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Sample records for capillary rogue waves

  1. Financial Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen-Ya

    2010-11-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black—Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  2. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  3. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation. PMID:18075587

  4. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  5. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  6. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  7. Controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Chen, Lang; Belić, Milivoj; Petrović, Nikola

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue waves in certain inhomogeneous media. An analytical rogue wave solution of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatially modulated coefficients and an external potential in the form of modulated quadratic potential is obtained by the similarity transformation. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison with the analytical solutions and to confirm the stability of the rogue wave solution obtained. These optical rogue waves are built by the products of parabolic-cylinder functions and the basic rogue wave solution of the standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Such rogue waves may appear in different forms, as the hump and paw profiles.

  8. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves. PMID:24580164

  9. How to excite a rogue wave

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

  10. Are Rogue Waves Really Unexpected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    An unexpected wave is defined by Gemmrich & Garrett (2008) as a wave that is much taller than a set of neighboring waves. Their definition of "unexpected" refers to a wave that is not anticipated by a casual observer. Clearly, unexpected waves defined in this way are predictable in a statistical sense. They can occur relatively often with a small or moderate crest height, but large unexpected waves that are rogue are rare. Here, this concept is elaborated and statistically described based on a third-order nonlinear model. In particular, the conditional return period of an unexpected wave whose crest exceeds a given threshold is developed. This definition leads to greater return periods or on average less frequent occurrences of unexpected waves than those implied by the conventional return periods not conditioned on a reference threshold. Ultimately, it appears that a rogue wave that is also unexpected would have a lower occurrence frequency than that of a usual rogue wave. As specific applications, the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events are examined in detail. Both waves appeared without warning and their crests were nearly $2$-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ wave crests, and thus unexpected. The two crest heights are nearly the same as the threshold~$h_{0.3\\cdot10^{6}}\\sim1.6H_{s}$ exceeded on average once every~$0.3\\cdot 10^{6}$ waves, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. In contrast, the Andrea and WACSIS events, as both rogue and unexpected, would occur slightly less often and on average once every~$3\\cdot10^{6}$ and~$0.6\\cdot10^6$ waves respectively.

  11. Rogue Waves and Modulational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Dyachenko, A.

    2015-12-01

    The most plausible cause of rogue wave formation in a deep ocean is development of modulational instability of quasimonochromatic wave trains. An adequate model for study of this phenomenon is the Euler equation for potential flow of incompressible fluid with free surface in 2-D geometry. Numerical integration of these equations confirms completely the conjecture of rogue wave formation from modulational instability but the procedure is time consuming for determination of rogue wave appearance probability for a given shape of wave energy spectrum. This program can be realized in framework of simpler model using replacement of the exact interaction Hamiltonian by more compact Hamiltonian. There is a family of such models. The popular one is the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE). This model is completely integrable and suitable for numerical simulation but we consider that it is oversimplified. It misses such important phenomenon as wave breaking. Recently, we elaborated much more reliable model that describes wave breaking but is as suitable as NLSE from the point of numerical modeling. This model allows to perform massive numerical experiments and study statistics of rogue wave formation in details.

  12. Evolution of rogue waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolba, R. E. El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The evolution of rogue waves associated with the dynamics of positively charged dust grains that interact with streaming electrons and ions is investigated. Using a perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The rational solution of the NLSE is presented, which proposed as an effective tool for studying the rogue waves in Jupiter. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming densities of the ions and electrons. Furthermore, the supersonic rogue waves are much taller than the subsonic rogue waves by ∼25 times.

  13. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  14. The destructive impact of the rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamin, Roman

    2013-04-01

    In our talk rogue waves at the ocean will be considered. By means of numerical modeling dangerous impact of rogue waves on the ships and oil rigs is calculated. Cases when these waves can bring in accident are considered. Using statistics of emergence of waves (see [1]-[2]), it is possible to estimate risks in each case. These results can be used for safety of the ships and oil rigs from rogue waves. References [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, R.V. Shamin. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y [2] V.E. Zakharov, R.V. Shamin. Statistics of rogue waves in computer experiments // JETP Letters, 2012, V. 96, Issue 1, pp 66-69.

  15. Rogue waves in 2006-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolkina, I.; Didenkulova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays rogue waves are frequently registered all over the world by various instrumental measurements (range finders installed on offshore platforms or deployed buoys, SAR image processing, etc.). They are confirmed to exist in both deep and shallow areas of the World Ocean and even at the coast. Usually coastal rogue events result in a short-time sudden flooding of the coast, or strong impact upon the steep bank or coastal structures. The relevant descriptions, although at times suffering from too emotional character, are still very important as they considerably broaden the understanding of possible rogue wave occurrence. Although there exist hundreds of instrumental freak wave records, the pool of existing data is still insufficient to build reliable statistics and to give a definite answer concerning the nature of rogue waves. Therefore, it is important further to collect and to analyse all existing data of rogue wave events. It can bring us to new ideas of its nature and mechanisms of formation. In this study the evidence of rogue wave existence all over the world during last years has been collected based mainly on mass media sources. The waves occurred not only in deep and shallow zones of the World Ocean, but also at the coast. From the total number of 131 events reported in 2006-2010, 78 were identified as evidence of rogue waves (which are expected to be at least twice larger than the significant wave height). The background significant wave height was estimated from the satellite wave data. The rogue waves at the coast, where the significant wave height is unknown or meaningless, were selected based on their unexpectedness and hazardous character. In addition, the information on wind speed has been provided when available. The annual and seasonal statistics of rogue waves in each group and overall statistics of rogue wave occurrence has been discussed. The geography of freak wave events has been analyzed. The occurrence of multiple extreme waves (two

  16. Nonlinear Talbot effect of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R.; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Song, Jianping; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-03-01

    Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers are rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Talbot effect (TE) is an image recurrence phenomenon in the diffraction of light waves. We report the nonlinear TE of rogue waves in a cubic medium. It is different from the linear TE, in that the wave propagates in a NL medium and is an eigenmode of NLSE. Periodic rogue waves impinging on a NL medium exhibit recurrent behavior, but only at the TE length and at the half-TE length with a π-phase shift; the fractional TE is absent. The NL TE is the result of the NL interference of the lobes of rogue wave breathers. This interaction is related to the transverse period and intensity of breathers, in that the bigger the period and the higher the intensity, the shorter the TE length.

  17. Book review: Rogue waves in the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Review info: Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics. By Christian Kharif, Efim Pelinovsky and Alexey Slunyaev, 2009. ISBN: 978-3540884187, xiii, 216 pp.

  18. Rogue waves and NLSE Lie point symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechuga, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    In past decades rogues waves have been reported to be the main cause of shipping incidents. The unexpectedness and sudden appearance can be seen as their trait more characteristic. Rogue wave damages are linked with this unexpectedness. Therefore many studies have been carried out to ascertain the possible mechanisms of generation of rogue waves. Since the pioneering work of Zakharov researchers have found the so called Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation as the source of solutions to different kinds of rogue waves, Akhmediev, Peregrine , Matveev and many others. Following the well-known Lie group theory many researchers found the Lie point symmetries of the NLSE. Invariants of this equation are the scaling transformations, Galilean transformations and phase transformations. There are different approaches, which mathematical treatment is outside the scope of this work, but at the end, in a travelling frame ,after preserving the Hamiltonian structure we get an ordinary differential equation that is the Duffing equation(well-known as a model of nonlinear oscillations). The next step is the qualitative analysis of this equation. Solutions of the Duffing equation for different coefficients can be put as Jacobi elliptic functions. In particular, in the case of the focusing NLSE, we are concerned with the instabilities, in the sense of Lyapunov, of the transition between some of the solutions. We thought that these instabilities could be the origin of some kind of rogue waves.

  19. Nonparaxial rogue waves in optical Kerr media.

    PubMed

    Temgoua, D D Estelle; Kofane, T C

    2015-06-01

    We consider the inhomogeneous nonparaxial nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with varying dispersion, nonlinearity, and nonparaxiality coefficients, which governs the nonlinear wave propagation in an inhomogeneous optical fiber system. We present the similarity and Darboux transformations and for the chosen specific set of parameters and free functions, the first- and second-order rational solutions of the nonparaxial NLS equation are generated. In particular, the features of rogue waves throughout polynomial and Jacobian elliptic functions are analyzed, showing the nonparaxial effects. It is shown that the nonparaxiality increases the intensity of rogue waves by increasing the length and reducing the width simultaneously, by the way it increases their speed and penalizes interactions between them. These properties and the characteristic controllability of the nonparaxial rogue waves may give another opportunity to perform experimental realizations and potential applications in optical fibers. PMID:26172812

  20. Nonparaxial rogue waves in optical Kerr media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the inhomogeneous nonparaxial nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with varying dispersion, nonlinearity, and nonparaxiality coefficients, which governs the nonlinear wave propagation in an inhomogeneous optical fiber system. We present the similarity and Darboux transformations and for the chosen specific set of parameters and free functions, the first- and second-order rational solutions of the nonparaxial NLS equation are generated. In particular, the features of rogue waves throughout polynomial and Jacobian elliptic functions are analyzed, showing the nonparaxial effects. It is shown that the nonparaxiality increases the intensity of rogue waves by increasing the length and reducing the width simultaneously, by the way it increases their speed and penalizes interactions between them. These properties and the characteristic controllability of the nonparaxial rogue waves may give another opportunity to perform experimental realizations and potential applications in optical fibers.

  1. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Yao, Alison M.; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a spatiotemporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction, and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg-Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatiotemporal vortex-mediated turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability density functions (PDFs) with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  2. Dynamics of nonautonomous rogue waves in Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Li-Chen

    2013-02-15

    We study rogue waves of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) analytically in a time-dependent harmonic trap with a complex potential. Properties of the nonautonomous rogue waves are investigated analytically. It is reported that there are possibilities to 'catch' rogue waves through manipulating nonlinear interaction properly. The results provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves experimentally in a BEC system. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One more generalized rogue wave solutions are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present one possible way to catch a rouge wave. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties of rogue waves are investigated analytically for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves in BEC.

  3. Optical rogue waves associated with the negative coherent coupling in an isotropic medium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhen, Hui-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Optical rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling, which describe the propagation of orthogonally polarized optical waves in an isotropic medium, are reported. We construct and discuss a family of the vector rogue-wave solutions, including the bright rogue waves, four-petaled rogue waves, and dark rogue waves. A bright rogue wave without a valley can split up, giving birth to two bright rogue waves, and an eye-shaped rogue wave can split up, giving birth to two dark rogue waves. PMID:25768624

  4. Early detection of rogue waves by the wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possible advantages of using the wavelet transform over the Fourier transform for the early detection of rogue waves. We show that the triangular wavelet spectra of the rogue waves can be detected at early stages of the development of rogue waves in a chaotic wave field. Compared to the Fourier spectra, the wavelet spectra are capable of detecting not only the emergence of a rogue wave but also its possible spatial (or temporal) location. Due to this fact, wavelet transform is also capable of predicting the characteristic distances between successive rogue waves. Therefore multiple simultaneous breaking of the successive rogue waves on ships or on the offshore structures can be predicted and avoided by smart designs and operations.

  5. Spatial Rogue Waves in Photorefractive Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangeli, D.; Di Mei, F.; Conti, C.; Agranat, A. J.; DelRe, E.

    2015-08-01

    Rogue waves are observed as light propagates in the extreme nonlinear regime that occurs when a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal is undergoing a structural phase transition. The transmitted spatial light distribution contains bright localized spots of anomalously large intensity that follow a signature long-tail statistics that disappears as the nonlinearity is weakened. The isolated wave events form as out-of-equilibrium response and disorder enhance the Kerr-saturated nonlinearity at the critical point. Self-similarity associable to the individual observed filaments and numerical simulations of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation suggests that dynamics of soliton fusions and scale invariance can microscopically play an important role in the observed rogue intensities and statistics.

  6. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. F.; Grimshaw, R. H. J.; Chow, K. W.; Chan, H. N.

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  7. Generation of rogue waves in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechuga, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rogue waves have been reported as causing damages and ship accidents all over the oceans of the world. For this reason in the past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of their main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this line we are trying to generate them in a water tank. The description of the procedure to do that is the objective of this presentation. After Akhmediev et al. (2011) we use a symmetric spectrum as input on the wave maker to produce waves with a rate(Maximun wave height/ significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77, clearly between the limits of rogue waves. As it was pointed out by Janssen (2003), Onorato et al. (2006) and Kharif, Pelinovsky and Slunyaev (2009) modulation instability is enhanced when waves depart from Gaussian statistics (i.e. big kurtosis) and therefore both numbers enforce the criterion that we are generating genuine rogue waves. The same is confirmed by Shemer (2010) and Dudley et al.(2009) from a different perspective. If besides being symmetrical the spectrum is triangular, following Akhmediev(2011),the generated waves are even more conspicuously rogue waves.

  8. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field. PMID:27415263

  9. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  10. Time-reversal generation of rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, Amin; Fink, Mathias

    2014-03-28

    The formation of extreme localizations in nonlinear dispersive media can be explained and described within the framework of nonlinear evolution equations, such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). Within the class of exact NLS breather solutions on a finite background, which describe the modulational instability of monochromatic wave trains, the hierarchy of rational solutions localized in both time and space is considered to provide appropriate prototypes to model rogue wave dynamics. Here, we use the time-reversal invariance of the NLS to propose and experimentally demonstrate a new approach to constructing strongly nonlinear localized waves focused in both time and space. The potential applications of this time-reversal approach include remote sensing and motivated analogous experimental analysis in other nonlinear dispersive media, such as optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, and plasma, where the wave motion dynamics is governed by the NLS. PMID:24724652

  11. Time-Reversal Generation of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin; Fink, Mathias

    2014-03-01

    The formation of extreme localizations in nonlinear dispersive media can be explained and described within the framework of nonlinear evolution equations, such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). Within the class of exact NLS breather solutions on a finite background, which describe the modulational instability of monochromatic wave trains, the hierarchy of rational solutions localized in both time and space is considered to provide appropriate prototypes to model rogue wave dynamics. Here, we use the time-reversal invariance of the NLS to propose and experimentally demonstrate a new approach to constructing strongly nonlinear localized waves focused in both time and space. The potential applications of this time-reversal approach include remote sensing and motivated analogous experimental analysis in other nonlinear dispersive media, such as optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, and plasma, where the wave motion dynamics is governed by the NLS.

  12. Optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Pierre; Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre

    2015-04-10

    We report optical experiments allowing us to investigate integrable turbulence in the focusing regime of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation (1D NLSE). In analogy with broad spectrum excitation of a one-dimensional water tank, we launch random initial waves in a single mode optical fiber. Using an original optical sampling setup, we measure precisely the probability density function of optical power of the partially coherent waves rapidly fluctuating with time. The probability density function is found to evolve from the normal law to a strong heavy-tailed distribution, thus revealing the formation of rogue waves in integrable turbulence. Numerical simulations of 1D NLSE with stochastic initial conditions quantitatively reproduce the experiments. Our numerical investigations suggest that the statistical features experimentally observed rely on the stochastic generation of coherent analytic solutions of 1D NLSE. PMID:25910126

  13. Integrable turbulence and formation of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafontsev, D. S.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation we study numerically the nonlinear stage of the modulation instability (MI) of the condensate. The development of the MI leads to the formation of ‘integrable turbulence’ (Zakharov 2009 Stud. Appl. Math. 122 219-34). We study the time evolution of its major characteristics averaged across realizations of initial data—the condensate solution seeded by small random noise with fixed statistical properties. We observe that the system asymptotically approaches to the stationary integrable turbulence, however this is a long process. During this process momenta, as well as kinetic and potential energies, oscillate around their asymptotic values. The amplitudes of these oscillations decay with time t as t-3/2, the phases contain the nonlinear phase shift that decays as t-1/2, and the frequency of the oscillations is equal to the double maximum growth rate of the MI. The evolution of wave-action spectrum is also oscillatory, and characterized by formation of the power-law region ˜|k|-α in the small vicinity of the zeroth harmonic k = 0 with exponent α close to 2/3. The corresponding modes form ‘quasi-condensate’, that acquires very significant wave action and macroscopic potential energy. The probability density function of wave amplitudes asymptotically approaches the Rayleigh distribution in an oscillatory way. Nevertheless, in the beginning of the nonlinear stage the MI slightly increases the occurrence of rogue waves. This takes place at the moments of potential energy modulus minima, where the PDF acquires ‘fat tales’ and the probability of rogue waves occurrence is by about two times larger than in the asymptotic stationary state. Presented facts need a theoretical explanation.

  14. Rogue waves in the ocean - review and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Kharif, Christian; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Rogue waves in the ocean and physical mechanisms of their appearance are discussed. Theyse waves are among waves naturally observed by people on the sea surface that represent inseparable feature of the Ocean. Rogue waves appear from nowhere, cause danger and disappear at once. They may occur at the surface of a relatively calm sea, reach not very high amplitudes, but be fatal for ships and crew due to their unexpectedness and abnormal features. The billows appear suddenly exceeding the surrounding waves twice and more, and obtained many names: abnormal, exceptional, extreme, giant, huge, sudden, episodic, freak, monster, rogue, vicious, killer, mad- or rabid-dog waves; cape rollers, holes in the sea, walls of water, three sisters… Freak monsters, though living for seconds, were able to arouse superstitious fear of the crew, cause damage, death of heedless sailors or the whole ship. All these epithets are full of human fear and feebleness. The serious studies of the phenomenon started about 20-30 years ago and have been intensified during the recent decade. The research is being conducted in different fields: in physics (search of physical mechanisms and adequate models of wave enhancement and statistics), in geoscience (determining the regions and weather conditions when rogue waves are most probable), and in ocean and coastal engineering (estimations of the wave loads on fixed and drifting floating structures). Thus, scientists and engineers specializing in different subject areas are involved in the solution of the problem. The state-of-art of the rogue wave study is summarized in our book [Kharif, Ch., Pelinovsky, E., and Slunyaev, A. Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Springer, 2009] and presented in given review. Firstly, we start with a brief introduction to the problem of freak waves aiming at formulating what is understood as rogue or freak waves, what consequences their existence imply in our life, why people are so worried about them. Then we discuss existing

  15. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Amaury; Froehly, Luc; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frédéric; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2015-08-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated with broader spatial spectra. In addition, the electric field statistics of the intermediate pattern shows properties of an “optical sea” with near-Gaussian statistics in elevation amplitude, and trough-to-crest statistics that are near-Rayleigh distributed but with an extended tail where a number of rogue wave events are observed.

  16. Potential changes of wave steepness and occurrence of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta M.; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Wave steepness is an important characteristic of a sea state. It is also well established that wave steepness is one of the parameter responsible for generation of abnormal waves called also freak or rogue waves. The study investigates changes of wave steepness in the past and future wave climate in the North Atlantic. The fifth assessment report IPCC (2013) uses four scenarios for future greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere called Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). Two of these scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 have been selected to project future wave conditions in the North Atlantic. RCP 4.5 is believed to achieve the political target of a maximum global mean temperature increase of 2° C while RPC 8.5 is close to 'business as usual' and expected to give a temperature increase of 4° C or more. The analysis includes total sea, wind sea and swell. Potential changes of wave steepness for these wave systems are shown and compared with wave steepness derived from historical data. Three historical data sets with different wave model resolutions are used. The investigations show also changes in the mean wind direction as well as in the relative direction between wind sea and swell. Consequences of wave steepness changes for statistics of surface elevation and generation of rogue waves are demonstrated. Uncertainties associated with wave steepness projections are discussed.

  17. Nonautonomous rogue waves and 'catch' dynamics for the combined Hirota-LPD equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fajun

    2016-05-01

    We study multi-rogue wave solutions of a Schro¨dinger equation with higher-order terms employing the generalized Darboux transformation. Some properties of the nonautonomous rogue waves are investigated analytically for the combined Hirota-Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel (LPD) equation. We consider the controllable behaviors of this nonautonomous rogue wave solution with the nonlinearity management function and gain/loss coefficient. It is reported that there are possibilities to 'catch' rogue waves through manipulating nonlinear function and gain/loss coefficient. Our approach can provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves and present the potential applications for the rogue wave phenomena.

  18. Rogue Waves in Near Gaussian Sea States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Alfred R.

    2015-04-01

    The field of nonlinear waves often emphasizes the importance of small amplitude modulations in the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLS). The Akhmediev and Peregrine breather trains are examples which manifest themselves from the usual linear instability analyses of NLS. In reality, however, oceanic sea states generated by wind waves are very nearly Gaussian processes and so the modulus of the Hilbert transform envelope is approximately Rayleigh distributed (with of course the possibility of a large amplitude tail) and is therefore never a small amplitude modulation. How can we then reconcile our usual perceptions with this fact? What are indeed the solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation non Gaussianity have on the actual types of solutions that are likely to occur in the real ocean? I discuss how finite gap theory for NLS allows us to answer these and many more questions about rogue sea states. I analyze data from various laboratory and oceanic experiments to illustrate the method. Finally, I discuss whether breather trains such as Akhmediev, Peregrine and Ma-Kuznetsov can actually occur in ocean wave data.

  19. Modulational Instability and Rogue Waves in Shallow Water Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimshaw, R.; Chow, K. W.; Chan, H. N.

    It is now well known that the focussing nonlinear Schrödinger equation allows plane waves to be modulationally unstable, and at the same time supports breather solutions which are often invoked as models for rogue waves. This suggests a direct connection between modulation instability and the existence of rogue waves. In this chapter we review this connection for a suite of long wave models, such as the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the extended Korteweg-de Vries (Gardner) equation, often used to describe surface and internal waves in shallow water, a Boussinesq equation and, also a coupled set of Korteweg-de Vries equations.

