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Sample records for capillaries critical glycerol

  1. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  2. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  3. The use of capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection for monitoring of glycerol in adipose tissues during a sporting performance.

    PubMed

    Tůma, Petr; Málková, Klára; Wedellová, Zuzana; Samcová, Eva; Stulík, Karel

    2010-06-01

    A CE procedure employing capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection has been developed for direct determination of the glycerol and mannitol polyalcohols in biological and pharmacological samples. Both glycerol and mannitol are fully separated from the sample matrix within very short times of 3.0 and 3.9 min, respectively, when using the optimized BGE, 60 mM H3BO3+30 mM LiOH (pH 9.1). The LODs amount to 0.5 microM for glycerol and 0.3 microM for mannitol. The repeatability of the glycerol determination in real biological materials is characterized by the coefficient of variation values, 0.5 and 3.2%, for the migration time and the peak area, respectively. The procedure has been used to monitor the free glycerol concentration in adipose tissue microdialyzates. A physiological study has demonstrated that the lipolysis occurring during a sporting action can be stimulated by local application of adrenaline. The procedure has further been utilized to determine mannitol in a pharmacological preparation. PMID:20564696

  4. Enhanced critical heat flux by capillary driven liquid flow on the well-designed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Eok; Park, Su Cheong; Yu, Dong In; Kim, Moo Hwan; Ahn, Ho Seon

    2015-07-01

    Based on the unique design of the surface morphology, we investigated the effects of gravity and capillary pressure on Critical heat flux (CHF). The micro-structured surfaces for pool boiling tests were comprised with both the rectangular cavity and microchannel structures. The microcavity structures could intrinsically block the liquid flow by capillary pressure effect, and the capillary flow into the boiling surface was one-dimensionally induced only through the microchannel region. Thus, we could clearly establish the relationship between the CHF and capillary wicking flow. The driving potentials for the liquid inflow can be classified into the hydrostatic head by gravitational force, and the capillary pressure induced by the interactions of vapor bubbles, liquid film, and surface solid structures. Through the analysis of the experimental data and visualization of vapor bubble behaviors, we present that the liquid supplement to maintain the nucleate boiling regime in pool boiling condition is governed by the gravitational pressure head and capillary pressure effect.

  5. Electropolishing the bore of metal capillary tubes: A technique for adjusting the critical flow.

    PubMed

    Stoffels, J J; Ells, D R

    1979-12-01

    A technique has been developed for electropolishing the bore of metal capillary tubes. Although developed specifically for stainless-steel tubes, the technique should be directly applicable to other metals. Tubes with inside diameter as small as 0.20 mm and 110 mm long have been successfully electropolished. The electropolishing technique can be used to increase the critical flow of a capillary tube in a controllable way. PMID:18699437

  6. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  7. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  8. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T

    2016-04-28

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc (*) = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc (*) controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime. PMID:27131561

  9. Collective motion of macroscopic spheres floating on capillary ripples: dynamic heterogeneity and dynamic criticality.

    PubMed

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Luding, Stefan; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-09-01

    When a densely packed monolayer of macroscopic spheres floats on chaotic capillary Faraday waves, a coexistence of large scale convective motion and caging dynamics typical for glassy systems is observed. We subtract the convective mean flow using a coarse graining (homogenization) method and reveal subdiffusion for the caging time scales followed by a diffusive regime at later times. We apply the methods developed to study dynamic heterogeneity and show that the typical time and length scales of the fluctuations due to rearrangements of observed particle groups significantly increase when the system approaches its largest experimentally accessible packing concentration. To connect the system to the dynamic criticality literature, we fit power laws to our results. The resultant critical exponents are consistent with those found in densely packed suspensions of colloids. PMID:25314540

  10. Online Capillary IsoElectric Focusing-ElectroSpray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIEF-ESI MS) in Glycerol-Water Media for the Separation and Characterization of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mokaddem, Meriem; d'Orlyé, Fanny; Varenne, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a high-resolution technique for the separation of ampholytes, such as proteins, according to their isoelectric point. CIEF coupled online with MS is regarded as a promising alternative to 2-D PAGE for fast proteome analysis with high-resolving capabilities and enhanced structural information without the drawbacks of conventional slab-gel electrophoresis. However, online coupling has been rarely described, as it presents some difficulties. A new methodology for the online coupling of CIEF with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been developed in glycerol-water media. This new integrated methodology provides a mean for the characterization of a large number of hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteins. PMID:27473481

  11. MR measurement of critical phase transition dynamics and supercritical fluid dynamics in capillary and porous media flow.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Erik M; Codd, Sarah L; Seymour, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCF) are useful solvents in green chemistry and oil recovery and are of great current interest in the context of carbon sequestration. Magnetic resonance techniques were applied to study near critical and supercritical dynamics for pump driven flow through a capillary and a packed bed porous media. Velocity maps and displacement propagators measure the dynamics of C(2)F(6) at pressures below, at, and above the critical pressure and at temperatures below and above the critical temperature. Displacement propagators were measured at various displacement observation times to quantify the time evolution of dynamics. In capillary flow, the critical phase transition fluid C(2)F(6) showed increased compressibility compared to the near critical gas and supercritical fluid. These flows exhibit large variations in buoyancy arising from large changes in density due to very small changes in temperature. PMID:22018694

  12. A critical overview of non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. Part I: mobility and separation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kenndler, Ernst

    2014-03-28

    This two-part review critically gives an overview on the theoretical and practical advances in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) achieved over the recent five years. Part I starts out by reviewing the aspects relevant to electromigration in organic solvents and evaluates potential advantages of the latter in comparison to aqueous solvent systems. The crucial role of solubility for the species involved in CE - analytes and back ground electrolyte constituents - is discussed both for ionic and neutral compounds. The impact of organic solvents on the electrophoretic and electroosmotic mobility and on the ionization (pKa values) of weak acids and bases is highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on methanol, acetonitrile and mixtures of these solvents, being the most frequent employed media for NACE applications. In addition, also solvents less commonly used in NACE will be covered, including other alcohols, amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide), propylene carbonate, dimethylsulphoxide, and nitromethane. The discussions address the consequences of dramatic pKa shifts frequently seen for weak acids and bases, and the important contributions of medium-specific electroosmotic flow (EOF) to electromigration in nonaqueous media. Important for NACE, the role of the water content on pKa and mobility is analyzed. Finally, association phenomena rather specific to nonaqueous solvents (ion pairing, homo- and heteroconjugation) will be addressed, along with their potential advantages for the development of NACE separation protocols. It is pointed out that this review is not intended as a listing of all papers that have been published on NACE in the period mentioned above. It rather deals with general aspects of migration and selectivity in organic solvent systems, and discusses - critically - examples from the literature with particular interest to the topic. An analog discussion about the role of the solvent on efficiency

  13. Measurements of the capillary trapping of super-critical carbon dioxide in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentland, Christopher H.; El-Maghraby, Rehab; Iglauer, Stefan; Blunt, Martin J.

    2011-03-01

    We measure primary drainage capillary pressure and the relationship between initial and residual non-wetting phase saturation for a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2)-brine system in Berea sandstone. We use the semi-permeable disk (porous-plate) coreflood method. Brine and CO2 were equilibrated prior to injection to ensure immiscible displacement. A maximum CO2 saturation of 85% was measured for an applied capillary pressure of 296 kPa. After injection of brine the CO2 saturation dropped to 35%; this is less than the maximum trapped saturation of 48% measured in an equivalent n-decane (oil)-brine experiment. The dimensionless capillary pressure is the same to within experimental error for supercritical CO2-brine, n-decane-brine and a mercury-air system. CO2 is the non-wetting phase and significant quantities can be trapped by capillary forces. We discuss the implications for CO2 storage.

  14. Critical effect of pore characteristics on capillary infiltration in mesoporous films.

    PubMed

    Ceratti, D R; Faustini, M; Sinturel, C; Vayer, M; Dahirel, V; Jardat, M; Grosso, D

    2015-03-12

    Capillary phenomena governing the mass-transport (capillary filling, condensation/evaporation) has been experimentally investigated in around 20 different silica thin films exhibiting various porosities with pores dimension ranging from 2 to 200 nm. Films have been prepared by sol-gel chemistry combined with soft-templating approaches and controlled dip coating process. Environmental ellipsometric porosimetry combined with electronic microscopy were used to assess the porosity characteristics. Investigation of lateral capillary filling was performed by following the natural infiltration of water and ionic liquids at the edge of a sessile drop in open air or underneath a PDMS cover. The Washburn model was applied to the displacement of the liquid front within the films to deduce the kinetic constants. The role of the different capillary phenomena were discussed with respect to the porosity characteristics (porosity vol%, pore dimensions and constrictions). We show that correlation between capillary filling rate and pore dimensions is not straightforward. Generally, with a minimum of constrictions, faster filling is observed for larger pores. In the case of mesopores (<50 nm in diameter), the presence of bottle necks considerably slows down the infiltration rate. At such a small dimension, evaporation/capillary condensation dynamics, taking place at the meniscus inside the porosity, has to be considered to explain the transport mode. This fundamental study is of interest for applications involving liquids at the interface of mesoporous networks such as nanofluidics, purification, separation, water harvesting or heat transfer. PMID:25723817

  15. Critical effect of pore characteristics on capillary infiltration in mesoporous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceratti, D. R.; Faustini, M.; Sinturel, C.; Vayer, M.; Dahirel, V.; Jardat, M.; Grosso, D.

    2015-03-01

    Capillary phenomena governing the mass-transport (capillary filling, condensation/evaporation) has been experimentally investigated in around 20 different silica thin films exhibiting various porosities with pores dimension ranging from 2 to 200 nm. Films have been prepared by sol-gel chemistry combined with soft-templating approaches and controlled dip coating process. Environmental ellipsometric porosimetry combined with electronic microscopy were used to assess the porosity characteristics. Investigation of lateral capillary filling was performed by following the natural infiltration of water and ionic liquids at the edge of a sessile drop in open air or underneath a PDMS cover. The Washburn model was applied to the displacement of the liquid front within the films to deduce the kinetic constants. The role of the different capillary phenomena were discussed with respect to the porosity characteristics (porosity vol%, pore dimensions and constrictions). We show that correlation between capillary filling rate and pore dimensions is not straightforward. Generally, with a minimum of constrictions, faster filling is observed for larger pores. In the case of mesopores (<50 nm in diameter), the presence of bottle necks considerably slows down the infiltration rate. At such a small dimension, evaporation/capillary condensation dynamics, taking place at the meniscus inside the porosity, has to be considered to explain the transport mode. This fundamental study is of interest for applications involving liquids at the interface of mesoporous networks such as nanofluidics, purification, separation, water harvesting or heat transfer.

  16. Separation of poly(acrylic acid) salts according to topology using capillary electrophoresis in the critical conditions.

    PubMed

    Maniego, Alison R; Ang, Dale; Guillaneuf, Yohann; Lefay, Catherine; Gigmes, Didier; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    Branching was detected in polyacrylates synthesised through radical polymerization via solution-state NMR, while inconsistencies have been reported for the determination of the molar mass of hydrophilic polyacrylates using aqueous-phase and organic-phase size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, poly(sodium acrylate)s, PNaAs, of various topologies were separated for the first time using free-solution capillary electrophoresis (CE). Free-solution CE does not separate the PNaAs by their molar mass, similarly to separations by liquid chromatography in the critical conditions, rather by different topologies (linear, star branched, and hyperbranched). The electrophoretic mobility of PNaAs increases as the degree of branching decreases. Separation is shown to be not only by the topology but also by the end groups as expected for a separation in the critical conditions: replacing a relatively bulky nitroxide end group with hydrogen atom yielded a higher electrophoretic mobility. This novel method, capillary electrophoresis in the critical conditions enabled, for the first time, the separation of hydrophilic polyacrylates according to their topology (branching) and their chain ends. This will allow meaningful and accurate characterization of their branched topologies as well as molar masses and progress in for advanced applications such as drug delivery or flocculation. PMID:23732867

  17. Pore-scale modeling of Capillary Penetration of Wetting Liquid into 3D Fibrous Media: A Critical Examination of Equivalent Capillary Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar; Ghia, Urmila; Comer, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Capillary penetration of liquid through fibrous porous media is important in many applications such as printing, drug delivery patches, sanitary wipes, and performance fabrics. Historically, capillary transport (with a distinct liquid propagating front) in porous media is modeled using capillary-bundle theory. However, it is not clear if the capillary model (Washburn equation) describes the fluid transport in porous media accurately, as it assumes uniformity of pore sizes in the porous medium. The present work investigates the limitations of the applicability of the capillary model by studying liquid penetration through virtual fibrous media with uniform and non-uniform pore-sizes. For the non-uniform-pore fibrous medium, the effective capillary radius of the fibrous medium was estimated from the pore-size distribution curve. Liquid penetration into the 3D virtual fibrous medium at micro-scale was simulated using OpenFOAM, and the numerical results were compared with the Washburn-equation capillary-model predictions. Preliminary results show that the Washburn equation over-predicts the height rise in the early stages (purely inertial and visco-inertial stages) of capillary transport.

  18. Preservation of peritubular capillary endothelial integrity and increasing pericytes may be critical to recovery from postischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Osun; Hong, Seok-Min; Sutton, Timothy A.; Temm, Constance J.

    2008-01-01

    Decreased renal blood flow following an ischemic insult contributes to a reduction in glomerular filtration. However, little is known about the underlying cellular or subcellular mechanisms mediating reduced renal blood flow in human ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) or acute renal failure (ARF). To examine renal vascular injury following ischemia, intraoperative graft biopsies were performed after reperfusion in 21 cadaveric renal allografts. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was utilized to examine vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell integrity as well as peritubular interstitial pericytes in the biopsies. The reperfused, transplanted kidneys exhibited postischemic injury to the renal vasculature, as demonstrated by disorganization/disarray of the actin cytoskeleton in vascular smooth muscle cells and disappearance of von Willebrand factor from vascular endothelial cells. Damage to peritubular capillary endothelial cells was more severe in subjects destined to have sustained ARF than in those with rapid recovery of their graft function. In addition, peritubular pericytes/myofibroblasts were more pronounced in recipients destined to recover than those with sustained ARF. Taken together, these data suggest damage to the renal vasculature occurs after ischemia-reperfusion in human kidneys. Preservation of peritubular capillary endothelial integrity and increasing pericytes may be critical to recovery from postischemic AKI. PMID:18562634

  19. Phase separation in a binary mixture confined between symmetric parallel plates: Capillary condensation transition near the bulk critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2013-03-01

    We investigate phase separation of near-critical binary mixtures between parallel symmetric walls in the strong adsorption regime. We take into account the renormalization effect due to the critical fluctuations using the recent local functional theory [Okamoto and Onuki, J. Chem. Phys.0021-960610.1063/1.3693331 136, 114704 (2012)]. In statics, a van der Waals loop is obtained in the relation between the average order parameter <ψ> in the film and the chemical potential when the temperature T is lower than the film critical temperature Tcca (in the case of an upper critical solution temperature). In dynamics, we lower T below the capillary condensation line from above Tcca. We calculate the subsequent time development assuming no mass exchange between the film and the reservoir. In the early stage, the order parameter ψ changes only in the direction perpendicular to the walls. For sufficiently deep quenching, such one-dimensional profiles become unstable with respect to the fluctuations varying in the lateral directions. The late-stage coarsening is then accelerated by the hydrodynamic interaction. A pancake domain of the phase disfavored by the walls finally appears in the middle of the film.

  20. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  1. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  2. Capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, M.

    1988-10-15

    Rapid instrumental methods for performing electrophoretic separations in capillary tubes have recently been developed, making capillary electrophoresis one of the most exciting new techniques available to analytical chemists. This article discusses detection methods, applications, and the future of capillary electrophoresis.

  3. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  4. Glycerol combustion and emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the growing capacity in biodiesel production and the resulting glut of the glycerol by-product, there is increasing interest in finding alternative uses for crude glycerol. One option may be to burn it locally for combined process heat and power, replacing fossil fuels and i...

  5. Preparation of Glycerol Cinnamate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol was combined with cinnamic acid to prepare the corresponding ester, glycerol cinnamate. Conversions of 81% were achieved after 16 hr in toluene at reflux conditions. The product was recovered by extraction with distilled water and diethyl ether. The isolated product displayed strong abso...

  6. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Fermentation of xylose to glycerol by Rhizopus javanicus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Yang, C.W.; Tsao, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Glycerol production from xylose fermentation using Rhizopus javanicus (ATCC 22581) has been investigated in shake flasks. The medium composition (xylose concentration, nitrogen sources), aeration rate, and temperature have been found to affect the accumulation and yield of glycerol. Some of these effects are explained in terms of the critical parameters, osmotic pressure, and dissolved oxygen levels in the medium. Relatively high glycerol yields and concentrations have been obtained at high sugar concentration with high level of aeration at room temperature. The addition of polyethylene glycol or sulfite can improve the yield and accumulation of glycerol.

  8. Electrochemical valorisation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Simões, Mário; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The worldwide glycerol stocks are increasing; to make the biodiesel industry sustainable economically, this chemical could be used as a secondary primary raw material. Electric energy or hydrogen and added-value-chemical cogeneration becomes more and more an important research topic for increasing economical and industrial interests towards electrochemical technologies. Studies on glycerol electrooxidation for fuel or electrolysis cell applications are scarce. The valorisation of glycerol is generally performed by organic chemistry reactions forming, for example, esters, glycerol carbonates, ethers, acetals or ketals. Glycerol oxidation is made up of complex pathway reactions that can produce a large number of useful intermediates or valuable fine chemicals with presently limited market impact due to expensive production processes. Many of these chemical oxidation routes lead to significant amounts of undesired by-products, and enzymatic processes are limited. Converse to classical heterogeneous processes, electrocatalytic oxidation processes can be tuned by controlling the nature, composition and structure of the electrocatalyts as well as the electrode potential. Such control may lead to very high selectivity and activity, avoiding or limiting product separation steps. The coupling of glycerol oxidation to produce chemicals with the oxygen reduction reaction in a fuel cell or water reduction reaction in an electrolysis cell on Pt-free catalysts results either in coproduction of electrical energy or hydrogen for energy storage. PMID:23112136

  9. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  10. Anaerobic digestion of glycerol and co-digestion of glycerol and pig manure.

