and to utilize ASC Capability Systems for the large capability jobs for which they were designed and procured.

  11. A Human Capabilities Framework for Evaluating Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a human capabilities approach for evaluating student learning and the social and pedagogical arrangements that support equality in capabilities for all students. It outlines the focus on valuable beings and doings in the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen, and Martha Nussbaum's capabilities focus on human flourishing.…

  12. Efficiency and capabilities of multi-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervoort, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation efficiency and capability go hand in hand. The more capability you have the lower the efficiency will be. The efficiency and capabilities are discussed. The lesson learned about generic simulation is: Don't rule out any capabilities at the beginning, but keep each one on a switch so it can be bypassed when warranted by a specific application.

  13. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Duke, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A progress review on In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) capability is presented. The topics include: 1) In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap: Level 1; 2) ISRU Emphasized Architecture Overview; 3) ISRU Capability Elements: Level 2 and below; and 4) ISRU Capability Roadmap Wrap-up.

  14. Maintaining US Space Weather Capabilities after DMSP: Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Holeman, E. G.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft was launched in 1972; the last is scheduled to fly in 2020. Presently, there is no replacement for the space-weather monitoring sensors that now fly on DMSP. The present suite has provided comprehensive, long-term records that constitute a critical component of the US space weather corporate memory. Evolving operational needs and research accomplishments justify continued collection of space environmental data. Examples include measurements to: (1) Monitor the Dst index in real time as a driver of next-generation satellite drag models; (2) Quantify electromagnetic energy fluxes from deep space to the ionosphere/ thermosphere that heat neutrals, drive disturbance-dynamo winds and degrade precise orbit determinations; (3) Determine strengths of stormtime electric fields at high and low latitudes that lead to severe blackouts and spacecraft anomalies; (4) Specify variability of plasma density irregularities, equatorial plasma bubbles, and the Appleton anomaly to improve reliability of communication, navigation and surveillance links; (5) Characterize energetic particle fluxes responsible for auroral clutter and radar degradation; (6) Map regions of L-Band scintillation for robust GPS applications; and (7) Update the World Magnetic Field Model needed to maintain guidance system superiority. These examples illustrate the utility of continued space environment awareness. Comprehensive assessments of both operational requirements and research advances are needed to make informed selections of sensors and spacecraft that support future capabilities. A proposed sensor set and satellite constellation to provide the needed measurement capabilities will be presented.

  15. Overview of NASA MSFC IEC Federated Engineering Collaboration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moushon, Brian; McDuffee, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The MSFC IEC federated engineering framework is currently developing a single collaborative engineering framework across independent NASA centers. The federated approach allows NASA centers the ability to maintain diversity and uniqueness, while providing interoperability. These systems are integrated together in a federated framework without compromising individual center capabilities. MSFC IEC's Federation Framework will have a direct affect on how engineering data is managed across the Agency. The approach is directly attributed in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAB) finding F7.4-11 which states the Space Shuttle Program has a wealth of data sucked away in multiple databases without a convenient way to integrate and use the data for management, engineering, or safety decisions. IEC s federated capability is further supported by OneNASA recommendation 6 that identifies the need to enhance cross-Agency collaboration by putting in place common engineering and collaborative tools and databases, processes, and knowledge-sharing structures. MSFC's IEC Federated Framework is loosely connected to other engineering applications that can provide users with the integration needed to achieve an Agency view of the entire product definition and development process, while allowing work to be distributed across NASA Centers and contractors. The IEC DDMS federation framework eliminates the need to develop a single, enterprise-wide data model, where the goal of having a common data model shared between NASA centers and contractors is very difficult to achieve.

  16. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI)F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time computations and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  17. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time comutation and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  18. Human Planetary Landing System (HPLS) Capability Roadmap NRC Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Rob; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Graves, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Capability Roadmap Team. Capability Description, Scope and Capability Breakdown Structure. Benefits of the HPLS. Roadmap Process and Approach. Current State-of-the-Art, Assumptions and Key Requirements. Top Level HPLS Roadmap. Capability Presentations by Leads. Mission Drivers Requirements. "AEDL" System Engineering. Communication & Navigation Systems. Hypersonic Systems. Super to Subsonic Decelerator Systems. Terminal Descent and Landing Systems. A Priori In-Situ Mars Observations. AEDL Analysis, Test and Validation Infrastructure. Capability Technical Challenges. Capability Connection Points to other Roadmaps/Crosswalks. Summary of Top Level Capability. Forward Work.