  20. Electrostatic rogue-waves in relativistically degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the modulational instability and the possibility of electrostatic rogue-wave propagations in a completely degenerate plasma with arbitrary degree of degeneracy, i.e., relativistically degenerate plasma, ranging from solid density to the astrophysical compact stars. The hydrodynamic approach along with the perturbation method is used to reduce the governing equations to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation from which the modulational instability, the growth rate of envelope excitations and the occurrence of rogue as well as super-rogue waves in the plasma, is evaluated. It is observed that the modulational instability in a fully degenerate plasma can be quite sensitive to the plasma number-density and the wavenumber of envelop excitations. It is further revealed that the relativistically degeneracy plasmas (R{sub 0} > 1) are almost always modulationally unstable. It is found, however, that the highly energetic sharply localized electrostatic rogue as well as super-rogue waves can exist in the astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs and neutron star crusts. The later may provide a link to understand many physical processes in such stars and it may lead us to the origin of the random-localized intense short gamma-ray bursts, which “appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace” quite similar to oceanic rogue structures.

  1. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  2. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  3. Rogue waves and their generating mechanisms in different physical contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, M.; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Montina, A.; Arecchi, F. T.

    2013-07-01

    Rogue waves is the name given by oceanographers to isolated large amplitude waves, that occur more frequently than expected for normal, Gaussian distributed, statistical events. Rogue waves are ubiquitous in nature and appear in a variety of different contexts. Besides water waves, they have been recently reported in liquid Helium, in nonlinear optics, microwave cavities, etc. The first part of the review is dedicated to rogue waves in the oceans and to their laboratory counterpart with experiments performed in water basins. Most of the work and interpretation of the experimental results will be based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, an universal model, that rules the dynamics of weakly nonlinear, narrow band surface gravity waves. Then, we present examples of rogue waves occurring in different physical contexts and we discuss the related anomalous statistics of the wave amplitude, which deviates from the Gaussian behavior that were expected for random waves. The third part of the review is dedicated to optical rogue waves, with examples taken from the supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers, laser fiber systems and two-dimensional spatiotemporal systems. In particular, the extreme waves observed in a two-dimensional spatially extended optical cavity allow us to introduce a description based on two essential conditions for the generation of rogue waves: nonlinear coupling and nonlocal coupling. The first requirement is needed in order to introduce an elementary size, such as that of the solitons or breathers, whereas the second requirement implies inhomogeneity, a mechanism needed to produce the events of mutual collisions and mutual amplification between the elementary solitons or wavepackets. The concepts of “granularity” and “inhomogeneity” as joint generators of optical rogue waves are introduced on the basis of a linear experiment. By extending these concepts to other systems, rogue waves can be classified as phenomena occurring in

  4. High-order rogue waves for the Hirota equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Linjing; Wu, Zhiwei; Wang, Lihong; He, Jingsong

    2013-07-15

    The Hirota equation is better than the nonlinear Schrödinger equation when approximating deep ocean waves. In this paper, high-order rational solutions for the Hirota equation are constructed based on the parameterized Darboux transformation. Several types of this kind of solutions are classified by their structures. -- Highlights: •The determinant representation of the N-fold Darboux transformation of the Hirota equation. •Properties of the fundamental pattern of the higher order rogue wave. •Ring structure and triangular structure of the higher order rogue waves.

  5. Vector rogue waves and baseband modulation instability in the defocusing regime.

    PubMed

    Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Degasperis, Antonio; Lombardo, Sara; Onorato, Miguel; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-07-18

    We report and discuss analytical solutions of the vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation that describe rogue waves in the defocusing regime. This family of solutions includes bright-dark and dark-dark rogue waves. The link between modulational instability (MI) and rogue waves is displayed by showing that only a peculiar kind of MI, namely baseband MI, can sustain rogue-wave formation. The existence of vector rogue waves in the defocusing regime is expected to be a crucial progress in explaining extreme waves in a variety of physical scenarios described by multicomponent systems, from oceanography to optics and plasma physics. PMID:25083646

  6. On shallow water rogue wave formation in strongly inhomogeneous channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-05-01

    Rogue wave formation in shallow water is often governed by dispersive focusing and wave-bottom interaction. In this study we try to combine these mechanisms by considering dispersive nonreflecting wave propagation in shallow strongly inhomogeneous channels. Nonreflecting wave propagation provides extreme wave amplification and the transfer of wave energy over large distances, while dispersive effects allow formation of a short-lived wave of extreme height (rogue wave). We found several types of water channels, where this mechanism can be realized, including (i) channels with a monotonically decreasing cross-section (normal dispersion), (ii) an inland basin described by a half of elliptic paraboloid (abnormal dispersion) and (iii) an underwater hill described by a half of hyperbolic paraboloid (normal dispersion). Conditions for variations of local frequency in the wave train providing optimal focusing of the wave train are also found.

  7. Observation of three dimensional optical rogue waves through obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Leonetti, Marco; Conti, Claudio

    2015-06-22

    We observe three-dimensional rogue waves in the speckle distribution of a spatially modulated optical beam. Light is transmitted beyond a partially reflecting obstacle generating optical rogue waves at a controlled position in the shadow of the barrier. When the barrier transmits only 0.07% of the input laser power, we observe the mostly localized event. These results demonstrate that an optimum amount of spatial non-homogeneity maximizes the probability of a gigantic event while the technique we exploit enables to control light behind a fully reflective wall.

  8. Rogue Waves and New Multi-wave Solutions of the (2+1)-Dimensional Ito Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying-hui; Dai, Zheng-de

    2015-06-01

    A three-soliton limit method (TSLM) for seeking rogue wave solutions to nonlinear evolution equation (NEE) is proposed. The (2+1)-dimensional Ito equation is used as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. As a result, two rogue waves and a family of new multi-wave solutions are obtained. The result shows that rogue wave can be obtained not only from extreme form of breather solitary wave but also from extreme form of double-breather solitary wave. This is a new and interesting discovery.

  9. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Abd El-Razek, H. N.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  10. Solitary waves and rogue waves in a plasma with nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Ji-Tao; Dai, Chao-Qing; Chen, Xin-Fen; Zhang, Jie-Fang

    2013-11-01

    In this Letter, we discuss the electron acoustic (EA) waves in plasmas, which consist of nonthermal hot electrons featuring the Tsallis distribution, and obtain the corresponding governing equation, that is, a nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. By means of Modulation Instability (MI) analysis of the EA waves, it is found that both electron acoustic solitary wave and rogue wave can exist in such plasmas. Basing on the Darboux transformation method, we derive the analytical expressions of nonlinear solutions of NLS equations, such as single/double solitary wave solutions and single/double rogue wave solutions. The existential regions and amplitude of solitary wave solutions and the rogue wave solutions are influenced by the nonextensive parameter q and nonthermal parameter α. Moreover, the interaction of solitary wave and how to postpone the excitation of rogue wave are also studied.

  11. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics. PMID:25314555

  12. Spatial rogue waves in a photorefractive pattern-forming system.

    PubMed

    Marsal, N; Caullet, V; Wolfersberger, D; Sciamanna, M

    2014-06-15

    We have experimentally analyzed pattern formation in an optical system composed of a bulk photorefractive crystal subjected to a single optical feedback. In a highly nonlinear regime far above the modulational instability threshold, we are reporting on turbulent spatiotemporal dynamics that leads to rare, intense localized optical peaks. We have proven that the statistics and features of those peaks correspond to the signatures of two-dimensional spatial rogue events. These optical rogue waves occur erratically in space and time and live typically the same amount of time as the response time of the photorefractive material. PMID:24978569

  13. Integrable Turbulence and Rogue Waves: Breathers or Solitons?

    PubMed

    Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N; Akhmediev, N

    2016-03-11

    Turbulence in dynamical systems is one of the most intriguing phenomena of modern science. Integrable systems offer the possibility to understand, to some extent, turbulence. Recent numerical and experimental data suggest that the probability of the appearance of rogue waves in a chaotic wave state in such systems increases when the initial state is a random function of sufficiently high amplitude. We provide explanations for this effect. PMID:27015481

  14. Dust-acoustic rogue waves in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, W. M.; Shukla, P. K.; Sabry, R.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2011-12-15

    We present an investigation for the generation of a dust-acoustic rogue wave in a dusty plasma composed of negatively charged dust grains, as well as nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The critical wave-number threshold k{sub c}, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. Two different behaviors of k{sub c} against the nonextensive parameter q are found. For small k{sub c}, it is found that increasing q would lead to an increase of k{sub c} until q approaches a certain value q{sub c}, then further increase of q beyond q{sub c} decreases the value of k{sub c}. For large k{sub c}, the critical wave-number threshold k{sub c} is always increasing with q. Within the modulational instability region, a random perturbation of the amplitude grows and thus creates dust-acoustic rogue waves. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution is presented. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, could be useful for controlling and maximizing highly energetic pulses in dusty plasmas.

  15. Dust-acoustic rogue waves in a nonextensive plasma.

    PubMed

    Moslem, W M; Sabry, R; El-Labany, S K; Shukla, P K

    2011-12-01

    We present an investigation for the generation of a dust-acoustic rogue wave in a dusty plasma composed of negatively charged dust grains, as well as nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The critical wave-number threshold k(c), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. Two different behaviors of k(c) against the nonextensive parameter q are found. For small k(c), it is found that increasing q would lead to an increase of k(c) until q approaches a certain value q(c), then further increase of q beyond q(c) decreases the value of k(c). For large k(c), the critical wave-number threshold k(c) is always increasing with q. Within the modulational instability region, a random perturbation of the amplitude grows and thus creates dust-acoustic rogue waves. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution is presented. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, could be useful for controlling and maximizing highly energetic pulses in dusty plasmas. PMID:22304203

  16. Nonlinear time series analysis: towards an effective forecast of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmeyer, Günter; Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan

    2016-03-01

    Rogue waves are extremely large waves that exceed any expectation based on long-term observation and Gaussian statistics. Ocean rogue waves exceed the significant wave height in the ocean by a factor 2. Similar phenomena have been observed in a multiplicity of optical systems. While the optical systems show a much higher frequency of rogue events than the ocean, it appears nevertheless questionable what conclusions can be drawn for the prediction of ocean rogue waves. Here we tackle the problem from a different perspective and analyze the predictability of rogue events in two optical systems as well as in the ocean using nonlinear time-series analysis. Our analysis is exclusively based on experimental data. The results appear rather surprising as the optical rogue wave scenario of fiber-based supercontinuum generation does not allow any prediction whereas real ocean rogue waves and a multifilament scenario do bear a considerable amount of determinism, which allows, at least in principle, the prediction of extreme events. It becomes further clear that there exist two fundamentally different types of rogue-wave supporting systems. One class of rogue waves is obviously seeded by quantum fluctuations whereas in the other class, linear random interference of waves seems to prevail.

  17. Emergent rogue wave structures and statistics in spontaneous modulation instability

    PubMed Central

    Toenger, Shanti; Godin, Thomas; Billet, Cyril; Dias, Frédéric; Erkintalo, Miro; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) is a seminal equation of nonlinear physics describing wave packet evolution in weakly-nonlinear dispersive media. The NLSE is especially important in understanding how high amplitude “rogue waves” emerge from noise through the process of modulation instability (MI) whereby a perturbation on an initial plane wave can evolve into strongly-localised “breather” or “soliton on finite background (SFB)” structures. Although there has been much study of such structures excited under controlled conditions, there remains the open question of how closely the analytic solutions of the NLSE actually model localised structures emerging in noise-seeded MI. We address this question here using numerical simulations to compare the properties of a large ensemble of emergent peaks in noise-seeded MI with the known analytic solutions of the NLSE. Our results show that both elementary breather and higher-order SFB structures are observed in chaotic MI, with the characteristics of the noise-induced peaks clustering closely around analytic NLSE predictions. A significant conclusion of our work is to suggest that the widely-held view that the Peregrine soliton forms a rogue wave prototype must be revisited. Rather, we confirm earlier suggestions that NLSE rogue waves are most appropriately identified as collisions between elementary SFB solutions. PMID:25993126

  18. High-order rogue waves in vector nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Ling, Liming; Guo, Boling; Zhao, Li-Chen

    2014-04-01

    We study the dynamics of high-order rogue waves (RWs) in two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. We find that four fundamental rogue waves can emerge from second-order vector RWs in the coupled system, in contrast to the high-order ones in single-component systems. The distribution shape can be quadrilateral, triangle, and line structures by varying the proper initial excitations given by the exact analytical solutions. The distribution pattern for vector RWs is more abundant than that for scalar rogue waves. Possibilities to observe these new patterns for rogue waves are discussed for a nonlinear fiber. PMID:24827185

  19. Optical rogue waves in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Dudley, John; Genty, Goëry; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical study showing that rogue waves can emerge in whispering-gallery-mode resonators as the result of the chaotic interplay between Kerr nonlinearity and anomalous group-velocity dispersion. The nonlinear dynamics of the propagation of light in a whispering-gallery-mode resonator is investigated using the Lugiato-Lefever equation, and we give evidence of a range of parameters where rare and extreme events associated with non-Gaussian statistics of the field maxima are observed.

  20. Roadmap on optical rogue waves and extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, Nail; Kibler, Bertrand; Baronio, Fabio; Belić, Milivoj; Zhong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yiqi; Chang, Wonkeun; Soto-Crespo, Jose M.; Vouzas, Peter; Grelu, Philippe; Lecaplain, Caroline; Hammani, K.; Rica, S.; Picozzi, A.; Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir; Mussot, Arnaud; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe; Amiraranashvili, Shalva; Bree, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Masoller, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Runge, Antoine F. J.; Erkintalo, Miro; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Arecchi, F. T.; Wabnitz, Stefan; Tiofack, C. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.

    2016-06-01

    The pioneering paper ‘Optical rogue waves’ by Solli et al (2007 Nature 450 1054) started the new subfield in optics. This work launched a great deal of activity on this novel subject. As a result, the initial concept has expanded and has been enriched by new ideas. Various approaches have been suggested since then. A fresh look at the older results and new discoveries has been undertaken, stimulated by the concept of ‘optical rogue waves’. Presently, there may not by a unique view on how this new scientific term should be used and developed. There is nothing surprising when the opinion of the experts diverge in any new field of research. After all, rogue waves may appear for a multiplicity of reasons and not necessarily only in optical fibers and not only in the process of supercontinuum generation. We know by now that rogue waves may be generated by lasers, appear in wide aperture cavities, in plasmas and in a variety of other optical systems. Theorists, in turn, have suggested many other situations when rogue waves may be observed. The strict definition of a rogue wave is still an open question. For example, it has been suggested that it is defined as ‘an optical pulse whose amplitude or intensity is much higher than that of the surrounding pulses’. This definition (as suggested by a peer reviewer) is clear at the intuitive level and can be easily extended to the case of spatial beams although additional clarifications are still needed. An extended definition has been presented earlier by N Akhmediev and E Pelinovsky (2010 Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 185 1–4). Discussions along these lines are always useful and all new approaches stimulate research and encourage discoveries of new phenomena. Despite the potentially existing disagreements, the scientific terms ‘optical rogue waves’ and ‘extreme events’ do exist. Therefore coordination of our efforts in either unifying the concept or in introducing alternative definitions must be continued. From

  1. Rogue waves of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation in a chaotic wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the properties of the chaotic wave fields generated in the frame of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). Modulation instability results in a chaotic wave field which exhibits small-scale filaments with a free propagation constant, k . The average velocity of the filaments is approximately given by the average group velocity calculated from the dispersion relation for the plane-wave solution; however, direction of propagation is controlled by the β parameter, the constant in front of the Raman-effect term. We have also calculated the probabilities of the rogue wave occurrence for various values of propagation constant k and showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence depends on k . Additionally, we have showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence significantly depends on the quintic and the Raman-effect nonlinear terms of the KEE. Statistical comparisons between the KEE and the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation have also been presented.

  2. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  3. Controlling formation and suppression of fiber-optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Brée, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Babushkin, Ihar; Morgner, Uwe; Demircan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    Fiber-optical rogue waves appear as rare but extreme events during optical supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers. This process is typically initiated by the decay of a high-order fundamental soliton into fundamental solitons. Collisions between these solitons as well as with dispersive radiation affect the soliton trajectory in frequency and time upon further propagation. Launching an additional dispersive wave at carefully chosen delay and wavelength enables statistical manipulation of the soliton trajectory in such a way that the probability of rogue wave formation is either enhanced or reduced. To enable efficient control, parameters of the dispersive wave have to be chosen to allow trapping of dispersive radiation in the nonlinear index depression created by the soliton. Under certain conditions, direct manipulation of soliton properties is possible by the dispersive wave. In other more complex scenarios, control is possible via increasing or decreasing the number of intersoliton collisions. The control mechanism reaches a remarkable efficiency, enabling control of relatively large soliton energies. This scenario appears promising for highly dynamic all-optical control of supercontinua. PMID:27472607

  4. From a breather homoclinic wave to a rogue wave solution for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanjian; Dai, Zhengde; Liu, Changfu

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, two types of multi-parameter breather homoclinic wave solutions—including breather homoclinic wave and rational homoclinic wave solutions—are obtained by using the Hirota technique and ansätz with complexity of parameter for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation. Rogue waves in the form of the rational homoclinic solution are derived when the periods of breather homoclinic wave go to infinite. Some novel features of homoclinic wave solutions are discussed and presented. In contrast to the normal bright rogue wave structure, a structure like a four-petaled flower in temporal-spatial distribution is exhibited. Further with the change of the wave number of the plane wave, the bright and dark rogue wave structures may change into each other. The bright rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby peaks, and the dark rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby holes. The dark rogue wave for the uncoupled Boussinesq equation is finally obtained. Its structural properties show that it never takes on bright rogue wave features with the change of parameter. It is hoped that these results might provide us with useful information on the dynamics of the relevant fields in physics.

  5. Rational solitary wave and rogue wave solutions in coupled defocusing Hirota equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    We derive and study a general rational solution of a coupled defocusing Hirota equation which can be used to describe evolution of light in a two-mode fiber with defocusing Kerr effect and some certain high-order effects. We find some new excitation patterns in the model, such as M-shaped soliton, W-shaped soliton, anti-eye-shaped rogue wave and four-petaled flower rogue wave. The results are compared with the solutions obtained in other coupled systems like vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation, coupled focusing Hirota and Sasa-Satsuma equations. We explain the new characters by modulational instability properties. This further indicates that rational solution does not necessarily correspond to rogue wave excitation dynamics and the quantitative relation between nonlinear excitations and modulational instability should exist.

  6. Rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations from inhomogeneous femtosecond optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Yomba, Emmanuel; Zakeri, Gholam-Ali

    2016-08-01

    The coupled inhomogeneous Schrödinger equations with a wide range of applications describing a field of pluses with the right and the left polarizations that take into account cross-phase modulations, stimulated Ramani scattering, and absorption effects are investigated. A combination of several different approaches is used in a novel way to obtain the explicit expressions for the rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves. We study the dynamics of these structurally stable rogues and analyze the effects of a parameter that controls the region of stability that intrinsically connects the cross-phase modulation and other Kerr nonlinearity factors. The effects of the right and left polarizations on the shape of the rogue-pair and other solitary rogue waves are graphically analyzed. These rogue-pair waves are studied on periodic and non-periodic settings. We observe that rogue-pair wave from the right and left polarizations has a similar structure while the dark-bright-rogue waves have quite different intensity profiles. PMID:27586611

  7. Construction of rogue wave and lump solutions for nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Zhuosheng; Chen, Yinnan

    2015-07-01

    Based on symbolic computation and an ansatz, we present a constructive algorithm to seek rogue wave and lump solutions for nonlinear evolution equations. As illustrative examples, we consider the potential-YTSF equation and a variable coefficient KP equation, and obtain nonsingular rational solutions of the two equations. The solutions can be rogue wave or lump solutions under different parameter conditions. We also present graphic illustration of some special solutions which would help better understand the evolution of solution waves.

  8. Rogue wave solutions for a generalized nonautonomous nonlinear equation in a nonlinear inhomogeneous fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xi-Yang; Tian, Bo; Wang, Yu-Feng; Sun, Ya; Jiang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate a generalized nonautonomous nonlinear equation which describes the ultrashort optical pulse propagating in a nonlinear inhomogeneous fiber. By virtue of the generalized Darboux transformation, the first- and second-order rogue-wave solutions for the generalized nonautonomous nonlinear equation are obtained, under some variable-coefficient constraints. Properties of the first- and second-order rogue waves are graphically presented and analyzed: When the coefficients are all chosen as the constants, we can observe the some functions, the shapes of wave crests and troughs for the first- and second-order rogue waves change. Oscillating behaviors of the first- and second-order rogue waves are observed when the coefficients are the trigonometric functions.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of trapped waves on jet currents and rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Shrira, V I; Slunyaev, A V

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves trapped by an opposing jet current is studied analytically and numerically. For wave fields narrow band in frequency but not necessarily with narrow angular distributions the developed asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory based on the modal approach of Shrira and Slunyaev [J. Fluid. Mech. 738, 65 (2014)] leads to the one-dimensional modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation of self-focusing type for a single mode. Its solutions such as envelope solitons and breathers are considered to be prototypes of rogue waves; these solutions, in contrast to waves in the absence of currents, are robust with respect to transverse perturbations, which suggests a potentially higher probability of rogue waves. Robustness of the long-lived analytical solutions describing modulated trapped waves and solitary wave groups is verified by direct numerical simulations of potential Euler equations. PMID:24827178

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of trapped waves on jet currents and rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrira, V. I.; Slunyaev, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves trapped by an opposing jet current is studied analytically and numerically. For wave fields narrow band in frequency but not necessarily with narrow angular distributions the developed asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory based on the modal approach of Shrira and Slunyaev [J. Fluid. Mech. 738, 65 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2013.584] leads to the one-dimensional modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation of self-focusing type for a single mode. Its solutions such as envelope solitons and breathers are considered to be prototypes of rogue waves; these solutions, in contrast to waves in the absence of currents, are robust with respect to transverse perturbations, which suggests a potentially higher probability of rogue waves. Robustness of the long-lived analytical solutions describing modulated trapped waves and solitary wave groups is verified by direct numerical simulations of potential Euler equations.