    PubMed

    Nuchdang, Sasikarn; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

    2012-06-30

    The potential of glycerol obtained from transesterification of waste cooking oil as a main carbon source for biogas production was investigated. The glycerol was highly contaminated with oils and fats and was pretreated with sulfuric acid. Using a carbon source of glucose as a control, we compared biogas production from the acid-treated glycerol in a synthetic medium and the acid-treated glycerol mixed with pig manure. The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with supplement in a synthetic medium was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates (OLR) between 1.3, 1.6 and 2.6 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1) d(-1). The maximum methane yield of 0.32 L at Standard temperature and pressure (STP) g(-1) COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.6 g COD L(-1) d(-1) and the methane content was 54% on an average. At a higher organic loading rate of 5.4 g COD L(-1) d(-1), the propionic acid to acetic acid ratio was higher than the critical threshold limit for metabolic imbalance. Anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was also investigated at the COD ratio of 80:20 (glycerol:pig manure). The anaerobic digestion of acid-treated glycerol with pig manure was found to be satisfactory at organic loading rates between 1.3, 1.7, 2.9 and 5.0 g COD L(-1) d(-1) in terms of COD reduction (>80%) and methane content of (62% on an average). However, the biogas production rate was found to significantly decrease at the highest load. The maximum methane yield of 0.24 L STP g(-1) COD removal was achieved at an OLR of 1.3 g COD L(-1) d(-1). PMID:22417895

  11. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  12. Coproduction of ethanol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Gong, C S; Du, J X; Cao, N J; Tsao, G T

    2000-01-01

    Ethanol and glycerol are both metabolic products of yeasts. There are occasions when coproduction of both is considered desirable in industrial operations. In this article, we describe the potential of integrating the two processes. A LORRE Y8 yeast culture isolated from molasses is capable of efficient glycerol production from glucose, and a yeast Culture 1400 is an excellent producer of ethanol. By controlling the process conditions, the ratio of ethanol and glycerol production can be varied. PMID:10849818

  13. Characterization of the CDP-2-Glycerol Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quan; Xu, Yanli; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Xiong, Wei; Wei, Dongmei; Shashkov, Alexander S.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide (CPS) plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is usually used as the pneumococcal vaccine target. Glycerol-2-phosphate is found in the CPS of S. pneumoniae types 15A and 23F and is rarely found in the polysaccharides of other bacteria. The biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotide-activated form of glycerol-2-phosphate (NDP-2-glycerol) has never been identified. In this study, three genes (gtp1, gtp2, and gtp3) from S. pneumoniae 23F that have been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of NDP-2-glycerol were cloned and the enzyme products were expressed, purified, and assayed for their respective activities. Capillary electrophoresis was used to detect novel products from the enzyme-substrate reactions, and the structure of the product was elucidated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Gtp1 was identified as a reductase that catalyzes the conversion of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone to glycerol, Gtp3 was identified as a glycerol-2-phosphotransferase that catalyzes the conversion of glycerol to glycerol-2-phosphate, and Gtp2 was identified as a cytidylyltransferase that transfers CTP to glycerol-2-phosphate to form CDP-2-glycerol as the final product. The kinetic parameters of Gtp1 and Gtp2 were characterized in depth, and the effects of temperature, pH, and cations on these two enzymes were analyzed. This is the first time that the biosynthetic pathway of CDP-2-glycerol has been identified biochemically; this pathway provides a method to enzymatically synthesize this compound. PMID:20729354

  14. Optimizing aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Slininger, P.J.; Bothast, R.J.

    1985-12-01

    Chemical oxidation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) leads to acrylic acid, an industrially important polymerizable monomer currently derived from petroleum. As the availability of petroleum declines, 3-HPA may become attractive as a product to be obtained through fermentation of glycerol, a renewable resource. When cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 (ATCC 8724) were grown aerobically on a rich glycerol medium and then suspended in buffer supplemented with semicarbazide and glycerol, aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) ensued. Depending on conditions, 0.38 to 0.67 g of 3-HPA were formed per gram of glycerol consumed. This means that up to 83.8% of the carbon invested as glycerol could potentially be recovered as the target product, 3-HPA. Production of 3-HPA was sensitive to the age of cells harvested for resuspension and was nonexistent if cells were cultivated on glucose instead of glycerol as the sole carbon source. Compared with 24- and 72-h cells, 48-h cells produced 3-HPA at the highest rate and with the greatest yield. The cell biomass concentration present during the fermentation was never particularly critical to the 3-HPA yield, but initial fermentation rates and 3-HPA accumulation displayed a linear dependence on biomass concentration that faded when biomass exceeded 3 g/liter. Fermentation performance was a function of temperature, and an optimum initial specific 3-HPA productivity occurred at 32/sup 0/C, although the overall 3-HPA yield increased continuously within the 25 to 37/sup 0/C range studied. The pH optimum based on fermentation rate was different from that based on overall yield; 8 versus 7, respectively. Initial glycerol concentrations in the 20 to 50 g/liter range optimized initial 3-HPA productivity and yield.

  15. Flavor impacts of glycerol in the processing of yeast fermented beverages: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangdong; Procopio, Susanne; Becker, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Glycerol contributes to the beverage body and fullness. Moreover, it also influences the flavor intensity. As a major byproduct, glycerol not only serves critical roles in yeast osmoregulation and redox balancing, but also acts as the carbon competitor against ethanol in alcoholic fermentation. Therefore, increasing glycerol yield benefits both the flavor and ethanol reduction for the fermented beverages. Glycerol yield has been elevated either by fermentation optimization or by yeast genetic modification. The fermentation optimizations reached maximum 14 g/L glycerol through screening yeast strains and optimizing fermentation parameters. Meanwhile the yeast overexpressing GPD1 (encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) produced up to 6 folds more glycerol for beer and wine. Except for glycerol improvement, the genetically modified yeasts accumulated dramatically undesirable compounds such as acetaldehyde, acetate and acetoin which are detrimental for beverage flavor. In comparison, the natural high glycerol producers showed strain-specific manner on the yeast-derived aroma compounds like volatile acids, fusel alcohols, esters, and aldehydes. Temperature, sugar concentration, nitrogen composition, oxygen and pH-value, which influence glycerol biosynthesis, also obtained various effects on the production of aromatic compounds. In the current review, we firstly deliberate the organoleptic contributions of glycerol for fermented beverages. Furthermore, glycerol optimization strategies are discussed regarding to the yield improvement, the genes expressions, the overall flavor impacts and the feasibilities in beverage applications. Lastly, for improving beverage flavor by glycerol optimization, a high-throughput platform is proposed to increase the screening capacity of yeast strains and parameters in the processing of fermented beverages. PMID:26604336

  16. Characterization of crude glycerol from biodiesel plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Luo, Xiaolan; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2012-06-13

    Characterization of crude glycerol is very important to its value-added conversion. In this study, the physical and chemical properties of five biodiesel-derived crude glycerol samples were determined. Three methods, including iodometric-periodic acid method, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography (GC), were shown to be suitable for the determination of glycerol content in crude glycerol. The compositional analysis of crude glycerol was successfully achieved by crude glycerol fractionation and characterization of the obtained fractions (aqueous and organic) using titrimetric, HPLC, and GC analyses. The aqueous fraction consisted mainly of glycerol, methanol, and water, while the organic fraction contained fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), free fatty acids (FFAs), and glycerides. Despite the wide variations in the proportion of their components, all raw crude glycerol samples were shown to contain glycerol, soap, methanol, FAMEs, water, glycerides, FFAs, and ash. PMID:22612334

  17. Glycerol production of various strains of saccharomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Radler, F.; Schuetz, H.

    1982-01-01

    The quantity of glycerol as principal by-product of the alcoholic fermentation depends to a large extent on the yeast strain. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to form amounts of glycerol varying between 4.2 to 10.4 g/L. The formation of glycerol is regarded as a result of the competition between alcohol dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that compete for the reduced coenzyme NADH/sub 2/. High and low glycerol forming yeast strains showed large differences in the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and only small variation in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. The total amount of glycerol formed was also influenced by amino acids. In thiamine deficient media a decrease in glycerol formation was observed. Experiments indicate a correlation between the formation of acetaldehyde and glycerol and the production of cell mass that may be of practical interest. (Refs. 12).

  18. Capillaroscopy and the measurement of capillary pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Angela C

    2000-01-01

    Capillaries play a critical role in cardiovascular function as the point of exchange of nutrients and waste products between the tissues and circulation. Studies of capillary function in man are limited by access to the vascular bed. However, skin capillaries can readily be studied by the technique of capillaroscopy which enables the investigator to assess morphology, density and blood flow velocity. It is also possible to estimate capillary pressure by direct cannulation using glass micropipettes. This review will describe the techniques used to make these assessments and will outline some of the changes that are seen in health and disease. PMID:11136289

  19. Identifying plasma glycerol concentration associated with urinary glycerol excretion in trained humans.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jeff L; Harmon, Molly E; Robergs, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    Glycerol has been used as a means to legitimately hyperhydrate the body in an attempt to offset the deleterious effects of dehydration. It has the potential to mask blood doping practices and as a result has been added to the WADA prohibited substance list. The purpose of this study was to identify the plasma glycerol concentration coinciding with urinary glycerol excretion. Twelve healthy, trained male subjects completed five separate trials under resting conditions. For each trial, subjects consumed a different glycerol dose (0.025, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, or 0.20 g glycerol/kg LBM) of a 5% glycerol solution in order to determine at what plasma glycerol concentration an increase in urine glycerol concentration becomes apparent. Based on regression analysis, plasma glycerol concentrations > 0.327 ± 0.190 mmol/L and a glycerol dose > 0.032 ± 0.010 g glycerol/kg LBM would be associated with urinary glycerol excretion. There were significant linear relationships between peak plasma glycerol concentration and time to reach peak plasma glycerol concentration to the ingested glycerol doses. Our findings illustrate the importance of considering the effect of urinary glycerol excretion on legitimate hyperhydration regimens as well as suggesting that it is possible to detect surreptitious use of glycerol as a masking agent through urinary analysis. PMID:22080901

  20. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  1. Capillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-05-19

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This "hyperbolic" force-velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136-195]. Hill's heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973-976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971-973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255-318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928-935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill's equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  2. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Glycerol clearance in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D G; Alberti, K G; Wright, R; Blain, P G

    1982-01-01

    Glycerol clearance was studied by a primed dose-constant infusion technique in 14 patients with alcoholic liver disease and six normal control subjects. Fasting blood glycerol concentrations were raised in the alcoholic subjects (0.09 +/- 0.01 vs 0.06 +/- 0.01 mumol/l, p less than 0.05) and glycerol clearance was impaired (24.5 +/- 1.9 vs 37.5 +/- 3.2 ml/kg/min, p less than 0.005). Endogenous production rate of glycerol and distribution space at steady state were similar in alcoholic and control subjects. The metabolic clearance rate of glycerol correlated negatively with basal glycerol concentrations. Thus tissue uptake of glycerol is impaired in liver disease. As glycerol is metabolised primarily in the liver by conversion to glucose, these data suggest a defect of gluconeogenesis in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:7076002

  4. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  5. Antioxidant properties of feruloyl glycerol derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural plant components, 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (F2G), were synthesized by the enzymatic esterification of glycerol and soybean oil mono- and diacylglycerols, respectively, with ethyl ferulate. The isolated FG and F2G were examined for their antioxidant acti...

  6. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  7. Kinetics of cinnamoyl glycerol formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The esterifications of glycerol with cinnamic acid, 2-methoxy cinnamic acid, and 4-methoxy cinnamic acid were investigated in batch reactions. Conversions of over 50% were achieved for cinnamic acid and 4-methoxy cinnamic acid within 8 hours. After 24 hours conversions of over 80% were obtained fo...

  8. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20-40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The existence of impurities such as water and remnants of alkaline catalyst in crude glycerol will direct the reaction to produce glycidol. Although impurities might not be desirable, the non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate could be an alternative method for conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to value-added glycerol carbonate.Graphical abstractPlausible reaction scheme for conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate. PMID:27386367

  9. Mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova-Krumova, Petya; Yankova, Sofia; Ilieva, Biliana

    2013-12-01

    A method for mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation by Klebsiella oxytoca is presented. Glycerol is a renewable resource for it is formed as a by-product during biodiesel production. Because of its large volume production, it seems to be a good idea to develop a technology that converts this waste into products of high value (1, 3-Propanediol; 2, 3-Butanediol). The kinetic model of this process consists of many equations and parameters. The minimization of the least square function will be used for model parameters identification. In cases of parameters identification in multiparameter models the minimization of the least square function is very difficult because it is multiextremal. This is the main problem in the multiextremal function minimization which will be solved on the base a hierarchical approach, using a polynomial approximation of the experimental data.

  10. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  11. Selective glycerol oxidation by electrocatalytic dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ju; Lee, Jechan; Green, Sara K; Huber, George W; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an electrochemical dehydrogenation process can be used to oxidize glycerol to glyceraldehyde and glyceric acid even without using stoichiometric chemical oxidants. A glyceric acid selectivity of 87.0 % at 91.8 % glycerol conversion was obtained in an electrocatalytic batch reactor. A continuous-flow electrocatalytic reactor had over an 80 % high glyceric acid selectivity at 10 % glycerol conversion, as well as greater reaction rates than either an electrocatalytic or a conventional catalytic batch reactor. PMID:24664518

  12. Glycerol-3-phosphatase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Panhorst, Maren; Youn, Jung-Won; Wiefel, Lars; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Formation of glycerol as by-product of amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum has been observed under certain conditions, but the enzyme(s) involved in its synthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate were not known. It was shown here that cg1700 encodes an enzyme active as a glycerol-3-phosphatase (GPP) hydrolyzing glycerol-3-phosphate to inorganic phosphate and glycerol. GPP was found to be active as a homodimer. The enzyme preferred conditions of neutral pH and requires Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ for its activity. GPP dephosphorylated both L- and D-glycerol-3-phosphate with a preference for the D-enantiomer. The maximal activity of GPP was estimated to be 31.1 and 1.7 U mg⁻¹ with K(M) values of 3.8 and 2.9 mM for DL- and L-glycerol-3-phosphate, respectively. For physiological analysis a gpp deletion mutant was constructed and shown to lack the ability to produce detectable glycerol concentrations. Vice versa, gpp overexpression increased glycerol accumulation during growth in fructose minimal medium. It has been demonstrated previously that intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate is growth inhibitory as shown for a recombinant C. glutamicum strain overproducing glycerokinase and glycerol facilitator genes from E. coli in media containing glycerol. In this strain, overexpression of gpp restored growth in the presence of glycerol as intracellular glycerol-3-phosphate concentrations were reduced to wild-type levels. In C. glutamicum wild type, GPP was shown to be involved in utilization of DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as source of phosphorus, since growth with DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as sole phosphorus source was reduced in the gpp deletion strain whereas it was accelerated upon gpp overexpression. As GPP homologues were found to be encoded in the genomes of many other bacteria, the gpp homologues of Escherichia coli (b2293) and Bacillus subtilis (BSU09240, BSU34970) as well as gpp1 from the plant Arabidosis thaliana were overexpressed in E. coli MG1655 and

  13. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H D; Anderson, R C; Miller, R K; Taylor, T M; Hardin, M D; Smith, S B; Krueger, N A; Nisbet, D J

    2012-09-01

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of supplemental glycerol on rumen lipolysis, mixed populations of ruminal bacteria were incubated with 6 or 20% glycerol (vol/vol). After 48-h anaerobic incubation of mixed culture rumen fluid, rates of free fatty acid production (nmol/mL per h) for the 6 and 20% glycerol-supplemented samples were decreased by 80 and 86%, respectively, compared with rates from nonsupplemented control cultures (12.4±1.0; mean ± SE). Conversely, assay of the prominent ruminal lipase-producing bacteria Anaerovibrio lipolyticus 5S, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens 49, and Propionibacterium species avidum and acnes revealed no effect of 2 or 10% (vol/vol) added glycerol on lipolytic activity by these organisms. Supplementing glycerol at 6% on a vol/vol basis, equivalent to supplementing glycerol at approximately 8 to 15% of diet dry matter, effectively reduced lipolysis. However, the mechanism of glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis remains to be demonstrated. PMID:22916923

  14. Effect of water polyamorphism on the molecular vibrations of glycerol in its glassy aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Osamu

    2016-07-14

    A glassy dilute glycerol-water solution undergoes a mutual polyamorphic transition relating to the transition between high- and low-density amorphous ices of solvent water. The polyamorphic transition behavior depends on the glycerol concentration, indicating that the glycerol affects the water polyamorphism. Here, we used the glassy dilute glycerol-water solution of the solute molar fraction of 0.07 and examined the effect of the polyamorphic change in solvent water on the molecular vibrations of glycerol via Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the molecular vibration of glycerol in high-density liquid like solvent water is different from that in the low-density liquid like solvent water and that the change in the molecular vibration of glycerol is synchronized with the polyamorphic transition of solvent water. The dynamical change of the solute molecule relates to the polyamorphic state of solvent water. This result suggests that the polyamorphic fluctuation of water structure emanated from the presumed liquid-liquid critical point plays an important role for the function of aqueous solution under an ambient condition such as the conformational stability of solute, the functional expression of solute, and so on. PMID:27421414

  15. Effect of water polyamorphism on the molecular vibrations of glycerol in its glassy aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Mishima, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    A glassy dilute glycerol-water solution undergoes a mutual polyamorphic transition relating to the transition between high- and low-density amorphous ices of solvent water. The polyamorphic transition behavior depends on the glycerol concentration, indicating that the glycerol affects the water polyamorphism. Here, we used the glassy dilute glycerol-water solution of the solute molar fraction of 0.07 and examined the effect of the polyamorphic change in solvent water on the molecular vibrations of glycerol via Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the molecular vibration of glycerol in high-density liquid like solvent water is different from that in the low-density liquid like solvent water and that the change in the molecular vibration of glycerol is synchronized with the polyamorphic transition of solvent water. The dynamical change of the solute molecule relates to the polyamorphic state of solvent water. This result suggests that the polyamorphic fluctuation of water structure emanated from the presumed liquid-liquid critical point plays an important role for the function of aqueous solution under an ambient condition such as the conformational stability of solute, the functional expression of solute, and so on.

  16. Calibrating the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether temperature signal in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Alison J.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Palaeotemperature proxies based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) lipids have been established for marine and lacustrine environments, but there has been relatively little study of their application in speleothems. In this study we analyse the GDGT content of 33 speleothem samples from 16 different sites around the globe, and test whether proxies based on isoprenoid tetraethers (TEX86) or branched tetraethers (MBT/CBT) are correlated with measured surface and cave mean annual air temperature (MAT). The results show that the TEX86 has a strong relationship with measured temperature (r2 = 0.78, standard error of the estimate 2.3 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Furthermore, the MBT/CBT also showed a significant relationship with temperature (r2 = 0.73, standard error of the estimate 2.7 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Some issues remain requiring future work, in particular the development of a larger calibration sample set with measured cave temperature data, and the investigation of controls other than temperature on GDGT distribution, but overall the results indicate that GDGT based proxies derived from speleothems may be highly viable new methods for reconstructing continental palaeotemperatures.