  19. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Jose A; Park, Min S; Unkefer, Clifford J; Bradbury, Andrew M; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2009-01-01

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and

  20. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoniette J

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen STE capabilities. Table 1

  1. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn A.; Capps, Richard; Day, Kevin Brian; Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gaither, Frank; Juro, Greg

    2013-01-01

    After takeoff, aircraft must merge into en route (Center) airspace traffic flows that may be subject to constraints that create localized demand/capacity imbalances. When demand exceeds capacity, Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) and Frontline Managers (FLMs) often use tactical departure scheduling to manage the flow of departures into the constrained Center traffic flow. Tactical departure scheduling usually involves a Call for Release (CFR) procedure wherein the Tower must call the Center to coordinate a release time prior to allowing the flight to depart. In present-day operations release times are computed by the Center Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) decision support tool, based upon manual estimates of aircraft ready time verbally communicated from the Tower to the Center. The TMA-computed release time is verbally communicated from the Center back to the Tower where it is relayed to the Local controller as a release window that is typically three minutes wide. The Local controller will manage the departure to meet the coordinated release time window. Manual ready time prediction and verbal release time coordination are labor intensive and prone to inaccuracy. Also, use of release time windows adds uncertainty to the tactical departure process. Analysis of more than one million flights from January 2011 indicates that a significant number of tactically scheduled aircraft missed their en route slot due to ready time prediction uncertainty. Uncertainty in ready time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route flows and lead to lost throughput. Next Generation Air Transportation System plans call for development of Tower automation systems capable of computing surface trajectory-based ready time estimates. NASA has developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept that improves tactical departure scheduling by automatically communicating surface trajectory-based ready time predictions and departure

  2. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Technology Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn A.; Capps, Richard; Day, Kevin; Robinson, Corissia; Null, Jody R.

    2013-01-01

    After takeoff, aircraft must merge into en route (Center) airspace traffic flows which may be subject to constraints that create localized demand-capacity imbalances. When demand exceeds capacity, Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) often use tactical departure scheduling to manage the flow of departures into the constrained Center traffic flow. Tactical departure scheduling usually involves use of a Call for Release (CFR) procedure wherein the Tower must call the Center TMC to coordinate a release time prior to allowing the flight to depart. In present-day operations release times are computed by the Center Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) decision support tool based upon manual estimates of aircraft ready time verbally communicated from the Tower to the Center. The TMA-computed release is verbally communicated from the Center back to the Tower where it is relayed to the Local controller as a release window that is typically three minutes wide. The Local controller will manage the departure to meet the coordinated release time window. Manual ready time prediction and verbal release time coordination are labor intensive and prone to inaccuracy. Also, use of release time windows adds uncertainty to the tactical departure process. Analysis of more than one million flights from January 2011 indicates that a significant number of tactically scheduled aircraft missed their en route slot due to ready time prediction uncertainty. Uncertainty in ready time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route flows and lead to lost throughput. Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) plans call for development of Tower automation systems capable of computing surface trajectory-based ready time estimates. NASA has developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept that uses this technology to improve tactical departure scheduling by automatically communicating surface trajectory-based ready time predictions to the

  3. Assessment of Current Jet Noise Prediction Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craid A.; Bridges, James E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capability of jet noise prediction codes over a broad range of jet flows, with the objective of quantifying current capabilities and identifying areas requiring future research investment. Three separate codes in NASA s possession, representative of two classes of jet noise prediction codes, were evaluated, one empirical and two statistical. The empirical code is the Stone Jet Noise Module (ST2JET) contained within the ANOPP aircraft noise prediction code. It is well documented, and represents the state of the art in semi-empirical acoustic prediction codes where virtual sources are attributed to various aspects of noise generation in each jet. These sources, in combination, predict the spectral directivity of a jet plume. A total of 258 jet noise cases were examined on the ST2JET code, each run requiring only fractions of a second to complete. Two statistical jet noise prediction codes were also evaluated, JeNo v1, and Jet3D. Fewer cases were run for the statistical prediction methods because they require substantially more resources, typically a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution of the jet, volume integration of the source statistical models over the entire plume, and a numerical solution of the governing propagation equation within the jet. In the evaluation process, substantial justification of experimental datasets used in the evaluations was made. In the end, none of the current codes can predict jet noise within experimental uncertainty. The empirical code came within 2dB on a 1/3 octave spectral basis for a wide range of flows. The statistical code Jet3D was within experimental uncertainty at broadside angles for hot supersonic jets, but errors in peak frequency and amplitude put it out of experimental uncertainty at cooler, lower speed conditions. Jet3D did not predict changes in directivity in the downstream angles. The statistical code JeNo,v1 was within experimental uncertainty predicting noise from cold subsonic

  4. Explosive Effectiveness Capability (ExEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakafuji, G.; Daily, L.; Leake, J.

    2000-07-26

    Gaining accurate predictions of damage inflicted by high explosive devices is vital in order to minimize collateral damage effects on a target. ExEC provides a means for conducting very detailed analysis of weapons effects on targets for advanced mission planning purposes. ExEC is composed of a suite of high fidelity physics codes, which have been used for decades by the nuclear weapons laboratories for assessing high explosive, thermal, and structural effects. The ExEC capability should not be confused with the fast running empirical codes MEA and MEVA, which are good for fast scoping analysis. MEA and MEVA rely on look-up tables or simple approximations to quickly obtain a rough estimate of weapon damage on a target. In contrast, the ExEC capability provides a much higher fidelity damage prediction and a limitless number of target configurations by solving the time dependent conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy, in order to directly simulate the interaction of a weapon with a target component. In contrast, MEA/MEVA must be calibrated for every different weapon type and target. ExEC has produced accurate simulations for weapon disablement, shape charge penetration, sympathetic detonation, fragment damage effects, and blast effects. For example, ExEC was used to look at a DTRA test performed at White Sands Missile Range, Dipole Orbit 1 (DO1). In DO1, a BLU-109 bomb was statically detonated in a partially buried four-room building that was storing chemical and biological weapon simulants, as well as inactive equipment typical of a CBW (Chemical and Biological Warfare) facility. The blast wave (overpressure) histories were recorded and compared to an ExEC and MEVA simulation. A direct comparison between experimental data and calculations, for a single pressure gauge, indicated that MEVA had a 200% error compared to 5% for ExEC. In addition, ExEC tracks the time dependant fluctuations in pressure (for an accurate prediction of the impulse), while MEVA