  11. Manipulating matter rogue waves and breathers in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Muruganandam, P.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2014-12-01

    We construct higher-order rogue wave solutions and breather profiles for the quasi-one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent interatomic interaction and external trap through the similarity transformation technique. We consider three different forms of traps: (i) the time-independent expulsive trap, (ii) time-dependent monotonous trap, and (iii) time-dependent periodic trap. Our results show that when we change a parameter appearing in the time-independent or time-dependent trap the second- and third-order rogue waves transform into the first-order-like rogue waves. We also analyze the density profiles of breather solutions. Here we also show that the shapes of the breathers change when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Our results may help to manage rogue waves experimentally in a BEC system.

  12. Biological multi-rogue waves in discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with saturable nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchinang Tchameu, J. D.; Togueu Motcheyo, A. B.; Tchawoua, C.

    2016-09-01

    The discrete multi-rogue waves (DMRW) as solution of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation with saturable nonlinearities is studied numerically. These biological rogue waves represent the complex probability amplitude of finding an amide-I vibrational quantum at a site. We observe that the growth in the higher order saturable nonlinearity implies the formation of DMRW including an increase in the short-living DMRW and a decrease in amplitude of the long-living DMRW.

  13. Generalized Darboux transformation and rogue wave solution of the coherently-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Yuan, Sha-Sha; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the generalized Darboux transformation for the coherently-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CCNLS) system is constructed in terms of determinant representations. Based on the Nth-iterated formula, the vector bright soliton solution and vector rogue wave solution are systematically derived under the nonvanishing background. The general first-order vector rogue wave solution can admit many different fundamental patterns including eye-shaped and four-petaled rogue waves. It is believed that there are many more abundant patterns for high order vector rogue waves in CCNLS system.

  14. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid {sup 4}He: Energy Cascades and Rogue Waves in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, V. B.; Ganshin, A. N.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Kolmakov, G. V.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2008-11-13

    Recent work on second sound acoustic turbulence in superfluid {sup 4}He is reviewed. Observations of forward and inverse energy cascades are described. The onset of the inverse cascade occurs above a critical driving energy and it is accompanied by giant waves that constitute an acoustic analogue of the rogue waves that occasionally appear on the surface of the ocean. The theory of the phenomenon is outlined and shown to be in good agreement with the experiments.

  15. Ion-acoustic super rogue waves in ultracold neutral plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2013-07-15

    The ion-acoustic rogue waves in ultracold neutral plasmas consisting of ion fluid and nonthermal electrons are reported. A reductive perturbation method is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for describing the system and the modulation instability of the ion-acoustic wave is analyzed. The critical wave number k{sub c}, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined. Moreover, the possible region for the ion-acoustic rogue waves to exist is defined precisely. The effects of the nonthermal parameter β and the ions effective temperature ratio σ{sub *} on the critical wave number k{sub c} are studied. It is found that there are two critical wave numbers in our plasma system. For low wave number, increasing β would lead to cringe k{sub c} until β approaches to its critical value β{sub c}, then further increase of β beyond β{sub c} would enhance the values of k{sub c}. For large wave numbers, the increase of β would lead to a decrease of k{sub c}. However, increasing σ{sub *} would lead to the reduction of k{sub c} for all values of the wave number. The dependence of the rogue waves profile on the plasma parameters is numerically examined. It is found that the rogue wave amplitudes have complex behavior with increasing β. Furthermore, the enhancement of σ{sub *} and the carrier wave number k reduces the rogue wave amplitude. It is noticed that near to the critical wave number, the rogue wave amplitude becomes high, but it shrinks whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. The implications of our results in laboratory ultracold neutral plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  16. Dust ion-acoustic rogue waves in a three-species ultracold quantum dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo Liu, Rong-Xiang; Liu, De-Yin

    2014-10-15

    Dust ion-acoustic (DIA) rogue waves are reported for a three-component ultracold quantum dusty plasma comprised of inertialess electrons, inertial ions, and negatively charged immobile dust particles. The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation appears for the low frequency limit. Modulation instability (MI) of the DIA waves is analyzed. Influence of the modulation wave number, ion-to-electron Fermi temperature ratio ρ and dust-to-ion background density ratio N{sub d} on the MI growth rate is discussed. The first- and second-order DIA rogue-wave solutions of the NLS equation are examined numerically. It is found that the enhancement of N{sub d} and carrier wave number can increase the envelope rogue-wave amplitudes. However, the increase of ρ reduces the envelope rogue-wave amplitudes. - Highlights: • The nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the low frequency limit. • Modulational instability growth rate is discussed. • The first- and second-order dust ion-acoustic rogue waves are examined numerically.

  17. Rogue wave variational modelling through the interaction of two solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno

    2016-04-01

    The extreme and unexpected characteristics of Rogue waves have made them legendary for centuries. It is only on the 1st of January 1995 that these mariners' tales started to raise scientist's curiosity, when such a wave was recorded in the North Sea; a sudden wall of water hit the Draupner offshore platform, more than twice higher than the other waves, providing evidence of the existence of rogue or freak waves. Since then, studies have shown that these surface gravity waves of high amplitude (at least twice the height of the other sea waves [Dyste et al., 2008]) appear in non-linear dispersive water motion [Drazin and Johnson, 1989], at any depth, and have caused a lot of damage in recent years [Nikolkina and Didenkulova, 2011 ]. So far, most of the studies have tried to determine their probability of occurrence, but no conclusion has been achieved yet, which means that we are currently unenable to predict or avoid these monster waves. An accurate mathematical and numerical water-wave model would enable simulation and observation of this external forcing on boats and offshore structures and hence reduce their threat. In this work, we aim to model rogue waves through a soliton splash generated by the interaction of two solitons coming from different channels at a specific angle. Kodama indeed showed that one way to produce extreme waves is through the intersection of two solitary waves, or one solitary wave and its oblique reflection on a vertical wall [Yeh, Li and Kodama, 2010 ]. While he modelled Mach reflection from Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) theory, we aim to model rogue waves from the three-dimensional potential flow equations and/or their asymptotic equivalent described by Benney and Luke [Benney and Luke, 1964]. These theories have the advantage to allow wave propagation in several directions, which is not the case with KP equations. The initial solitary waves are generated by removing a sluice gate in each channel. The equations are derived through a

  18. On Hokusai's Great wave off Kanagawa: localization, linearity and a rogue wave in sub-Antarctic waters

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, J. M.; Sarano, V.; Dias, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Hokusai woodcut entitled The great wave off Kanagawa has been interpreted as an unusually large storm wave, likely to be classed as a rogue wave, and possibly generated from nonlinear wave dynamics (J. H. E. Cartwright and H. Nakamura, Notes Rec. R. Soc. 63, 119–135 (2009)). In this paper, we present a complementary discussion of this hypothesis, discussing in particular how linear and nonlinear mechanisms can both contribute to the emergence of rogue wave events. By making reference to the Great wave's simultaneous transverse and longitudinal localization, we show that the purely linear mechanism of directional focusing also predicts characteristics consistent with those of the Great wave. In addition, we discuss the properties of a particular rogue wave photographed on the open ocean in sub-Antarctic waters, which shows two-dimensional localization and breaking dynamics remarkably similar to Hokusai's depiction in the woodcut. PMID:24687148

  19. Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Sun, Ya; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dispersion varying fibres have applications in optical pulse compression techniques. We investigate Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) solitons and optical rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre based on a variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Analytical solutions in the forms of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves up to the second order of that equation are obtained via the generalised Darboux transformation and integrable constraint. The properties of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre, e.g. dispersion decreasing fibre (DDF) or a periodically distributed system (PDS), are discussed: in a DDF we observe the compression behaviours of KM solitons and rogue waves on a monotonically increasing background. The amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton increases, while the width of each peak of the KM soliton gradually decreases along the propagation distance; in a PDS, the amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton varies periodically along the propagation distance on a periodic background. Different from the KM soliton, the Akhmediev breather and rogue waves repeat their behaviours along the propagation distance without the compression.

  20. The nonlinear evolution of rogue waves generated by means of wave focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, HanHong; Ma, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Generating the rogue waves in offshore engineering is investigated, first of all, to forecast its occurrence to protect the offshore structure from being attacked, to study the mechanism and hydrodynamic properties of rouge wave experimentally as well as the rouge/structure interaction for the structure design. To achieve these purposes demands an accurate wave generation and calculation. In this paper, we establish a spatial domain model of fourth order nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation for describing deep-water wave trains in the moving coordinate system. In order to generate rogue waves in the experimental tank efficiently, we take care that the transient water wave (TWW) determines precisely the concentration of time/place. First we simulate the three-dimensional wave using TWW in the numerical tank and modeling the deepwater basin with a double-side multi-segmented wave-maker in Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) under the linear superposing theory. To discuss its nonlinearity for guiding the experiment, we set the TWW as the initial condition of the NLS equation. The differences between the linear and nonlinear simulations are presented. Meanwhile, the characteristics of the transient water wave, including water particle velocity and wave slope, are investigated, which are important factors in safeguarding the offshore structures.

  1. New Rational Homoclinic Solution and Rogue Wave Solution for the Coupled Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Zheng-De; Liu, Ren-Lang

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the rational homoclinic solution (rogue wave solution) can be obtained via the classical homoclinic solution for the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation and the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) equation, respectively. This is a new way for generating rogue wave comparing with direct constructing method and Darboux dressing technique

  2. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  3. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M.

    2015-11-01

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  4. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A. El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M. E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  5. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  6. Amplification of matter rogue waves and breathers in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Kraenkel, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    We construct rogue wave and breather solutions of a quasi-two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent interatomic interaction and external trap. We show that the trapping potential and an arbitrary functional parameter that present in the similarity transformation should satisfy a constraint for the considered equation to be integrable and yield the desired solutions. We consider two different forms of functional parameters and investigate how the density of the rogue wave and breather profiles vary with respect to these functional parameters. We also construct vector localized solutions of a two coupled quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate system. We then investigate how the vector localized density profiles modify in the constant density background with respect to the functional parameters. Our results may help to manipulate matter rogue waves experimentally in the two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate systems.

  7. Rogue waves for a system of coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hiu Ning; Malomed, Boris; Chow, Kwok Wing

    2015-11-01

    Previous works in the literature on water waves have demonstrated that the fourth-order evolution of gravity waves in deep water will be governed by a higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In the presence of two wave trains, the system is described by a higher order coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system. Through a gauge transformation, these evolution equations are reduced to a coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger system. The goal here is to study rogue waves, unexpectedly large displacements from an equilibrium position, through the Hirota bilinear transformation theoretically. The connections between the onset of rogue waves and modulation instability are investigated. The range of cubic nonlinearity allowing rogue wave formation is elucidated. Under a finite group velocity mismatch between the two components, the existence regime for rogue waves is extended as compared to the case with a single wave train. The amplification ratio of the amplitude can be higher than that of the single component nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Partial financial support has been provided by the Research Grants Council through contracts HKU711713E and HKU17200815.

  8. Rogue wave modes for a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hiu Ning; Chow, Kwok Wing; Kedziora, David Jacob; Grimshaw, Roger Hamilton James; Ding, Edwin

    2014-03-01

    Rogue waves in fluid dynamics and optical waveguides are unexpectedly large displacements from a background state, and occur in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with positive linear dispersion in the regime of positive cubic nonlinearity. Rogue waves of a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation are calculated in this work as a long-wave limit of a breather (a pulsating mode), and can occur in the regime of negative cubic nonlinearity if a sufficiently strong self-steepening nonlinearity is also present. This critical magnitude is shown to be precisely the threshold for the onset of modulation instabilities of the background plane wave, providing a strong piece of evidence regarding the connection between a rogue wave and modulation instability. The maximum amplitude of the rogue wave is three times that of the background plane wave, a result identical to that of the Peregrine breather in the classical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. This amplification ratio and the resulting spectral broadening arising from modulation instability correlate with recent experimental results of water waves. Numerical simulations in the regime of marginal stability are described. PMID:24730920

  9. Amplitude modulation of hydromagnetic waves and associated rogue waves in magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Sabry, R; Moslem, W M; Shukla, P K

    2012-09-01

    It is shown that the dynamics of amplitude-modulated compressional dispersive Alfvénic (CDA) waves in a collisional megnetoplasma is governed by a complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation. The nonlinear dispersion relation for the modulational instability of the CDA waves is derived and investigated numerically. It is found that the growth rate of the modulational instability decreases (increases) with the increase of the normalized electron-ion collision frequency α (the plasma β). The modulational instability criterion for the CGL equation is defined precisely and investigated numerically. The region of the modulational instability becomes narrower with the increase of α and β, indicating that the system dissipates the wave energy by collisions, and a stable CDA wave envelope packet in the form of a hole will be a dominant localized pulse. For a collisionless plasma, i.e., α=0, the CGL equation reduces to the standard nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The latter is used to investigate the modulational (in)stability region for the CDA waves in a collisionless magnetoplasma. It is shown that, within unstable regions, a random set of nonlinearly interacting CDA perturbations leads to the formation of CDA rogue waves. In order to demonstrate that the characteristics of the CDA rogue waves are influenced by the plasma β, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution of the NLS equation is presented. The application of our investigation to space and laboratory magnetoplasmas is discussed. PMID:23031035

  10. Dark three-sister rogue waves in normally dispersive optical fibers with random birefringence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    We investigate dark rogue wave dynamics in normally dispersive birefringent optical fibers, based on the exact rational solutions of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Analytical solutions are derived up to the second order via a nonrecursive Darboux transformation method. Vector dark "three-sister" rogue waves as well as their existence conditions are demonstrated. The robustness against small perturbations is numerically confirmed in spite of the onset of modulational instability, offering the possibility to observe such extreme events in normal optical fibers with random birefringence, or in other Manakov-type vector nonlinear media. PMID:25401907

  11. Rogue wave triggered at a critical frequency of a nonlinear resonant medium.

    PubMed

    He, Jingsong; Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K; Cheng, Yi; Dinda, P Tchofo

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two-level atomic system interacting with an electromagnetic field controlled in amplitude and frequency by a high intensity laser. We show that the amplitude of the induced electric field admits an envelope profile corresponding to a breather soliton. We demonstrate that this soliton can propagate with any frequency shift with respect to that of the control laser, except a critical frequency, at which the system undergoes a structural discontinuity that transforms the breather in a rogue wave. A mechanism of generation of rogue waves by means of an intense laser field is thus revealed. PMID:27415249

  12. Raman rogue waves in a partially mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Runge, Antoine F J; Aguergaray, Claude; Broderick, Neil G R; Erkintalo, Miro

    2014-01-15

    We report on an experimental study of spectral fluctuations induced by intracavity Raman conversion in a passively partially mode-locked, all-normal dispersion fiber laser. Specifically, we use dispersive Fourier transformation to measure single-shot spectra of Raman-induced noise-like pulses, demonstrating that for low cavity gain values Raman emission is sporadic and follows rogue-wave-like probability distributions, while a saturated regime with Gaussian statistics is obtained for high pump powers. Our experiments further reveal intracavity rogue waves originating from cascaded Raman dynamics. PMID:24562136

  13. Rogue wave triggered at a critical frequency of a nonlinear resonant medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingsong; Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K.; Cheng, Yi; Dinda, P. Tchofo

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two-level atomic system interacting with an electromagnetic field controlled in amplitude and frequency by a high intensity laser. We show that the amplitude of the induced electric field admits an envelope profile corresponding to a breather soliton. We demonstrate that this soliton can propagate with any frequency shift with respect to that of the control laser, except a critical frequency, at which the system undergoes a structural discontinuity that transforms the breather in a rogue wave. A mechanism of generation of rogue waves by means of an intense laser field is thus revealed.

  14. Effect of a weak CW trigger on optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Duan, Xiaoqi

    2015-06-15

    We numerically study the characteristics of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum (SC) generation and use the CW triggering mechanism to control the SC generation. Detailed simulation results show for the first time that a weak CW trigger can manipulate the behaviors of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond SC regime. For the proposed CW triggering technique which requires only wavelength tuning and is a handy approach for the active control of SC, the resultant spectrum can be greatly broadened, and the noise properties of the SC can be significantly improved in terms of both of the coherence and intensity stability. PMID:26193609

  15. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjan; Mukherjee, Abhik; Naskar, Tapan

    2014-01-01

    Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep isolated waves, which appear suddenly in a calm sea and disappear equally fast. However, though the rogue waves are localized surface waves, their theoretical models and experimental observations are available mostly in one dimension, with the majority of them admitting only limited and fixed amplitude and modular inclination of the wave. We propose two dimensions, exactly solvable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation derivable from the basic hydrodynamic equations and endowed with integrable structures. The proposed two-dimensional equation exhibits modulation instability and frequency correction induced by the nonlinear effect, with a directional preference, all of which can be determined through precise analytic result. The two-dimensional NLS equation allows also an exact lump soliton which can model a full-grown surface rogue wave with adjustable height and modular inclination. The lump soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded by a hole state, with its dynamics controlled by the current term. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing ocean rogue waves. PMID:24711719

  16. Vector rogue waves and dark-bright boomeronic solitons in autonomous and nonautonomous settings.

    PubMed

    Mareeswaran, R Babu; Charalampidis, E G; Kanna, T; Kevrekidis, P G; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2014-10-01

    In this work we consider the dynamics of vector rogue waves and dark-bright solitons in two-component nonlinear Schrödinger equations with various physically motivated time-dependent nonlinearity coefficients, as well as spatiotemporally dependent potentials. A similarity transformation is utilized to convert the system into the integrable Manakov system and subsequently the vector rogue and dark-bright boomeronlike soliton solutions of the latter are converted back into ones of the original nonautonomous model. Using direct numerical simulations we find that, in most cases, the rogue wave formation is rapidly followed by a modulational instability that leads to the emergence of an expanding soliton train. Scenarios different than this generic phenomenology are also reported. PMID:25375572

  17. Solitons and Rogue Waves for a Higher-Order Nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch System in an Erbium-Doped Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuan-Qi; Gao, Yi-Tian; Xue, Long; Yu, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Under investigation in this article is a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch (HNLS-MB) system for the optical pulse propagation in an erbium-doped fiber. Lax pair, Darboux transformation (DT), and generalised DT for the HNLS-MB system are constructed. Soliton solutions and rogue wave solutions are derived based on the DT and generalised DT, respectively. Properties of the solitons and rogue waves are graphically presented. The third-order dispersion parameter, fourth-order dispersion parameter, and frequency detuning all influence the characteristic lines and velocities of the solitons. The frequency detuning also affects the amplitudes of solitons. The separating function has no effect on the properties of the first-order rogue waves, except for the locations where the first-order rogue waves appear. The third-order dispersion parameter affects the propagation directions and shapes of the rogue waves. The frequency detuning influences the rogue-wave types of the module for the measure of polarization of resonant medium and the extant population inversion. The fourth-order dispersion parameter impacts the rogue-wave interaction range and also has an effect on the rogue-wave type of the extant population inversion. The value of separating function affects the spatial-temporal separation of constituting elementary rogue waves for the second-order and third-order rogue waves. The second-order and third-order rogue waves can exhibit the triangular and pentagon patterns under different choices of separating functions.

  18. Observation of a hierarchy of up to fifth-order rogue waves in a water tank.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Slunyaev, A; Sergeeva, A; Pelinovsky, E; Akhmediev, N

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental observations of the hierarchy of rational breather solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) generated in a water wave tank. First, five breathers of the infinite hierarchy have been successfully generated, thus confirming the theoretical predictions of their existence. Breathers of orders higher than five appeared to be unstable relative to the wave-breaking effect of water waves. Due to the strong influence of the wave breaking and relatively small carrier steepness values of the experiment these results for the higher-order solutions do not directly explain the formation of giant oceanic rogue waves. However, our results are important in understanding the dynamics of rogue water waves and may initiate similar experiments in other nonlinear dispersive media such as fiber optics and plasma physics, where the wave propagation is governed by the NLS. PMID:23214897

  19. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems.

  20. Rogue wave formation under the action of quasi-stationary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrashkin, A. A.; Oshmarina, O. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of rogue wave formation on deep water is considered. A wave of extreme amplitude is born against the background of uniform waves (Gerstner waves) under the action of external pressure on free surface. The pressure distribution has a form of a quasi-stationary "pit". The fluid motion is supposed to be a vortex one and is described by an exact solution of equations of 2D hydrodynamics for an ideal fluid in Lagrangian coordinates. Liquid particles are moving around circumferences of different radii in the absence of drift flow. Values of amplitude and wave steepness optimal for rogue wave formation are found numerically. The influence of vorticity distribution and pressure drop on parameters of the fluid is investigated.

  1. Two-dimensional linear and nonlinear Talbot effect from rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R.; Petrović, Milan S.; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-03-01

    We introduce two-dimensional (2D) linear and nonlinear Talbot effects. They are produced by propagating periodic 2D diffraction patterns and can be visualized as 3D stacks of Talbot carpets. The nonlinear Talbot effect originates from 2D rogue waves and forms in a bulk 3D nonlinear medium. The recurrences of an input rogue wave are observed at the Talbot length and at the half-Talbot length, with a π phase shift; no other recurrences are observed. Differing from the nonlinear Talbot effect, the linear effect displays the usual fractional Talbot images as well. We also find that the smaller the period of incident rogue waves, the shorter the Talbot length. Increasing the beam intensity increases the Talbot length, but above a threshold this leads to a catastrophic self-focusing phenomenon which destroys the effect. We also find that the Talbot recurrence can be viewed as a self-Fourier transform of the initial periodic beam that is automatically performed during propagation. In particular, linear Talbot effect can be viewed as a fractional self-Fourier transform, whereas the nonlinear Talbot effect can be viewed as the regular self-Fourier transform. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the rogue-wave initial condition is sufficient but not necessary for the observation of the effect. It may also be observed from other periodic inputs, provided they are set on a finite background. The 2D effect may find utility in the production of 3D photonic crystals.