  17. On the Role of the Blood Vessel Endothelial Microvilli in the Blood Flow in Small Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Vladimir; Zueva, Lidia; Sanabria, Priscila; Wessinger, William Dave; Golubeva, Tatiana; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microvilli that protrude into the capillary lumen, although invisible in the optical microscopy, may play an important role in the blood flow control in the capillaries. Because of the plug effects, the width of the gap between the capillary wall and the blood cell is especially critical for the blood flow dynamics in capillaries, while microvilli located on the capillary wall can easily control the velocity of the blood flow. We report that microvilli in the capillaries of different vertebrate species have similar characteristics and density, suggesting similarities between the respective regulation mechanisms. A simplified physical model of the capillary effective diameter control by the microvilli is presented. PMID:26604921

  18. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  19. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  20. Sterility Testing by Capillary Electrophoresis: A Comparison of On-line Preconcentration Approaches in Capillaries with Greater Internal Diameters

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Jan; Jiang, Chunxia; Sevcik, Juraj; Tesarova, Eva; Armstrong, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of microbial contamination is of critical importance in the medical and the food industry. Rapid tests for the absence or presence of viable microorganisms are in urgent demand. Capillary electrophoresis is a modern analytical technique that can be adapted for rapid screening of microbial contamination. However, the small dimensions of capillaries allow introduction of only a small fraction of the sample, which can be problematic when examining large samples. In this article, we examine the possibilities of introducing larger sample volumes using capillaries with greater internal diameters (i.d.) together with different stacking techniques. The use of 0.32 mm i.d. capillary and the injection of 60 % of the capillary volume led to approximately 120-fold improvement of the injected sample volume over the classical injection 5% of a 0.10 mm i.d. capillary. The setup we described opens new possibilities in sterility testing using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:19847804

  1. RUMINAL FERMENTATION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL AND GLYCEROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in dec...

  2. Formulation and Applications of Glycerol Polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased production of biodiesel in the U.S. and Europe during the past several years has created an oversupply of glycerol, creating lower domestic profitability. In addition, increased petroleum prices have driven up the cost of synthetic polymers made from petrochemicals. Glycerol can be polym...

  3. Thermal and physical characterization of glycerol polyesters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol polyesters were prepared by the condensation of glycerol and adipic acid, azelaic acid, sebacic acid, or suberic acids. After 48 hours at 125 deg C the polymers were clear and flexible. Samples of the reaction mixtures were analyzed by modulated differential scanning calorimetry to identi...

  4. Correlation spectroscopy applied to glycerol polyester spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of glycerol polyesters for use as controlled release matrix materials in the nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals industries presented a unique opportunity to apply correlation spectroscopy. In a typical formulation the glycerol is reacted with a polyfunctional acid such as citr...

  5. Glycerol citrate polyesters produced through microwave heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of various heating methods without catalysis to prepare copolyesters from citric acid:glycerol blends were studied. In the presence of short term microwave treatments, i.e., 60 sec at 1200 W, blends of glycerol and citric acid invariably formed solid amorphous copolyesters. Fourier tra...

  6. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  7. Biosynthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol by lipase in dimethyl carbonate as the solvent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Park, Chang-Ho; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2010-11-01

    Glycerol carbonate was synthesized from renewable glycerol and dimethyl carbonate using lipase in solvent-free reaction system in which excess dimethyl carbonate played as the reaction medium. A variety of lipases have been tested for their abilities to catalyze transesterification reaction, and Candida antartica lipase B and Novozyme 435 exhibited higher catalytic activities. The silica-coated glycerol with a 1:1 ratio was supplied to prevent two-phase formation between hydrophobic dimethyl carbonate and hydrophilic glycerol. Glycerol carbonate was successfully synthesized with more than 90% conversion from dimethyl carbonate and glycerol with a molar ratio of 10 using Novozyme 435-catalyzed transesterification at 70 °C. The Novozyme 435 [5% (w/w) and 20% (w/w)] and silica gel were more than four times recycled with good stability in a repeated batch operation for the solvent-free synthesis of glycerol carbonate. PMID:20502921

  8. Capillary Flow Limitations of Nanowicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Conan; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Thermal management is an important issue in microelectronic systems. The inaccessibility and diminishing size of these systems, however, requires that the heat management components be reliable and compact, such as is the case with heat pipes. In most intermediate temperature heat pipes typically found in microelectronics, the critical heat flux is governed by the capillary limit. Given the projected increases in computer chip heat fluxes, it is important to investigate the use of nanowicks as a means of raising this capillary limit. A theoretical model was developed to simulate flow through a vertical nanopillar array by balancing the capillary driving forces and the viscous losses in a quasi-steady state dynamic formulation. Based on this model, the maximum mass flow and its critical heat flux can be found for a wick given its microstructure geometry. These values were also found experimentally for commercially available wicks and nanowicks. We found that nanowicks provide lower mass flow rates than conventional wicks, mainly due to a reduced cross section. However, nanowicks achieved higher velocities and show promise over some conventional heat pipe wicks.

  9. Capillary-scale polarimetry for flowing streams.

    PubMed

    Swinney, K; Nodorft, J; Bornhop, D J

    2001-05-01

    A micro-polarimeter with a 40 nL probe volume was configured so that it is compatible with capillary-scale flowing stream analysis. The optical configuration consists of two polarizing optics, a capillary, a laser source and a photodetector which is very simple to configure with low cost components. This unique polarimeter is based upon the interaction of a linearly polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, in this case one with an inner diameter of 250 microns. Side illumination of the tube results in a 360 degrees fan of scattered light, which contains a set of interference fringes that change in response to optically active solutes. Solutes that exhibit optical activity are quantifiable and are detected by analyzing the polarization state of the backscattered light. The ability of the instrument to make extremely sensitive optical activity measurements in flowing streams is shown by the determination of (R)-mandelic acid, with a detection limit of 66 x 10(-6) M (507 x 10(-12) g), and the non-optically active control, glycerol. Additionally, the detector was configured to minimize refractive index perturbations. PMID:11394312

  10. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  11. Aquaporin-10 Represents an Alternative Pathway for Glycerol Efflux from Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela F.; Gastaldi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycerol outflow from adipocytes has been considered for a decade to be mediated by aquaporin-7, an aquaglyceroporin highly expressed in the adipose tissue. Its involvement in glycerol metabolism has been widely studied also in humans. Recent studies in different aquaporin-7 KO mice models pose two different questions 1) the exact localization of aquaporin-7 in human white adipose tissue; 2) the existence of other aquaglyceroporins that work with aquaporin-7 to guarantee glycerol efflux and thus a normal adiposity in humans. To this purpose we investigated the expression, the localization and the functioning of aquaglyceroporin-10 in subcutaneous white adipose tissue, in isolated and cultured differentiated adipocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Aquaporin-7 and -10 were expressed in the white adipose tissue both at mRNA and at protein level. Immunofluorescence revealed aquaporin-7 and -10 labelling in the human adipose tissue both to the plasma membrane and to a thin rim of cytoplasm of adipocytes. Aquaporin-7, but not aquaporin-10, colocalized with the endothelial marker CD34. Human cultured differentiated adipocytes showed an aquaporin-7 and -10 labelling mainly in the cytoplasm and in the lipid droplets with insulin reinforcing the lipid droplets staining and isoproterenol inducing its translocation to the plasma membrane compartment. Water and glycerol permeability measurements using adipocytes and adipose membrane vesicles confirmed the presence of functioning aquaglyceroporins. Aquaporin-10 silencing in human differentiated adipocytes resulted in a 50% decrease of glycerol and osmotic water permeability. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that aquaporin-7, differently from mice, is present in both adipocyte and capillary plasma membranes of human adipose tissue. Aquaporin-10, on the contrary, is expressed exclusively in the adipocytes. The expression of two aquaglyceroporins in human adipose tissue is particularly important for the

  12. TEACHING PHYSICS: Capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Petrova, Hristina

    2000-07-01

    We examine capillary tubes with a variable cross section, in which there is a column of fully wetting or fully non-wetting liquid. The direction in which the liquid moves when the tubes are placed horizontally is determined by means of Pascal's law. We promote the idea that the conical capillary tube is a hydraulic machine, whose two pistons are the liquid column's free surfaces, which have different radii. We propose a new way of demonstrating the described capillary effects by means of flat models of capillary tubes, constructed from glass plates. The demonstrations are presented in front of a large audience using an overhead projector.

  13. The role of chemisorbed hydroxyl species in alkaline electrocatalysis of glycerol on gold.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Simpson, D E; Roy, D

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of energy conversion in a direct glycerol fuel cell (DGFC) is governed by the anode supported heterogeneous steps of glycerol electro-oxidation. In aerated alkaline electrolytes, glycerol also participates in a base catalyzed process, which can release certain species mixing with the anode catalyzed surface products. As a result, selective probing of the surface catalytic reactions involving such systems can be difficult. The present work addresses this issue for a gold anode by using the analytical capability of cyclic voltammetry (CV). In addition, surface plasmon resonance measurements are used to optically probe the adsorption characteristics of the electrolyte species. The net exchange current of the oxidation process and the transfer coefficient of the rate determining step are evaluated by analyzing the CV data. The interfacial reactions and their products on Au are identified by measuring the number of electrons released during the electro-oxidation of glycerol. The results indicate that these reactions are facilitated by the surface bound hydroxyl species on Au (chemisorbed OH(-) and faradaically formed Au-OH). By comparing the findings for stationary and rotating electrodes, it is shown that, convective mass transport is critical to maintaining efficient progression of the consecutive oxidation steps of glycerol. In the absence of hydrodynamic support, the main surface products of glycerol oxidation appear to be glyceraldehyde, glycerate and malonate, formed through a net six-electron route. In the presence of controlled convection, a ten-electron process is activated, where mesaxolate is the likely additional product. PMID:25855265

  14. Production of biohydrogen from crude glycerol in an upflow column bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dounavis, Athanasios S; Ntaikou, Ioanna; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2015-12-01

    A continuous attached growth process for the production of biohydrogen from crude glycerol was developed. The process consisted of an anaerobic up-flow column bioreactor (UFCB), packed with cylindrical ceramic beads, which constituted the support matrix for the attachment of bacterial cells. The effect of crude glycerol concentration, pH and hydraulic retention time on glycerol conversion, hydrogen yield and metabolite distribution was investigated. It was shown that the most critical parameter for the efficient bioconversion was the pH of the influent, whereas the hydrogen yield increased with an increase in feed glycerol concentration and a decrease in the hydraulic retention time. The main soluble metabolite detected was 1,3-propanediol in all cases, followed by butyric and hexanoic acids. The latter is reported to be produced from glycerol for the first time. Acidification of the waste reached 38.5%, and the maximum H2 productivity was 107.3 ± 0.7 L/kg waste glycerol at optimal conditions. PMID:26441027

  15. Capillary rheometry for thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malguarnera, S. C.; Carroll, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Capillary rheometry is effectively used with thermosets. Most important is providing a uniform temperature in the barrel. This was successfully accomplished by using a circulating hot oil system. Standard capillary rheometry methods provide the dependence of thermoset apparent viscosity on shear rate, temperature and time. Such information is very useful in evaluating resin processability and in setting preliminary fabrication conditions.

  16. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    PubMed

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined. PMID:20005094

  17. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  18. Production of 3-Hydroxypropionaldehyde from Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Slininger, Patricia J.; Bothast, Rodney J.; Smiley, Karl L.

    1983-01-01

    3-Hydroxypropionaldehyde is a precursor to acrolein, which can be used as an intermediate for making acrylic acid and a variety of other useful industrial chemicals. Conversion of glycerol, a renewable resource, to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde was attempted via action of glycerol dehydrase isolated from Lactobacillus sp. strain NRRL B-1720. This method, however, was unsatisfactory because enzyme activity was lost within 60 to 90 min after the reaction initiation. Fermentation of glycerol by whole cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 in the presence of optimal semicarbazide hydrochloride proved more effective. Using this technique, glycerol solutions of 30 g/liter yielded 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde solutions of 13.1 g/liter. Thus, a conversion efficiency equal to 55% of the theoretical maximum was realized. PMID:16346353

  19. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  20. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  1. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  2. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  3. Glycerol monooleate-blood interactions.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Faxälv, Lars; Weissenrieder, Anna; Askendal, Agneta; Lindahl, Tomas L; Tengvall, Pentti

    2009-01-01

    In the present study the initial blood compatibility of glycerol monooleate (GMO)-coated surfaces was evaluated after deposition to surfaces and in bulk. The model surface was silica onto which multiple layers of fibrinogen or human serum albumin (HSA) was immobilized. The protein-coated surfaces were subsequently dip-coated in GMO in ethanol and used for blood plasma and whole blood experiments. The characterization methods included null ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy, imaging of coagulation, hemolysis test and whole blood coagulation time by free oscillation rheometry. The results showed a GMO film thickness of approximately 350 A (approximately 4 microg/cm(2)) upon dip-coating in ethanolic solution. A major part of the deposited layer detached in aqueous solutions, especially during shear conditions. The coagulation time on GMO was significantly prolonged compared to that on HSA coated silica. Whole blood tests showed that GMO is a very weak hemolytic agent. Deposited GMO detached easily from surfaces upon rinsing or shearing, although a stable layer with undefined phase structure and a thickness of 50-70 A remained on HSA and fibrinogen precoated surfaces. This indicates that GMO has stronger adhesive forces to its substrate compared to the cohesive forces acting within the bulk GMO. The ability of GMO to detach from itself and tentatively form micelles or lipid bilayers when subjected to flowing blood may be of use in extravascular applications. It is concluded that GMO results in weak blood activation, and the material may in spite of this be suitable in selected biomaterial applications, especially as a biosealant and in colloidal dispersions. PMID:18996684

  4. Synthesis of Glycerol Carbonate by Transesterification of Glycerol with Urea Over Zn/Al Mixed Oxide.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Bok; Baek, Jae Ho; Kim, Yangdo; Lee, Man Sig

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of glycerol carbonate using glycerol and urea have been carried out previously using ZnSO4 and ZnO catalysts, and high yields have been reported using ZnSO4 as catalyst. However, this salt is soluble in glycerol, and recycling of catalyst is difficult after the reaction. In this study, we prepared a mixed metal oxide catalyst using Zn and Al, and this catalyst consisted of a mixture of ZnO and ZnAl2O4. We confirmed the conversion of glycerol and the yield of glycerol carbonate of the amount of Al. As a result, we obtained a yield of 82.3% and a conversion of 82.7%. In addition we obtained high yield in recycling of catalyst. The yield of the glycerol carbonate increases with an increase of acid and base site of catalysts and the highest catalytic activity was obtained when acid/base ratio was approx. 1. From this result, we may conclude that the acid and base site density and ratio of catalysts were very important parameters in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate from urea and glycerol. PMID:26328352

  5. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with (32P)ATP and glycerokinase, residual (32P)ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free (32P)phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays.

  6. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D C; Kaslow, H R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus (1971, J. Biol. Chem. 246, 3885-3894) for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays. PMID:2817333

  7. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  8. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  9. Capillary saturation and desaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.; Armstrong, R. T.; Berg, S.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  10. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  11. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  12. Facilitating protein crystal cryoprotection in thick-walled plastic capillaries by high-pressure cryocooling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2009-01-01

    Many steps in the X-ray crystallographic solution of protein structures have been automated. However, the harvesting and cryocooling of crystals still rely primarily on manual handling, frequently with consequent mechanical damage. An attractive alternative is to grow crystals directly inside robust plastic capillaries that may be cryocooled and mounted on the beamline goniometer. In this case, it is still desirable to devise a way to cryoprotect the crystals, which is difficult owing to the poor thermal conductivity of thick plastic capillary walls and the large thermal mass of the capillary and internal mother liquor. A method is described to circumvent these difficulties. It is shown that high-pressure cryocooling substantially reduced the minimal concentrations of cryoprotectants required to cryocool water inside capillaries without formation of ice crystals. The minimal concentrations of PEG 200, PEG 400 and glycerol necessary for complete vitrification under pressure cryocooling were determined. PMID:19529790

  13. L-lactate production from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol by metabolically engineered Enterococcus faecalis: cytotoxic evaluation of biodiesel waste and development of a glycerol-inducible gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yuki

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel waste is a by-product of the biodiesel production process that contains a large amount of crude glycerol. To reuse the crude glycerol, a novel bioconversion process using Enterococcus faecalis was developed through physiological studies. The E. faecalis strain W11 could use biodiesel waste as a carbon source, although cell growth was significantly inhibited by the oil component in the biodiesel waste, which decreased the cellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio and then induced oxidative stress to cells. When W11 was cultured with glycerol, the maximum culture density (optical density at 600 nm [OD600]) under anaerobic conditions was decreased 8-fold by the oil component compared with that under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, W11 cultured with dihydroxyacetone (DHA) could show slight or no growth in the presence of the oil component with or without oxygen. These results indicated that the DHA kinase reaction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was sensitive to the oil component as an oxidant. The lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) activity of W11 during anaerobic glycerol metabolism was 4.1-fold lower than that during aerobic glycerol metabolism, which was one of the causes of low l-lactate productivity. The E. faecalis pflB gene disruptant (Δpfl mutant) expressing the ldhL1LP gene produced 300 mM l-lactate from glycerol/crude glycerol with a yield of >99% within 48 h and reached a maximum productivity of 18 mM h(-1) (1.6 g liter(-1) h(-1)). Thus, our study demonstrates that metabolically engineered E. faecalis can convert crude glycerol to l-lactate at high conversion efficiency and provides critical information on the recycling process for biodiesel waste. PMID:25576618

  14. l-Lactate Production from Biodiesel-Derived Crude Glycerol by Metabolically Engineered Enterococcus faecalis: Cytotoxic Evaluation of Biodiesel Waste and Development of a Glycerol-Inducible Gene Expression System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel waste is a by-product of the biodiesel production process that contains a large amount of crude glycerol. To reuse the crude glycerol, a novel bioconversion process using Enterococcus faecalis was developed through physiological studies. The E. faecalis strain W11 could use biodiesel waste as a carbon source, although cell growth was significantly inhibited by the oil component in the biodiesel waste, which decreased the cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and then induced oxidative stress to cells. When W11 was cultured with glycerol, the maximum culture density (optical density at 600 nm [OD600]) under anaerobic conditions was decreased 8-fold by the oil component compared with that under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, W11 cultured with dihydroxyacetone (DHA) could show slight or no growth in the presence of the oil component with or without oxygen. These results indicated that the DHA kinase reaction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was sensitive to the oil component as an oxidant. The lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) activity of W11 during anaerobic glycerol metabolism was 4.1-fold lower than that during aerobic glycerol metabolism, which was one of the causes of low l-lactate productivity. The E. faecalis pflB gene disruptant (Δpfl mutant) expressing the ldhL1LP gene produced 300 mM l-lactate from glycerol/crude glycerol with a yield of >99% within 48 h and reached a maximum productivity of 18 mM h−1 (1.6 g liter−1 h−1). Thus, our study demonstrates that metabolically engineered E. faecalis can convert crude glycerol to l-lactate at high conversion efficiency and provides critical information on the recycling process for biodiesel waste. PMID:25576618

  15. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC. In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production. PMID:22455837