  5. Improving the explanation capabilities of advisory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Bruce; Souther, Art

    1994-01-01

    A major limitation of current advisory systems (e.g., intelligent tutoring systems and expert systems) is their restricted ability to give explanations. The goal of our research is to develop and evaluate a flexible explanation facility, one that can dynamically generate responses to questions not anticipated by the system's designers and that can tailor these responses to individual users. To achieve this flexibility, we are developing a large knowledge base, a viewpoint construction facility, and a modeling facility. In the long term we plan to build and evaluate advisory systems with flexible explanation facilities for scientists in numerous domains. In the short term, we are focusing on a single complex domain in biological science, and we are working toward two important milestones: (1) building and evaluating an advisory system with a flexible explanation facility for freshman-level students studying biology, and (2) developing general methods and tools for building similar explanation facilities in other domains.

  6. Improving the explanation capabilities of advisory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Bruce; Souther, Art

    1993-01-01

    A major limitation of current advisory systems (e.g., intelligent tutoring systems and expert systems) is their restricted ability to give explanations. The goal of our research is to develop and evaluate a flexible explanation facility, one that can dynamically generate responses to questions not anticipated by the system's designers and that can tailor these responses to individual users. To achieve this flexibility, we are developing a large knowledge base, a viewpoint construction facility, and a modeling facility. In the long term we plan to build and evaluate advisory systems with flexible explanation facilities for scientists in numerous domains. In the short term, we are focusing on a single complex domain in biological science, and we are working toward two important milestones: (1) building and evaluating an advisory system with a flexible explanation facility for freshman-level students studying biology; and (2) developing general methods and tools for building similar explanation facilities in other domains.

  7. The ontogenetic development of orientation capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emlen, S. T.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of celestial references on the navigation ability of birds are discussed. Tests were conducted in a planetarium with indigo buntings to determine the amount of stellar pattern which could be removed before disorientation occurred. It was determined that young birds have a predisposition to respond to the apparent rotational motion of the night sky. It was concluded that the peak in responsiveness to rotational information is presented during the first summer of life, prior to the first migration season.

  8. Developing the Capable Practitioner. Professional Capability through Higher Education. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Dave, Ed.; Cunningham, Lynne, Ed.; Lester, Stan, Ed.

    Nineteen papers address aspects of professional education in institutions of higher education from a British perspective. Papers are grouped into five sections addressing: the reflective practitioner, learner autonomy and action learning, assessing capability, professional bodies and the needs of employers, and values and models. Following a…

  9. Disability, Capability, and Special Education: Towards a Capability-Based Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the article was to investigate the claim that the capability approach fares better with an understanding of disability as presented by the World Health Organization's "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health" (ICF) than by the social model, which has been promoted within disability studies. Scholars…

  10. Characterizing Learning Environments Capable of Nurturing Generic Capabilities in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kember, David; Leung, Doris Y. P.; Ma, Rosa S. F.

    2007-01-01

    There has been wide recognition that today's graduates need the type of generic capabilities necessary for lifelong learning. However, the mechanism by which universities can develop these generic skills is not clearly established. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism for their development. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to…

  11. SAAO small telescopes, capabilities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefako, Ramotholo

    2015-03-01

    The SAAO is at a geographically crucial site in the southern hemisphere between South America and Australasia. SAAO has a long history of involvement in infrared and optical astronomy that dates back almost two hundred years. The observatory expects to continue contributing to astronomical research for many years to come, using its small (0.5m, 0.75m, 1.0m and 1.9m) telescopes and their various instruments (ranging from spectroscopy to polarimetry and high-speed photometry), together with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and other hosted international telescopes. In this paper, I discuss the capabilities and uses of the SAAO small telescopes, and the challenges that threaten astronomical research at the observatory, including light pollution and other emerging threats to the usually dust-free and dark-night-sky site at Sutherland. This is mitigated by the legislation called the Astronomy Geographic Advantage (AGA) Act of 2007 that protects the observatory from these threats.

  12. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Anderson, B. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Merkin, V. G.; Kelly, M. A.; Miller, E. S.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Erlandson, R. E.; Barnes, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL, and examine how they could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  13. Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, Don F.; St. Clair, Jack A.; Togami, Henry K.

    1983-01-01

    A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

  14. A Moving Grid Capability for NPARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Version 3.1 of the NPARC computational fluid dynamics flow solver introduces a capability to solve unsteady flow on moving multi-block, structured grids with nominally second-order time accuracy. The grid motion is due to segments of the boundary grid that translate and rotate in a rigid-body manner or deform. The grid is regenerated at each time step to accommodate the boundary grid motion. The flow equations and computational models sense the moving grid through the grid velocities, which are computed from a time-difference of the grids at two consecutive time levels. For three-dimensional flow domains, it is assumed that the grid retains a planar character with respect to one coordinate. The application and accuracy of NPARC v3.1 is demonstrated for flow about a flying wedge, rotating flap, a collapsing bump in a duct, and the upstart / restart flow in a variable-geometry inlet. The results compare well with analytic and experimental results.