  2. Kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in superthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Li, Bo Xia, Li-Dong

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the small but finite amplitude solitary Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in low β plasmas with superthermal electrons modeled by a kappa-type distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of KAWs is derived by using the standard reductive perturbation method. Examining the dependence of the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients of the KdV equation on the superthermal parameter κ, plasma β, and obliqueness of propagation, we show that these parameters may change substantially the shape and size of solitary KAW pulses. Only sub-Alfvénic, compressive solitons are supported. We then extend the study to examine kinetic Alfvén rogue waves by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the KdV equation. Rational solutions that form rogue wave envelopes are obtained. We examine how the behavior of rogue waves depends on the plasma parameters in question, finding that the rogue envelopes are lowered with increasing electron superthermality whereas the opposite is true when the plasma β increases. The findings of this study may find applications to low β plasmas in astrophysical environments where particles are superthermally distributed.

  3. Mechanical energy fluctuations in granular chains: the possibility of rogue fluctuations or waves.

    PubMed

    Han, Ding; Westley, Matthew; Sen, Surajit

    2014-09-01

    The existence of rogue or freak waves in the ocean has been known for some time. They have been reported in the context of optical lattices and the financial market. We ask whether such waves are generic to late time behavior in nonlinear systems. In that vein, we examine the dynamics of an alignment of spherical elastic beads held within fixed, rigid walls at zero precompression when they are subjected to sufficiently rich initial conditions. Here we define such waves generically as unusually large energy fluctuations that sustain for short periods of time. Our simulations suggest that such unusually large fluctuations ("hot spots") and occasional series of such fluctuations through space and time ("rogue fluctuations") are likely to exist in the late time dynamics of the granular chain system at zero dissipation. We show that while hot spots are common in late time evolution, rogue fluctuations are seen in purely nonlinear systems (i.e., no precompression) at late enough times. We next show that the number of such fluctuations grows exponentially with increasing nonlinearity whereas rogue fluctuations decrease superexponentially with increasing precompression. Dissipation-free granular alignment systems may be possible to realize as integrated circuits and hence our observations may potentially be testable in the laboratory. PMID:25314501

  4. Semirational and symbiotic self-similar rogue waves in a (2+1)-dimensional graded-index waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Kanchan Kumar; Soloman Raju, Thokala; Kumar, C. N.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the (?)-dimensional variable coefficient-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation (vc-CNLSE) in a graded-index waveguide. Similarity transformations are used to convert the vc-CNLSE into constant coefficient CNLSE. Under certain functional constraints we could extract semirational, multi-parametric solution of the associated Manakov system. This family of solutions include known Peregrine soliton, mixture of either bright soliton and rogue wave or dark soliton and rogue wave or breather and rogue wave. Under a distinct set of self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation coefficients we could establish symbiotic existence of different soliton pairs as solutions. These soliton pairs may constitute of one bright and a dark soliton, two bright solitons or two dark solitons. Finally, when two wave components are directly proportional, we find bright and dark similaritons, self-similar breathers, and rogue waves as different solutions.

  5. Two-dimensional cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in ultrarelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ata-ur-Rahman; Ali, S.; Moslem, W. M.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-07-15

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves is investigated in a two-dimensional ultrarelativistic degenerate warm dense plasma. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived, which can be further transformed into a Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, the KdV equation can be transferred to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets. The propagation characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are strongly influenced by the variation of different plasma parameters in an ultrarelativistic degenerate dense plasma. The present results might be helpful to understand the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasmas.

  6. Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Samit Kumar; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we have studied the peregrine rogue wave dynamics, with a solitons on finite background (SFB) ansatz, in the recently proposed (Ablowitz and Musslimani, (2013) [31]) continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity. We have found that the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with PT-symmetric nonlinearity also admits Peregrine soliton solution. Motivated by the fact that Peregrine solitons are regarded as prototypical solutions of rogue waves, we have studied Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the c-PTNLSE model. Upon numerical computation, we observe the appearance of low-intense Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) soliton trains in the absence of transverse shift (unbroken PT-symmetry) and well-localized high-intense Peregrine rogue waves in the presence of transverse shift (broken PT-symmetry) in a definite parametric regime.

  7. Analytical solutions and rogue waves in (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheng-Yi; Ma, Song-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Analytical solutions in terms of rational-like functions are presented for a (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with time-varying coefficients and a harmonica potential using the similarity transformation and a direct ansatz. Several free functions of time t are involved to generate abundant wave structures. Three types of elementary functions are chosen to exhibit the corresponding nonlinear rogue wave propagations.

  8. Rogue Waves: From Nonlinear Schrödinger Breather Solutions to Sea-Keeping Test

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Miguel; Proment, Davide; Clauss, Günther; Klein, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Under suitable assumptions, the nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves can be modeled by the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Besides traveling wave solutions like solitons, this model admits also breather solutions that are now considered as prototypes of rogue waves in ocean. We propose a novel technique to study the interaction between waves and ships/structures during extreme ocean conditions using such breather solutions. In particular, we discuss a state of the art sea-keeping test in a 90-meter long wave tank by creating a Peregrine breather solution hitting a scaled chemical tanker and we discuss its potential devastating effects on the ship. PMID:23405086

  9. Dissipative rogue waves induced by soliton explosions in an ultrafast fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Luo, Zhi-Chao

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the observation of dissipative rogue waves (DRWs) induced by soliton explosions in an ultrafast fiber laser. It was found that the soliton explosions could be obtained in the fiber laser at a critical pump power level. During the process of the soliton explosion, the high-amplitude waves that fulfill the rogue wave criteria could be detected. The appearance of the DRWs was identified by characterizing the intensity statistics of the time-stretched soliton profile based on the dispersive Fourier-transform method. Our findings provide the first experimental demonstration that the DRWs could be observed in the soliton explosion regime and further enhance the understanding of the physical mechanism of optical RW generation. PMID:27607935

  10. Classification of homoclinic rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Certain homoclinic solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, with spatially periodic boundary conditions, are the most common unstable wave packets associated with the phenomenon of oceanic rogue waves. Indeed the homoclinic solutions due to Akhmediev, Peregrine and Kuznetsov-Ma are almost exclusively used in scientific and engineering applications. Herein I investigate an infinite number of other homoclinic solutions of NLS and show that they reduce to the above three classical homoclinic solutions for particular spectral values in the periodic inverse scattering transform. Furthermore, I discuss another infinity of solutions to the NLS equation that are not classifiable as homoclinic solutions. These latter are the genus-2N theta function solutions of the NLS equation: they are the most general unstable spectral solutions for periodic boundary conditions. I further describe how the homoclinic solutions of the NLS equation, for N = 1, can be derived directly from the theta functions in a particular limit. The solutions I address herein are actual spectral components in the nonlinear Fourier transform theory for the NLS equation: The periodic inverse scattering transform. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss a broader class of rogue wave packets1 for ship design, as defined in the Extreme Seas program. The spirit of this research came from D. Faulkner (2000) who many years ago suggested that ship design procedures, in order to take rogue waves into account, should progress beyond the use of simple sine waves. 1An overview of other work in the field of rogue waves is given elsewhere: Osborne 2010, 2012 and 2013. See the books by Olagnon and colleagues 2000, 2004 and 2008 for the Brest meetings. The books by Kharif et al. (2008) and Pelinovsky et al. (2010) are excellent references.

  11. Integrative approach to the problem of the rogue waves appearance and elimination of their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Artem; Rodina, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Every year marine natural disasters claim thousands of lives. Only rogue waves during the last 10 years caused the death of 125 and injury of 169 people. In addition to studying the physical mechanisms of generation of rogue waves is important to study the mechanisms of human behavior in such extreme situations. The impact as large-scale natural disasters, as well as less severe (in its consequences) disaster strikes must be assessed on the basis of the entire set of conditions, in whose framework the community of people appears to be, taking into account both the power of the elements, and the available resources at their disposal to restore an acceptable level of life, including social and psychological context. Here particular relevance acquire interdisciplinary researches. This interaction is extremely important not only for sociologists and psychologists, but also for the representatives of the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, mathematics) since the ultimate goal of all efforts is to minimize the harm produced by any element or negative influence of technological progress.This also work contains statistical analysis of the appearance of rogue waves on the wind wave background in the shallow bay, obtained during the experiment in the Baltic Sea.

  12. Families of quasi-rational solutions of the NLS equation and multi-rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    We construct a multi-parametric family of the solutions of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) from the known results describing the multi-phase almost-periodic elementary solutions given in terms of Riemann theta functions. We give a new representation of their solutions in terms of Wronskians determinants of order 2N composed of elementary trigonometric functions. When we perform a special passage to the limit when all the periods tend to infinity, we obtain a family of quasi-rational solutions. This leads to efficient representations for the Peregrine breathers of orders N = 1, 2, 3 first constructed by Akhmediev and his co-workers and also allows us to obtain a simpler derivation of the generic formulas corresponding the three or six rogue-wave formation in the frame of the NLS model first explained by V B Matveev in 2010. Our formulation allows us to isolate easily the second- or third-order Peregrine breathers from ‘generic’ solutions and also to compute the Peregrine breathers of orders 2 and 3 easily with respect to other approaches. In the cases N = 2, 3, we obtain the comfortable formulas to study the deformation of a higher Peregrine breather of order 2 to the three rogue-wave or order 3 to the six rogue-wave solutions via the variation of the free parameters of our construction.

  13. Rogue waves of the Hirota and the Maxwell-Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong; Porseizan, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a Darboux transformation of the Hirota and the Maxwell-Bloch (H-MB) system which is governed by femtosecond pulse propagation through an erbium doped fiber and further generalize it to the matrix form of the n-fold Darboux transformation of this system. This n-fold Darboux transformation implies the determinant representation of nth solutions of (E[n],p[n],η[n]) generated from the known solution of (E,p,η). The determinant representation of (E[n],p[n],η[n]) provides soliton solutions, positon solutions, and breather solutions (both bright and dark breathers) of the H-MB system. From the breather solutions, we also construct a bright and dark rogue wave solution for the H-MB system, which is currently one of the hottest topics in mathematics and physics. Surprisingly, the rogue wave solution for p and η has two peaks because of the order of the numerator and denominator of them. Meanwhile, after fixing the time and spatial parameters and changing two other unknown parameters α and β, we generate a rogue wave shape.

  14. Modulation instability and ion-acoustic rogue waves in a strongly coupled collisional plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Yaling; Li, Ying

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves is theoretically reported in a collisional plasma containing strongly coupled ions and nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution. For this purpose, the nonlinear integro-differential form of the generalized hydrodynamic model is used to investigate the strong-coupling effect. The modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term is derived for the potential wave amplitude in the hydrodynamic regime, and the modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves is examined. When the dissipative effect is neglected, the modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation reduces to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Within the unstable region, two different types of second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves including single peak type and rogue wave triplets are discussed. The effect of the plasma parameters on the rogue waves is also presented.

  15. A comparison of the measured North Sea Andrea rogue wave with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2013-09-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform the 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm are here applied as input to calculate random realizations of sea surface and evolution of its statistical properties associated with this specific wave event by solving the Euler equations with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM). The numerical results are compared with the Andrea wave profile as well as characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at the Ekofisk field.

  16. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics. PMID:27627303

  17. Nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuan-Qi; Gao, Yi-Tian; Xue, Long; Wang, Qi-Min

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Gross-Pitaevskii equation which describes the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensate. Lax pair, conservation laws and Darboux transformation (DT) are constructed. Nonautonomous solitons and breathers are derived based on the DT obtained. A kind of modulation instability process is generated. Nonautonomous rogue waves are obtained via the generalized DT. Influence of the nonlinearity, linear external potential, harmonic external potential, and spectral parameter on the propagation and interaction of the nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves is also discussed. Amplitude of the first-order nonautonomous soliton is proportional to the imaginary part of the spectral parameter and inversely proportional to the nonlinearity parameter. Linear external potential parameter affects the location of the first-order nonautonomous soliton. Head-on interaction, overtaking interaction and bound-state-like nonautonomous solitons can be formed based on the signs of the real parts of the spectral parameters. Quasi-periodic behaviors are exhibited for the nonautonomous breathers. If the harmonic external potential parameter is negative, quasi-period decreases along the positive time axis, with an increase in the amplitude and a compression in the width. Quasi-period decreases with the increase of the nonlinearity parameter. The second-order nonautonomous rogue wave can split into three first-order ones. Nonlinearity parameter has an effect on the amplitude of the rogue wave. Linear external potential parameter influences the location of the rogue wave, while harmonic external potential parameter affects the curved direction of the background.

  18. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  19. Ion-acoustic solitons, double layers and rogue waves in plasma having superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Saini, Nareshpal

    2016-07-01

    Most of the space and astrophysical plasmas contain different type of charged particles with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions (e.g., nonthermal, superthermal, Tsallis ). These distributions are commonly found in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere, planetary magnetosphere, solar and stellar coronas, solar wind, etc. The observations from various satellite missions have confirmed the presence of superthermal particles in space and astrophysical environments. Over the last many years, there have been a much interest in studying the different kind of properties of the electrostatic nonlinear excitations (solitons, double layers, rogue waves etc.) in a multi-component plasmas in the presence of superthermal particles. It has been analyzed that superthermal distributions are more appropriate than Maxwellian distribution for the modeling of space data. It is interesting to study the dynamics of various kinds of solitary waves, Double layers, Shocks etc. in varieties of plasma systems containing different kind of species obeying Lorentzian (kappa-type)/Tsallis distribution. In this talk, I have focused on the study of large amplitude IA solitary structures (bipolar solitary structures, double layers etc.), modulational instability and rogue waves in multicomponent plasmas. The Sagdeev potential method has been employed to setup an energy balance equation, from which we have studied the characteristics of large amplitude solitary waves under the influence of superthermality of charged particles and other plasma parameters. The critical Mach number has been determined, above which solitary structures are observed and its variation with superthermality of electrons and other parameters has also been discussed. Double layers have also been discussed. Multiple scale reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive NLS equation. From the different kind of solutions of this equation, amplitude modulation of envelope solitons and rogue waves have been

  20. On the extension of solutions of the real to complex KdV equation and a mechanism for the construction of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, H. I.; Tantawy, M.; Abo Elkhair, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    Rogue waves are more precisely defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. This remarkable height was measured (by Draupner in 1995). Thus, the need for constructing a mechanism for the rogue waves is of great utility. This motivated us to suggest a mechanism, in this work, that rogue waves may be constructed via nonlinear interactions of solitons and periodic waves. This suggestion is consolidated here, in an example, by studying the behavior of solutions of the complex (KdV). This is done here by the extending the solutions of its real version.

  1. The effect of different background beams on the optical rogue waves generated in a graded-index waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit; Raju, Thokala Soloman; Kumar, C. N.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-04-01

    We analytically explore optical rogue waves in a nonlinear graded-index waveguide, with spatially modulated dispersion, nonlinearity, and linear refractive-index. We study the evolution of first-order rogue wave and rogue wave triplet on Airy-Bessel, sech2, and tanh background beams, and reveal that the characteristics of RWs are well maintained while the amplitude of the first-order RW gets enhanced three times the maximum value of the Airy-Bessel and sech2 background beams and five times in the case of RW triplet. These results could be of great interest in realizing the RWs in experimentally realizable situations on small-amplitude background beams in nonlinear optics.

  2. Soliton, Breather, and Rogue Wave for a (2+1)-Dimensional Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wen, Li-Li

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which is a generalisation of the NLS equation, is under investigation. The classical and generalised N-fold Darboux transformations are constructed in terms of determinant representations. With the non-vanishing background and iterated formula, a family of the analytical solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation are systematically generated, including the bright-line solitons, breathers, and rogue waves. The interaction mechanisms between two bright-line solitons and among three bright-line solitons are both elastic. Several patterns for first-, second, and higher-order rogue wave solutions fixed at space are displayed, namely, the fundamental pattern, triangular pattern, and circular pattern. The two-dimensional space structures of first-, second-, and third-order rogue waves fixed at time are also demonstrated.

  3. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a single sample ion and a background electrolyte consisting of a single co-ion and a counterion in the absence of any processes that might change the ionization states of the constituents. If the ionic diffusivities are assumed to be the same for all constituents the concentration of sample ion is shown to obey a one dimensional advection diffusion equation with a concentration dependent advection velocity. If the analyte concentration is sufficiently low in a suitable non-dimensional sense, Burgers’ equation is recovered, and thus, the time dependent problem is exactly solvable with arbitrary initial conditions. In the case of small diffusivity either a leading edge or trailing edge shock is formed depending on the electrophoretic mobility of the sample ion relative to the background ions. Analytical formulas are presented for the shape, width and migration velocity of the sample peak and it is shown that axial dispersion at long times may be characterized by an effective diffusivity that is exactly calculated. These results are consistent with known observations from physical and numerical simulation experiments. PMID:20238181

  4. Asymmetric Rogue Waves, Breather-to-Soliton Conversion, and Nonlinear Wave Interactions in the Hirota-Maxwell-Bloch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Zi-Qi; Xu, Tao; Qi, Feng-Hua; Xue, Yu-Shan

    2016-02-01

    We study the nonlinear localized waves on constant backgrounds of the Hirota-Maxwell-Bloch (HMB) system arising from the erbium doped fibers. We derive the asymmetric breather, rogue wave (RW) and semirational solutions of the HMB system. We show that the breather and RW solutions can be converted into various soliton solutions. Under different conditions of parameters, we calculate the locus of the eigenvalues on the complex plane which converts the breathers or RWs into solitons. Based on the second-order solutions, we investigate the interactions among different types of nonlinear waves including the breathers, RWs and solitons.

  5. Compressional Alfvénic rogue and solitary waves in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, Anuraj; Rizvi, H.; Ryu, C. M.

    2013-08-15

    Generation of compressional Alfvénic rogue and solitary waves in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas is investigated. Dispersive effect caused by non-ideal electron inertia currents perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can balance the nonlinear steepening of waves leading to the formation of a soliton. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain a Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of the solitary wave. The height of a soliton is proportional to the soliton speed “U” and inversely proportional to plasma “β” (ratio of plasma thermal pressure to pressure of the confining magnetic field) and the width of soliton is proportional to the electron inertial length. KdV equation is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable compressional Alfvénic wavepackets via the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The characteristics of rogue wave influenced by plasma “β” and the electron inertial length are described.

  6. Controllable Discrete Rogue Wave Solutions of the Ablowitz—Ladik Equation in Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of symbolic computation Maple, the discrete Ablowitz—Ladik equation is studied via an algebra method, some new rational solutions with four arbitrary parameters are constructed. By analyzing related parameters, the discrete rogue wave solutions with alterable positions and amplitude for the focusing Ablowitz—Ladik equations are derived. Some properties are discussed by graphical analysis, which might be helpful for understanding physical phenomena in optics. Supported by the Beijing Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 1153004, and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015M570161 and the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61471406

  7. Dissipative rogue wave generation in multiple-pulsing mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecaplain, C.; Grelu, Ph; Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Akhmediev, N.

    2013-06-01

    Following the first experimental observation of a new mechanism leading to optical rogue wave (RW) formation briefly reported in Lecaplain et al (2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 233901), we provide an extensive study of the experimental conditions under which these RWs can be detected. RWs originate from the nonlinear interactions of bunched chaotic pulses that propagate in a fiber laser cavity, and manifest as rare events of high optical intensity. The crucial influence of the electrical detection bandwidth is illustrated. We also clarify the observation of RWs with respect to other pulsating regimes, such as Q-switching instability, that also lead to L-shaped probability distribution functions.

  8. Rogue waves lead to the instability in GaN semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yahia, M. E.; Tolba, R. E.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Labany, S. K.; Moslem, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to understand the electron/hole interfaced plasma in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). A quantum hydrodynamic model is constructed to include electrons/holes degenerate pressure, Bohm potential, and the exchange/correlation effect and then reduced to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Numerical analysis of the latter predicts the rough (in)stability domains, which allow for the rogue waves to occur. Our results might give physical solution rather than the engineering one to the intrinsic problems in these high frequency/power transistors. PMID:26206731

  9. Phase randomization of three-wave interactions in capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Punzmann, H; Shats, M G; Xia, H

    2009-08-01

    We present new experimental results on the transition from coherent-phase to random-phase three-wave interactions in capillary waves under parametric excitation. Above the excitation threshold, coherent wave harmonics spectrally broaden. An increase in the pumping amplitude increases spectral widths of wave harmonics and eventually causes a strong decrease in the degree of the three-wave phase coupling. The results point to the modulation instability of capillary waves, which leads to breaking of continuous waves into ensembles of short-lived wavelets or envelope solitons, as the reason for the phase randomization of three-wave interactions. PMID:19792572

  10. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  11. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, N. S. Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2015-11-15

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  12. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, N. S.; Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  13. Modulational instability, nonautonomous breathers and rogue waves for a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Xu, Tao

    2015-03-15

    Under investigation in this paper is a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (vc-DNLS) equation modeling the nonlinear Alfvén waves in the inhomogeneous plasmas. The modulation instability is examined for this inhomogeneous nonlinear model. The nonautonomous breather and rogue wave solutions of the vc-DNLS equation are obtained via the modified Darboux transformation. It is found that the velocity and amplitude of the breather can be controlled by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. Such novel phenomena as breather amplification and nonlinear Talbot effect-like property are demonstrated with the proper choices of the inhomogeneous parameters. Furthermore, dynamics of the fundamental rogue wave, periodical rogue wave, and composite rogue wave are graphically discussed. The trajectories and amplitudes of the rogue waves can be manipulated by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. In addition, the nonlinear tunneling of the rogue waves and breathers is studied. As an application, a sample model is treated with our results, and the graphical illustrations exhibit the compressing, expanding, and fluctuating phenomena of the Alfvén rogue waves.