  16. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    application papers of sequencing up to this level were also published in the mid 1990's. A major interest of the sequencing community has always been read length. The longer the sequence read per run the more efficient the process as well as the ability to read repeat sequences. We therefore devoted a great deal of time to studying the factors influencing read length in capillary electrophoresis, including polymer type and molecule weight, capillary column temperature, applied electric field, etc. In our initial optimization, we were able to demonstrate, for the first time, the sequencing of over 1000 bases with 90% accuracy. The run required 80 minutes for separation. Sequencing of 1000 bases per column was next demonstrated on a multiple capillary instrument. Our studies revealed that linear polyacrylamide produced the longest read lengths because the hydrophilic single strand DNA had minimal interaction with the very hydrophilic linear polyacrylamide. Any interaction of the DNA with the polymer would lead to broader peaks and lower read length. Another important parameter was the molecular weight of the linear chains. High molecular weight (> 1 MDA) was important to allow the long single strand DNA to reptate through the entangled polymer matrix. In an important paper, we showed an inverse emulsion method to prepare reproducibility linear polyacrylamide polymer with an average MWT of 9MDa. This approach was used in the polymer for sequencing the human genome. Another critical factor in the successful use of capillary electrophoresis for sequencing was the sample preparation method. In the Sanger sequencing reaction, high concentration of salts and dideoxynucleotide remained. Since the sample was introduced to the capillary column by electrokinetic injection, these salt ions would be favorably injected into the column over the sequencing fragments, thus reducing the signal for longer fragments and hence reading read length. In two papers, we examined the role of individual

  17. Brain capillaries in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baloyannis, Stavros J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of irreversible dementia, affecting mostly the presenile and senile age, shaping a tragic profile in the epilogue of the life of the suffering people. Due to the severity and the social impact of the disease an ongoing research activity is in climax nowadays, associated with many legal, social, ethical, humanitarian, philosophical and economic considerations. From the neuropathological point of view the disease is characterized by dendritic pathology, loss of synapses and dendritic spines, affecting mostly selective neuronal networks of critical importance for memory and cognition, such as the basal forebrain cholinergic system, the medial temporal regions, the hippocampus and many neocortical association areas. Tau pathology consisted of intracellular accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorilated tau protein and accumulation of Aβ-peptide's deposits, defined as neuritic plaques, are the principal neuropathological diagnostic criteria of the disease. The neurotoxic properties of the oligomerics of the Aβ-peptide and tau mediated neurodegeneration are among the main causative factors of impaired synaptic plasticity, neuronal loss, dendritic alterations and tremendous synaptic loss. The gradual degeneration of the organelles, particularly mitochondria, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, visualized clearly by electron microscopy (EM), emphasize the importance of the oxidative stress and amyloid toxicity in the pathogenetic cascade of the disease. The vascular factor may be an important component of the whole spectrum of the pathogenesis of AD. It is of substantial importance the concept that the structural alterations of the brain capillaries, may contribute in the pathology of AD, given that the disruption of the BBB may induce exacerbation of AD pathology, by promoting inflammation around the blood capillaries and in the neuropile space diffusely. From the morphological point of view

  18. Biorefinery for Glycerol Rich Biodiesel Industry Waste.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Prakash, Jyotsana; Koul, Shikha

    2016-06-01

    The biodiesel industry has the potential to meet the fuel requirements in the future. A few inherent lacunae of this bioprocess are the effluent, which is 10 % of the actual product, and the fact that it is 85 % glycerol along with a few impurities. Biological treatments of wastes have been known as a dependable and economical direction of overseeing them and bring some value added products as well. A novel eco-biotechnological strategy employs metabolically diverse bacteria, which ensures higher reproducibility and economics. In this article, we have opined, which organisms and what bioproducts should be the focus, while exploiting glycerol as feed. PMID:27570302

  19. Tandem transformation of glycerol to esters.

    PubMed

    Sotenko, Maria V; Rebroš, Martin; Sans, Victor S; Loponov, Konstantin N; Davidson, Matthew G; Stephens, Gill; Lapkin, Alexei A

    2012-12-31

    Tandem transformation of glycerol via microbial fermentation and enzymatic esterification is presented. The reaction can be performed with purified waste glycerol from biodiesel production in a continuous mode, combining continuous fermentation with membrane-supported enzymatic esterification. Continuous anaerobic fermentation was optimized resulting in the productivity of 2.4 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ of 1,3-propanediol. Biphasic esterification of 1,3-propanediol was optimized to achieve ester yield of up to 75%. A hollow fibre membrane contactor with immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase was demonstrated for the continuous tandem fermentation-esterification process. PMID:22796408

  20. The role of aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) in ethanol production from glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Baek-Rock; Hong, Won-Kyung; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Joe, Min-ho; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2013-02-01

    Transcriptome analysis of a K. pneumoniae GEM167 mutant strain derived by irradiation with gamma rays, which exhibited high-level production of ethanol from glycerol, showed that the mutant expressed AdhE at a high level. Ethanol production decreased significantly, from 8.8 to 0.5 g l(-1), when an adhE-deficient derivative of that strain was grown on glycerol. Bacterial growth was also reduced under such conditions, showing that AdhE plays a critical role in maintenance of redox balance by catalyzing ethanol production. Overexpression of AdhE enhanced ethanol production, from pure or crude glycerol, to a maximal level of 31.9 g l(-1) under fed-batch fermentation conditions; this is the highest level of ethanol production from glycerol reported to date. PMID:23296976

  1. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered. PMID:26986972

  2. A macrothermodynamic approach to the limit of reversible capillary condensation.

    PubMed

    Trens, Philippe; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Galarneau, Anne; Brunel, Daniel; Fubini, Bice; Garrone, Edoardo; Fajula, François; Di Renzo, Francesco

    2005-08-30

    The threshold of reversible capillary condensation is a well-defined thermodynamic property, as evidenced by corresponding states treatment of literature and experimental data on the lowest closure point of the hysteresis loop in capillary condensation-evaporation cycles for several adsorbates. The nonhysteretical filling of small mesopores presents the properties of a first-order phase transition, confirming that the limit of condensation reversibility does not coincide with the pore critical point. The enthalpy of reversible capillary condensation can be calculated by a Clausius-Clapeyron approach and is consistently larger than the condensation heat in unconfined conditions. Calorimetric data on the capillary condensation of tert-butyl alcohol in MCM-41 silica confirm a 20% increase of condensation heat in small mesopores. This enthalpic advantage makes easier the overcoming of the adhesion forces by the capillary forces and justifies the disappearing of the hysteresis loop. PMID:16114972

  3. Genetic construction of recombinant Pseudomonas chlororaphis for improved glycerol utilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to improve by genetic engineering the glycerol metabolic capability of Pseudomonas chlororaphis which is capable of producing commercially valuable biodegradable poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and biosurfactant rhamnolipids (RLs). In the study, glycerol uptake facilitat...

  4. Sorption behavior of mixtures of glycerol and starch.

    PubMed

    Enrione, Javier I; Hill, Sandra E; Mitchell, John R

    2007-04-18

    Glycerol is often added to starches to plasticize the product, but the presence of glycerol may also affect the water content of the samples. To evaluate the effect of glycerol on the sorption properties of starches, waxy maize, rice, and wheat starch were thermomechanically extruded in the presence of glycerol. Sorption isotherms of these extruded samples were ascertained using dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). BET and GAB modeling showed a monolayer (mo) significantly higher for waxy maize than for rice and wheat. Glycerol inclusion changed the model values, indicating reduction in sorption energy at the monolayer and restructuring of the multilayer. An interaction factor (xi) based on weight fraction models was calculated. Differences in xi were obtained when glycerol was added, varying from approximately 0.9 for 5% glycerol to approximately 0.8 for 20% glycerol, supporting the hypothesis of interactions between starch and this polyol. PMID:17362027

  5. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We << 1). The tested liquids were aqueous solutions of sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES), which is broadly used in personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  6. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  7. 1,2-Isopropylidene glycerol carbonate: preparation, characterization, and hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of excess glycerol supplies derived from the burgeoning biodiesel industry is of major importance to the oleochemical industry as the economic viability of the biodiesel and oleochemical industries are closely linked to glycerol prices. Carbonate compounds based on glycerol, such as...

  8. Determining Atmospheric Pressure with a Eudiometer and Glycerol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jed; Rohald, Kate; Sutton, Atasha

    2010-01-01

    We consider a volume of air trapped over a glycerol column in a eudiometer. We demonstrate that there is an approximately linear relationship between the volume of trapped air and the height of the glycerol column. Simply by moving the eudiometer up and down, we cause the glycerol-column height and trapped-air volume to vary. The plot of volume…

  9. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood...

  10. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood...

  11. Digestable and Metabolizable Energy of Crude Glycerol in Growing Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The apparent DE and ME value of crude glycerol for growing pigs was determined in a series of 5 experiments using crude glycerol (86.95% glycerol) from a biodiesel production facility with soybean oil used as the initial feedstock (AG Processing Inc., Sergeant Bluff, IA). Dietary treatments were 0, ...

  12. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas. PMID:24043264

  13. Glycerol oxidation using gold-containing catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Hammond, Ceri; Prati, Laura; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-05-19

    Glycerol is an important byproduct of biodiesel production, and it is produced in significant amounts by transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. Due to the highly functionalized nature of glycerol, it is an important biochemical that can be utilized as a platform chemical for the production of high-added-value products. At present, research groups in academia and industry are exploring potential direct processes for the synthesis of useful potential chemicals using catalytic processes. Over the last 10 years, there has been huge development of potential catalytic processes using glycerol as the platform chemical. One of the most common processes investigated so far is the catalytic oxidation of glycerol at mild conditions for the formation of valuable oxygenated compounds used in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. The major challenges associated with the selective oxidation of glycerol are (i) the control of selectivity to the desired products, (ii) high activity and resistance to poisoning, and (iii) minimizing the usage of alkaline conditions. To address these challenges, the most common catalysts used for the oxidation of glycerol are based on supported metal nanoparticles. The first significant breakthrough was the successful utilization of supported gold nanoparticles for improving the selectivity to specific products, and the second was the utilization of supported bimetallic nanoparticles based on gold, palladium, and platinum for improving activity and controlling the selectivity to the desired products. Moreover, the utilization of base-free reaction conditions for the catalytic oxidation of glycerol has unlocked new pathways for the production of free-base products, which facilitates potential industrial application. The advantages of using gold-based catalysts are the improvement of the catalyst lifetime, stability, and reusability, which are key factors for potential commercialization. In this Account, we discuss the advantages of the

  14. Synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea with gold-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A; Ab Rahim, Mohd Hasbi; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jenkins, Robert L; Carley, Albert F; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Knight, David W; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-04-21

    The reaction of glycerol with urea to form glycerol carbonate is mostly reported in the patent literature and to date there have been very few fundamental studies of the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, most previous studies have involved homogeneous catalysts whereas the identification of heterogeneous catalysts for this reaction would be highly beneficial. This is a very attractive reaction that utilises two inexpensive and readily available raw materials in a chemical cycle that overall, results in the chemical fixation of CO(2). This reaction also provides a route to up-grade waste glycerol produced in large quantities during the production of biodiesel. Previous reports are largely based on the utilisation of high concentrations of metal sulfates or oxides, which suffer from low intrinsic activity and selectivity. We have identified heterogeneous catalysts based on gallium, zinc, and gold supported on a range of oxides and the zeolite ZSM-5, which facilitate this reaction. The addition of each component to ZSM-5 leads to an increase in the reaction yield towards glycerol carbonate, but supported gold catalysts display the highest activity. For gold-based catalysts, MgO is the support of choice. Catalysts have been characterised by XRD, TEM, STEM and XPS, and the reaction has been studied with time-on-line analysis of products via a combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC, (13)C NMR and GC-MS analysis to evaluate the reaction pathway. Our proposed mechanism suggests that glycerol carbonate forms via the cyclization of a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl carbamate and that a subsequent reaction of glycerol carbonate with urea yields the carbamate of glycerol carbonate. Stability and reactivity studies indicate that consecutive reactions of glycerol carbonate can limit the selectivity achieved and reaction conditions can be selected to avoid this. The effect of the catalyst in the proposed mechanism is discussed. PMID:21258674

  15. The Capillary Fluidics of Espresso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Nathan; Wollman, Drew; Graf, John; Weislogel, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Espresso is enjoyed by tens of millions of people daily. The coffee is distinguished by a complex low density colloid of emulsified oils. Due to gravity, these oils rise to the surface forming a foam lid called the crema. In this work we present a variety of large length scale capillary fluidic effects for espresso in a gravity-free environment. Drop tower tests are performed to establish brief microgravity conditions under which spontaneous capillarity-driven behavior is observed. Because the variety of espresso drinks is extensive, specific property measurements are made to assess the effects of wetting and surface tension for `Italian' espresso, caffe latte, and caffe Americano. To some, the texture and aromatics of the crema play a critical role in the overall espresso experience. We show how in the low-g environment this may not be possible. We also suggest alternate methods for enjoying espresso aboard spacecraft. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  16. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  17. Yeast Fps1 glycerol facilitator functions as a homotetramer.

    PubMed

    Beese-Sims, Sara E; Lee, Jongmin; Levin, David E

    2011-12-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fps1 glycerol channel is a member of the major intrinsic protein (MIP) family of plasma membrane channel proteins that functions in osmoregulatory pathways to transport glycerol passively out of the cell. The MIP family is subdivided into members that are selectively permeable to water (aquaporins) and those permeated by glycerol (aquaglyceroporins or glycerol facilitators). Although aquaporins function as homo-tetramers with each monomer possessing its own channel, previous studies have suggested that aquaglyceroporins may function as monomers. Here we provide both genetic and biochemical evidence that Fps1 functions as a homotetramer to regulate glycerol transport in yeast. PMID:22030956

  18. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  19. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Michał J.; Bujak, Renata; Daghir, Emilia

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a widespread technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins in biological samples. CIEF is used to separate mixtures of compounds on the basis of differences in their isoelectric point. Aspects of sample preparation, capillary selection, zone mobilization procedures as well as various detection modes used have been described and discussed. Moreover CIEF, coupled to various types of detection techniques (MALDI or LIF), has increasingly been applied to the analysis of variety different high-molecular compounds. CIEF is considered as a highly specific analytical method which may be routinely used in the separation of rare hemoglobin variants. In addition, the application of CIEF in proteomic field have been discussed on the examples of analyses of glycoproteins and immunoglobins due to the meaning in clinical diagnostic.

  20. Semipreparative capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, J R; Zare, R N; Peters, E C; Svec, F; Frechét, J J

    2001-05-01

    Capillaries with inner diameters of 550 microm have successfully been packed with 1.5-microm octadecyl silica particles using frits made of macroporous polymers by the UV photopolymerization of a solution of glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate. This type of frit is found superior to one made of low-melting point poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) beads. Bubble formation is not observed to occur within these capillary columns under our experimental conditions. Separations can be achieved with sample injection volumes as high as 1 microL. To demonstrate its semipreparative use, a mixture of 500 nL of taxol (20 mM) and its precursor, baccatin III (30 mM), is separated using such a column with a Tris buffer. PMID:11354480

  1. Ultrasound assisted enzyme catalyzed synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Govind V; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    The present work illustrates the transesterification of glycerol to glycerol carbonate (GlyC) from dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using commercial immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) under ultrasonic irradiation. The experiments were performed in a batch reactor placed in an ultrasonic water bath using a sequence of experimental protocol to evaluate the effects of temperature, molar ratios of substrates, enzyme loading, duty cycle and ultrasound power on the conversion of glycerol to GlyC. It has been found that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed transesterification of glycerol would be a potential alternative to conventional alkali-catalyzed method, as high conversion (99.75%) was obtained at mild operating conditions: molar ratio of DMC to glycerol 3:1, catalyst amount of 13% (w/w), lower power input (100W), duty cycle 50% and temperature (60°C) in a relatively short reaction time (4h) using Novozym 435 as catalyst. Ultrasound reduces the reaction time up to 4h as compared to conventional stirring method (14h) catalyzed by Novozym 435. The repeated use of the catalyst under the optimum experimental condition resulted in decay in both enzyme activity and product conversion. PMID:25069889

  2. Biological Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E. S.

    In a search to turn the economically and environmentally non-valuable "waste" streams of biodiesel production into a profitable byproduct, a mutant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 was developed by six-tube subculturing technique. This technique is based on the principle of adaptive evolution, and involved subculturing the bacterium in a tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) containing specific glycerol and ethanol concentration for six consecutive times. Then, the six consecutive subculturing was repeated in a fresh TSB of higher glycerol and ethanol concentrations. A new mutant strain, E. aerogenes S012, which could withstand a combination of 200 g/l glycerol and 30 g/l ethanol concentrations, was developed. The wild and mutant strains were used for the fermentation of pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol. Taguchi and full factorial methods of design of experiments were used to screen and optimize the important process factors that influence the microbial production of ethanol. A statistically sound regression model was used to establish the mathematical relationship between the process variables and ethanol production. Temperature of 38°C, agitation speed of 200 rpm, pH of 6.3-6.6, and microaerobic condition were the optimum process conditions. Different pretreatment methods to recover glycerol from the crude glycerol and the subsequent fermentation method showed that direct acidification using 85% H3PO4 was the best. The R-glycerol contained 51% pure glycerol and 21% methanol. The wild strain, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048, produced only 12 g/l and 12.8 g/l ethanol from 20 g/l P- and R-glycerol respectively, and could not utilize higher glycerol concentrations. The mutant, E. aerogenes S012, produced ethanol amount and yield of 43 g/l and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol from P-glycerol, respectively within 96 h. It also produced ethanol amount and yield of 26.8 g/l and 1.07 mol/mol-glycerol, respectively, from R-glycerol within the same duration. In a

  3. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  4. Carbon nanotube patterning with capillary micromolding of catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Ryu, Choonghan; Lee, Sungwoo; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-11-01

    Patterning of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber has been achieved by catalyst patterning using capillary micromolding process. Iron acetate catalyst nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and mold was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The ethanol solution containing catalyst nanoparticles was filled into the microchannel formed between PDMS mold and Si-wafer by capillary force. The capillary action of different solvents was simulated by commercial CFD-ACE+ simulation code to determine optimal solvents. Simulated result shows that the choice of solvent was critical in this capillary filling process. After the catalyst patterning, MWNT was grown at 700 approximately 800 degrees C by PECVD process using CH4 and Ar gas in a scale of approximately 10 micro-meters in a tubular inductively coupled plasma reactor. Grown CNTs were analyzed by FE-SEM and Raman Spectroscopy. PMID:18047145

  5. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  6. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation. PMID:27392247

  7. Measuring glycerol turnover, gluconeogenesis from glycerol, and total gluconeogenesis with [2-13C] glycerol: role of the infusion-sampling mode.