  15. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    The human element is likely the most complex and difficult one of mission design; it significantly influences every aspect of mission planning, from the basic parameters like duration to the more complex tradeoffs between mass, volume, power, risk, and cost. For engineers who rely on precise specifications in data books and other such technical references, dealing with the uncertainty and the variability of designing for human beings can be frustrating. When designing for the human element, questions arise more often than definitive answers. Nonetheless, we do not doubt that the most captivating discoveries in future space missions will necessitate human explorers. These guidelines and capabilities are meant to identify the points of intersection between humans and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. We seek to provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  16. Meso-scale machining capabilities and issues

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; ADAMS,DAVID P.; YANG,PIN

    2000-05-15

    Meso-scale manufacturing processes are bridging the gap between silicon-based MEMS processes and conventional miniature machining. These processes can fabricate two and three-dimensional parts having micron size features in traditional materials such as stainless steels, rare earth magnets, ceramics, and glass. Meso-scale processes that are currently available include, focused ion beam sputtering, micro-milling, micro-turning, excimer laser ablation, femto-second laser ablation, and micro electro discharge machining. These meso-scale processes employ subtractive machining technologies (i.e., material removal), unlike LIGA, which is an additive meso-scale process. Meso-scale processes have different material capabilities and machining performance specifications. Machining performance specifications of interest include minimum feature size, feature tolerance, feature location accuracy, surface finish, and material removal rate. Sandia National Laboratories is developing meso-scale electro-mechanical components, which require meso-scale parts that move relative to one another. The meso-scale parts fabricated by subtractive meso-scale manufacturing processes have unique tribology issues because of the variety of materials and the surface conditions produced by the different meso-scale manufacturing processes.

  17. Wide Tuning Capability for Spacecraft Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Mysoor, Narayan; Shah, Biren; Cook, Brian; Smith, Scott

    2007-01-01

    A document presents additional information on the means of implementing a capability for wide tuning of microwave receiver and transmitter frequencies in the development reported in the immediately preceding article, VCO PLL Frequency Synthesizers for Spacecraft Transponders (NPO- 42909). The reference frequency for a PLL-based frequency synthesizer is derived from a numerically controlled oscillator (NCO) implemented in digital logic, such that almost any reference frequency can be derived from a fixed crystal reference oscillator with microhertz precision. The frequency of the NCO is adjusted to track the received signal, then used to create another NCO frequency used to synthesize the transmitted signal coherent with, and at a specified frequency ratio to, the received signal. The frequencies can be changed, even during operation, through suitable digital programming. The NCOs and the related tracking loops and coherent turnaround logic are implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The interface between the analog microwave receiver and transmitter circuits and the FPGA includes analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters, the sampling rates of which are chosen to minimize spurious signals and otherwise optimize performance. Several mixers and filters are used to properly route various signals.

  18. Transient dynamics capability at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attaway, Steven W.; Biffle, Johnny H.; Sjaardema, G. D.; Heinstein, M. W.; Schoof, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    A brief overview of the transient dynamics capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on recent new developments and current research is presented. In addition, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Engineering Analysis Code Access System (SEACAS), which is a collection of structural and thermal codes and utilities used by analysts at SNL, is described. The SEACAS system includes pre- and post-processing codes, analysis codes, database translation codes, support libraries, Unix shell scripts for execution, and an installation system. SEACAS is used at SNL on a daily basis as a production, research, and development system for the engineering analysts and code developers. Over the past year, approximately 190 days of CPU time were used by SEACAS codes on jobs running from a few seconds up to two and one-half days of CPU time. SEACAS is running on several different systems at SNL including Cray Unicos, Hewlett Packard PH-UX, Digital Equipment Ultrix, and Sun SunOS. An overview of SEACAS, including a short description of the codes in the system, are presented. Abstracts and references for the codes are listed at the end of the report.

  19. Fabrication Capabilities Utilizing In Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Carole A.; Fikes, John C.; Darby, Charles A.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a Space Exploration Policy that lays out a plan that far exceeds the earlier Apollo goals where landing on the moon and taking those first historic steps fulfilled the mission. The policy states that we will set roots on the moon by establishing an outpost. This outpost will be used as a test bed for residing in more distant locales, such as Mars. In order to become self-sufficient, the occupants must have the capability to fabricate component parts in situ. Additionally, in situ materials must be used to minimize valuable mission upmass and to be as efficient as possible. In situ materials can be found from various sources such as raw lunar regolith whereby specific constituents can be extracted from the regolith (such as aluminum, titanium, or iron), and existing hardware already residing on the moon from past Apollo missions. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process lends itself well to fabricating parts, tools, and other necessary items using in situ materials and will be discussed further in this paper.