  14. Double-Wronskian solitons and rogue waves for the inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation in an inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo Jiang, Yan; Zhen, Hui-Ling

    2014-04-15

    Plasmas are the main constituent of the Universe and the cause of a vast variety of astrophysical, space and terrestrial phenomena. The inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation is hereby investigated, which describes the propagation of an electron plasma wave packet with a large wavelength and small amplitude in a medium with a parabolic density and constant interactional damping. By virtue of the double Wronskian identities, the equation is proved to possess the double-Wronskian soliton solutions. Analytic one- and two-soliton solutions are discussed. Amplitude and velocity of the soliton are related to the damping coefficient. Asymptotic analysis is applied for us to investigate the interaction between the two solitons. Overtaking interaction, head-on interaction and bound state of the two solitons are given. From the non-zero potential Lax pair, the first- and second-order rogue-wave solutions are constructed via a generalized Darboux transformation, and influence of the linear and parabolic density profiles on the background density and amplitude of the rogue wave is discussed. -- Highlights: •Double-Wronskian soliton solutions are obtained and proof is finished by virtue of some double Wronskian identities. •Asymptotic analysis is applied for us to investigate the interaction between the two solitons. •First- and second-order rogue-wave solutions are constructed via a generalized Darboux transformation. •Influence of the linear and parabolic density profiles on the background density and amplitude of the rogue wave is discussed.

  15. Theoretical and experimental evidence of non-symmetric doubly localized rogue waves

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingsong; Guo, Lijuan; Zhang, Yongshuai; Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-01-01

    We present determinant expressions for vector rogue wave (RW) solutions of the Manakov system, a two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. As a special case, we generate a family of exact and non-symmetric RW solutions of the NLS equation up to third order, localized in both space and time. The derived non-symmetric doubly localized second-order solution is generated experimentally in a water wave flume for deep-water conditions. Experimental results, confirming the characteristic non-symmetric pattern of the solution, are in very good agreement with theory as well as with numerical simulations, based on the modified NLS equation, known to model accurately the dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave packets in deep water. PMID:25383023

  16. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  17. Two different kinds of rogue waves in weakly crossing sea states.

    PubMed

    Ruban, V P

    2009-06-01

    Formation of giant waves in sea states with two spectral maxima centered at close wave vectors k_{0}+/-Deltak/2 in the Fourier plane is numerically simulated using the fully nonlinear model for long-crested water waves [V. P. Ruban, Phys. Rev. E 71, 055303(R) (2005)]. Depending on an angle theta between the vectors k_{0} and Deltak , which determines a typical orientation of interference stripes in the physical plane, rogue waves arise having different spatial structure. If theta less, < or = arctan(1/sqrt[2]) , then typical giant waves are relatively long fragments of essentially two-dimensional (2D) ridges, separated by wide valleys and consisting of alternating oblique crests and troughs. At nearly perpendicular k_{0} and Deltak , the interference minima develop to coherent structures similar to the dark solitons of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, and a 2D freak wave looks much as a piece of a one-dimensional freak wave bounded in the transversal direction by two such dark solitons. PMID:19658553

  18. Modulation instability and dissipative rogue waves in ion-beam plasma: Roles of ionization, recombination, and electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-11-15

    The amplitude modulation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in an unmagnetized plasma containing positive ions, negative ions, and electrons obeying a kappa-type distribution that is penetrated by a positive ion beam. By considering dissipative mechanisms, including ionization, negative-positive ion recombination, and electron attachment, we introduce a comprehensive model for the plasma with the effects of sources and sinks. Via reductive perturbation theory, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a dissipative term is derived to govern the dynamics of the modulated waves. The effect of the plasma parameters on the modulation instability criterion for the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is numerically investigated in detail. Within the unstable region, first- and second-order dissipative ion-acoustic rogue waves are present. The effect of the plasma parameters on the characteristics of the dissipative rogue waves is also discussed.

  19. Rogue-wave solutions for an inhomogeneous nonlinear system in a geophysical fluid or inhomogeneous optical medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xi-Yang; Tian, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Sun, Wen-Rong; Sun, Ya; Gao, Yi-Tian

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this paper is an inhomogeneous nonlinear system, which describes the marginally-unstable baroclinic wave packets in a geophysical fluid or ultra-short pulses in nonlinear optics with certain inhomogeneous medium existing. By virtue of a kind of the Darboux transformation, under the Painlevé integrable condition, the first- and second-order bright and dark rogue-wave solutions are derived. Properties of the first- and second-order bright and dark rogue waves with α(t), which measures the state of the basic flow, and β(t), representing the interaction of the wave packet and mean flow, are graphically presented and analyzed: α(t) and β(t) have no influence on the wave packet, but affect the correction of the basic flow. When we choose α(t) as a constant and linear function, respectively, the shapes of the first- and second-order dark rogue waves change, and the peak heights and widths of them alter with the value of β(t) changing.

  20. Rogue waves for a system of coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H. N.; Malomed, B. A.; Chow, K. W.; Ding, E.

    2016-01-01

    Rogue waves (RWs) are unexpectedly strong excitations emerging from an otherwise tranquil background. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a ubiquitous model with wide applications to fluid mechanics, optics, plasmas, etc., exhibits RWs only in the regime of modulation instability (MI) of the background. For a system of multiple waveguides, the governing coupled NLSEs can produce regimes of MI and RWs, even if each component has dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of opposite signs. A similar effect is demonstrated here for a system of coupled derivative NLSEs (DNLSEs) where the special feature is the nonlinear self-steepening of narrow pulses. More precisely, these additional regimes of MI and RWs for coupled DNLSEs depend on the mismatch in group velocities between the components, and the parameters for cubic nonlinearity and self-steepening. RWs considered in this paper differ from those of the NLSEs in terms of the amplification ratio and criteria of existence. Applications to optics and plasma physics are discussed.

  1. The role of PR in the formation of psychological readiness for a rogue wave events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaykovskaya, N.; Rodin, A.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years the study of psychological foundations of human behavior when dealing with rogue waves has received increasing attention. However, this problem is only in the interest of a narrow circle of specialists, while the task is to explain the rules of behavior when dealing with the phenomenon to anyone who can get into this situation. This problem can only be solved by media and PR-specialists working in this field. PR- specialists are required to convey to people the need of correct action stereotype for assault element, because, as it is known, a fact only becomes a fact when it is written about in a newspaper or is made a story about in a summary of radio or TV news. This publication is devoted to the developing of forms and methods of PR-specialists activity in this area.

  2. A hybrid model for simulating rogue waves in random seas on a large temporal and spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinghua; Ma, Q. W.; Yan, S.

    2016-05-01

    A hybrid model for simulating rogue waves in random seas on a large temporal and spatial scale is proposed in this paper. It is formed by combining the derived fifth order Enhanced Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation based on Fourier transform, the Enhanced Spectral Boundary Integral (ESBI) method and its simplified version. The numerical techniques and algorithm for coupling three models on time scale are suggested. Using the algorithm, the switch between the three models during the computation is triggered automatically according to wave nonlinearities. Numerical tests are carried out and the results indicate that this hybrid model could simulate rogue waves both accurately and efficiently. In some cases discussed, the hybrid model is more than 10 times faster than just using the ESBI method, and it is also much faster than other methods reported in the literature.

  3. Laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Kondrashov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The propagation of laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries was studied experimentally and numerically during pulsed exposure to CO2 laser radiation. The dependence of the plasma front propagation rate on the initial air pressure in the capillary is determined. In a broad range of parameters, the formation time of the optically opaque plasma layer is governed by the total laser pulse energy from the beginning of the exposure to the instant screening appears, and is weakly dependent on the pulse shape and gas pressure.

  4. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure.

    PubMed

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra. PMID:27385164

  5. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    PubMed Central

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra. PMID:27385164

  6. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra.

  7. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  8. Rogue waves in electronegative space plasmas: The link between the family of the KdV equations and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the likelihood of the ion-acoustic rogue waves propagation in a non-Maxwellian electronegative plasma in the framework of the family of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations (KdV/modified KdV/Extended KdV equation). For this purpose, we use the reductive perturbation technique to carry out this study. It is known that the family of the KdV equations have solutions of distinct structures such as solitons, shocks, kinks, cnoidal waves, etc. However, the dynamics of the nonlinear rogue waves is governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Thus, the family of the KdV equations is transformed to their corresponding NLSE developing a weakly nonlinear wave packets. We show the possible region for the existence of the rogue waves and define it precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. We investigate numerically the effects of relevant physical parameters, namely, the negative ion relative concentration, the nonthermal parameter, and the mass ratio on the propagation of the rogue waves profile. The present study should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the nonlinear structures such as, ion-acoustic solitary waves, shock waves, and rogue waves in space and in laboratory plasma where two distinct groups of ions, i.e. positive and negative ions, and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons are present.

  9. Generalized perturbation (n, M)-fold Darboux transformations and multi-rogue-wave structures for the modified self-steepening nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple and constructive method is presented to find the generalized perturbation (n,M)-fold Darboux transformations (DTs) of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in terms of fractional forms of determinants. In particular, we apply the generalized perturbation (1,N-1)-fold DTs to find its explicit multi-rogue-wave solutions. The wave structures of these rogue-wave solutions of the MNLS equation are discussed in detail for different parameters, which display abundant interesting wave structures, including the triangle and pentagon, etc., and may be useful to study the physical mechanism of multirogue waves in optics. The dynamical behaviors of these multi-rogue-wave solutions are illustrated using numerical simulations. The same Darboux matrix can also be used to investigate the Gerjikov-Ivanov equation such that its multi-rogue-wave solutions and their wave structures are also found. The method can also be extended to find multi-rogue-wave solutions of other nonlinear integrable equations. PMID:26274257

  10. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields.

  11. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields. PMID:26723154

  12. Predictability of Rogue Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2015-05-01

    Using experimental data from three different rogue wave supporting systems, determinism, and predictability of the underlying dynamics are evaluated with methods of nonlinear time series analysis. We included original records from the Draupner platform in the North Sea as well as time series from two optical systems in our analysis. One of the latter was measured in the infrared tail of optical fiber supercontinua, the other in the fluence profiles of multifilaments. All three data sets exhibit extreme-value statistics and exceed the significant wave height in the respective system by a factor larger than 2. Nonlinear time series analysis indicates a different degree of determinism in the systems. The optical fiber scenario is found to be driven by quantum noise whereas rogue waves emerge as a consequence of turbulence in the others. With the large number of rogue events observed in the multifilament system, we can systematically explore the predictability of such events in a turbulent system. We observe that rogue events do not necessarily appear without a warning, but are often preceded by a short phase of relative order. This surprising finding sheds some new light on the fascinating phenomenon of rogue waves.

  13. Nonlinear ion-acoustic structures in a nonextensive electron–positron–ion–dust plasma: Modulational instability and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin; Research Group MAC, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam, 1098XG ; Mei, Liquan; Center for Computational Geosciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 ; Sun, Anbang

    2013-05-15

    The nonlinear propagation of planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron–positron–ion–dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics. Using the reductive perturbation method, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the potential wave amplitude. The effects of plasma parameters on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves are discussed in detail for planar as well as for cylindrical and spherical geometries. In addition, for the planar case, we analyze how the plasma parameters influence the nonlinear structures of the first- and second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves within the modulational instability region. The present results may be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future spatial observations and laboratory plasma experiments. -- Highlights: ► Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a new plasma model is discussed. ► Tsallis’s statistics is considered in the model. ► The second-order ion-acoustic rogue wave is studied for the first time.

  14. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study three-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in the wave-vector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve four waves, at the capillary crossover we observe a nonlocal coupling between a gravity wave and two capillary waves. Furthermore, nonlinear spectral spreading permits three-gravity wave coupling. These observations raise the question of the relevance of these processes in the oceanographic context and in particular the range of frequencies of gravity waves that may be impacted.

  15. Second-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation breather solutions in the degenerate and rogue wave limits.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2012-06-01

    We present an explicit analytic form for the two-breather solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with imaginary eigenvalues. It describes various nonlinear combinations of Akhmediev breathers and Kuznetsov-Ma solitons. The degenerate case, when the two eigenvalues coincide, is quite involved. The standard inverse scattering technique does not generally provide an answer to this scenario. We show here that the solution can still be found as a special limit of the general second-order expression and appears as a mixture of polynomials with trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. A further restriction of this particular case, where the two eigenvalues are equal to i, produces the second-order rogue wave with two free parameters considered as differential shifts. The illustrations reveal a precarious dependence of wave profile on the degenerate eigenvalues and differential shifts. Thus we establish a hierarchy of second-order solutions, revealing the interrelated nature of the general case, the rogue wave, and the degenerate breathers. PMID:23005231

  16. Three-dimensional dust-ion-acoustic rogue waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons and opposite polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-08-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) rogue waves are investigated in a three-dimensional magnetized plasma containing nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution, both positive and negative ions, and immobile dust grains having both positive and negative charges. Via the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is derived to govern the dynamics of the DIA wave packets. The modulation instability of DIA waves described by the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation is investigated. By means of the similarity transformation and symbolic computation, both the first- and second-order rogue wave solutions of the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation are constructed in terms of rational functions. Moreover, the dynamics properties and the effects of plasma parameters on the nonlinear structures of rogue waves are discussed in detail. The results could be useful for understanding the physical mechanism of rogue waves in laboratory experiments where pair-ion plasmas with electrons and dust grains can be found.

  17. Solitons, breathers and rogue waves for a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch system in an erbium-doped fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Min; Gao, Yi-Tian; Su, Chuan-Qi; Zuo, Da-Wei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch system with quintic terms is investigated, which describes the propagation of ultrashort optical pulses, up to the attosecond duration, in an erbium-doped fiber. Multi-soliton, breather and rogue-wave solutions are derived by virtue of the Darboux transformation and the limiting procedure. Features and interaction patterns of the solitons, breathers and rogue waves are discussed. (i) The solitonic amplitudes, widths and velocities are exhibited, and solitonic amplitudes and widths are proved to have nothing to do with the higher-order terms. (ii) The higher-order terms and frequency detuning affect the growth rate of periodic modulation and skewing angle for the breathers, except for the range of the frequency of modulation. (iii) The quintic terms and frequency detuning have the effects on the temporal duration for the rogue waves. (iv) Breathers are classified into two types, according to the range of the modulation instability. (v) Interaction between the two solitons is elastic. When the two solitons interact with each other, the periodic structure occurs, which is affected by the higher-order terms and frequency detuning. (vi) Interaction between the two Akhmediev-like breathers or two Kuznetsov-Ma-like solitons shows the different patterns with different ratios of the relative modulation frequencies, while the interaction area induced by the two breathers looks like a higher-order rogue wave.

  18. Strongly nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-05-01

    In capillary electrophoresis, sample ions migrate along a microcapillary filled with a background electrolyte under the influence of an applied electric field. If the sample concentration is sufficiently high, the electrical conductivity in the sample zone could differ significantly from the background. Under such conditions, the local migration velocity of sample ions becomes concentration-dependent, resulting in a nonlinear wave that exhibits shocklike features. If the nonlinearity is weak, the sample concentration profile, under certain simplifying assumptions, can be shown to obey Burgers’ equation [Ghosal and Chen, Bull. Math. Biol.BMTBAP0092-824010.1007/s11538-010-9527-2 72, 2047 (2010)], which has an exact analytical solution for arbitrary initial condition. In this paper, we use a numerical method to study the problem in the more general case where the sample concentration is not small in comparison to the concentration of background ions. In the case of low concentrations, the numerical results agree with the weakly nonlinear theory presented earlier, but at high concentrations, the wave evolves in a way that is qualitatively different.

  19. The Hagen-Poiseuille, Plane Couette and Poiseuille Flows Linear Instability and Rogue Waves Excitation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, Sergey; Chefranov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow yields a conclusion of infinitely large threshold Reynolds number, Re, value. This contradiction to the observation data is bypassed using assumption of the HP flow instability having hard type and possible for sufficiently high-amplitude disturbances. HP flow disturbance evolution is considered by nonlinear hydrodynamic stability theory. Similar is the case of the plane Couette (PC) flow. For the plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, linear theory just quantitatively does not agree with experimental data defining the threshold Reynolds number Re= 5772 ( S. A. Orszag, 1971), more than five-fold exceeding however the value observed, Re=1080 (S. J. Davies, C. M. White, 1928). In the present work, we show that the linear stability theory conclusions for the HP and PC on stability for any Reynolds number and evidently too high threshold Reynolds number estimate for the PP flow are related with the traditional use of the disturbance representation assuming the possibility of separation of the longitudinal (along the flow direction) variable from the other spatial variables. We show that if to refuse from this traditional form, conclusions on the linear instability for the HP and PC flows may be obtained for finite Reynolds numbers (for the HP flow, for Re>704, and for the PC flow, for Re>139). Also, we fit the linear stability theory conclusion on the PP flow to the experimental data by getting an estimate of the minimal threshold Reynolds number as Re=1040. We also get agreement of the minimal threshold Reynolds number estimate for PC with the experimental data of S. Bottin, et.al., 1997, where the laminar PC flow stability threshold is Re = 150. Rogue waves excitation mechanism in oppositely directed currents due to the PC flow linear instability is discussed. Results of the new linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the HP, PP, and PC flows are published in the following papers: 1. S.G. Chefranov, A

  20. Rogue waves, rational solitons, and modulational instability in an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-10-01

    We analytically study rogue-wave (RW) solutions and rational solitons of an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger (FONLS) equation with three free parameters. It includes, as particular cases, the usual NLS, Hirota, and Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel equations. We present continuous-wave (CW) solutions and conditions for their modulation instability in the framework of this model. Applying the Darboux transformation to the CW input, novel first- and second-order RW solutions of the FONLS equation are analytically found. In particular, trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first- and second-order RWs are produced by means of analytical and numerical methods. The solutions also include newly found rational and W-shaped one- and two-soliton modes. The results predict the corresponding dynamical phenomena in extended models of nonlinear fiber optics and other physically relevant integrable systems.

  1. Dam break problem for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the generation of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Khamis, E. G.; Tovbis, A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel, analytically tractable, scenario of the rogue wave formation in the framework of the small-dispersion focusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with the initial condition in the form of a rectangular barrier (a ‘box’). We use the Whitham modulation theory combined with the nonlinear steepest descent for the semi-classical inverse scattering transform, to describe the evolution and interaction of two counter-propagating nonlinear wave trains—the dispersive dam break flows—generated in the NLS box problem. We show that the interaction dynamics results in the emergence of modulated large-amplitude quasi-periodic breather lattices whose amplitude profiles are closely approximated by the Akhmediev and Peregrine breathers within certain space-time domain. Our semi-classical analytical results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the results of direct numerical simulations of the small-dispersion focusing NLS equation.

  2. Rogue waves, rational solitons, and modulational instability in an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya; Malomed, Boris A

    2015-10-01

    We analytically study rogue-wave (RW) solutions and rational solitons of an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger (FONLS) equation with three free parameters. It includes, as particular cases, the usual NLS, Hirota, and Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel equations. We present continuous-wave (CW) solutions and conditions for their modulation instability in the framework of this model. Applying the Darboux transformation to the CW input, novel first- and second-order RW solutions of the FONLS equation are analytically found. In particular, trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first- and second-order RWs are produced by means of analytical and numerical methods. The solutions also include newly found rational and W-shaped one- and two-soliton modes. The results predict the corresponding dynamical phenomena in extended models of nonlinear fiber optics and other physically relevant integrable systems. PMID:26520078

  3. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  4. The role of capillary waves in two-fluid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Luu, Patrick; Childs, Paul; Teshome, Asseged; Tsai, Chen S.

    1997-10-01

    A mechanistic study of two-fluid atomization has been carried out using a new spray technique called ultrasound-modulated two-fluid (UMTF) atomization. This technique is based on resonance between the liquid capillary waves generated by ultrasound and those generated by high-velocity air. Specifically, capillary waves are established on the surface of a liquid jet as it issues from a coaxial two-fluid atomizer, the nozzle tip of which vibrates at the same frequency as the ultrasound while the frequency of the capillary waves is only half of the ultrasound frequency. As these capillary waves travel downstream in the direction of air flow, their amplitude is further amplified by the air flowing around them. Atomization occurs when the wave amplitude becomes too great to maintain wave stability; the resulting drop sizes are proportional to the wavelength of the resonant capillary waves which is determined by the harmonic frequency of the ultrasound in accordance with the Kelvin equation. Theoretical calculations of the amplitude growth rate are based on two models of temporal instability of wind-generated capillary waves: Taylor's dispersion relation and Jeffreys' one-parameter (sheltering factor) model. Good agreements between the theoretical predictions by these models and the experimental results of how drop-size and size distributions are influenced by air velocity and surface tension led to the conclusion that Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves plays a very important role in two-fluid atomization. Furthermore, all peak drop diameters can be accounted for by the harmonic frequencies of the ultrasound. Hence, it is further concluded that secondary atomization is negligible in co-flow two-fluid atomization of a water jet at air velocities up to 170 m/s and air-to-water mass ratio up to 5.6. In addition, uniform drops with diameters predetermined by the ultrasound frequency can be accomplished by adjusting the air velocity.

  5. Akhmediev breathers, Ma solitons, and general breathers from rogue waves: a case study in the Manakov system.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Priya, N; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2013-08-01

    We present explicit forms of general breather (GB), Akhmediev breather (AB), Ma soliton (MS), and rogue wave (RW) solutions of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, namely Manakov equation. We derive these solutions through two different routes. In the forward route, we first construct a suitable periodic envelope soliton solution to this model from which we derive GB, AB, MS, and RW solutions. We then consider the RW solution as the starting point and derive AB, MS, and GB in the reverse direction. The second approach has not been illustrated so far for the two component NLS equation. Our results show that the above rational solutions of the Manakov system can be derived from the standard scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a modified nonlinearity parameter. Through this two-way approach we establish a broader understanding of these rational solutions, which will be of interest in a variety of situations. PMID:24032912

  6. Non-Condensable Gas Absorption by Capillary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2013-03-01

    Oceans and atmosphere are constantly exchanging heat and mass; this has a direct consequence on the climate. While these exchanges are inherently multi-scales, in non-breaking waves the smallest scales strongly govern the transfer rates at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The present experimental study aims at characterizing and quantifying the exchanges of non-condensable gas at a sub-millimeter scale, in the presence of capillary waves. In oceans, capillaries are generated by high winds and are also present on the forward face of short gravity waves. Capillary waves are thus present over a large fraction of the ocean surface, but their effect on interphase phenomena is little known. In the experiment, 2D capillary waves are generated by the relaxation of a shear layer at the surface of a laminar water slab jet. Wave profile is measured with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and 2D velocity field of the water below the surface is resolved with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Special optical arrangements coupled with high speed imaging allow 0.1 mm- and 0.1 ms- resolution. These data reveal the interaction of vorticity and free surface in the formation and evolution of capillaries. The effect of the capillaries on the transfer of oxygen from the ambient air to anoxic water is measured with another PLIF system. In this diagnostic, dissolved oxygen concentration field is indirectly measured using fluorescence quenching of Pyrenebutyric Acid (PBA). The three measurements performed simultaneously -surface profile, velocity field, and oxygen concentration- give deep physical insights into oxygen transfer mechanisms under capillary waves.