    PubMed

    Peroni, O; Large, V; Odeon, M; Beylot, M

    1996-07-01

    Mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA) of glucose during infusion of [2-13C]glycerol is a new method for measuring total gluconeogenesis (GNG). Since this method relies on calculation of the isotopic enrichment (IE) of hepatic triose phosphates (TP), the results should be independent of the sites of tracer infusion and blood sampling. Postabsorptive and starved rats were infused with [2-13C]glycerol and sampled either in the arterial-venous (A-V) or venous-arterial (V-A) modes. Blood was also sampled from the portal vein. In both postabsorptive and starved rats, glycerol turnover rate (Rt) and the percent contribution of glycerol to total glucose production were higher in the A-V mode than in the V-A mode (P < .05). Glycerol IE in portal venous blood was intermediate between IE values observed in peripheral arterial and venous blood. Its use for calculating the contribution of glycerol to glucose production reconciled the results obtained with the two infusion-sampling modes in both postabsorptive and starved rats; this contribution was increased by starvation (P < .01). In postabsorptive rats, total GNG calculated from MIDA of glucose accounted for approximately 50% of glucose production whatever the infusion-sampling mode (A-V, 48.8% +/- 4.7%; V-A, 52.2% +/- 3.9%). This contribution increased to 90% in starved rats, again, with no difference between A-V (95.2% +/- 1.8%) and V-A (89.2% +/- 1.3%) modes. In conclusion, during infusion of [2-13C]glycerol, total GNG measured from MIDA of glucose is independent of the infusion-sampling mode, contrary to calculations of Rt and GNG from glycerol. Measurement of glycerol IE in portal venous blood reconciles the results obtained with the two modes with respect to the contribution of glycerol to GNG. PMID:8692028

  8. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  9. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  10. Coaxial capillary and conductive capillary interfaces for collection of fractions isolated by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, R.W.; Walker, K.L.; Hagen, J.J.; Monning, C.A.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1995-11-15

    An instrument is described that allows the automated collection of fractions isolated by capillary electrophoresis. This instrument allows the electrical connection to be established with the separation capillary by using a coaxial capillary flow cell or by treating the outer surface of the capillary with a gold-filled epoxy to allow electrophoresis. The coaxial interface is most useful when the electroosmotic flow in the capillary is small, and the conductive capillary interface is favored when dilution and contamination of the sample must be minimized. Both geometries permit closely spaced fractions to be acquired with minimal cross-contamination and dilution. Sample recoveries were better than 80% and virtually independent of the chemical characteristics of the sample. Fractions isolated with this instrument were successfully analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  12. Borrelia burgdorferi Requires Glycerol for Maximum Fitness During The Tick Phase of the Enzootic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Christopher J.; Iyer, Radha; Petzke, Mary M.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.; Schwartz, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is a vector-borne pathogen that cycles between a mammalian host and tick vector. This complex life cycle requires that the spirochete modulate its gene expression program to facilitate growth and maintenance in these diverse milieus. B. burgdorferi contains an operon that is predicted to encode proteins that would mediate the uptake and conversion of glycerol to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Previous studies indicated that expression of the operon is elevated at 23°C and is repressed in the presence of the alternative sigma factor RpoS, suggesting that glycerol utilization may play an important role during the tick phase. This possibility was further explored in the current study by expression analysis and mutagenesis of glpD, a gene predicted to encode glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Transcript levels for glpD were significantly lower in mouse joints relative to their levels in ticks. Expression of GlpD protein was repressed in an RpoS-dependent manner during growth of spirochetes within dialysis membrane chambers implanted in rat peritoneal cavities. In medium supplemented with glycerol as the principal carbohydrate, wild-type B. burgdorferi grew to a significantly higher cell density than glpD mutant spirochetes during growth in vitro at 25°C. glpD mutant spirochetes were fully infectious in mice by either needle or tick inoculation. In contrast, glpD mutants grew to significantly lower densities than wild-type B. burgdorferi in nymphal ticks and displayed a replication defect in feeding nymphs. The findings suggest that B. burgdorferi undergoes a switch in carbohydrate utilization during the mammal to tick transition. Further, the results demonstrate that the ability to utilize glycerol as a carbohydrate source for glycolysis during the tick phase of the infectious cycle is critical for maximal B. burgdorferi fitness. PMID:21750672

  13. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  14. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-01-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 Å resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes. PMID:18296637

  15. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  16. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  17. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  18. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  19. Current role of capillary electrophoretic/electrokinetic techniques in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Tagliaro, Franco; Bortolotti, Federica; Pascali, Jennifer P

    2007-08-01

    The current application of capillary electrophoresis in forensic toxicology has been critically reviewed with special focus on the areas where this technique has shown real advantages over chromatographic methods. For example, capillary electrophoresis has been most successfully applied to the chiral analysis of some drugs of forensic interest, including amphetamines and their congeners. Another typical application field of capillary electrophoresis is represented by protein analysis. Recently, special interest has been paid to carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT), the most important biological marker of chronic alcohol abuse. Other specific applications of capillary electrophoresis of potential forensic toxicological concern are also discussed. The review includes 62 references. PMID:17572886

  20. Isolation of the human Xp21 glycerol kinase gene by positional cloning.

    PubMed

    Walker, A P; Muscatelli, F; Monaco, A P

    1993-02-01

    The gene for human glycerol kinase deficiency (GK) maps in Xp21.3 in a critical region of about 50-250 kb located distal to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (DMD) by analysis of patient deletions and YAC contigs. We have used a genomic exon amplification strategy to isolate potential exons from two cosmids which mapped to this interval. The genomic exons were used to isolate six overlapping cDNA clones from human fetal liver which encode the X-linked glycerol kinase gene. The cDNA clones map to cosmids, YAC clones and deletions in patients which define the GK critical region and also hybridize to several autosomal fragments and one Xq fragment in genomic DNA. The GK gene is expressed most in human liver with three transcript sizes of 1.85, 2.7, and 3.7 kb. Sequence analysis of 1.5 kb of several overlapping liver cDNA clones predicted a protein with approximately 63% similarity to the E. coli and B. subtilis glycerol kinase genes. The liver cDNA clones have sequence identity with four genomic exons and the 3' untranslated region from an Xp21.3 cosmid thus indicating that this is the expressed GK gene which when deleted in patients gives rises to GK deficiency. PMID:8499898

  1. Ruminal fermentation of propylene glycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Tjandrakusuma, Siska; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2007-08-22

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h, all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in decreasing order, all increased with incubation time. Addition of any of the three substrates somewhat decreased acetate formation, while addition of either propylene glycol increased propionate formation but decreased that of butyrate. R- and S-propylene glycol did not differ significantly in either their rates of disappearance or the products formed when they were added to the fermentation medium. Fermentations of rumen fluid containing propylene glycol emitted the sulfur-containing gases 1-propanethiol, 1-(methylthio)propane, methylthiirane, 2,4-dimethylthiophene, 1-(methylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl disulfide, 1-(propylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl trisulfide, 3,5-diethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2-ethyl-1,3-dithiane, and 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trithiane. Metabolic pathways that yield each of these gases are proposed. The sulfur-containing gases produced during propylene glycol fermentation in the rumen may contribute to the toxic effects seen in cattle when high doses are administered for therapeutic purposes. PMID:17655323

  2. The order of condensation in capillary grooves.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Nürnberg, Robert; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2013-05-15

    We consider capillary condensation in a deep groove of width L. The transition occurs at a pressure p(co)(L) described, for large widths, by the Kelvin equation p(sat) - p(co)(L) = 2σ cosθ/L, where θ is the contact angle at the side walls and σ is the surface tension. The order of the transition is determined by the contact angle of the capped end θcap; it is continuous if the liquid completely wets the cap, and first-order otherwise. When the transition is first-order, corner menisci at the bottom of the capillary lead to a pronounced metastability, determined by a complementary Kelvin equation Δp(L) = 2σ sinθcap/L. On approaching the wetting temperature of the capillary cap, the corner menisci merge and a single meniscus unbinds from the bottom of the groove. Finite-size scaling shifts, crossover behaviour and critical singularities are determined at mean-field level and beyond. Numerical and experimental results showing the continuous nature of condensation for θcap = 0 and the influence of corner menisci on adsorption isotherms are presented. PMID:23611878

  3. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  4. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  5. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  6. Principles of Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography Applied in Pharmaceutical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hancu, Gabriel; Simon, Brigitta; Rusu, Aura; Mircia, Eleonora; Gyéresi, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    Since its introduction capillary electrophoresis has shown great potential in areas where electrophoretic techniques have rarely been used before, including here the analysis of pharmaceutical substances. The large majority of pharmaceutical substances are neutral from electrophoretic point of view, consequently separations by the classic capillary zone electrophoresis; where separation is based on the differences between the own electrophoretic mobilities of the analytes; are hard to achieve. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, a hybrid method that combines chromatographic and electrophoretic separation principles, extends the applicability of capillary electrophoretic methods to neutral analytes. In micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, surfactants are added to the buffer solution in concentration above their critical micellar concentrations, consequently micelles are formed; micelles that undergo electrophoretic migration like any other charged particle. The separation is based on the differential partitioning of an analyte between the two-phase system: the mobile aqueous phase and micellar pseudostationary phase. The present paper aims to summarize the basic aspects regarding separation principles and practical applications of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, with particular attention to those relevant in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:24312804

  7. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed. PMID:20402585

  8. Transketolase activity modulates glycerol-3-phosphate levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vimala, A; Harinarayanan, R

    2016-04-01

    Transketolase activity provides an important link between the metabolic pathways of glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt and catalyzes inter-conversions between pentose phosphates and glycolytic intermediates. It is widely conserved in life forms. A genetic screen for suppression of the growth defect of Escherichia coli tktA tktB mutant in LB medium revealed two mutations, one that rendered the glpK expression constitutive and another that inactivated deoB. Characterizing these mutations aided in uncovering the role of ribose-5-P (a transketolase substrate) as an inhibitor of glycerol assimilation and de novo glycerol-3-P synthesis. Using lacZ fusions, we show that ribose-5-P enhances GlpR-mediated repression of the glpFKX operon and inhibits glycerol assimilation. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) showed ribose-5-P made the DNA-GlpR complex less sensitive to the inducer glycerol-3-P. In addition to inhibition of glycerol assimilation, obstruction of ribose-5-P metabolism retards growth from glycerol-3-P limitation. Glucose helps to overcome this limitation through a mechanism involving catabolite repression. To our knowledge, this report is the first to show ribose-5-P can modulate glycerol-3-P concentration in the cell by regulation of glycerol assimilation as well as its de novo synthesis. This regulation could be prevalent in other organisms. PMID:26691989

  9. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  10. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  11. Degradation rates of glycerol polyesters at acidic and basic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyesters prepared from glycerol with mixtures of adipic and citric acids were evaluated in the laboratory to estimate degradation rates over a range of pH conditions. These renewable polymers provide a market for glycerol that is generated during biodiesel production. The polyesters were prepared...

  12. The Acrylation of Glycerol: a Precursor to Functionalized Lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Didecanoylacryloylglycerol was synthesized from decanoic and acrylic acids and glycerol using K2O as catalyst. This reaction was carried out in hexane in a closed stainless steel reactor at 200°C for 5h. The reactants were added in a 1:3:4 glycerol:decanoic acid:acrylic acid molar ratio. The resu...

  13. THERMOPLASTIC STARCH-KRAFT LIGNIN-GLYCEROL BLENDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin-glycerol blends were extruded in a twin-screw extruder to produce non-brittle films. One week after extrusion, films with a mid-range composition of 52% starch, 20% lignin, and 28% glycerol showed a tensile strength at break of 2.8 MPa, Young's modulus of 48 MPa, and elongation ...

  14. Fabrication of a glycerol from CO2 reaction system, supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication, installation, and testing of a glycerol hydrogenation and a CO2 hydrogenation - CH4 partial oxidation units are reported. The glycerol system proved to be operational while the CO2 system was installed but not bought on operational steam.

  15. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 4-METHOXY CINNAMOYL GLYCEROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol was combined with cinnamic acid to prepare the corresponding ester, glycerol cinnamate. Conversions of 81% were achieved after 16 hr in toluene at reflux conditions. The product was recovered by extraction with distilled water and diethyl ether. The isolated product displayed strong abso...

  16. Biodegradation of Glycerol Trinitrate and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Agrobacterium radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    White, G. F.; Snape, J. R.; Nicklin, S.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria capable of metabolizing highly explosive and vasodilatory glycerol trinitrate (GTN) were isolated under aerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions from soil, river water, and activated sewage sludge. One of these strains (from sewage sludge) chosen for further study was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter subgroup B. A combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the culture medium during the growth of A. radiobacter on basal salts-glycerol-GTN medium showed the sequential conversion of GTN to glycerol dinitrates and glycerol mononitrates. Isomeric glycerol 1,2-dinitrate and glycerol 1,3-dinitrate were produced simultaneously and concomitantly with the disappearance of GTN, with significant regioselectivity for the production of the 1,3-dinitrate. Dinitrates were further degraded to glycerol 1- and 2-mononitrates, but mononitrates were not biodegraded. Cells were also capable of metabolizing pentaerythritol tetranitrate, probably to its trinitrate and dinitrate analogs. Extracts of broth-grown cells contained an enzyme which in the presence of added NADH converted GTN stoichiometrically to nitrite and the mixture of glycerol dinitrates. The specific activity of this enzyme was increased 160-fold by growth on GTN as the sole source of nitrogen. PMID:16535244

  17. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  18. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  19. Capillary interconnect device

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-12-25

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) means for applying an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  20. Glycerol, an underestimated flavor precursor in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Devaud-Goumoens, Stéphanie; Viton, Florian

    2013-10-30

    The objective of the present work was to investigate in depth the role of glycerol in Maillard reactions and its potential to act as an active flavor precursor. Reactions using isotopically labeled compounds (various reducing sugars, proline, and glycerol) unambiguously demonstrated that, in addition to its role of solvent, glycerol actively contributes to the formation of proline-specific compounds in Maillard model systems. Additionally, rhamnose and fucose/proline/glycerol systems generated the 2-propionyl-1(3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridines, known for their roasty, popcorn aroma. Their formation from such systems is unprecedented. The results presented here have direct implications for flavor generation during thermal processing of foods containing glycerol, which is a ubiquitous food ingredient and an underestimated flavor precursor. PMID:23373461

  1. Microbial conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Biebl, H.; Deckwer, W.D.

    1996-10-01

    Glycerol is a byproduct from the soap and detergent industry and possibly from future biodiesel plants. The conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (PD) is of industrial interest due to the potential use of PD for the synthesis of polyesters. We have been studying the microbial conversion of glycerol to PD with work ranging from strain isolation, medium optimization, pathway analysis, product formation kinetics and growth modeling, downstream processing and reactor scale-up (up to 2000 1). PD yields of nearly 100% of the theoretical maximum (0.72 mol/mol glycerol) and final product concentrations of about 65 g/l were achieved with both Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium butyricum. In addition to summarizing our experimental results the advances of bioconversion of glycerol will be reviewed in this presentation, with emphasis on discussing further research and development needs in this area. Results of process engineering and cost analysis will also be presented.

  2. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  3. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  4. On singularities of capillary surfaces in the absence of gravity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roytburd, V.

    1983-01-01

    We smore » tudy numerical solutions to the equation of capillary surfaces in trapezoidal domains in the absence of gravity when the boundary contact angle declines from 90 ° to some critical value. We also discuss a result on the behavior of solutions in more general domains that confirms numerical calculations.« less

  5. Toxic and osmotic effects of glycerol on human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are damaged by exposure to concentrations of glycerol as low as 0.5 M. We therefore investigated the addition of glycerol to granulocytes and its subsequent dilution under various conditions to try to distinguish between toxic and harmful osmotic effects of glycerol. The lesion caused by glycerol at 0/sup 0/C was expressed as a loss of plasma membrane integrity (as visualized by fluorescein diacetate) only after incubation (greater than or equal to1 h) at 37/sup 0/C. This damage was not ameliorated when osmotic stress was lessened by reducing the rates of addition and dilution of glycerol to keep the computed cell volume within 80-170% of isotonic cell volume. However, when osmotic stress was reduced further by increasing the temperature of addition and dilution of glycerol from 0/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/C, the tolerance of the cells to 1 M glycerol increased somewhat. Reducing exposure to glycerol to 3 min or less at 0/sup 0/C greatly increased survival, but this time was too short to allow glycerol to equilibrate intracellularly. Finally, the presence of extra impermeant solute (NaCl or sucrose) in the medium to reduce the equilibrium cell volume to 60% of isotonic cell volume enabled granulocytes to survive 30-min exposure to 1 M glycerol at 0/sup 0/C, but cells had to remain shrunken during the 37/sup 0/C incubation to prevent the loss of membrane integrity. Suspensions that contained damaged granulocytes formed aggregates when incubated at 37/sup 0/C, and these aggregates were responsible for a major fraction of the observed loss in viability.

  6. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  7. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  8. Feruloyl glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl glycerol antioxidant behavior in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Laszlo, Joseph A; Appell, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (F2G), the by-product of biocatalytic transesterification soybean oil and ethyl ferulate, were examined for their behavior in phospholipid vesicles. Based on absorbance and fluorescence methods, FG and F2G both were found to partition into vesicles and incorporate well into 1,2-dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) vesicles. FG and F2G incorporation resulted in vesicles that were as or slightly more stable than the unloaded vesicles. FG and F2G both demonstrated the ability to maintain antioxidant properties within the lipid bilayer. Bilayer depth analysis was conducted using the parallax method and molecular modeling. PMID:26561732

  9. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  10. Renewable chemicals: dehydroxylation of glycerol and polyols.