  20. Turning negotiation into a corporate capability.

    PubMed

    Ertel, D

    1999-01-01

    Every company today exists in a complex web of relationships formed, one at a time, through negotiation. Purchasing and outsourcing contracts are negotiated with vendors. Marketing arrangements are negotiated with distributors. Product development agreements are negotiated with joint-venture partners. Taken together, the thousands of negotiations a typical company engages in have an enormous effect on both its strategy and its bottom line. But few companies think systematically about their negotiating activities as a whole. Instead they take a situational view, perceiving each negotiation to be a separate event with its own goals, tactics, and measures of success. Coordinating them all seems an overwhelming and impracticable job. In reality, the author argues, it is neither. A number of companies are successfully building coordinated negotiation capabilities by applying four broad changes in practice and perspective. First, they've established a company-wide negotiation infrastructure to apply the knowledge gained from forging past agreements to improve future ones. Second, they've broadened the measures they use to evaluate negotiators' performance beyond matters of cost and price. Third, they draw a clear distinction between the elements of an individual deal and the nature of the ongoing relationship between the parties. Fourth, they make their negotiators feel comfortable walking away from a deal when it's not in the company's best interests. These changes aren't radical steps. But taken together, they will let companies establish closer, more creative relationships with suppliers, customers, and other partners. PMID:10387578

  1. The National Ignition Facility: Experimental Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-09-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF will be the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar, conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars, planets and in nuclear weapons. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules of infrared light and over 16 kJ at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for facility diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as green laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  2. Extending particle tracking capability with Delaunay triangulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejia; Anthony, Stephen M; Granick, Steve

    2014-04-29

    Particle tracking, the analysis of individual moving elements in time series of microscopic images, enables burgeoning new applications, but there is need to better resolve conformation and dynamics. Here we describe the advantages of Delaunay triangulation to extend the capabilities of particle tracking in three areas: (1) discriminating irregularly shaped objects, which allows one to track items other than point features; (2) combining time and space to better connect missing frames in trajectories; and (3) identifying shape backbone. To demonstrate the method, specific examples are given, involving analyzing the time-dependent molecular conformations of actin filaments and λ-DNA. The main limitation of this method, shared by all other clustering techniques, is the difficulty to separate objects when they are very close. This can be mitigated by inspecting locally to remove edges that are longer than their neighbors and also edges that link two objects, using methods described here, so that the combination of Delaunay triangulation with edge removal can be robustly applied to processing large data sets. As common software packages, both commercial and open source, can construct Delaunay triangulation on command, the methods described in this paper are both computationally efficient and easy to implement. PMID:24734998

  3. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The human element is likely the most complex and difficult one of mission design; it significantly influences every aspect of mission planning, from the basic parameters like duration to the more complex tradeoffs between mass, volume, power, risk, and cost. For engineers who rely on precise specifications in data books and other such technical references, dealing with the uncertainty and the variability of designing for human beings can be frustrating. When designing for the human element, questions arise more often than definitive answers. Nonetheless, we do not doubt that the most captivating discoveries in future space missions will necessitate human explorers. These guidelines and capabilities are meant to identify the points of intersection between humans and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. We seek to provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  4. Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.; Pigni, M.T.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Mattoon, C.M.; Capote, R.; Cho, Young-Sik; Trkov, A.

    2008-06-24

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The Atlas of Neutron Resonances by Mughabghab is used as a primary source of information on uncertainties at low energies. Care is taken to ensure consistency among the resonance parameter uncertainties and those for thermal cross sections. The resulting resonance parameter covariances are formatted in the ENDF-6 File 32. In the fast neutron range our methodology is based on model calculations with the code EMPIRE combined with experimental data through several available approaches. The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures yield comparable results. The Kalman filter and/or the generalized least square fitting procedures are employed to incorporate experimental information. We compare the two approaches analyzing results for the major reaction channels on {sup 89}Y. We also discuss a long-standing issue of unreasonably low uncertainties and link it to the rigidity of the model.

  5. Development of Covariance Capabilities in EMPIRE Code

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M. Pigni, M.T.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Mattoon, C.M.; Capote, R.; Cho, Young-Sik; Trkov, A.

    2008-12-15

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The Atlas of Neutron Resonances by Mughabghab is used as a primary source of information on uncertainties at low energies. Care is taken to ensure consistency among the resonance parameter uncertainties and those for thermal cross sections. The resulting resonance parameter covariances are formatted in the ENDF-6 File 32. In the fast neutron range our methodology is based on model calculations with the code EMPIRE combined with experimental data through several available approaches. The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures yield comparable results. The Kalman filter and/or the generalized least square fitting procedures are employed to incorporate experimental information. We compare the two approaches analyzing results for the major reaction channels on {sup 89}Y. We also discuss a long-standing issue of unreasonably low uncertainties and link it to the rigidity of the model.