  7. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves. PMID:25910127

  8. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1995-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory, inertial spectra of capillary gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear inertia gravity waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak-turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work for an arbitrary degree of nonlinearity is shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The theory explains the dependence of the wave spectrum on wind input and describes the accelerated roll-off of the spectral density function in the narrow sub-range separating scale-invariant regimes of purely gravity and capillary waves, while the appropriate (long- and short-wave) limits yield power laws corresponding to the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra.

  9. Rogue wave solutions for the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients by generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a higher-order variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which plays an important role in the control of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation in nonlinear optical systems. Then, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation (GDT) for the higher-order variable coefficient NLS equation. The Nth order rogue wave solution is obtained by the iterative rule and it can be expressed by the determinant form. As application, we calculate rogue waves (RWs) from first- to fourth-order in accordance with different kinds of parameters. In particular, the dynamical properties and spatial-temporal structures of RWs are discussed and compared with Hirota equation through some figures.

  10. Nonlinear structures of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma: Solitons collision and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2014-05-15

    Solitons (small-amplitude long-lived waves) collision and rogue waves (large-amplitude short-lived waves) in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma have been investigated. For the solitons collision, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is used to derive the coupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with the quadratic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts. The calculations reveal that both positive and negative polarity solitons can propagate in the present model. At critical value of plasma parameters, the coefficients of the quadratic nonlinearities disappear. Therefore, the coupled modified KdV (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts have been derived. The effects of the electron-to-positron temperature ratio, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, the positron-to-ion concentration, and the nonextensive parameter on the colliding solitons profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are examined. Moreover, generation of ion-acoustic rogue waves from small-amplitude initial perturbations in plasmas is studied in the framework of the mKdV equation. The properties of the ion-acoustic rogue waves are examined within a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that has been derived from the mKdV equation. The dependence of the rogue wave profile on the relevant physical parameters has been investigated. Furthermore, it is found that the NLSE that has been derived from the KdV equation cannot support the propagation of rogue waves.

  11. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1993-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory [JFM, 243, 623-625], spectra of capillary-gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The resultant absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear Rossby waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work is shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. Its low- and high-frequency limits yield power-laws characterizing spectra of purely gravity and capillary waves, respectively. In the limits of weak and strong linearity, these reduce of the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra, respectively.

  12. A coupling modulation model of capillary waves from gravity waves: Theoretical analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengzhen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Li; Chong, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    According to Bragg theory, capillary waves are the predominant scatterers of high-frequency band (such as Ka-band) microwave radiation from the surface of the ocean. Therefore, understanding the modulation mechanism of capillary waves is an important foundation for interpreting high-frequency microwave remote sensing images of the surface of the sea. In our experiments, we discovered that modulations of capillary waves are significantly larger than the values predicted by the classical theory. Further, analysis shows that the difference in restoring force results in an inflection point while the phase velocity changes from gravity waves region to capillary waves region, and this results in the capillary waves being able to resonate with gravity waves when the phase velocity of the gravity waves is equal to the group velocity of the capillary waves. Consequently, we propose a coupling modulation model in which the current modulates the capillary wave indirectly by modulating the resonant gravity waves, and the modulation of the former is approximated by that of the latter. This model very effectively explains the results discovered in our experiments. Further, based on Bragg scattering theory and this coupling modulation model, we simulate the modulation of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of typical internal waves and show that the high-frequency bands are superior to the low-frequency bands because of their greater modulation of NRCS and better radiometric resolution. This result provides new support for choice of radar band for observation of wave-current modulation oceanic phenomena such as internal waves, fronts, and shears.

  13. Capillary waves in the subcritical nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyreff, G.

    2010-01-15

    We expand recent results on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with cubic-quintic nonlinearity to show that some solutions are described by the Bernoulli equation in the presence of surface tension. As a consequence, capillary waves are predicted and found numerically at the interface between regions of large and low amplitude.

  14. Comb generation using multiple compression points of Peregrine rogue waves in periodically modulated nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiofack, C. G. L.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.; De Bièvre, S.; Dujardin, G.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown that sufficiently large periodic modulations in the coefficients of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation can drastically impact the spatial shape of the Peregrine soliton solutions: they can develop multiple compression points of the same amplitude, rather than only a single one, as in the spatially homogeneous focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The additional compression points are generated in pairs forming a comblike structure. The number of additional pairs depends on the amplitude of the modulation but not on its wavelength, which controls their separation distance. The dynamics and characteristics of these generalized Peregrine solitons are analytically described in the case of a completely integrable modulation. A numerical investigation shows that their main properties persist in nonintegrable situations, where no exact analytical expression of the generalized Peregrine soliton is available. Our predictions are in good agreement with numerical findings for an interesting specific case of an experimentally realizable periodically dispersion modulated photonic crystal fiber. Our results therefore pave the way for the experimental control and manipulation of the formation of generalized Peregrine rogue waves in the wide class of physical systems modeled by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  15. Quantum Capillary Waves at the Superfluid—Mott-Insulator Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Steffen Patrick; Spivak, Boris; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-10-01

    We discuss quantum fluctuations of the interface between a superfluid and a Mott-insulating state of ultracold atoms in a trap. The fluctuations of the boundary are due to a new type of surface modes, whose spectrum is similar—but not identical—to classical capillary waves. The corresponding quantum capillary length sets the scale for the penetration of the superfluid into the Mott-insulating regime by the proximity effect and may be on the order of several lattice spacings. It determines the typical magnitude of the interface width due to quantum fluctuations, which may be inferred from single-site imaging of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice.

  16. A Cascade Model of Wave Turbulence with Applications to Surface Gravity and Capillary Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1993-01-01

    A heuristic approach to the derivation of power spectra of wave motion is described and applied to capillary waves. The case of gravity waves studied earlier is briefly reviewed. In contract to the previous studies, the nonlinearity of the wave motion is not required to be small, and the mean number of resonantly interacting wave harmonics is not limited to a smallest possible number (which is 4 for gravity waves on a deep fluid and 3 for capillary waves). The main external parameter of the problem is the input flux Q of the wave energy related to the mean wind velocity. Depending on its value, wave spectra take various forms---from that corresponding to the weak-turbulence limit to that corresponding to the saturated (Phillips') wave spectra...

  17. Thermal capillary waves in colloid polymer mixtures in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamie, E. A. G.; Davies, G. J.; Howe, M. D.; Dullens, R. P. A.; Aarts, D. G. A. L.

    2008-12-01

    We develop two colloid-polymer mixtures in water and study their phase and interface behaviour by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy. The systems consist either of silica or of poly(methylmethacrylate) particles, fluorescently labelled, with, as the polymer, xanthan. The fluid-fluid phase separation can be clearly followed in time and, depending on the concentrations and system details, we observe coarsening either of a bicontinuous spinodal structure or of a suspension of colloid-rich droplets. After phase separation has completed, we study the thermal capillary waves at the fluid-fluid interface. We construct correlation functions and compare with capillary wave theory. Finally, we demonstrate that these colloid-polymer systems are compatible with microfluidics.

  18. Polymer Surface Melting Mediated by Capillary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf; Landfester, Katharina

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of atactic polystyrene emulsions yield direct evidence that the polymer surface exhibits a rather well-defined molten layer. Its thickness d grows continuously as the temperature is increased towards the bulk glass transition, according to d∝(Tg-T)-1. This is precisely what was recently predicted by a simple continuum model considering viscoelastic surface waves. Furthermore, this model is capable of explaining the frequently reported depression of the glass transition temperature in thin polymer films, and thus suggests a quite simple mechanism to underlie all these effects.

  19. Capillary Wave Dynamics of Thin Polymer Films over Submerged Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Dai, Yeling; Ro, Hyun W.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Soles, Christopher L.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.

    2012-11-13

    The surface dynamics of thin molten polystyrene films supported by nanoscale periodic silicon line-space gratings were investigated with x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Surface dynamics over these nanostructures exhibit high directional anisotropy above certain length scales, as compared to surface dynamics over flat substrates. A cutoff length scale in the dynamics perpendicular to the grooves is observed. This marks a transition from standard over-damped capillary wave behavior to suppressed dynamics due to substrate interactions.

  20. Three-wave interactions in a gravity-capillary range of wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosnik, M.; Dulov, V.; Kudryavtsev, V.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of three-wave interactions on forming of short wind waves spectrum are investigated. Wavenumber spectrum in gravity-capillary and capillary range is found as a result of evolution of initial arbitrary spectrum under the influence of assigned sources of kinetic equation. Three-wave interactions are taken into account using exact collision integral without any additional assumptions simplifying a problem. Model validity is proved by reproducing Zaharov & Filonenko (1967) theoretical spectra describing the "energy equipartition" and "inertial interval" cases. Numerical calculations show that the main role of three-wave interactions consists in energy transfer from short gravity waves to waves of smaller lengths. The prominent feature of most of resulting spectra is a dip on curvature spectrum in the vicinity of phase speed minimum. Wind forcing, viscous dissipation and mechanism of generation of parasitic capillaries are considered in a number of calculations using parameterization for corresponding sources by Kudryavtsev, Makin, Chapron, 1999. The necessity of additional nonlinear dissipation terms in kinetic equation for short gravity and capillary waves is revealed. The results of calculation with this realistic parameterization of kinetic equation sources show that, when accounted, nonlinear dissipation and parasitic capillaries terms play much more significant part in capillary range than wave-wave interactions. The latter are important only in phase speed minimum area where the typical dip remains at the same wavenumber in all numerical experiments. This work was supported by the EU under the projects INTAS 05-1000008-8014, INTAS/ESA 06-1000025-9264 and Contract # SST5 CT 2006 031001 (MONRUK) of FP6.

  1. Rogue events in the group velocity horizon

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Ayhan; Amiranashvili, Shalva; Brée, Carsten; Mahnke, Christoph; Mitschke, Fedor; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of rogue waves arises from a mysterious and potentially calamitous phenomenon of oceanic surfaces. There is mounting evidence that they are actually commonplace in a variety of different physical settings. A set of defining criteria has been advanced; this set is of great generality and therefore applicable to a wide class of systems. The question arises naturally whether there are generic mechanisms responsible for extreme events in different systems. Here we argue that under suitable circumstances nonlinear interaction between weak and strong waves results in intermittent giant waves with all the signatures of rogue waves. To obtain these circumstances only a few basic conditions must be met. Then reflection of waves at the so-called group-velocity horizon occurs. The connection between rogue waves and event horizons, seemingly unrelated physical phenomena, is identified as a feature common in many different physical systems. PMID:23152941

  2. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  3. Lax Pair, Conservation Laws, Solitons, and Rogue Waves for a Generalised Nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch System under the Nonlinear Tunneling Effect for an Inhomogeneous Erbium-Doped Silica Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhe; Gao, Yi-Tian; Su, Chuan-Qi; Wang, Qi-Min; Mao, Bing-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Under investigation in this article is a generalised nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch system for the picosecond optical pulse propagation in an inhomogeneous erbium-doped silica optical fibre. Lax pair, conservation laws, Darboux transformation, and generalised Darboux transformation for the system are constructed; with the one- and two-soliton solutions, the first- and second-order rogue waves given. Soliton propagation is discussed. Nonlinear tunneling effect on the solitons and rogue waves are investigated. We find that (i) the detuning of the atomic transition frequency from the optical pulse frequency affects the velocity of the pulse when the detuning is small, (ii) nonlinear tunneling effect does not affect the energy redistribution of the soliton interaction, (iii) dispersion barrier/well has an effect on the soliton velocity, whereas nonlinear well/barrier does not, (iv) nonlinear well/barrier could amplify/compress the solitons or rogue waves in a smoother manner than the dispersion barrier/well, and (v) dispersion barrier could "attract" the nearby rogue waves, whereas the dispersion well has a repulsive effect on them.

  4. Regularity for steady periodic capillary water waves with vorticity.

    PubMed

    Henry, David

    2012-04-13

    In the following, we prove new regularity results for two-dimensional steady periodic capillary water waves with vorticity, in the absence of stagnation points. Firstly, we prove that if the vorticity function has a Hölder-continuous first derivative, then the free surface is a smooth curve and the streamlines beneath the surface will be real analytic. Furthermore, once we assume that the vorticity function is real analytic, it will follow that the wave surface profile is itself also analytic. A particular case of this result includes irrotational fluid flow where the vorticity is zero. The property of the streamlines being analytic allows us to gain physical insight into small-amplitude waves by justifying a power-series approach. PMID:22393112

  5. Dissipative rogue waves induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser with a topological insulator-deposited microfiber photonic device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Cai, Ze-Rong; Hu, Song; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Luo, Zhi-Chao

    2015-10-15

    We reported on the generation of dissipative rogue waves (DRWs) induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser based on a topological insulator (TI)-deposited microfiber photonic device. By virtue of the simultaneous saturable absorption effect and high nonlinearity provided by the TI-deposited microfiber, a localized, chaotic multi-pulse wave packet with strong long-range nonlinear interactions could be obtained, which gives rise to the formation of DRWs. The results might enhance the understanding of DRWs in optical systems, and further demonstrated that the TI-deposited microfiber could be considered as an excellent photonic device with both saturable absorption and highly nonlinear effects for the application field of nonlinear optics. PMID:26469615

  6. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence.

  7. Thermally excited capillary waves at vapor/liquid interfaces of water-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Vaknin, David; Bu, Wei; Sung, Jaeho; Jeon, Yoonnam; Kim, Doseok

    2009-02-02

    The density profiles of liquid/vapor interfaces of water–alcohol (methanol, ethanol and propanol) mixtures were studied by surface-sensitive synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity and diffuse scattering measurements, from the pure and mixed liquids, were analyzed in the framework of capillary wave theory to address the characteristic length scales of the intrinsic roughness and the shortest capillary wavelength (alternatively, the upper wavevector cutoff in capillary wave theory). Our results establish that the intrinsic roughness is dominated by average interatomic distances. The extracted effective upper wavevector cutoff indicates capillary wave theory breaks down at distances of the order of bulk correlation lengths.

  8. Wave drag due to generation of capillary-gravity surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghelea, Teodor; Steinberg, Victor

    2002-11-01

    The onset of the wave resistance via the generation of capillary-gravity waves by a small object moving with a velocity V is investigated experimentally. Due to the existence of a minimum phase velocity Vc for surface waves, the problem is similar to the generation of rotons in superfluid helium near their minimum. In both cases, waves or rotons are produced at V>Vc due to Cherenkov radiation. We find that the transition to the wave drag state is continuous: in the vicinity of the bifurcation the wave resistance force is proportional to (V-Vc) for various fluids. This observation contradicts the theory of Raphaël and de Gennes. We also find that the reduced wave drag force for different fluids and different ball size may be scaled in such a way that all the data collapse on a single curve. The capillary-gravity wave pattern and the shape of the wave-generating region are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Good agreement between the theory and the experimental data is found in this case.

  9. Rogue run-up events at the North Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Blossier, Brice; Daly, Christopher; Herbst, Gabriel; Senichev, Dmitry; Winter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    On the 1st of January, 1995, the Statoil-operated "Draupner" platform located in the North Sea recorded the so-called "New Year wave". Since then, rogue waves have been the topic of active scientific discussions and investigations. Waves of extreme height appearing randomly at the sea surface have been measured in both deep and shallow waters and have been involved in a number of ship accidents. Nowadays rogue waves are frequently recorded all over the world with several different instruments (range finders installed on offshore platforms, deployed buoys, radars including SAR, etc.). Rogue wave also occur at the coast, where they appear as either sudden flooding of coastal areas or high splashes over steep banks or sea walls. These waves are especially dangerous for beach users and lead regularly to human injuries and fatalities. Despite numerous reports of human accidents, coastal rogue waves have not yet been recorded experimentally. In this paper we discuss the recording of rogue wave events at German North Sea coasts by using high-resolution beach cameras. The recorded rogue waves are observed during different tide levels and different weather conditions. Possible mechanisms of their generation are discussed.

  10. Capillary freak waves in He-II as a manifestation of discrete wave turbulent regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Two fundamental findings of the modern theory of wave turbulence are • existence of Kolmogorov-Zakharov power energy spectra (KZ-spectra) in k-space, [1], and • existence of 'gaps" in KZ-spectra corresponding to the resonance clustering, [2]. Accordingly, three wave turbulent regimes can be singled out: kinetic (described by wave kinetic equations and KZ-spectra, in random phase approximation, [3]); discrete (described by a few dynamical systems, with coherent phases corresponding to resonance conditions, [4]); mesoscopic (where kinetic and discrete evolution of the wave field coexist, [5]). We present an explanation of freak waves appearance in capillary waves in He-II, [6], as a manifestation of discrete wave turbulent regime. Implications of these results for other wave systems are briefly discussed. References [1] V. E. Zakharov and N. N. Filonenko. Weak turbulence of capillary waves. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 4 (1967), 500-15. [2] E. Kartashova. A model of laminated turbulence. JETP Lett., 83 (2006), 341-45. [3] V. E. Zakharov, V. S. L'vov and G. Falkovich. Kolmogorov Spectra of Turbulence (Series in Nonlinear Dynamics, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1992). [4] E. Kartashova. Discrete wave turbulence. EPL 87 (2009), 44001-1-5. [5] V. E. Zakharov, A. O. Korotkevich, A. N. Pushkarev and A. I. Dyachenko. Mesoscopic wave turbulence. JETP Lett. 82 (2005), 487-91. [6] L. V. Abdurakhimov, Y. M. Brazhnikov, G. V. Kolmakov and A. A. Levchenko. Study of high-frequency edge of turbulent cascade on the surface of He-II. J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 150 (2009) (3): 032001.

  11. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  12. Diffusing light photography of solitons and capillary-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.; Budak, R.; Putterman, S. )

    1994-11-01

    The attenuation of light propagating through a slab of water (containing a dilute concentration of polyballs) is approximately proportional to its thickness. Application of this insight to the local elevation of a fluid surface has enabled us to use photography to determine the instantaneous global topography of the surface of a fluid in motion. Use of diffusing light enables us to obtain images that are free of the caustics which plague shadowgraphs. Applications include breather solitons and wave turbulence which results from the nonlinear interaction of a broadband spectrum of high amplitude surface ripples. Measurements indicate that as the amplitude of excitation of the surface of water is increased the wave number of the capillary motion displays a transition to a broadband spectrum. The temporal response of a single pixel yields the power spectrum of the surface height as a function of frequency [ital f].'' The numerous harmonics which can be seen at low amplitude merge at high amplitude into a broadband spectrum which goes as 1/[ital f][sup 3]. This technique should permit the measurement of turbulent parameters which go beyond the purported range of current theories. [Work supported by US DOE Division of Engineering and Geophysics and NASA Microgravity.

  13. Going rogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Once thought to be the stuff of exaggeration by seafaring folk, we now know that giant “rogue” waves that soar to heights of up to 30 m really do occur at sea. But scientists can't yet agree on why they happen, as Philip Ball reports.

  14. Capillary waves in an inhomogeneous three-layer liquid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Grigor'ev, A. I.; Zav'yalov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    In the domain of capillary waves, a bicubic dispersion relation is derived and analyzed for surface and internal capillary-gravitational waves in a three-layer liquid with a free surface. It is shown that the ratio of the internal wave amplitudes to the surface wave amplitudes is fairly large if the trivial condition of a "homogeneous liquid" is discarded. The amplitude ratio between the internal waves themselves (generated at different interfaces) may be both greater and smaller than unity depending on the physical parameters of the system. Specifically, it strongly depends on the densities of the layers and their thicknesses.

  15. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  16. Stability of capillary-gravity interfacial waves between two bounded fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Paul; Dias, Frédéric

    1995-12-01

    Two-dimensional periodic capillary-gravity waves at the interface between two bounded fluids of different densities are considered. Based on a variational formulation, the relation between wave frequency and wave amplitude is obtained through a weakly nonlinear analysis. All classes of space-periodic waves are studied: traveling and standing waves as well as a degenerate class of mixed waves. As opposed to water waves, mixed interfacial waves exist even for pure gravity waves. The stability of traveling and standing waves with respect to three-dimensional modulations is then studied. By using the method of multiple scales, Davey-Stewartson-type equations are obtained. A detailed stability analysis is performed in three cases: pure gravity waves, capillary-gravity waves when one layer is infinitely deep, and capillary-gravity waves when both layers are infinitely deep. The main results for oblique (i.e., combined longitudinal and transverse) modulations reveal a mostly stabilizing effect of the density ratio for traveling waves and a destabilizing effect for standing waves.

  17. On the physical mechanism of front-back asymmetry of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yulia; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    In nature wind waves of all scales are asymmetric both with respect to the horizontal and vertical axes. The front-back (or fore-aft asymmetry), i.e. the asymmetry with respect to the vertical axis, manifests itself in steeper front slopes. Although it can be important for remote sensing of sea surface and wave field interaction with wind, especially for the waves of gravity-capillary range, at present the understanding of physical mechanisms causing the gravity-capillary waves asymmetry and its dependence on parameters is very poor; there has been no study dedicated to this problem. Here we address this gap. The decimetre-range water waves in many respects essentially differ from the waves of other ranges: wind forcing is stronger, steep waves develop a characteristic pattern of capillary ripples on their forward slopes. These 'parasitic capillaries', generated by a narrow pressure distribution associated with an underlying longer wave' crest, remain quasi-stationary with regard to the longer wave. The train of capillaries is localised on the front slope and decays towards the trough. We investigate the nature of the asymmetry of such waves by extensive numerical simulations of the Euler equations employing the method of conformal mapping for two-dimensional potential flow and taking into account wave generation by wind and dissipation due to molecular viscosity. We examine the role of various factors contributing to the wave profile asymmetry: wind pumping, viscous stresses, the Reynolds stresses caused by ripples and found the latter to be by far the most important. It is the lop-sided ripple distribution which leads to noticeable fore-aft asymmetry of the mean wave profile. We also found how the asymmetry depends on wavelength, steepness, wind and viscosity, which enables us to parametrize these dependencies for applications in microwave remote sensing and wave generation.