    PubMed

    ten Dam, Jeroen; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2011-08-22

    The production of renewable chemicals is gaining attention over the past few years. The natural resources from which they can be derived in a sustainable way are most abundant in sugars, cellulose and hemicellulose. These highly functionalized molecules need to be de-functionalized in order to be feedstocks for the chemical industry. A fundamentally different approach to chemistry thus becomes necessary, since the traditionally employed oil-based chemicals normally lack functionality. This new chemical toolbox needs to be designed to guarantee the demands of future generations at a reasonable price. The surplus of functionality in sugars and glycerol consists of alcohol groups. To yield suitable renewable chemicals these natural products need to be defunctionalized by means of dehydroxylation. Here we review the possible approaches and evaluate them from a fundamental chemical aspect. PMID:21887771

  11. Renewable Chemicals: Dehydroxylation of Glycerol and Polyols

    PubMed Central

    ten Dam, Jeroen; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The production of renewable chemicals is gaining attention over the past few years. The natural resources from which they can be derived in a sustainable way are most abundant in sugars, cellulose and hemicellulose. These highly functionalized molecules need to be de-functionalized in order to be feedstocks for the chemical industry. A fundamentally different approach to chemistry thus becomes necessary, since the traditionally employed oil-based chemicals normally lack functionality. This new chemical toolbox needs to be designed to guarantee the demands of future generations at a reasonable price. The surplus of functionality in sugars and glycerol consists of alcohol groups. To yield suitable renewable chemicals these natural products need to be defunctionalized by means of dehydroxylation. Here we review the possible approaches and evaluate them from a fundamental chemical aspect. PMID:21887771

  12. Design and analysis of biorefineries based on raw glycerol: addressing the glycerol problem.

    PubMed

    Posada, John A; Rincón, Luis E; Cardona, Carlos A

    2012-05-01

    Glycerol as a low-cost by-product of the biodiesel industry can be considered a renewable building block for biorefineries. In this work, the conversion of raw glycerol to nine added-value products obtained by chemical (syn-gas, acrolein, and 1,2-propanediol) or bio-chemical (ethanol, 1,3-propanediol, d-lactic acid, succinic acid, propionic acid, and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) routes were considered. The technological schemes for these synthesis routes were designed, simulated, and economically assessed using Aspen Plus and Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator, respectively. The techno-economic potential of a glycerol-based biorefinery system for the production of fuels, chemicals, and plastics was analyzed using the commercial Commercial Sale Price/Production Cost ratio criteria, under different production scenarios. More income can be earned from 1,3-propanediol and 1,2-propanediol production, while less income would be obtained from hydrogen and succinic acid. This analysis may be useful mainly for biodiesel producers since several profitable alternatives are presented and discussed. PMID:22349197

  13. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  14. Capillary and microchip electrophoretic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ferey, Ludivine; Delaunay, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants which can reach the environment and food in different ways. Because of their high toxicity, two international regulatory institutions, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the European Food Safety Authority, have classified PAHs as priority pollutants, generating an important demand for the detection and identification of PAHs. Thus, sensitive, fast, and cheap methods for the analysis of PAHs in environmental and food samples are urgently needed. Within this context, electrophoresis, in capillary or microchip format, displays attractive features. This review presents and critically discusses the published literature on the different approaches to capillary and microchip electrophoresis analysis of PAHs. PMID:25542576

  15. Glycerol dynamics in weight-losing cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Edén, E; Edström, S; Bennegárd, K; Lindmark, L; Lundholm, K

    1985-02-01

    This study was designed to show whether weight-losing cancer patients have an elevated glycerol turnover. Four groups of patients were examined: weight-losing cancer patients, weight-losing patients without cancer, cancer patients without weight loss, and weight-stable and well-nourished hospitalized control patients. Glycerol was infused intravenously at three different rates (200, 400, and 800 mumol/hr/kg body weight) after an overnight fast. This allowed measurement of clearance and plasma glycerol turnover. Weight-losing cancer patients (group 1) had an almost threefold higher glycerol turnover per kilogram of body weight compared with malnourished and well-nourished noncancer patients. However, both malnourished cancer and noncancer patients had an elevated glycerol turnover compared with well-nourished patients when glycerol turnover was related to whole body lipids. The results how that progressive clinical cancer is associated with an elevated plasma glycerol turnover, probably indicating an increased whole body lipolysis. This may explain the loss of body fat during the development of cancer cachexia. PMID:4038560

  16. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  17. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  19. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  20. Optimization of medium composition for erythritol production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Rywińska, Anita; Marcinkiewicz, Marta; Cibis, Edmund; Rymowicz, Waldemar

    2015-08-18

    Several factors affecting erythritol production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica Wratislavia K1 strain were examined in batch fermentations. Ammonium sulfate, monopotassium phosphate, and sodium chloride were identified as critical medium components that determine the ratio of polyols produced. The central composite rotatable experimental design was used to optimize medium composition for erythritol production. The concentrations of ammonium sulfate, monopotassium phosphate, and sodium chloride in the optimized medium were 2.25, 0.22, and 26.4 g L(-1), respectively. The C:N ratio was found as 81:1. In the optimized medium with 100 g L(-1) of glycerol the Wratislavia K1 strain produced 46.9 g L(-1) of erythritol, which corresponded to a 0.47 g g(-1) yield and a productivity of 0.85 g L(-1) hr(-1). In the fed-batch mode and medium with the total concentration of glycerol at 300 g L(-1) and C:N ratio at 81:1, 132 g L(-1) of erythritol was produced with 0.44 g g(-1) yield and a productivity of 1.01 g L(-1) hr(-1.) PMID:25387364

  1. Glycerol uptake is by passive diffusion in the heart but by facilitated transport in RBCs at high glycerol levels in cold acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax).

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Driedzic, William R

    2012-04-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small fish that accumulates glycerol at low winter seawater temperatures. In laboratory-held fish, glycerol concentration typically reaches 225 mM in plasma and in all cells. Glycerol uptake by the heart and red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed by tracking [(14)C(U)]glycerol into the acid-soluble pool. In fish acclimated to 9-10°C a decrease in perfusion/incubation temperature from 8 to 1°C resulted in a decrease in glycerol uptake with a Q(10) of 3.2 in heart and 2.4 in RBCs. Acclimation to ∼1.5°C did not result in an adaptive enhancement of glycerol uptake as rates were unchanged in heart and RBCs. Glycerol uptake at 1°C was by passive diffusion in heart as evidenced by a linear relationship between glycerol uptake and extracellular glycerol concentration and a lack of inhibition by phloretin. In contrast, in RBCs, glycerol uptake with respect to glycerol concentration showed two linear relationships with a transition point around 50 mM extracellular glycerol. The slope of the second phase was much steeper and eliminated with the inclusion of phloretin. In RBCs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a related species that does not accumulate glycerol, glycerol uptake showed only a single linear curve and was not inhibited by phloretin. The data imply a strong facilitated component to glycerol uptake in rainbow smelt RBCs at high glycerol concentrations. We propose this is related to cyclic changes in RBC glycerol content involving a loss of glycerol at the gill and a reaccumulation during passage through the liver. PMID:22319051

  2. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed. PMID:17124140

  3. Gravity-Capillary Lumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Triantaphyllos R.; Kim, Boguk

    2004-11-01

    In dispersive wave systems, it is known that 1-D plane solitary waves can bifurcate from linear sinusoidal wavetrains at particular wave numbers k = k0 where the phase speed c(k) happens to be an extremum (dc/dk| _0=0) and equals the group speed c_g(k_0). Two distinct possibilities thus arise: either the extremum occurs in the long-wave limit (k_0=0) and, as in shallow water, the bifurcating solitary waves are of the KdV type; or k0 ne 0 and the solitary waves are in the form of packets, described by the NLS equation to leading order, as for gravity-capillary waves in deep water. Here it is pointed out that an entirely analogous scenario is valid for the genesis of 2-D solitary waves or `lumps'. Lumps also may bifurcate at extrema of the phase speed and do so when 1-D solitary waves happen to be unstable to transverse perturbations; moreover, they have algebraically decaying tails and are either of the KPI type (e.g. in shallow water in the presence of strong surface tension) or of the wave packet type (e.g. in deep water) and are described by an elliptic-elliptic Davey-Stewartson equation system to leading order. Examples of steady lump profiles are presented and their dynamics is discussed.

  4. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J C T; Tas, N R; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-10-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because of decreased velocity gradients at the wall. Both these effects essentially stem from the spontaneous formation of an electric double layer (EDL) and the resulting streaming potential caused by the net capillary-flow-driven advection of ionic species within the EDL. Our results demonstrate that filling of charged capillaries also exhibits the well-known linear and Washburn regimes witnessed for uncharged capillaries, although the filling rate is always lower than that of the uncharged capillary. We attribute this to a competitive success of the lowering of the driving forces (because of electroviscous effects), in comparison to the effect of weaker drag forces. We further reveal that the time at which the transition between the linear and the Washburn regime occurs may become significantly altered with the introduction of surface charges, thereby altering the resultant capillary dynamics in a rather intricate manner. PMID:25375597

  5. Production of rapamycin in Streptomyces hygroscopicus from glycerol-based media optimized by systemic methodology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Bu Soo; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Jeon, Jong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Yi, Da-Hye; Lee, Ju-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2014-10-01

    Rapamycin, produced by the soil bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus, has the ability to suppress the immune system and is used as an antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunosuppressive agent. In an attempt to increase the productivity of rapamycin, mutagenesis of wild-type Streptomyces hygroscopicus was performed using ultraviolet radiation, and the medium composition was optimized using glycerol (which is one of the cheapest starting substrates) by applying Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology. Plackett-Burman design was used to analyze 14 medium constituents: M100 (maltodextrin), glycerol, soybean meal, soytone, yeast extract, (NH4)2SO4, L-lysine, KH2PO4, K2HPO4, NaCl, FeSO4·7H2O, CaCO3, 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid, and the initial pH level. Glycerol, soytone, yeast extract, and CaCO3 were analyzed to evaluate their effect on rapamycin production. The individual and interaction effects of the four selected variables were determined by Box-Behnken design, suggesting CaCO3, soytone, and yeast extract have negative effects, but glycerol was a positive factor to determine rapamycin productivity. Medium optimization using statistical design resulted in a 45% (220.7 ± 5.7 mg/l) increase in rapamycin production for the Streptomyces hygroscopicus mutant, compared with the unoptimized production medium (151.9 ± 22.6 mg/l), and nearly 588% compared with wildtype Streptomyces hygroscopicus (37.5 ± 2.8 mg/l). The change in pH showed that CaCO3 is a critical and negative factor for rapamycin production. PMID:25001557

  6. Capillary force in high aspect-ratio micropillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh

    High aspect-ratio (HAR) micropillar arrays are important for many applications including, mechanical sensors and actuators, tunable wetting surfaces and substrates for living cell studies. However, due to their mechanical compliance and large surface area, the micropillars are susceptible to deformation due to surface forces, such as adhesive force and capillary force. In this thesis we have explored the capillary force driven mechanical instability of HAR micropillar arrays. We have shown that when a liquid is evaporated off the micropillar arrays, the pillars bend and cluster together due to a much smaller capillary meniscus interaction force while still surrounded by a continuous liquid body, rather than due to often reported Laplace pressure difference because of isolated capillary bridges. We have studied both theoretically and experimentally, the capillary force induced clustering behavior of micropillar arrays as a function of their elastic modulus. To this end, we have developed a modified replica molding process to fabricate a wide range of hydrogel micropillar arrays, whose elastic modulus in the wet state could be tuned by simply varying the hydrogel monomer composition. By minimizing the sum of capillary meniscus interaction energy and bending energy of the pillars in a cluster, we have derived a critical micropillar cluster size, which is inversely proportional to elastic modulus of micropillars. The estimated cluster size as a function of elastic modulus agrees well with our experimental observation. We have also explored the utility of the clustered micropillar arrays as ultrathin whitening layers mimicking the structural whitening mechanism found in some insects in nature. Finally, we have theoretically studied the capillary force induced imbibition of a liquid droplet on a model rough surface consisting of micropillar arrays. Our theoretical model suggests that due to shrinking liquid droplet, the imbibition dynamics does not follow the diffusive

  7. Capillary Flow Experiments Began on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    J. Mark Hickman; Green, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    The Capillary Flow Experiments (CFEs) are a suite of fluid physics flight experiments designed to investigate capillary flows and phenomena in low gravity. Data obtained from the CFEs will be crucial to NASA s Space Exploration Initiative, particularly pertaining to fluids management systems such as fuels and cryogen storage systems, thermal control systems (e.g., water recycling), and materials processing in the liquid state. NASA s current plans for exploration missions assume the use of larger liquid propellant masses than have ever flown on interplanetary missions. Under low-gravity conditions, capillary forces can be exploited to control fluid orientation so that such large mission-critical systems perform predictably. The first of the CFE experiments has been conducted on the International Space Station, and the data are being analyzed. The experiment suite is described briefly.

  8. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate and alginate from glycerol by Azotobacter vinelandii under nitrogen-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an interesting feedstock for biomaterials such as biofuels and bioplastics because of its abundance as a by-product during biodiesel production. Here we demonstrate glycerol metabolism in the nitrogen-fixing species Azotobacter vinelandii through metabolomics and nitrogen-free bacterial production of biopolymers, such as poly-d-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and alginate, from glycerol. Glycerol-3-phosphate was accumulated in A. vinelandii cells grown on glycerol to the exponential phase, and its level drastically decreased in the cells grown to the stationary growth phase. A. vinelandii also overexpressed the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene when it was grown on glycerol. These results indicate that glycerol was first converted to glycerol-3-phosphate by glycerol kinase. Other molecules with industrial interests, such as lactic acid and amino acids including γ-aminobutyric acid, have also been accumulated in the bacterial cells grown on glycerol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that glycerol-grown A. vinelandii stored PHB within the cells. The PHB production level reached 33% per dry cell weight in nitrogen-free glycerol medium. When grown on glycerol, alginate-overproducing mutants generated through chemical mutagenesis produced 2-fold the amount of alginate from glycerol than the parental wild-type strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial production of biopolymers from glycerol without addition of any nitrogen source. PMID:25880041

  9. Capillary viscometer with a pressure sensor: a subject for student projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massalha, Taha; Digilov, Rafael M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe a vacuum-based pressure-detecting capillary viscometer for the viscosity determination of Newtonian fluids without known density. The viscometer operates on the principle that the variation in air pressure of the vacuum vessel p≤ft(t\\right) replaces the flow rate and pressure drop measurements which are usually required for the operation of a capillary tube viscometer. The mathematical expression for p≤ft(t\\right), found in the terms of the Lambert-W function, is used to fit the experimental data for viscosity determination. The results for viscosities of distilled water and 50 wt.% glycerol aqueous solution obtained under ambient temperature condition were compared to reference data and a good agreement was observed. The viscometer is suitable for undergraduate laboratories due to its low cost and simplicity in experimental setup. Moreover, the experimental with the vacuum vessel setup provides an in-depth understanding of fluid flow.

  10. Glycerol administration before endurance exercise: metabolism, urinary glycerol excretion and effects on doping-relevant blood parameters.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karsten; Braun, Hans; de Marees, Markus; Geyer, Hans; Thevis, Mario; Mester, Joachim; Schaenzer, Wilhelm

    2014-03-01

    Glycerol is prohibited as a masking agent by the World Anti-Doping Agency and a urinary threshold has recently been recommended. However, little is known about urinary glycerol excretion after exercise, when (1) exogenous glycerol is metabolized increasingly and (2) endogenous glycerol levels are elevated. The purpose of the placebo-controlled cross-over study was to determine the effects of pre-exercise glycerol administration on glycerol metabolism, urinary excretion, and selected blood parameters. After administration of glycerol (G; 1.0 g/kg body weight (BW) + 25 ml fluid/kg BW) or placebo (P; 25 ml fluid/kg), 14 cyclists exercised 90 min at 60% VO2max . Samples were taken at 0 h (before administration), 2.5 h (before exercise), 4 h (after exercise) and 6.5 h and additional urine samples were collected until 24 h. Exercise increased endogenous plasma glycerol (0.51 ± 0.21 mmol/l) but peak concentrations were much higher in G (2.5 h: 15.6 ± 7.8 mmol/l). Urinary glycerol increased rapidly (58,428 ± 71,084 µg/ml after 2.5 h) and was significantly higher than in P until 13.6 ± 0.9 h (p < 0.01). In comparison with placebo administration, G caused significantly greater changes in plasma volume and haemoglobin concentrations after 2.5 h. BW and urine production were significantly different between P and G after 2.5 h and post-exercise. Despite exercise-induced increases in endogenous glycerol in the control group, urinary excretion remained well below the previously recommended threshold. In addition, exercise-related glycerol degradation did not appear to negatively affect the detection of exogenously administered glycerol. PMID:23359436

  11. Plasma reforming of glycerol for synthesis gas production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinli; Hoang, Trung; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2009-05-28

    Glycerol can be effectively converted to synthesis gas (selectivity higher than 80%) with small amounts of water or no water using plasmas at low temperature and atmospheric pressure, without external heating. PMID:19436906

  12. Diffusion-viscosity decoupling in supercooled glycerol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Trejo González, José A; Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion of ferrocene methanol in supercooled glycerol-water mixtures has been measured over a wide viscosity range, which allowed analyzing the composition dependence of the Stokes-Einstein breakdown (diffusion-viscosity decoupling). The observed decoupling exhibits a common behavior for all studied compositions (glycerol mass fractions between 0.7 and 0.9), determined by the reduced temperature (T/Tg) of the mixtures. This result differs from that reported previously for the diffusion of glycerol in its aqueous solutions, where the reduced temperature for the decoupling decreases with increasing water content. We conclude that the contradictory results are only apparent, and they can be explained by the use of inconsistent extrapolated values of the viscosity of the glycerol-water mixtures in the supercooled region. PMID:25478790

  13. Dehydration of glycerol over niobia-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Yi; Ok, Hye Jeong; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over nanosized niobia-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts was performed to investigate the effect of the silicotungstic acid loading on the catalytic performance of the catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by following an impregnation method with different HSiW loadings in the range of 10-50 wt%. The prepared catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption, XRD, FT-IR, TPD of ammonia, and TGA. Dehydration of glycerol was conducted in an autoclave reactor under the conditions of controlled reaction temperatures under corresponding pressure. Increasing HSiW loading rapidly increased the acidity of HSiW/Nb205 catalyst and rate of glycerol conversion, but acrolein selectivity decreased due to enhanced deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposit. Consequently, it was confirmed that catalytic activity for the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was dependant on the acidity of catalyst and can be controlled by HSiW loading. PMID:23646735

  14. Recent Advances in Glycerol Polymers: Chemistry and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol polymers are attracting increased attention due to the diversity of polymer compositions and architectures available. This article provides a brief chronological review on the current status of these polymers along with representative examples of their use for biomedical applications. First, we describe the underlying chemistry of glycerol, which provides access to a range of monomers for subsequent polymerizations. We then review the various synthetic methodologies to prepare glycerol-based polymers including polyethers, polycarbonates, polyesters, and so forth. Next, we describe several biomedical applications where glycerol polymers are being investigated including carriers for drug delivery, sealants or coatings for tissue repair, and agents possessing antibacterial activity. Fourth, we describe the growing market opportunity for the use of polymers in medicine. Finally we conclude and summarize the findings, as well as discuss potential opportunities for continued research efforts. PMID:25308354

  15. Physicochemical characterization of oil palm mesocarp fibre treated with glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor Hamizah M., A.; Roila, A.; Rahimi M., Y.

    2015-09-01

    Lignocellulose has been identified as another source for conversion into value added products. In the present work, physicochemical features from the oil palm mesocarp fibre treated by using pure glycerol with 2% (w/w) NaOH catalyst and crude glycerol have been studied. Treatment was conducted at temperatures 150 °C for 60 min. Fibre treated by crude glycerol resulted in high percentages of holocellulose and lower content of insoluble lignin. These results suggest that crude glycerol can be used as an alternative solvent for pretreatment process. The characterization treated fibre by means of FTIR and TGA has shown significant differences compared to untreated fibre. It was revealed that treated fibre successful eliminated hemicellulose and reduce of lignin content.