  6. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  7. Magnetic nanosensor particles in luminescence upconversion capability.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Hirsch, Thomas; Scheucher, Elisabeth; Mayr, Torsten; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit interesting size-dependent electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties that cannot be observed in their bulk counterparts. The synthesis of NPs (i.e., crystalline particles ranging in size from 1 to 100 nm) has been intensely studied in the past decades. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) form a particularly attractive class of NPs and have found numerous applications such as in magnetic resonance imaging to visualize cancer, cardiovascular, neurological and other diseases. Other uses include drug targeting, tissue imaging, magnetic immobilization, hyperthermia, and magnetic resonance imaging. MNPs, due to their magnetic properties, can be easily separated from (often complex) matrices and manipulated by applying external magnetic field. Near-infrared to visible upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCLNPs) form another type of unusual nanoparticles. They are capable of emitting visible light upon NIR light excitation. Lanthanide-doped (Yb, Er) hexagonal NaYF₄ UCLNPs are the most efficient upconversion phosphors known up to now. The use of UCLNPs for in vitro imaging of cancer cells and in vivo imaging in tissues has been demonstrated. UCLNPs show great potential as a new class of luminophores for biological, biomedical, and sensor applications. We are reporting here on our first results on the combination of MNP and UCLNP technology within an ongoing project supported by the DFG and the FWF (Austria). PMID:22022719

  8. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Merkin, V. G.; Stephens, G. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Berger, T. E.; Bonadonna, L. C. M. F.; Hesse, M.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review the space weather system developed for the Van Allen Probes mission, together with other datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL. We will look at how these, and results from future missions such as Solar Probe Plus, could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  9. VML Sequencing: Growing Capabilities over Multiple Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Christopher A.; Lock, Patricia D.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Machine Language (VML) is an award-winning advanced procedural sequencing language in use on NASA deep-space missions since 1997. Missions featuring VML include Spitzer Space Telescope, Mars Odyssey, Stardust, Genesis, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Phoenix, Dawn and Juno. The latest deployed version, VML 2.0, features parameterized functions, conditionals, polymorphism, a rich set of control directives and data types, event detection and response, and on-the-fly creation of spacecraft commands. This feature set is used to simplify spacecraft operations and science gathering activities. A new 2.1 version is being prototyped for use as an executive within flight instruments, and may be deployed on Juno.

  10. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  11. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: DEFINING THE NEEDED CAPABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-10

    This is the second of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper begins with a discussion of the current nuclear force and the plans and procurement programs for the modernization of that force. Current weapon systems and warheads were conceived and built decades ago, and procurement programs have begun for the modernization or replacement of major elements of the nuclear force: the heavy bomber, the air-launched cruise missile, the ICBMs, and the ballistic-missile submarines. In addition, the Nuclear Weapons Council has approved a new framework for nuclear-warhead life extension � not fully fleshed out yet � that aims to reduce the current number of nuclear explosives from seven to five, the so-called �3+2� vision. This vision includes three interoperable warheads for both ICBMs and SLBMs (thus eliminating one backup weapon) and two warheads for aircraft delivery (one gravity bomb and one cruise-missile, eliminating a second backup gravity bomb). This paper also includes a discussion of the current and near-term nuclear-deterrence mission, both global and regional, and offers some observations on future of the strategic deterrence mission and the challenges of regional and extended nuclear deterrence.

  12. The diagnostic capability of iron limes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Teresa; Nisini, Brunella; Antoniucci, Simone; Alcala, Juan; Bacciotti, Francesca; Bonito, Rosaria; Podio, Linda; Stelzer, Beate; Whelan, Emma

    2013-07-01

    We present the VLT/X-Shooter spectrum of two jets from young protostars of different luminosity and mass, ESO-Halpha 574 and Par-Lup 3-4. In the covered spectral range (350-2500 nm) we detected more than 100 [FeII] and [FeIII] lines, which are used to precisely probe the key physical parameters of the gas (electron density and temperature, ionization degree, visual extinction). These quantities have been compared with shock-model predictions, which suggest that only the higher luminosity source (ESO-Ha 574) is able to drive a high-velocity and dissociative shock. The diagnostic capability of Iron, proven on the presented objects, represents a unique tool for the following reasons: 1) the large number of lines in the uv-infrared range makes possible to trace the physical conditions in a very large range of the parameter space; 2) at variance with the diagnostic commonly performed with other species, such as Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Sulphur, no assumption on the relative abundance is needed, since all the parameters are derived from line ratios of the same species; 3) in the unperturbed ISM, Iron is locked on the grain surfaces, while it is released in gas-phase if gas-grain or grain-grain collisions occur within a shock. Therefore the Iron abundance (derivable from ratios of Iron lines with those of other volatile species) is a direct probe of the presence of dust in the jet beam, an information crucial to understand whether jets originate close to the star or in the circumstellar disk.

  13. Microfluidic device capable of sensing ultrafast chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Teck; Ko, Seok Oh; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2009-05-15

    Based on the principle of liquid core waveguide, a novel microfluidic device with micro-scale detection window capable of sensing flashlight emitted from rapid 1,1'-oxalyldi-4-methylimidazole (OD4MI) chemiluminescence (CL) reaction was fabricated. Light emitted from OD4MI CL reaction occurring in the micro-dimensional pentagonal detection window (length of each line segment: 900.0 microm, depth: 50.0 microm) of the microfluidic device with two inlets and one outlet was so bright that it was possible to take an image every 1/30 s at the optimal focusing distance (60 cm) using a commercial digital camera. Peaks obtained using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system with the micro-scale detection window and OD4MI CL detection show excellent resolution and reproducibility without any band-broadening observed in analytical devices having additional reaction channel(s) to measure light generated from slow CL reaction. Maximum height (H(max)) and area (A) of peak, reproducibility and sensitivity observed in the FIA system with the microfluidic device and OD4MI CL detection depends on (1) the mole ratio between bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) oxalate and 4-methyl imidazole yielding OD4MI, (2) the flow rate to mix OD4MI, H(2)O(2) and 1-AP in the detection window of the microfluidic device, and (3) H(2)O(2) concentration. We obtained linear calibration curves with wide dynamic ranges using H(max) and A. The detection limit of 1-AP determined with H(max) and A was as low as 0.05 fmole/injection (signal/background=3.0). PMID:19269463