  18. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b. PMID:24229283

  19. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  20. Capillary Dynamics of Elastic-Wave-Enhanced Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilpert, Markus; Guo, Chunyan; Katz, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    Elastic waves may enhance two-phase flow in porous media. We investigate the role and dynamics of capillary forces during the enhancement process. We present a theory that allows us to estimate the response of trapped nonwetting phase blobs to variable frequency excitation. According to this theory capillary trapped oil blobs may exhibit resonance, depending on the properties of the fluids and the pore space. Using this theory we estimate the resonant frequencies of crude oil and gasoline blobs in sphere packings. We will also present experimental evidence showing that capillary trapped liquid blobs exhibit resonance.

  1. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  2. Stability and interactions of nanocolloids at fluid interfaces: effects of capillary waves and line tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehle, H.; Oettel, M.

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the effective potential for nanoparticles trapped at a fluid interface within a simple model which incorporates surface and line tensions as well as a thermal average over interface fluctuations (capillary waves). For a single colloid, a reduced steepness of the potential well hindering movements out of the interface plane compared to rigid interface models is observed, and an instability of the capillary wave partition sum in the case of negative line tensions is pointed out. For two colloids, averaging over the capillary waves leads to an effective Casimir-type interaction which is long ranged, power-like in the inverse distance, but whose power sensitively depends on possible restrictions of the colloid degrees of freedom. A nonzero line tension leads to changes in the magnitude but not in the functional form of the effective potential asymptotics.

  3. Acoustic microfluidics: Capillary waves and vortex currents in a spherical fluid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev-Stepanov, P. V.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the radiation forces in a spherical drop lying on a solid substrate. The forces form as a result of the action of a capillary wave on a fluid as it propagates along the free spherical surface. We study the structure of acoustic currents excited by the radiation forces.

  4. Gravity capillary waves in fluid layers under normal electric fields.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T; Petropoulos, Peter G; Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    We study the formation and dynamics of interfacial waves on a perfect dielectric ideal fluid layer of finite depth, wetting a solid wall, when the region above the fluid is hydrodynamically passive but has constant permittivity, for example, air. The wall is held at a constant electric potential and a second electrode having a different potential is placed parallel to the wall and infinitely far from it. In the unperturbed state the interface is flat and the normal horizontally uniform electric field is piecewise constant in the liquid and air. We derive a system of long wave nonlinear evolution equations valid for interfacial amplitudes as large as the unperturbed layer depth and which retain gravity, surface tension and electric field effects. It is shown that for given physical parameters there exists a critical value of the voltage potential difference between electrodes, below which the system is dispersive and above which a band of unstable waves is possible centered around a finite wavenumber. In the former case nonlinear traveling waves are calculated and their stability is studied, while in the latter case the instability leads to thinning of the layer with the interface touching down in finite time. A similarity solution of the second kind is found to be dominant near the singularity, and the scaling exponents are determined using analysis and computations. PMID:16383611

  5. Acoustic wave detection of chemical species electrokinetically transported within a capillary tube.

    PubMed

    Li, Paul C H; Prasad, Ronald

    2003-06-01

    For the first time, we report the acoustic wave detection of chemical species being transported in a capillary tube to a region where acoustic coupling occurs. The measured parameter was a change in phase, which was originally only attributed to a change in solution density as the analyte passed by the detection region. Accordingly, we report the detection of change in phase as various chemical species (e.g. Cy5 dye, Cy5-derivatized glycine and underivatized glycine) were introduced into and migrated along a capillary tube through electrokinetic processes. To improve detection sensitivity, we modified various experimental parameters, such as run buffer concentration, capillary wall thickness and transducer frequency. Although acoustic wave detection was feasible, the peak width and detection limit were inadequate as compared to conventional detection methods for HPLC or CE. Nevertheless, the effects of various physical and chemical relaxation processes on acoustic wave absorption were discussed, and this has shed some light on explaining some observations, which cannot be explained by density differences alone. Accordingly, the acoustic wave method is suggested to investigate these processes, as studied in ultrasonic relaxation spectroscopy, in a flow system. PMID:12866892

  6. Hamiltonian structure for rotational capillary waves in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Calin Iulian

    2016-07-01

    We show that the governing equations of two-dimensional water waves driven by surface tension propagating over two-layered stratified flows admit a Hamiltonian formulation. Moreover, the underlying flows that we consider here, have piecewise constant distribution of vorticity, the jump in vorticity being located along the interface separating the fluid of bigger density at the bottom from the lighter fluid adjacent to the free surface.

  7. Sensitive detection of malachite green and crystal violet by nonlinear laser wave mixing and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Eric J; Tong, William G

    2016-05-01

    An ultrasensitive label-free antibody-free detection method for malachite green and crystal violet is presented using nonlinear laser wave-mixing spectroscopy and capillary zone electrophoresis. Wave-mixing spectroscopy provides a sensitive absorption-based detection method for trace analytes. This is accomplished by forming dynamic gratings within a sample cell, which diffracts light to create a coherent laser-like signal beam with high optical efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio. A cubic dependence on laser power and square dependence on analyte concentration make wave mixing sensitive enough to detect molecules in their native form without the use of fluorescent labels for signal enhancement. A 532 nm laser and a 635 nm laser were used for malachite green and crystal violet sample excitation. The use of two lasers of different wavelengths allows the method to simultaneously detect both analytes. Selectivity is obtained through the capillary zone electrophoresis separation, which results in characteristic migration times. Measurement in capillary zone electrophoresis resulted in a limit of detection of 6.9 × 10(-10)M (2.5 × 10(-19) mol) for crystal violet and 8.3 × 10(-11)M (3.0 × 10(-20) mol) for malachite green at S/N of 2. PMID:26998858

  8. Silicon surface periodic structures produced by plasma flow induced capillary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcinovic, I. P.; Kuraica, M. M.; Obradovic, B. M.; Puric, J.

    2006-08-14

    Silicon single crystal surface modification by the action of nitrogen quasistationary compression plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor is studied. It has been found that highly oriented silicon periodic cylindrical shape structures are produced during a single pulse surface treatment. The periodical structure formation can be related to the driven capillary waves quenched during fast cooling and resolidification phase of the plasma flow interaction with silicon surface. These waves are induced on the liquid silicon surface due to the compression plasma flow intrinsic oscillations.

  9. Water Surface Currents, Short Gravity-Capillary Waves and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atakturk, Serhad S.; Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1993-01-01

    Despite their importance for air-sea interaction and microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, intrinsic properties of short gravity-capillary waves are not well established. This is largely due to water surface currents and their effects on the direct measurements of wave parameters conducted at a fixed point. Frequencies of small scale waves propagating on a surface which itself is in motion, are subject to Doppler shifts. Hence, the high frequency tail of the wave spectra obtained from such temporal observations is smeared. Conversion of this smeared measured-frequency spectra to intrinsic-frequency (or wavenumber) spectra requires corrections for the Doppler shifts. Such attempts in the past have not been very successful in particular when field data were used. This becomes evident if the amplitude modulation of short waves by underlying long waves is considered. Microwave radar studies show that the amplitude of a short wave component attains its maximum value near the crests and its minimum in the troughs of the long waves. Doppler-shifted wave data yield similar results but much larger in modulation magnitude, as expected. In general, Doppler shift corrections reduce the modulation magnitude. Overcorrection may result in a negligible modulation or even in a strong modulation with the maximum amplitude in the wave troughs. The latter situation is clearly contradictory to our visual observations as well as the radar results and imply that the advection by currents is overestimated. In this study, a differential-advection approach is used in which small scale waves are advected by the currents evaluated not at the free surface, but at a depth proportional to their wavelengths. Applicability of this approach is verified by the excellent agreement in phase and magnitude of short-wave modulation between results based on radar and on wave-gauge measurements conducted on a lake.

  10. Experimental investigations of capillary effects on nonlinear free-surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diorio, James D.

    This thesis presents the results of three experiments on various aspects of the effects of surface tension on nonlinear free-surface waves. The first two experiments focus on capillary effects on the breaking of short-wavelength gravity waves, a problem of interest in areas of physical oceanography and remote sensing. The third experiment is concerned with the bifurcation of solitary capillary-gravity waves, a problem that is relevant in the study of nonlinear, dispersive wave systems. In the first set of experiments, streamwise profile measurements were made of spilling breakers at the point of incipient breaking. Both wind-waves and mechanically generated waves were investigated in this study, with gravity wavelengths in the range of 10--120 cm. Although it has been previously argued that the crest shape is dependent only on the surface tension, the results reported herein are to the contrary as several geometrical parameters used to describe the crest change significantly with the wavelength. However, the non-dimensional crest shape is self-similar, with two-shape parameters that depend on a measure of the local wave slope. This self-similarity persists over the entire range of wavelengths and breaker conditions measured, indicating a universal behavior in the near-crest dynamics that is independent of the method used to generate the wave. The measured wave slope is found to be related to the wave growth rate and phase-speed prior to breaking, a result that contributes towards the development of a breaking criterion for unsteady capillary-gravity waves. The second set of experiments examines the cross-stream surface structure in the turbulent breaking zone generated by short-wavelength breakers. Waves in this study were generated using a mechanical wedge and ranged in wavelength from 80--120 cm. To isolate the effects of surface tension on the flow, the important experimental parameters were adjusted to produce Froude-scaled, dispersively-focused wave packets

  11. Interfacial free energy of the NaCl crystal-melt interface from capillary wave fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Benet, Jorge; MacDowell, Luis G; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study, by means of molecular dynamics simulations, the solid-liquid interface of NaCl under coexistence conditions. By analysing capillary waves, we obtain the stiffness for different orientations of the solid and calculate the interfacial free energy by expanding the dependency of the interfacial free energy with the solid orientation in terms of cubic harmonics. We obtain an average value for the solid-fluid interfacial free energy of 89 ± 6 mN m(-1) that is consistent with previous results based on the measure of nucleation free energy barriers [Valeriani et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 194501 (2005)]. We analyse the influence of the simulation setup on interfacial properties and find that facets prepared as an elongated rectangular stripe give the same results as those prepared as squares for all cases but the 111 face. For some crystal orientations, we observe at small wave-vectors a behaviour not consistent with capillary wave theory and show that this behavior does not depend on the simulation setup. PMID:25854257

  12. Capillary waves on the surface of a droplet falling into a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Ilinykh, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    In a laboratory pool, the fine structure of flows arising from the primary contact of freely falling droplet with a liquid at rest is investigated by the methods of macrophotography and high-speed videotaping. Primary attention is paid to visualization of short capillary waves on the droplet surface formed from the impact of small splashes. The angular positions of the trajectories of splashes determine the values of the surface-tension coefficients of the liquids of the droplet and the accepting environment. The conditions under which the splashes hit the droplet surface are determined.

  13. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  14. Spatiotemporal rogue events in optical multiple filamentation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Simon; Nibbering, Erik T J; Brée, Carsten; Skupin, Stefan; Demircan, Ayhan; Genty, Goëry; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-12-13

    The transient appearance of bright spots in the beam profile of optical filaments formed in xenon is experimentally investigated. Fluence profiles are recorded with high-speed optical cameras at the kilohertz repetition rate of the laser source. A statistical analysis reveals a thresholdlike appearance of heavy-tailed fluence distributions together with the transition from single to multiple filamentation. The multifilament scenario exhibits near-exponential probability density functions, with extreme events exceeding the significant wave height by more than a factor of 10. The extreme events are isolated in space and in time. The macroscopic origin of these experimentally observed heavy-tail statistics is shown to be local refractive index variations inside the nonlinear medium, induced by multiphoton absorption and subsequent plasma thermalization. Microscopically, mergers between filament strings appear to play a decisive role in the observed rogue wave statistics. PMID:24483663

  15. Spatiotemporal Rogue Events in Optical Multiple Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, Simon; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Brée, Carsten; Skupin, Stefan; Demircan, Ayhan; Genty, Goëry; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-12-01

    The transient appearance of bright spots in the beam profile of optical filaments formed in xenon is experimentally investigated. Fluence profiles are recorded with high-speed optical cameras at the kilohertz repetition rate of the laser source. A statistical analysis reveals a thresholdlike appearance of heavy-tailed fluence distributions together with the transition from single to multiple filamentation. The multifilament scenario exhibits near-exponential probability density functions, with extreme events exceeding the significant wave height by more than a factor of 10. The extreme events are isolated in space and in time. The macroscopic origin of these experimentally observed heavy-tail statistics is shown to be local refractive index variations inside the nonlinear medium, induced by multiphoton absorption and subsequent plasma thermalization. Microscopically, mergers between filament strings appear to play a decisive role in the observed rogue wave statistics.

  16. Growth of gravity-capillary waves in countercurrent air/water turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Zonta, Francesco; Onorato, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    We use Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier Stokes equations to analyze the dynamics of the interface between air and water when both phases are driven by opposite pressure gradients (countercurrent configuration). The Reynolds number (Reτ), the Weber number (We) and the Froude number (Fr) fully describe the physical problem. We examine the problem of the transient growth of interface waves for different combinations of physical parameters. Keeping Reτ constant and varying We and Fr , we show that, in the initial stages of the wave generation process, the amplitude of the interface elevation η grows in time as η ~t 2 / 5 . Wavenumber spectra, E (kx) , of the surface elevation in the capillary range are in good agreement with the prediction of the Wave Turbulence Theory. Finally, the wave-induced modification of the average wind and current velocity profiles will be addressed. Support from Regione Autonoma Friuli Venezia Giulia under grant PAR FSC 2007/2013 is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method. PMID:27077859

  18. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method. PMID:27077859

  19. Capillary Waves at Liquid/Vapor Interfaces: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Scott W.; Grest, Gary S.; Lacasse, Martin-D.

    1999-07-16

    Evidence for capillary waves at a liquid/vapor interface are presented from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a system containing up to 1.24 million Lennard-Jones particles. Careful measurements show that the total interfacial width depends logarithmically on L{sub {parallel}}, the length of the simulation cell parallel to the interface, as predicted theoretically. The strength of the divergence of the interfacial width on L{sub {parallel}} depends inversely on the surface tension {gamma}. This allows us to measure {gamma} two ways since {gamma} can also be obtained from the difference in the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the interface. These two independent measures of {gamma} agree provided that the interfacial order parameter profile is fit to an error function and not a hyperbolic tangent, as often assumed. We explore why these two common fitting functions give different results for {gamma}.

  20. Laboratory investigation of damping of gravity-capillary waves on the surface of turbulized liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S. A.; Kapustin, I. A.; Shomina, O. V.

    2014-03-01

    Investigation of damping of gravity-capillary waves (GCWs) in the presence of turbulence is a classical hydrodynamic problem which has important geophysical applications, one of which is related with the problem of forming a radar and optical image of a ship wake on wavy water surface. In this work a new method for the laboratory study of surface wave damping in turbulized liquid is described and the results are presented. The damping of standing GCWs by turbulence on the water surface in a tank mounted on a vibration table is studied. GCWs and turbulence are excited using a two-frequency mode of vibration table oscillations. A high-frequency small amplitude signal is used for parametric GCW excitation; a low-frequency large amplitude signal is used for generating turbulence due to water flowing through a fixed perforated grid submerged into the tank. The coefficient of GCW damping is determined by measured threshold of parametric excitation of the waves; turbulence characteristics are determined by the PIV and PTV techniques. Dependences of GCW damping coefficients on their frequency at different turbulence intensities are obtained, estimates for turbulent viscosity are presented, and a comparison with empirical models proposed earlier is performed.

  1. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models.

    PubMed

    Parry, A O; Rascón, C; Evans, R

    2016-06-22

    We investigate the local structure factor S (z;q) at a free liquid-gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (z;q) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors [Formula: see text]. We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (z;q) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (z;q) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results. PMID:27115774

  2. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Evans, R.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the local structure factor S (zq) at a free liquid–gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (zq) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors q\\to 0 . We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein–Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (zq) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (zq) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results.

  3. Capillary wave Hamiltonian for the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson density functional.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2016-06-22

    We study the link between the density functional (DF) formalism and the capillary wave theory (CWT) for liquid surfaces, focused on the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson (LGW) model, or square gradient DF expansion, with a symmetric double parabola free energy, which has been extensively used in theoretical studies of this problem. We show the equivalence between the non-local DF results of Parry and coworkers and the direct evaluation of the mean square fluctuations of the intrinsic surface, as is done in the intrinsic sampling method for computer simulations. The definition of effective wave-vector dependent surface tensions is reviewed and we obtain new proposals for the LGW model. The surface weight proposed by Blokhuis and the surface mode analysis proposed by Stecki provide consistent and optimal effective definitions for the extended CWT Hamiltonian associated to the DF model. A non-local, or coarse-grained, definition of the intrinsic surface provides the missing element to get the mesoscopic surface Hamiltonian from the molecular DF description, as had been proposed a long time ago by Dietrich and coworkers. PMID:27115912

  4. Capillary wave Hamiltonian for the Landau–Ginzburg–Wilson density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We study the link between the density functional (DF) formalism and the capillary wave theory (CWT) for liquid surfaces, focused on the Landau–Ginzburg–Wilson (LGW) model, or square gradient DF expansion, with a symmetric double parabola free energy, which has been extensively used in theoretical studies of this problem. We show the equivalence between the non-local DF results of Parry and coworkers and the direct evaluation of the mean square fluctuations of the intrinsic surface, as is done in the intrinsic sampling method for computer simulations. The definition of effective wave-vector dependent surface tensions is reviewed and we obtain new proposals for the LGW model. The surface weight proposed by Blokhuis and the surface mode analysis proposed by Stecki provide consistent and optimal effective definitions for the extended CWT Hamiltonian associated to the DF model. A non-local, or coarse-grained, definition of the intrinsic surface provides the missing element to get the mesoscopic surface Hamiltonian from the molecular DF description, as had been proposed a long time ago by Dietrich and coworkers.

  5. Slow Modulations of Periodic Waves in Hamiltonian PDEs, with Application to Capillary Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzoni-Gavage, S.; Noble, P.; Rodrigues, L. M.

    2014-08-01

    Since its elaboration by Whitham almost 50 years ago, modulation theory has been known to be closely related to the stability of periodic traveling waves. However, it is only recently that this relationship has been elucidated and that fully nonlinear results have been obtained. These only concern dissipative systems though: reaction-diffusion systems were first considered by Doelman et al. (Mem Am Math Soc 199(934):viii+105, 2009), and viscous systems of conservation laws have been addressed by Johnson et al. (Invent Math, 2013). Here, only nondissipative models are considered, and a most basic question is investigated, namely, the expected link between the hyperbolicity of modulated equations and the spectral stability of periodic traveling waves to sideband perturbations. This is done first in an abstract Hamiltonian framework, which encompasses a number of dispersive models, in particular the well-known (generalized) Korteweg-de Vries equation and the less known Euler-Korteweg system, in both Eulerian coordinates and Lagrangian coordinates. The latter is itself an abstract framework for several models arising in water wave theory, superfluidity, and quantum hydrodynamics. As regards its application to compressible capillary fluids, attention is paid here to untangle the interplay between traveling waves/modulation equations in Eulerian coordinates and those in Lagrangian coordinates. In the most general setting, it is proved that the hyperbolicity of modulated equations is indeed necessary for the spectral stability of periodic traveling waves. This extends earlier results by Serre (Commun Partial Differ Equ 30(1-3):259-282, 2005), Oh and Zumbrun (Arch Ration Mech Anal 166(2):99-166, 2003), and Johnson et al. (Phys D 239(23-24):2057-2065, 2010). In addition, reduced necessary conditions are obtained in the small-amplitude limit. Then numerical investigations are carried out for the modulated equations of the Euler-Korteweg system with two types of "pressure

  6. Roots and Rogues in German Child Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the proper characterization of subject omission at a particular stage in German child language. It focuses on post-verbal null subjects in finite clauses, here termed Rogues. It is argued that the statistically significant presence of Rogues, in conjunction with their distinct developmental profile, speaks against a…

  7. Damage Caused by the Rogue Trustee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine community college presidents and chancellors in 16 states report on the damage caused by rogue trustees. While the damage to presidents, other trustees, and faculty and staff is alarming, the damage these trustees cause the college suggests that the rogue trustee may be the single most destructive force ever to plague an educational…

  8. Comparison of the capillary wave method and pressure tensor route for calculation of interfacial tension in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella; Frost, Denzil S; Phelan, Harrison; Dai, Lenore L

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the calculation of surface and interfacial tension for a variety of liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Because of the inherently small scale of MD systems, large pressure fluctuations can cause imprecise calculations of surface tension using the pressure tensor route. The capillary wave method exhibited improved precision and stability throughout all of the simulated systems in this study. In order to implement this method, the interface was defined by fitting an error function to the density profile. However, full mapping of the interface from coordinate files produced enhanced accuracy. Upon increasing the system size, both methods exhibited higher precision, although the capillary wave method was still more reliable. PMID:24122780

  9. Strichartz estimates and local existence for the gravity-capillary waves with non-Lipschitz initial velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Poyferré, Thibault; Nguyen, Quang-Huy

    2016-07-01

    We consider the gravity-capillary waves in any dimension and in fluid domains with general bottoms. Using the paradifferential reduction established in [19], we prove Strichartz estimates for solutions to this problem, at a low regularity level such that initially, the velocity field can be non-Lipschitz up to the free surface. We then use those estimates to solve the Cauchy problem at this level of regularity.