  16. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T.; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm3 H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  17. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm(3) H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  18. A comparison of absorption of glycerol tristearate and glycerol trioleate by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstedt, S.E.; Hayashi, H.; Kritchevsky, D.; Tso, P. )

    1990-09-01

    Generally, fats rich in saturated fatty acids raise serum cholesterol, whereas fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids lower it. There appear to be exceptions; e.g., stearic acid (18:0)-rich fats have little or no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations. This apparent lack of cholesterolemic effect of stearic acid-rich fat could be because intestinal absorption of fat is poor or subsequent plasma and/or tissue metabolism of fat is different. To investigate mechanisms involved, we compared intestinal digestion, uptake, and lymphatic transport of glycerol tristearate (TS) and glycerol trioleate (TO, 18:1). Two groups of rats bearing intestinal lymph fistulas were used. TO rats were fed intraduodenally for 8 h at a constant rate a lipid emulsion of 25 mumols/h of TO (labeled with glycerol tri(9,10 (n)-3H)oleate), 7.8 mumols of egg phosphatidylcholine, and 57 mumols of sodium taurocholate in 3 ml of phosphate-buffered saline. TS rats were fed the same lipid emulsion except that TS replaced TO and the emulsion was labeled with glyceryl (1,3-14C)tristearate. The lymph triglyceride and radioactivity were determined. After infusion, the luminal and mucosal radioactive lipid content was analyzed. The results showed that there was significantly less lipid transported in the lymph of TS rats compared with TO rats. The results also showed a significant decrease in the absorption of TS as compared with TO. This was due in part to poor lipolysis. In addition, the lipid absorbed by the intestine of the TS rats was transported into lymph less efficiently than in TO rats.

  19. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  20. Processes and systems for the production of propylene glycol from glycerol

    DOEpatents

    Frye, John G; Oberg, Aaron A; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-01-20

    Processes and systems for converting glycerol to propylene glycol are disclosed. The glycerol feed is diluted with propylene glycol as the primary solvent, rather than water which is typically used. The diluted glycerol feed is sent to a reactor where the glycerol is converted to propylene glycol (as well as other byproducts) in the presence of a catalyst. The propylene glycol-containing product from the reactor is recycled as a solvent for the glycerol feed.

  1. Value-added uses for crude glycerol--a byproduct of biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is a promising alternative, and renewable, fuel. As its production increases, so does production of the principle co-product, crude glycerol. The effective utilization of crude glycerol will contribute to the viability of biodiesel. In this review, composition and quality factors of crude glycerol are discussed. The value-added utilization opportunities of crude glycerol are reviewed. The majority of crude glycerol is used as feedstock for production of other value-added chemicals, followed by animal feeds. PMID:22413907

  2. Key enzymes catalyzing glycerol to 1,3-propanediol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Wang, Yuanpeng; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel as it is produced from animal fats and vegetable oils, and it produces about 10 % (w/w) glycerol, which is a promising new industrial microbial carbon, as a major by-product. One of the most potential applications of glycerol is its biotransformation to high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD), dihydroxyacetone (DHA), succinic acid, etc., through microbial fermentation. Glycerol dehydratase, 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase (1,3-propanediol-oxydoreductase), and glycerol dehydrogenase, which were encoded, respectively, by dhaB, dhaT, and dhaD and with DHA kinase are encompassed by the dha regulon, are the three key enzymes in glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA, and these are discussed in this review article. The summary of the main research direction of these three key enzyme and methods of glycerol bioconversion into 1,3-PD and DHA indicates their potential application in future enzymatic research and industrial production, especially in biodiesel industry. PMID:26966462

  3. Occurrence of glycerol uptake in Dunaliella tertiolecta under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huixin; Fang, Lei; Low, Chin Seng; Chow, Yvonne; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2013-02-01

    The unicellular halotolerant green alga species Dunaliella are able to proliferate in extremely varied salinities by synthesizing intracellular glycerol and adjusting the cell shape and volume. However, some marine Dunaliella species such as Dunaliella tertiolecta are not able to regulate cell volume as an immediate response to counter external osmotic shock. Here we report that a rapid shock-response mechanism is present in Dunaliella tertiolecta, involving uptake of exogenous glycerol in response to hyperosmotic shock without changing cell volume, and this glycerol uptake activity is associated with the Dunaliella tertiolecta glycerol uptake protein 1 (DtGUP1) gene, which belongs to the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase. The mutant DtGUP1-E, in which the DtGUP1 gene is silenced, displayed an inability to take up glycerol from the medium and showed cell death under hyperosmotic shock. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gene product has been reported in Dunaliella tertiolecta that is involved in glycerol uptake activity under hyperosmotic stress. PMID:23279806

  4. Efficient synthetic protocols in glycerol under heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Orio, Laura; Gaudino, Emanuela Calcio; Martina, Katia; Tavor, Dorith; Wolfson, Adi

    2011-08-22

    The massive increase in glycerol production from the transesterification of vegetable oils has stimulated a large effort to find novel uses for this compound. Hence, the use of glycerol as a solvent for organic synthesis has drawn particular interest. Drawbacks of this green and renewable solvent are a low solubility of highly hydrophobic molecules and a high viscosity, which often requires the use of a fluidifying co-solvent. These limitations can be easily overcome by performing reactions under high-intensity ultrasound and microwaves in a stand-alone or combined manner. These non-conventional techniques facilitate and widen the use of glycerol as a solvent in organic synthesis. Glycerol allows excellent acoustic cavitation even at high temperatures (70-100 °C), which is otherwise negligible in water. Herein, we describe three different types of applications: 1) the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol in which glycerol plays the dual role of the solvent and hydrogen donor; 2) the palladium-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling; and (3) the Barbier reaction. In all cases glycerol proved to be a greener, less expensive, and safer alternative to the classic volatile organic solvents. PMID:21853535

  5. Hydration and endocrine responses to intravenous fluid and oral glycerol.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, S P; Strobel, N A; Osborne, M A; Fassett, R G; Coombes, J S

    2015-06-01

    Athletes use intravenous (IV) saline in an attempt to maximize rehydration. The diuresis from IV rehydration may be circumvented through the concomitant use of oral glycerol. We examined the effects of rehydrating with differing regimes of oral and IV fluid, with or without oral glycerol, on hydration, urine, and endocrine indices. Nine endurance-trained men were dehydrated by 4% bodyweight, then rehydrated with 150% of the fluid lost via four protocols: (a) oral = oral fluid only; (b) oral glycerol = oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg); (c) IV = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid; and (d) IV with oral glycerol = 50% IV fluid, 50% oral fluid with added glycerol (1.5 g/kg), using a randomized, crossover design. They then completed a cycling performance test. Plasma volume restoration was highest in IV with oral glycerol > IV > oral glycerol  > oral. Urine volume was reduced in both IV trials compared with oral. IV and IV with oral glycerol resulted in lower aldosterone levels during rehydration and performance, and lower cortisol levels during rehydration. IV with oral glycerol resulted in the greatest fluid retention. In summary, the IV conditions resulted in greater fluid retention compared with oral and lower levels of fluid regulatory and stress hormones compared with both oral conditions. PMID:25943662

  6. Microaerobic Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew S.; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W.; Le, Thao Q.; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process. PMID:24584248

  7. Importance of capillary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hardaway, R M

    1979-11-01

    Perfusion is more critical than oxygen in the maintenance of cell viability. A high hematocrit or high fibrinogen level increases blood viscosity and predisposes to disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is recommended that a hematocrit of about 30 be maintained in periods of circulatory stress such as shock or extracorporeal circulation. PMID:495856

  8. Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Seligra, Paula González; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Biodegradable and non-retrogradable starch-glycerol based films were obtained using citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent at 75°C. This material allowed decreasing water vapor permeability (WVP) more than 35%, remained amorphous for at least 45 days as a result of the network formed by the CA that avoided starch retrogradation and maintained the degradability in compost, occurring only six days after the films without citric acid. A simulation of the gelatinization process of starch-glycerol with and without CA, using a differential thermal analysis device, showed that the system with CA completed the gelatinization 5°C before than the other and, CA first reacted with glycerol and then starch-glycerol-CA reaction occurred. The temperature at which the gelatinization process was carried out was critical to obtain the best results. An increase of gelatinization process temperature at 85°C in system with CA, led to a worsening on WVP and its integrity after a swelling process with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compared to the films processed at 75°C. PMID:26794739

  9. Glycerol supplementation of the growth medium enhances in situ detoxification of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii during butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural adversely affect fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity on fermenting microbes. To harness the potential of lignocellulose as a cheap source of fermentable sugars, in situ detoxification of furfural and other lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors is essential. To enhance in situ detoxification and tolerance of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, the effect of glycerol on NADH/NADPH generation and ABE production by furfural (4, 5, and 6 g/L)-challenged cultures was investigated in this study. In all instances, beneficial outcomes were observed. For example, the fermentation medium supplemented with glycerol and subjected to 5 g/L furfural elicited up to 1.8- and 3-fold increases, respectively, in NADH and NADPH levels in C. beijerinckii 8052 relative to the control culture. These critical changes are the likely underpinnings for the glycerol-mediated 2.3-fold increase in the rate of detoxification of 5 g/L furfural, substrate consumption, and ABE production compared to the unsupplemented medium. Collectively, these results demonstrate that increased intracellular NADH/NADPH in C. beijerinckii 8052 due to glycerol utilization engenders favorable effects on many aspects of cellular metabolism, including enhanced furfural reduction and increased ABE production. PMID:24839212

  10. Capillary Pressure of a Liquid Between Uniform Spheres Arranged in a Square-Packed Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexader, J. Iwan D.; Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Collicott, Steven H.

    2004-01-01

    The capillary pressure in the pores defined by equidimensional close-packed spheres is analyzed numerically. In the absence of gravity the menisci shapes are constructed using Surface Evolver code. This permits calculation the free surface mean curvature and hence the capillary pressure. The dependences of capillary pressure on the liquid volume constructed here for a set of contact angles allow one to determine the evolution of basic capillary characteristics under quasi-static infiltration and drainage. The maximum pressure difference between liquid and gas required for a meniscus passing through a pore is calculated and compared with that for hexagonal packing and with approximate solution given by Mason and Morrow [l]. The lower and upper critical liquid volumes that determine the stability limits for the equilibrium capillary liquid in contact with square packed array of spheres are tabulated for a set of contact angles.

  11. The Effect of Ion Motion on Laser-Driven Plasma Wake in Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Suyun; Chen, Hui; Li, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ion motion in capillary-guided laser-driven plasma wake is investigated through rebuilding a two-dimensional analytical model. It is shown that laser pulse with the same power can excite more intense wakefield in the capillary of a smaller radius. When laser intensity exceeds a critical value, the effect of ion motion reducing the wakefield rises, which becomes significant with a decrease of capillary radius. This phenomenon can be attributed to plasma ions in smaller capillary obtaining more energy from the plasma wake. The dependence of the difference value between maximal scalar potential of wake for two cases of ion rest and ion motion on the radius of the capillary is discussed. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11247016), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Nos. 2014ZBAB202001 and 20151BAB212010), and the Science Foundation for Youths of the Jiangxi Education Committee of China (No. GJJ14224)

  12. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  13. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  14. Sounding rocket experiment on capillary channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, U.; Fechtmann, C.; Dreyer, M. E.

    2005-08-01

    This paper is concerned with flow rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions. The channels consist of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. In the case of steady flow the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the adjusted volumetric flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces. In order to investigate this type of flow an experiment aboard the sounding rocket TEXUS-41 was performed. The aim of the investigation was to achieve the profiles of the free liquid surfaces and to determine the maximum flow rate of the steady flow. For this purpose a new approach to the critical flow condition by enlarging the channel length was applied. The paper gives a review of the experimental set-up and the preparation of the flight procedures. Furthermore the experiment performance is described and the typical appearance of the flow indicated by its surface profiles is presented.

  15. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  16. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  17. Thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow of a low Prandtl number binary mixture with a -1 capillary ratio in an annular pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Chun-Mei; Li, You-Rong; Chen, Jie-Chao

    2016-08-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations on thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow in an annular pool were carried out. The pool was filled with silicon-germanium melt with an initial silicon mass fraction of 1.99%. The Prandtl number and the Lewis number of the working fluid are 6.37 × 10-3 and 2197.8, respectively. Both the radial temperature gradient and the solute concentration gradient were applied to the annular pool. The capillary ratio was assumed to be -1, which means that the solutal and thermal capillary effects were equal and opposite. Results show that the thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow always occurs at this special case with the capillary ratio of -1, and even in a shallow annular pool with an aspect ratio of 0.05. With the increase of the thermal Marangoni number, four kinds of flow patterns appear orderly, including concentric rolls, petal-like, spoke, and rosebud-like patterns. These flow patterns are strongly influenced by the local interaction between the solutal and thermal capillary effects and the vertical solute concentration gradient near the outer cylinder. A small vortex driven by the dominant solutal capillary effect emerges near the inner cylinder, which is different from the flow pattern in a pure fluid. In addition, the critical thermal Marangoni number of the initial three-dimensional flow decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio of the annular pool.

  18. Crude glycerol-based production of amino acids and putrescine by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Rittmann, Doris; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2013-10-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum possesses genes for glycerol kinase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that were shown to support slow growth with glycerol only when overexpressed from a plasmid. Pure glycerol and crude glycerol from biodiesel factories were tested for growth of recombinant strains expressing glpF, glpK and glpD from Escherichia coli. Some, but not all crude glycerol lots served as good carbon sources. Although the inhibitory compound(s) present in these crude glycerol lots remained unknown, the addition of substoichiometric glucose concentrations (below 10% by weight) enabled the utilization of some of the inhibitory crude glycerol lots. Besides growth, production of the amino acids L-glutamate, L-lysine, L-ornithine and L-arginine as well as of the diamine putrescine based on crude glycerol qualities from biodiesel factories was demonstrated. PMID:23562176

  19. Engineering of a glycerol utilization pathway for amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Rittmann, Doris; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2008-10-01

    The amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum cannot utilize glycerol, a stoichiometric by-product of biodiesel production. By heterologous expression of Escherichia coli glycerol utilization genes, C. glutamicum was engineered to grow on glycerol. While expression of the E. coli genes for glycerol kinase (glpK) and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD) was sufficient for growth on glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source, additional expression of the aquaglyceroporin gene glpF from E. coli increased growth rate and biomass formation. Glutamate production from glycerol was enabled by plasmid-borne expression of E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD in C. glutamicum wild type. In addition, a lysine-producing C. glutamicum strain expressing E. coli glpF, glpK, and glpD was able to produce lysine from glycerol as the sole carbon substrate as well as from glycerol-glucose mixtures. PMID:18757581

  20. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  2. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  3. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  4. Critical care in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Simko, L C

    1997-08-01

    Critical care nursing in Nicaragua is vastly different than critical care practiced in the United States. The current status of critical care nursing in Nicaragua is challenging at best. Medical personnel do not have access to arterial blood gases, blood cultures, and capillary blood glucose monitoring. The strengths and challenges present in Nicaraguan critical care has made the nursing staff rely on keen and astute nursing assessment of their patients. Due to the lack of technology in Nicaragua, creativity and improvising are a must in caring for a critically ill patient. However, the concerns and issues facing the nurses in Nicaragua are very similar to those experienced by critical care nurses in the United States. Critical care nursing in Nicaragua is indeed true nursing at its finest. PMID:9313419

  5. Percolation and Burgers' dynamics in a model of capillary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglio, A.; de Candia, A.; di Talia, S.; Gamba, A.

    2004-05-01

    Capillary networks are essential in vertebrates to supply tissues with nutrients. Experiments of in vitro capillary formation show that cells randomly spread on a gel matrix autonomously organize to form vascular networks. Cells form disconnected networks at low densities and connected ones above a critical density. Above the critical density the network is characterized by a typical mesh size ˜200 μm , which is approximately constant on a wide range of density values. In this paper we present a full characterization of a recently proposed model which reproduces the main features of the biological system, focusing on its dynamical properties, on the fractal properties of patterns, and on the percolative phase transition. We discuss the relevance of the model in relation with some experiments in living beings and proposed diagnostic methods based on the measurement of the fractal dimension of vascular networks.

  6. Droplet motion driven by electro-elasto-capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jaymeen; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2013-11-01

    The motion of droplets on natural and synthetic fibers underlines many technological applications including flexible displays, insulation, and smart filters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the coupled electrical, elastic, and capillary forces on droplets in fiber networks. In the present study, the motion of a water droplet suspended between two electrically insulated fibers of different Young's modulus, lengths and diameters are examined under electric fields. The results on rigid fibers reveal a critical voltage, under which the droplet remain stationary. Above this critical voltage, droplet self-propulsion is observed as a result of the interplay of electro, elasto and capillary forces on the droplet. The effects of the inter-fiber distance and Young's modulus on droplet motion are also discussed. The controllable motion of droplets can be used to manipulate or transport liquid at small scales.