  14. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM): Systematic Capability Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Holland, Randy; Schmalzwel, John; Duncavage, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a credible approach for implementation of ISHM capability in any system. The requirements and processes to implement ISHM capability are unique in that a credible capability is initially implemented at a low level, and it evolves to achieve higher levels by incremental augmentation. In contrast, typical capabilities, such as thrust of an engine, are implemented once at full Functional Capability Level (FCL), which is not designed to change during the life of the product. The approach will describe core ingredients (e.g. technologies, architectures, etc.) and when and how ISHM capabilities may be implemented. A specific architecture/taxonomy/ontology will be described, as well as a prototype software environment that supports development of ISHM capability. This paper will address implementation of system-wide ISHM as a core capability, and ISHM for specific subsystems as expansions and evolution, but always focusing on achieving an integrated capability.

  15. Recommended satellite imagery capabilities for disaster management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. B.; Robinove, C. J.; Wiesnet, D. R.; Salomonson, V. V.; Maxwell, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    This study explores the role that satellite imaging systems might play in obtaining information needed in the management of natural and manmade disasters. Information requirements which might conceivably be met by satellite were identified for over twenty disasters. These requirements covered pre-disaster mitigation and preparedness activities, disaster response activities, and post-disaster recovery activities. The essential imaging satellite characteristics needed to meet most of the information requirements are 30 meter (or finer) spatial resolution, frequency of observations of one week or less, data delivery times of one day or less, and stereo, synoptic all-weather coverage of large areas in the visible, near infrared, thermal infrared and microwave bands. Of the current and planned satellite systems investigated for possible application to disaster management, Landsat-D and SPOT appear to have the greatest potential during disaster mitigation and preparedness activities, but all satellites studied have serious deficiencies during response and recovery activities. Several strawman concepts are presented for a satellite system optimized to support all disaster management activities.

  16. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  17. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Murphy, Mark K.; Myers, Lynette E.; Piper, Roman K.; Rolph, James T.

    2005-07-09

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  18. Background: Preflight Screening, In-flight Capabilities, and Postflight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Duncan, James

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for minimal in-flight capabilities: Retinal Imaging - provide in-flight capability for the visual monitoring of ocular health (specifically, imaging of the retina and optic nerve head) with the capability of downlinking video/still images. Tonometry - provide more accurate and reliable in-flight capability for measuring intraocular pressure. Ultrasound - explore capabilities of current on-board system for monitoring ocular health. We currently have limited in-flight capabilities on board the International Space Station for performing an internal ocular health assessment. Visual Acuity, Direct Ophthalmoscope, Ultrasound, Tonometry(Tonopen):

  19. Airborne Tactical Intent-Based Conflict Resolution Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Vivona, Robert A.; Roscoe, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Trajectory-based operations with self-separation involve the aircraft taking the primary role in the management of its own trajectory in the presence of other traffic. In this role, the flight crew assumes the responsibility for ensuring that the aircraft remains separated from all other aircraft by at least a minimum separation standard. These operations are enabled by cooperative airborne surveillance and by airborne automation systems that provide essential monitoring and decision support functions for the flight crew. An airborne automation system developed and used by NASA for research investigations of required functionality is the Autonomous Operations Planner. It supports the flight crew in managing their trajectory when responsible for self-separation by providing monitoring and decision support functions for both strategic and tactical flight modes. The paper focuses on the latter of these modes by describing a capability for tactical intent-based conflict resolution and its role in a comprehensive suite of automation functions supporting trajectory-based operations with self-separation.

  20. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

  1. Establishment and assessment of code scaling capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jaehyok

    In this thesis, a method for using RELAP5/MOD3.3 (Patch03) code models is described to establish and assess the code scaling capability and to corroborate the scaling methodology that has been used in the design of the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR applications (PUMA-E) facility. It was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) under the program "PUMA ESBWR Tests". PUMA-E facility was built for the USNRC to obtain data on the performance of the passive safety systems of the General Electric (GE) Nuclear Energy Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). Similarities between the prototype plant and the scaled-down test facility were investigated for a Gravity-Driven Cooling System (GDCS) Drain Line Break (GDLB). This thesis presents the results of the GDLB test, i.e., the GDLB test with one Isolation Condenser System (ICS) unit disabled. The test is a hypothetical multi-failure small break loss of coolant (SB LOCA) accident scenario in the ESBWR. The test results indicated that the blow-down phase, Automatic Depressurization System (ADS) actuation, and GDCS injection processes occurred as expected. The GDCS as an emergency core cooling system provided adequate supply of water to keep the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) coolant level well above the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) during the entire GDLB transient. The long-term cooling phase, which is governed by the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condensation, kept the reactor containment system that is composed of Drywell (DW) and Wetwell (WW) below the design pressure of 414 kPa (60 psia). In addition, the ICS continued participating in heat removal during the long-term cooling phase. A general Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation approach was discussed in detail relative to safety analyses of Light Water Reactor (LWR). The major components of the CSAU methodology that were highlighted particularly focused on the

  2. Hybrid Reality Lab Capabilities - Video 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Francisco J.; Noyes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    objects that have the same shape, size, location to their physical object counterpart in virtual reality environment can be a game changer when it comes to training, planning, engineering analysis, science, entertainment, etc. Our Project is developing such capabilities for various types of environments. The video outlined with this abstract is a representation of an ISS Hybrid Reality experience. In the video you can see various Hybrid Reality elements that provide immersion beyond just standard Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality.