  7. Glycerol dehydrates oedematous as well as normal brain in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Chen, J L

    1994-04-01

    1. Although the effect of glycerol on reducing intracranial pressure has been widely investigated, only a few studies have reported its dehydrating effect on brain oedema caused by infarction, ischaemia, microembolism and cold injury, but none on traumatic oedema. In this study the effects of glycerol (1 g/kg, i.v. bolus infusion at a rate of 0.04 g/kg per min) on traumatic and cryogenic cerebral oedema and on normal brain were compared in the anaesthetized dog. The tissue water content was measured with the gravimetric method. 2. Oedema resulting from mechanical trauma was initiated 4 h prior to treatment with glycerol (8 dogs) or vehicle (5 dogs) by closed head contusion with fixed force under general anaesthesia. Tissue samples underneath the region of contusion were taken, before and 1 h after infusion of glycerol or vehicle, for the measurement of water content. 3. Glycerol infusion decreased the water content in white matter of the traumatic brain model from 76.54 +/- 1.70% to 70.73 +/- 1.54% (P < 0.001). In normal brain the reduction was from 68.42 +/- 0.48% to 65.36 +/- 0.39% (P < 0.001). Neither vehicle nor glycerol infusion resulted in significant changes in specific gravity of the gray matter. 4. Cryogenic oedema was initiated 3 h prior to the infusion of glycerol or vehicle by applying unilaterally a brass conical cup (bottom diameter 1 cm) filled with dry ice-acetone (-65 degrees C) to the exposed dura for 1 min. The contralateral hemisphere, which was not subjected to cold injury, was used for determination of water content of normal gray and white matter. 5. Glycerol infusion decreased the water content in the white matter of the cold-injured region from 75.38 +/- 0.69% to 72.57 +/- 0.58% (P < 0.001). In the normal white matter the reduction was from 68.63 +/- 0.34% to 65.48 +/- 0.49% (P < 0.001). 6. Our data indicate that glycerol decreases water content of the white matter in traumatic and cold-injured oedematous brain as well as in normal brain

  8. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  9. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  10. Synthesis of monophytanyl ether analogues of lysophosphatidic and lysophosphatidyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kates, M; Hancock, A J

    1976-10-01

    The chemical synthesis of 3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phosphoric acid (monophytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidic acid) was effected by condensation of 1-iodo-2-O-benzyl-3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycerol with silver di-p-nitrobenzyl phosphate in anhydrous toluene followed by catalytic hydrogenolysis of the resulting phosphotriester to remove the benzyl and p-nitrobenzyl groups. Synthesis of 3-O-phytanyl-sn-glycero-1-phosphoryl-1'-sn-glycerol (monophytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidyl glycerol) was carried out by conversion of the above phosphotriester to the monosilver salt of the suitably blocked lysophosphatidic acid which was condensed with 1-iodo-2-O-t-butyl-3-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol. Removal of the protecting aromatic and t-butyl groups from the resulting blocked triester intermediate gave the desired phytanyl ether analogue of lysophosphatidyl glycerol. Both lyso analogues were isolated as analytically and chromatographically pure potassium salts. Their physical properties and behavior towards acid hydrolysis are described. PMID:991376

  11. Treatment of glycerol phase formed by biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-05-01

    Glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel produced by transesterification and is contained in the glycerol phase together with many other materials such as soaps, remaining catalyst, water, and esters formed during the process. The content of glycerol is approximately 30-60 wt.%. In this paper, treatments of the glycerol phase to obtain glycerol with a purity of 86 wt.% (without distillation) and a mixture of fatty acids with esters (1:1) or only a mixture of fatty acids with a purity of 99 wt.% are presented. The treatment was carried out by removing of alkaline substances and esters. Fatty acids were produced by saponification of the remaining esters and subsequent neutralization of alkaline substances by phosphoric, sulfuric, hydrochloric, or acetic acids. Salts are by-products and, in the case of phosphoric acid can be used as potash-phosphate fertilizer. The process of treatment is easy and environmentally friendly, because no special chemicals or equipment are required and all products are utilizable. PMID:20074939

  12. Thermodynamics of interdigitated phases of phosphatidylcholine in glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, M J; Marsh, D

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of the electron spin resonance spectra of phosphatidylcholines spin-labeled in the sn-2 chain at a position close to the polar region and close to the methyl terminus indicate that symmetrical saturated diacyl phosphatidylcholines with odd and even chain lengths from 13 to 20 C-atoms (and probably also 12 C-atoms) have gel phases in which the chains are interdigitated when dispersed in glycerol. The chain-length dependences of the chain-melting transition enthalpies and entropies are similar for phosphatidylcholines dispersed in glycerol and in water, but the negative end contributions are smaller for phosphatidylcholines dispersed in glycerol than for those dispersed in water: d delta Ht/dCH2 = 1.48 (1.43) kcal.mol-1, d delta St/dCH2 = 3.9 (4.0) cal.mol-1K-1, and delta H o = -12.9 (-15.0) kcal.mol-1, delta S o = -29 (-40) cal.mol-1K-1, respectively, for dispersions in glycerol (water). These differences reflect the interfacial energetics in glycerol and in water, and the different structure of the interdigitated gel phase. PMID:8534810

  13. Determination of optimal glycerol concentration for optical tissue clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Eungjun; Son, Taeyoon; Kim, Han-Sung; Jung, Byungjo

    2012-02-01

    The laser scattering in tissue is significant in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes of laser. Many studies have been conducted to minimize laser scattering in tissue and therefore, to maximize the clinical efficacy by enhancing photon density. Optical clearing agents (OCAs) have been employed for optical tissue clearing (OTC). This study was aimed to investigate the optimal concentration of an OCA, glycerol, in topical application,, so that it can be utilized for clinical diagnosis and therapy in dermatology. Glycerol was topically applied to avoid possible edema caused by dermal injection. The effect of OTC was quantitatively evaluated as a function of the concentration of glycerol with various methods. Optical methods such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and an integrating sphere were used to assess the enhancement of light penetration depth and refractive index matching. In addition, a non-optical method, ultrasound scanner, was utilized to evaluate quantitatively collagen dissociation. The results revealed that 70 % glycerol was the optimal concentration of OTC for topical application. This study may provide a guideline regarding to the use of glycerol for optimal diagnostic and therapeutic effects in dermatology.

  14. Dysferlin and Myoferlin Regulate Transverse Tubule Formation and Glycerol Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Rossi, Ann E.; Alvarez, Manuel G.; Swanson, Kaitlin E.; Deveaux, H. Kieran; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vohra, Ravneet; Walter, Glenn A.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Dysferlin is a membrane-associated protein implicated in muscular dystrophy and vesicle movement and function in muscles. The precise role of dysferlin has been debated, partly because of the mild phenotype in dysferlin-null mice (Dysf). We bred Dysf mice to mice lacking myoferlin (MKO) to generate mice lacking both myoferlin and dysferlin (FER). FER animals displayed progressive muscle damage with myofiber necrosis, internalized nuclei, and, at older ages, chronic remodeling and increasing creatine kinase levels. These changes were most prominent in proximal limb and trunk muscles and were more severe than in Dysf mice. Consistently, FER animals had reduced ad libitum activity. Ultrastructural studies uncovered progressive dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and ectopic and misaligned transverse tubules in FER skeletal muscle. FER muscle, and Dysf- and MKO-null muscle, exuded lipid, and serum glycerol levels were elevated in FER and Dysf mice. Glycerol injection into muscle is known to induce myopathy, and glycerol exposure promotes detachment of transverse tubules from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dysf, MKO, and FER muscles were highly susceptible to glycerol exposure in vitro, demonstrating a dysfunctional sarcotubule system, and in vivo glycerol exposure induced severe muscular dystrophy, especially in FER muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate the importance of dysferlin and myoferlin for transverse tubule function and in the genesis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:24177035

  15. Glycerol use in hyperhydration and rehydration: scientific update.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, S P; Coombes, J S

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol ingestion creates an osmotic drive that enhances fluid retention. The major practical applications for athletes are to either (i) hyperhydrate before exercise so that they have more fluid to be lost as sweat during subsequent performance, thereby delaying the progression of dehydration from becoming physiologically significant, or (ii) improve both the rate of rehydration and total fluid retention following exercise. Recently we showed that rehydration may be improved further by combining glycerol with intravenous fluids. Improvements in endurance time, time trial performance and total power and work output have been seen during exercise following glycerol-induced hyperhydration or rehydration. Another recent trial showed that the increased body weight associated with the extra fluid does not inadvertently affect running economy. Concerns that the haemodilution associated with the fluid retention in the vascular space may be sufficient to mask illegal doping practices by athletes led the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) to add glycerol to its list of prohibited substances in 2010. Recent evidence suggests that doses of > 0.032 ± 0.010 g/kg lean body mass (much lower than those required for rehydration) will result in urinary excretion that may be detectable, so athletes under the WADA jurisdiction should be cautious to limit their inadvertent glycerol intake. PMID:23075560

  16. The structure of GlpF, a glycerol conducting channel.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dax; Libson, Andrew; Stroud, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The passage of water or small neutral solutes across the cell membrane in animals, plants and bacteria is facilitated by a family of homologous membrane channels, variously known as aquaporins though perhaps more correctly as aquaglyceroporins. The glycerol facilitator (GlpF) is a 28 kDa aquaglyceroporin that catalyses transmembrane diffusion of glycerol and certain linear polyhydric alcohols in Escherichia coli. X-ray crystallographic analysis of GlpF to 2.2 A resolution revealed an alpha-barrel structure, surrounded by six full-length transmembrane helices and two half-spanning helices that are joined head-to-head in the middle of the membrane. These helices are arranged to a quasi twofold manner relative to the central membrane plane, where highly conserved residues make helix-to-helix contacts that stabilize the relative position and orientation of the helices in the structure. This sequence-structure correlation suggests that the evolutionary divergence of aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins is constrained by a conserved structural framework within which specialized function may be developed. Three glycerol molecules were resolved in the central channel through the GlpF monomer, thereby defining a transmembrane channel for glycerol permeation. The structure of glycerol GlpF complex provides insight into the chemical basis for transmembrane selective permeability. PMID:12027015

  17. Callibration of capillaries for density measurement of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peukert, Pavel; Duška, Michal; Hykl, Jiří; Sladký, Petr; Nikl, Zbyněk; Hrubý, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Density of supercooled water at elevated pressure is interesting because of the strong anomalies which can be explained by existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the region of supercooled water. In order to provide accurate data for density at these conditions a procedure was developed to calibrate the course of the inner cross section of a capillary along its length. Further, the image analysis for the sub-pixel evaluation of meniscus postion is described.

  18. Effect of NaCl on the accumulation of glycerol by three Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Zidan, M A; Abdel-Mallek, A Y

    1987-01-01

    The accumulation of glycerol was investigated in three Aspergillus species, A. niger, A. ochraceus and A. tamarii after being grown in media containing different NaCl concentrations. Intra-extracellular as well as total glycerol were markedly accumulated by the three organisms in response to increased salinity. However, at salinity levels of 10-14% NaCl, extracellular glycerol was somewhat lowered. In addition, it was found that the maximum accumulation of glycerol in A. niger and A. tamarii was reached within the first 10 hours after salinization. However, after desalinization, the extracellular glycerol was continuously increased within the first 6 hours at the expense of intracellular glycerol. PMID:3449615

  19. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  20. Water availability determines branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether distributions in soils of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, J.; Huguet, C.; Alcañiz, J. M.; Fietz, S.; Sachse, D.; Rosell-Melé, A.

    2013-06-01

    The MBT/CBT has recently gained significant attention as a novel paleotemperature proxy. It is based on the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in soils. The CBT quantifies the degree of cyclisation and relates to soil pH. The MBT' quantifies the degree of methylation and relates to mean annual temperature and soil pH. Combining these two indices allows estimation of mean annual temperature (MAT). However other factors such as soil water availability or moisture conditions have been suggested to influence the MBT'. To assess the effect of moisture conditions on the MBT'/CBT a set of 23 Iberian Peninsula soil samples covering a temperature range from 10-18 °C and a wide range of soil moisture regimes (405 mm to 1455 mm mean annual precipitation per year), was analyzed. We find that CBT is significantly correlated to soil pH confirming it as a robust proxy. In contrast the MBT' index was not correlated to MAT and was weakly correlated to annual mean precipitation (MAP). Instead we found a significant correlation between MBT' and the Aridity Index (AI), a parameter related to water availability in soils. The AI can explain 70% of the residuals of MAT estimation and 50% of the actual variation of the MBT'. This suggests that in dry environments or under moisture shortage the degree of methylation of branched GDGTs is not controlled by temperature but rather by the degree of water available. Our results suggest that the MBT/CBT index is not applicable as a paleotemperature proxy in dry subhumid to hyperarid environments.

  1. In situ production of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in a great basin hot spring (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Wang, Jinxiang; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Williams, Amanda J.; Zhu, Chun; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Zheng, Fengfeng; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs) are predominantly found in soils and peat bogs. In this study, we analyzed core (C)-bGDGTs after hydrolysis of polar fractions using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry and analyzed intact P-bGDGTs using total lipid extract (TLE) without hydrolysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-multiple stage mass spectrometry. Our results show multiple lines of evidence for the production of bGDGTs in sediments and cellulolytic enrichments in a hot spring (62–86°C) in the Great Basin (USA). First, in situ cellulolytic enrichment led to an increase in the relative abundance of hydrolysis-derived P-bGDGTs over their C-bGDGT counterparts. Second, the hydrolysis-derived P- and C-bGDGT profiles in the hot spring were different from those of the surrounding soil samples; in particular, a monoglycosidic bGDGT Ib containing 13,16-dimethyloctacosane and one cyclopentane moiety was detected in the TLE but it was undetectable in surrounding soil samples even after sample enrichments. Third, previously published 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis from the same lignocellulose samples demonstrated the enrichment of thermophiles, rather than mesophiles, and total bGDGT abundance in cellulolytic enrichments correlated with the relative abundance of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags from thermophilic bacteria in the phyla Bacteroidetes, Dictyoglomi, EM3, and OP9 (“Atribacteria”). These observations conclusively demonstrate the production of bGDGTs in this hot spring; however, the identity of organisms that produce bGDGTs in the geothermal environment remains unclear. PMID:23847605

  2. Accelerated dynamics of supercooled glycerol in soft confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blochowicz, T.; Gouirand, E.; Fricke, A.; Spehr, T.; Stühn, B.; Frick, B.

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of supercooled glycerol in a soft confinement within microemulsion droplets. The structure of the system is characterized by small-angle neutron scattering. We show that temperature-stable droplets establish a confinement, which may be varied in size from about 1 to 10 nm. Subsequently we focus on the dynamics of glass-forming glycerol confined within nanodroplets of different sizes. By combining neutron backscattering and time-of-flight for a broad dynamic range we obtain the incoherent intermediate scattering function S(q,t), which reveals increasingly accelerated dynamics as glycerol is confined to smaller droplets and for the relaxation times a crossover from Vogel-Fulcher behavior in the bulk to an Arrhenius law in confinement.

  3. Ru/FTO: Heterogeneous catalyst for glycerol hydrogenolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Wan Zurina; Isahak, Wan Nor Roslam Wan; Liew, Kin Hong; Nordin, Norazzizi; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi

    2014-09-01

    An introduction of Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) as new catalyst support with Ru metal had enhanced the conversion and selectivity for glycerol hydrogenolysis. A small cluster of Ru were highly dispersed and intercalated over FTO via simple chemical mixture and reduction method. In comparison with various metal (Pd, Os, Cu), Ru/FTO catalyst showed the highest conversion (100%) and highly selectivity of 1,2-propanediol (94%) in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol. The reaction was optimally conducted at 150 °C, 20 bar of H2 pressure and at 8 hours. Ru/FTO catalyst was ascribed as active catalyst due to the amphoteric sites of FTO and small size of Ru metal. This provides high surface concentration of reduction process that involves the chemical bond dissociation in the glycerol hydrogenolysis.

  4. Enhanced production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glycerol by modulation of glycerol metabolism in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangwook; Kim, Sun-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is a valuable biochemical with high potential for bioplastic manufacturing. The endogenous glycerol metabolism and by-product formation pathway in Escherichia coli were modulated to enhance 3-HP production from glycerol. Double deletion of glpK and yqhD directed the glycerol flux to 3-HP biosynthesis and reduced the formation of 1,3-propanediol. Since 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA), a precursor of 3-HP, is toxic to cell growth, the gene encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa semialdehyde dehydrogenase (PSALDH) highly active on 3-HPA was expressed in E. coli. Finally, fed-batch culture of recombinant E. coli BL21star(DE3) without glpK and yqhD, and expressing Lactobacillus brevis DhaB-DhaR, and P. aeruginosa PSALDH resulted in 57.3g/L 3-HP concentration, 1.59g/L-h productivity and 0.88g/g yield. In conclusion, modulation of the glycerol metabolism in combination with enhanced activity of 3-HPA dehydrogenation improved the production of 3-HP from glycerol. PMID:24502915

  5. Capillary Flow in Containers of Polygonal Section: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.; Rame, Enrique (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved understanding of the large-length-scale capillary flows arising in a low-gravity environment is critical to that engineering community concerned with the design and analysis of spacecraft fluids management systems. Because a significant portion of liquid behavior in spacecraft is capillary dominated it is natural to consider designs that best exploit the spontaneous character of such flows. In the present work, a recently verified asymptotic analysis is extended to approximate spontaneous capillary flows in a large class of cylindrical containers of irregular polygonal section experiencing a step reduction in gravitational acceleration. Drop tower tests are conducted using partially-filled irregular triangular containers for comparison with the theoretical predictions. The degree to which the experimental data agree with the theory is a testament to the robustness of the basic analytical assumption of predominantly parallel flow. As a result, the closed form analytical expressions presented serve as simple, accurate tools for predicting bulk flow characteristics essential to practical low-g system design and analysis. Equations for predicting corner wetting rates, total container flow rates, and transient surfaces shapes are provided that are relevant also to terrestrial applications such as capillary flow in porous media.

  6. A study of heat flux induced dryout in capillary grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Timothy J.

    1992-12-01

    This is an experimental study of ethanol flowing in the narrow grooves of a copper plate which is subjected to heat fluxes sufficient to evaporate more liquid than can be replaced by capillary pumping. Three groove geometries are used: square, rectangle, and trapezoid. The objective is to simulate aspects of liquid flow in heat pipes with axial grooves. In order to validate analytical models of capillary flow in grooves, the capillary limit, dryout front location, and dryout front movement in response to power draw downs are documented. The results show the rewet performance of the groove is dependent on geometry. Grooves of higher heat transfer capacity can be poor for recovering from dryout, like the trapezoidal groove. Comparisons of the theoretical maximum heat transfer with the data are good for the square and rectangle, but overestimate the value for the trapezoid. No theory sufficiently predicted the location of the dryout front for the three geometries. For both a quiescent dryout front and a boiling dryout front, the theory does not utilize an accurate description of the geometry of the liquid front which is critical for determining the capillary pressure difference.

  7. Effect of biodiesel-derived raw glycerol on 1,3-propanediol production by different microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chuloo; Ahn, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Seung W; Sang, Byoung-In; Um, Youngsoon

    2010-05-01

    The microbial production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) from raw glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, is economically and environmentally advantageous. Although direct use of raw glycerol without any pretreatment is desirable, previous studies have reported that this could cause inhibition of microbial growth. In this study, we investigated the effects of raw glycerol type, different microorganisms, and pretreatment of raw glycerol on the production of 1,3-PD. Raw glycerol from waste vegetable-oil-based biodiesel production generally caused more inhibition of 1,3-PD production and microbial growth compared to raw glycerol from soybean-oil-based biodiesel production. In addition, two raw glycerol types produced from two biodiesel manufacturers using waste vegetable oil exhibited different 1,3-PD production behavior, partially due to different amounts of methanol included in the raw glycerol from the two biodiesel manufacturers. Klebsiella strains were generally resistant to all types of raw glycerol while the growth of Clostridium strains was variably inhibited depending on the type of raw glycerol. The 1,3-PD production of the Clostridium strains using acid-pretreated raw glycerol was significantly enhanced compared to that with raw glycerol, demonstrating the feasibility of using raw glycerol for 1,3-PD production by various microorganisms. PMID:19937397

  8. Pulse loading of glycerol by electric explosion of wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, S. V.; Bannikova, I. A.; Naimark, O. B.

    2015-11-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the relaxation properties of glycerol under shock-wave loading. The strain rates at the compression wave front were in the range of 105-107 s-1. A modified version of the wire explosion set-up was used. Free surface velocity profiles were recorded by VISAR with fiber-optic sensor. We found that the glycerol exhibits the non-Newtonian liquid behavior: viscosity is higher at the high strain rate. Strain rate at the compressive wave front is found to be dependent on the wave amplitude in power of 1.3.

  9. Propylene from renewable resources: catalytic conversion of glycerol into propylene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yong-Mei; He, He-Yong; Fan, Kang-Nian; Cao, Yong

    2014-03-01

    Propylene, one of the most demanded commodity chemicals, is obtained overwhelmingly from fossil resources. In view of the diminishing fossil resources and the ongoing climate change, the identification of new efficient and alternative routes for the large-scale production of propylene from biorenewable resources has become essential. Herein, a new selective route for the synthesis of propylene from bio-derived glycerol is demonstrated. The route consists of the formation of 1-propanol (a versatile bulk chemical) as intermediate through hydrogenolysis of glycerol at a high selectivity. A subsequent dehydration produces propylene. PMID:24578188

  10. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kasina, A; Putzeys, T; Wübbenhorst, M

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk Tg and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in cp by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at -75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of "MROL glycerol" to its "normal" (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy cp, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τcal from that of normal "bulk" glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the existence of rigid polar clusters (RPCs