  3. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  4. Variable-Speed Wind Power Plant Operating With Reserve Power Capability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Ela, E.

    2013-10-01

    As the level of wind penetration increases, wind turbine technology must move from merely generating power from wind to taking a role in supporting the bulk power system. Wind turbines should have the capability to provide inertial response and primary frequency (governor) response. Wind turbine generators with this capability can support the frequency stability of the grid. To provide governorresponse, wind turbines should be able to generate less power than the available wind power and hold the rest in reserves, ready to be accessed as needed. In this paper, we explore several ways to control wind turbine output to enable reserve-holding capability. The focus of this paper is on doubly-fed induction generator (also known as Type 3) and full-converter (also known as Type 4) windturbines.

  5. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  6. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-17

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing

  7. Enhancing the Radio Astronomy Capabilities at NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence; Franco, Manuel M.; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Jacobs, Christopher; Kuiper, Thomas; Majid, Walid

    2015-08-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is well known for its role in commanding and communicating with spacecraft across the solar system that produce a steady stream of new discoveries in Astrophysics, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science. Equipped with a number of large antennas distributed across the world, the DSN also has a history of contributing to a number of leading radio astronomical projects. This paper summarizes a number of enhancements that are being implemented currently and that are aimed at increasing its capabilities to engage in a wide range of science observations. These enhancements include* A dual-beam system operating between 18 and 27 GHz (~ 1 cm) capable of conducting a variety of molecular line observations, searches for pulsars in the Galactic center, and continuum flux density (photometry) of objects such as nearby protoplanetary disks* Enhanced spectroscopy and pulsar processing backends for use at 1.4--1.9 GHz (20 cm), 18--27 GHz (1 cm), and 38--50 GHz (0.7 cm)* The DSN Transient Observatory (DTN), an automated, non-invasive backend for transient searching* Larger bandwidths (>= 0.5 GHz) for pulsar searching and timing; and* Improved data rates (2048 Mbps) and better instrumental response for very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations with the new DSN VLBI processor (DVP), which is providing unprecedented sensitivity for maintenance of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and development of future versions.One of the results of these improvements is that the 70~m Deep Space Station 43 (DSS-43, Tidbinbilla antenna) is now the most sensitive radio antenna in the southern hemisphere. Proposals to use these systems are accepted from the international community.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics & Space Administration.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1400-1 - Hoists; brakes, capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoists; brakes, capability. 75.1400-1 Section 75.1400-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; brakes, capability. Brakes on hoists used to transport persons shall be capable of stopping...

  9. Validating DOE's Office of Science "capability" computing needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattern, Peter L.; Camp, William J.; Leland, Robert W.; Barsis, Edwin Howard

    2004-07-01

    A study was undertaken to validate the 'capability' computing needs of DOE's Office of Science. More than seventy members of the community provided information about algorithmic scaling laws, so that the impact of having access to Petascale capability computers could be assessed. We have concluded that the Office of Science community has described credible needs for Petascale capability computing.

  10. 48 CFR 5231.205-90 - Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Shipbuilding capability... Organizations 5231.205-90 Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements. (a) Scope and authority. Where it... enter into a shipbuilding capability preservation agreement with a contractor. As authorized by...

  11. 48 CFR 5231.205-90 - Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Shipbuilding capability... Organizations 5231.205-90 Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements. (a) Scope and authority. Where it... enter into a shipbuilding capability preservation agreement with a contractor. As authorized by...

  12. 48 CFR 5231.205-90 - Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shipbuilding capability... Organizations 5231.205-90 Shipbuilding capability preservation agreements. (a) Scope and authority. Where it... enter into a shipbuilding capability preservation agreement with a contractor. As authorized by...

  13. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  14. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  15. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  16. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  17. 10 CFR 26.123 - Testing facility capabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Testing facility capabilities. 26.123 Section 26.123 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.123 Testing facility capabilities. Each licensee testing facility shall have the capability, at the...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1400-1 - Hoists; brakes, capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hoists; brakes, capability. 75.1400-1 Section 75.1400-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; brakes, capability. Brakes on hoists used to transport persons shall be capable of stopping...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1400-1 - Hoists; brakes, capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoists; brakes, capability. 75.1400-1 Section 75.1400-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; brakes, capability. Brakes on hoists used to transport persons shall be capable of stopping...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1400-1 - Hoists; brakes, capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hoists; brakes, capability. 75.1400-1 Section 75.1400-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... Hoists; brakes, capability. Brakes on hoists used to transport persons shall be capable of stopping...