  10. Contours of slope as a measure of gravity-capillary wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. S.; Zhang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Contours of both x and y components of water surface slopes can be generated optically. Two horizontal arrays of thin, linear lamps placed a few meters below the water surface are photographed from above. One array, consisting of a group of colored y-parallel lamps produces contours of x-slope. The value of each contour is recognized by its color. The other array, of x -parallel lamps produces contours of y-slope. When the two arrays are pulsed alternately and photographed by a fast camera, the full structure and evolution of the water surface shape can be monitored. In order to register capillaries down to one or two millimeter wavelengths the light pulses must be as short as 200 micro seconds to avoid smearing Adequate light intensity in such short pulses is generated by a row of high intensity light emitting diodes in each linear lamp. LEDs are advantageous because several different colored types are available. permitting many different contours to be generated. When each emitter has a narrow wavelength range, problems from light dispersion and differential color absorption in the water are avoided. In analyzing the photographs, correct identification of the color in the image of each contour is essential. Color sensing cameras have only the three color coordinates, red, green and blue. It is useful to identify each colored contour image by a unit vector in the 3-space of RGB for comparison with the array of expected values. This enables recognition of the most probable color and an estimate of probable error of the choice. If the probable error is large, the contour can then be discarded because of uncertainty of its value.. The conversion from a small number of contours to a continuous representation of the water surface shape is in theory perfect for a band limited spectrum of waves, but in practice inaccuracies, even at the pixel level, in the location of contours produce errors. The spacing of contours of slope is determined by the physical spacing between

  11. Understanding the influence of capillary waves on solvation at the liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Kaustubh; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the question if surface capillary waves (CWs) affect interfacial solvation thermodynamic properties that determine the propensity of small molecules toward the liquid-vapor interface. We focus on (1) the evaluation of these properties from molecular simulations in a practical manner and (2) understanding them from the perspective of theories in solvation thermodynamics, especially solvent reorganization effects. Concerning the former objective, we propose a computational method that exploits the relationship between an external field acting on the liquid-vapor interface and the magnitude of CWs. The system considered contains the solvent, an externally applied field (f) and the solute molecule fixed at a particular location. The magnitude of f is selected to induce changes in CWs. The difference between the solvation free energies computed in the presence and in the absence of f is then shown to quantify the contribution of CWs to interfacial solvation. We describe the implementation of this method in the canonical ensemble by using a Lennard-Jones solvent and a non-ionic solute. Results are shown for three types of solutes that differ in the nature of short-ranged repulsive (hard-core) interactions. Overall, we observe that CWs have a negligible or very small effect on the interfacial solvation free energy of a solute molecule fixed near the liquid-vapor interface for the above systems. We also explain how the effects of pinning or dampening of CWs caused by a fixed solute are effectively compensated and do not contribute to the solvation free energy.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Free Surface Profiles Generated by a Moving Pressure Source: Solitary Capillary-Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diorio, J. D.; Watkins, N.; Zuech, J.; Duncan, J. H.

    2008-11-01

    There have been several recent numerical investigations that have shown the existence of three-dimensional nonlinear solitary surface wave patterns that propagate with speeds less than the minimum wave phase speed prescribed by linear theory (23 cm/s for clean water). In the present study, wave patterns were generated by translating a small-diameter region of high pressure across a water surface. The high-pressure region was created by forcing air through a small-diameter vertically oriented tube attached to a carriage that propelled it horizontally at speeds near 23 cm/s. The wave pattern was measured with a cinematic LIF technique. It was found that a steady solitary wave pattern can exist at speeds below the linear-theory minimum phase speed, while for speeds above the minimum, a pattern of gravity-capillary waves was produced. The solitary wave pattern, which only appeared when the pressure forcing was large, dissipated rapidly when the forcing was turned off. The streamwise dimension of the solitary wave was much smaller than the transverse dimension.

  13. On the variation and growth of wave-slope spectra in the capillary-gravity range with increasing wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. R.; Huang, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    A new laser device has been used to make direct wave-slope measurements in the capillary-gravity range. Owing to the design principles, the digital nature of the system and the use of a laser beam as a probe, the earlier problems of intensity variations and meniscus effects were avoided. Using this new technique, wave-slope spectra both down and across the channel were obtained for different wind conditions, along with corresponding mean-square slope values. Comparisons are made with existing data. The results indicate that a quasi-equilibrium state may exist for each wind speed and that it increases in intensity with increasing wind, which may imply an asymptotic nature for the equilibrium-range coefficient. From the data, two significant frictional velocities, 17.5 and 31 cm/s respectively, are identified as critical values for different ranges of wave development.

  14. On the unsteady free surface wave pattern found behind a localized pressure distribution moving at speeds just below the minimum phase speed of linear gravity capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a localized pressure distribution moving at constant speed just below the minimum phase speed (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) of gravity-capillary waves is studied experimentally in a long tank. The pressure distribution is generated by blowing air onto the water surface via a vertically oriented 2-mm-ID tube that is mounted on an instrument carriage that is in turn set to move along the tank at constant speeds between 20 and 23 cm/s. A cinematic light refraction method is used to obtain quantitative measurements of the surface deformation pattern behind the air jet. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady V-shaped wave pattern appears behind the pressure source. From observations of the wave pattern evolution, it is found that localized depressions are generated near the pressure source and propagate in pairs along the two arms of the V-shaped pattern. These are eventually shed from the tips of the pattern and rapidly decay. Measurements of the evolution of the speed of these localized depression patterns are compared to existing measurements of the speeds of steady three-dimensional solitary gravity-capillary waves (lumps) that appear behind the pressure source at even lower towing speeds. Supported by the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences.

  15. Disjoining pressure and the film-height-dependent surface tension of thin liquid films: new insight from capillary wave fluctuations.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Luis G; Benet, Jorge; Katcho, Nebil A; Palanco, Jose M G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we review simulation and experimental studies of thermal capillary wave fluctuations as an ideal means for probing the underlying disjoining pressure and surface tensions, and more generally, fine details of the Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We discuss recent simulation results that reveal a film-height-dependent surface tension not accounted for in the classical Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We show how this observation may be explained bottom-up from sound principles of statistical thermodynamics and discuss some of its implications. PMID:24351859

  16. Simultaneous Modeling of Waveforms Associated With Backscattered He-Ne Laser Light from a Fluid Filled Capillary Tube by Use of Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, Hendra J.

    2008-09-01

    Backscattered He-Ne laser light from a side illuminated fluid-filled fused silica capillary tube generates a series of fringes when viewed in an imaging plane. The light intensity variation as a function of scattering angle constitutes a waveform, which contains hills and valleys. Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories, simultaneously, are employed to model the waveforms and quantify the index of refraction of fluid in the capillary tube.

  17. Mechanical Characterization of Ultralow Interfacial Tension Oil-in-Water Droplets by Thermal Capillary Wave Analysis in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Guido; Saito, Yuki; Tyler, Arwen I I; Ward, Andrew D; Bain, Colin D; Ces, Oscar

    2016-04-19

    Measurements of the ultralow interfacial tension and surfactant film bending rigidity for micron-sized heptane droplets in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate-NaCl aqueous solutions were performed in a microfluidic device through the analysis of thermally driven droplet interface fluctuations. The Fourier spectrum of the stochastic droplet interface displacement was measured through bright-field video microscopy and a contour analysis technique. The droplet interfacial tension, together with the surfactant film bending rigidity, was obtained by fitting the experimental results to the prediction of a capillary wave model. Compared to existing methods for ultralow interfacial tension measurements, this contactless, nondestructive, all-optical approach has several advantages, such as fast measurement, easy implementation, cost-effectiveness, reduced amount of liquids, and integration into lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:26982629

  18. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  19. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  20. Strategies for Dealing with Rogue Trustees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    In the two previous articles in this three-part series the author reported on the motivations and damage caused by rogue trustees. The articles are based on a study of 59 community college CEOs from 16 different states. In this final article the author addresses the strategies that presidents and their board chairs have used to curtail the…

  1. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: capillary waves on gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces under liquid flow can produce significant slip, and thus drag reduction, when they entrap gas bubbles within their roughness elements. Our work aims to explore the onset mechanism to the failure of drag reduction by superhydrophobic surfaces when they are exposed to turbulent boundary layers. We focus on the effect of finite surface tension to the dynamic response of deformable interfaces between overlying water flow and the gas pockets. To this end, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces allowing deformable gas-liquid interface. DNS results show that spanwise-coherent, upstream-traveling waves develop on the gas-liquid interface as a result of its interactions with turbulence. We study the nature and scaling of the upstream-traveling waves through semi-analytical modeling. We will show that the traveling waves are well described by a Weber number based on the slip velocity at the interface. In higher Weber number, the stability of gas pocket decreases as the amplitude of interface deformation and the magnitude of pressure fluctuations are augmented. Supported by Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, M.

    1988-10-15

    Rapid instrumental methods for performing electrophoretic separations in capillary tubes have recently been developed, making capillary electrophoresis one of the most exciting new techniques available to analytical chemists. This article discusses detection methods, applications, and the future of capillary electrophoresis.

  4. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1310 - Rogue River, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rogue River, OR. 80.1310 Section 80.1310 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1310 Rogue River, OR. A line drawn...

  6. Modulational instability, higher-order localized wave structures, and nonlinear wave interactions for a nonautonomous Lenells-Fokas equation in inhomogeneous fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yu-Jie; Qi, Feng-Hua; Li, Min; Guo, Rui

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the nonautonomous Lenells-Fokas (LF) model is investigated. The modulational instability analysis of the solutions with variable coefficients in the presence of a small perturbation is studied. Higher-order soliton, breather, earthwormon, and rogue wave solutions of the nonautonomous LF model are derived via the n-fold variable-coefficient Darboux transformation. The solitons and earthwormons display the elastic collisions. It is found that the nonautonomous LF model admits the higher-order periodic rogue waves, composite rogue waves (rogue wave pair), and oscillating rogue waves, whose dynamics can be controlled by the inhomogeneous nonlinear parameters. Based on the second-order rogue wave, a diamond structure consisting of four first-order rogue waves is observed. In addition, the semirational solutions (the mixed rational-exponential solutions) of the nonautonomous LF model are obtained, which can be used to describe the interactions between the rogue waves and breathers. Our results could be helpful for the design of experiments in the optical fiber communications. PMID:26117105

  7. Axisymmetric capillary waves on thin annular liquid sheets. II. Spatial development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, C.; Sirignano, W. A.

    2000-06-01

    The forced motion of semi-infinite axisymmetric thin inviscid annular liquid sheets, exiting from a nozzle or atomizer into a surrounding void under zero gravity but with constant gas-core pressure is analyzed by means of the reduced-dimension approach described in C. Mehring and W. A. Sirignano [Phys. Fluids 12, 1417 (2000)]. Linear analytical time-dependent ("limit-cycle") solutions to the pure boundary-value problem are presented as well as linear and nonlinear numerical (transient) solutions to the mixed boundary- and initial-value problem of initially undisturbed sheets harmonically forced at the orifice or nozzle exit. Group velocities for the six independent solutions to the linear boundary-value problem are used to determine the location of boundary conditions. Numerical simulations of the linear transient problem are employed to validate these predictions. Parameter studies on sheet breakup and collapse lengths as well as on breakup and collapse times are reported. The dependence on modulation frequency, modulated disturbance amplitude, Weber number, and annular radius is presented for various cases of the mixed problem, i.e., for linearly or nonlinearly stable and unstable, dilationally or sinusoidally forced sheets. Nonlinear effects often have significant effects on breakup times and lengths or on collapse times and lengths. Nonlinear wave forms can deviate substantially from linear predictions resulting in major impacts on the size of the rings and shells that will remain after breakup.

  8. Effectiveness of charged noncovalent polymer coatings against protein adsorption to silica surfaces studied by evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Haselberg, Rob; van der Sneppen, Lineke; Ariese, Freek; Ubachs, Wim; Gooijer, Cees; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2009-12-15

    Protein adsorption to silica surfaces is a notorious problem in analytical separations. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) were employed to investigate the capability of positively charged polymer coatings to minimize the adsorption of basic proteins. Adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) to silica coated with a single layer of polybrene (PB), or a triple layer of PB, dextran sulfate (DS), and PB, was studied and compared to bare silica. Direct analysis of silica surfaces by EW-CRDS revealed that both coatings effectively reduce irreversible protein adsorption. Significant adsorption was observed only for protein concentrations above 400 microM, whereas the PB-DS-PB coating was shown to be most effective and stable. CE analyses of cyt c were performed with and without the respective coatings applied to the fused-silica capillary wall. Monitoring of the electroosmotic flow and protein peak areas indicated a strong reduction of irreversible protein adsorption by the positively charged coatings. Determination of the electrophoretic mobility and peak width of cyt c revealed reversible protein adsorption to the PB coating. It is concluded that the combination of results from EW-CRDS and CE provides highly useful information on the adsorptive characteristics of bare and coated silica surfaces toward basic proteins. PMID:19921852

  9. Simulation of Arrhythmogenic Effect of Rogue RyRs in Failing Heart by Using a Coupled Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Zhu, Xiuwei

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac cells with heart failure are usually characterized by impairment of Ca2+ handling with smaller SR Ca2+ store and high risk of triggered activities. In this study, we developed a coupled model by integrating the spatiotemporal Ca2+ reaction-diffusion system into the cellular electrophysiological model. With the coupled model, the subcellular Ca2+ dynamics and global cellular electrophysiology could be simultaneously traced. The proposed coupled model was then applied to study the effects of rogue RyRs on Ca2+ cycling and membrane potential in failing heart. The simulation results suggested that, in the presence of rogue RyRs, Ca2+ dynamics is unstable and Ca2+ waves are prone to be initiated spontaneously. These release events would elevate the membrane potential substantially which might induce delayed afterdepolarizations or triggered action potentials. Moreover, the variation of membrane potential depolarization is indicated to be dependent on the distribution density of rogue RyR channels. This study provides a new possible arrhythmogenic mechanism for heart failure from subcellular to cellular level. PMID:23056145

  10. Functional description of signal processing in the Rogue GPS receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past year, two Rogue GPS prototype receivers have been assembled and successfully subjected to a variety of laboratory and field tests. A functional description is presented of signal processing in the Rogue receiver, tracing the signal from RF input to the output values of group delay, phase, and data bits. The receiver can track up to eight satellites, without time multiplexing among satellites or channels, simultaneously measuring both group delay and phase for each of three channels (L1-C/A, L1-P, L2-P). The Rogue signal processing described requires generation of the code for all three channels. Receiver functional design, which emphasized accuracy, reliability, flexibility, and dynamic capability, is summarized. A detailed functional description of signal processing is presented, including C/A-channel and P-channel processing, carrier-aided averaging of group delays, checks for cycle slips, acquistion, and distinctive features.

  11. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, K; Muruganandam, P; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials. PMID:27078349

  12. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Muruganandam, P.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  13. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  14. First-Order Inconsistencies Caused by Rogue Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postma, John V.; Yee, Eugene; Wilson, John D.

    2012-09-01

    A theoretical requirement of the Interaction by Exchange with the Conditional Mean (IECM) micromixing model is that the mean concentration field produced by it must be consistent with the mean concentration field produced by a traditional Lagrangian stochastic (LS) marked particle model. We examine the violation of this requirement that occurs in a coupled LS-IECM model when unrealistically high particle velocities occur. No successful strategy was found to mitigate the effects of these rogue trajectories. It is our hope that this work will provide renewed impetus for investigation into rogue trajectories and methods to eliminate them from LS models.

  15. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1-4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5-12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound.

  16. INFLUENCE OF ROGUE DROPLET ATOMIZATION ON INCINERATION EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measuring the trajectories and carbon destruction efficiency of fuel oil droplets in a 100 kW combustor, in an effort to better understand the influence of rogue droplet atomization on incineration effectiveness. The single monodisperse droplet streams ...

  17. Short duration microlensing events: Searching for rogue planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Primini, Francis A.; Lew, Wei Peng; Gau, Lai Su; Benson, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Einstein described gravitational microlensing in 1936, at the same time suggesting it to be an unobservable phenomenon. He did not foresee technological advancements that would lead to microlensing becoming a productive tool for astronomy. Of particular interest may be the role it has begun to play in the discovery of rogue planets - exoplanets that are not bound to a star or stars. Rogue planets may be formed independently, or they may be formed in the confines of a stellar system and then ejected by gravitational interactions. Currently fewer than a dozen rogue planets are known but estimates of their abundance conservatively start at double the number of stars in our galaxy.The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) and Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) teams have collectively detected approximately 2500 events this year alone. A significant portion of these events are of short duration, with an Einstein crossing time of less than 10 days. Microlensing events generally occur on a timescale of weeks to months, so short duration events are an interesting class for study, particularly with regard to searches for rogue planets. We have undertaken a systematic study and categorization of the short duration microlensing events from recent OGLE and MOA alerts, with a special eye to identifying exoplanet candidates.

  18. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in consolidated porous media due to capillary imbibition under ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hamida, Tarek; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2007-09-01

    Numerous studies done in the last four decades have demonstrated that acoustic stimulation may enhance recovery in oil reservoirs. This technology is not only technically feasible, but also serves as an economical, environmentally friendly alternative to currently accepted enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method. It requires low capital expenditure, and yields almost immediate improvement without any additional EOR agents. Despite a vast body of empirical and theoretical support, this method lacks sufficient understanding to make meaningful and consistent engineering predictions. This is in part due to the complex nature of the physical processes involved, as well as due to a shortage of fundamental/experimental research. Much of what the authors believe is happening within acoustically stimulated porous media is speculative and theoretical. This paper focuses on the effects of ultrasound on the interfacial forces between immiscible fluids. Capillary (spontaneous) imbibition of an aqueous phase into oil (or air)-saturated Berea sandstone and Indiana limestone samples experiments were conducted. Solutions of water, brine (15,000 and 150,000 ppm NaCl), anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate), nonionic surfactant (alcohol ethoxylate) and polymer (xanthan gum) were prepared as the aqueous phase. Both counter-current and co-current geometries were tested. Due to the intrinsically unforced, gentle nature of the process, and their strong dependence on wettability, interfacial tension, viscosity and density, such experiments provide valuable insight into some of the governing mechanisms behind ultrasonic stimulation. PMID:17927413

  19. Gravity-Capillary Lumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Triantaphyllos R.; Kim, Boguk

    2004-11-01

    In dispersive wave systems, it is known that 1-D plane solitary waves can bifurcate from linear sinusoidal wavetrains at particular wave numbers k = k0 where the phase speed c(k) happens to be an extremum (dc/dk| _0=0) and equals the group speed c_g(k_0). Two distinct possibilities thus arise: either the extremum occurs in the long-wave limit (k_0=0) and, as in shallow water, the bifurcating solitary waves are of the KdV type; or k0 ne 0 and the solitary waves are in the form of packets, described by the NLS equation to leading order, as for gravity-capillary waves in deep water. Here it is pointed out that an entirely analogous scenario is valid for the genesis of 2-D solitary waves or `lumps'. Lumps also may bifurcate at extrema of the phase speed and do so when 1-D solitary waves happen to be unstable to transverse perturbations; moreover, they have algebraically decaying tails and are either of the KPI type (e.g. in shallow water in the presence of strong surface tension) or of the wave packet type (e.g. in deep water) and are described by an elliptic-elliptic Davey-Stewartson equation system to leading order. Examples of steady lump profiles are presented and their dynamics is discussed.

  20. Rational solutions to the KPI equation and multi rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    We construct here rational solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (KPI) as a quotient of two polynomials in x, y and t depending on several real parameters. This method provides an infinite hierarchy of rational solutions written in terms of polynomials of degrees 2 N(N + 1) in x, y and t depending on 2 N - 2 real parameters for each positive integer N. We give explicit expressions of the solutions in the simplest cases N = 1 and N = 2 and we study the patterns of their modulus in the (x , y) plane for different values of time t and parameters.

  1. NSLS-II BPM System Protection from Rogue Mode Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh, A.; Bach, B.; Borrelli, A.; Ferreira, M.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hetzel, C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Rogue mode RF shielding has been successfully designed and implemented into the production multipole vacuum chambers. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system we introduced frequency shift of HOM's by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot of each multipole vacuum chamber. To satisfy the pumping requirement the face of the shielding has been perforated with roughly 50 percent transparency. It stays clear of synchrotron radiation in each chamber.

  2. Modeling the spread of insect transmitted plant pathogens: roguing in perennial crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roguing (the removal of infected plants) is commonly used to manage the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens. In the case of perennial crops, rogued plants are often replaced with healthy plants. Replacement of infected plants has two potential benefits. First, removing an infected plant e...

  3. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  4. Capillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-05-19

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This "hyperbolic" force-velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136-195]. Hill's heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973-976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971-973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255-318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928-935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill's equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  5. Signal-processing theory for the TurboRogue receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    Signal-processing theory for the TurboRogue receiver is presented. The signal form is traced from its formation at the GPS satellite, to the receiver antenna, and then through the various stages of the receiver, including extraction of phase and delay. The analysis treats the effects of ionosphere, troposphere, signal quantization, receiver components, and system noise, covering processing in both the 'code mode' when the P code is not encrypted and in the 'P-codeless mode' when the P code is encrypted. As a possible future improvement to the current analog front end, an example of a highly digital front end is analyzed.

  6. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  7. The impact of positrons beam on the propagation of super freak waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we examine the nonlinear propagation of planar ion-acoustic freak waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions and superthermal electrons subjected to cold positrons beam. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) for the evolution of electrostatic potential wave. We determine the domain of the plasma parameters where the rogue waves exist. The effect of the positron beam on the modulational instability of the ion-acoustic rogue waves is discussed. It is found that the region of the modulational stability is enhanced with the increase of positron beam speed and positron population. Second as positrons beam increases the nonlinearities of the plasma system, large amplitude ion acoustic rogue waves are pointed out. The present results will be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future laboratory plasma experiments.

  8. Management of insect-transmitted plant pathogens: defining conditions for successful roguing with a spatially-explicit simulation model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roguing (the replacement of infected plants with healthy plants) is commonly used to manage the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens. Roguing has two potential benefits. First, removing an infected plant eliminates a source of inoculum, potentially slowing pathogen spread. Second, as infe...

  9. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  10. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  11. The local properties of ocean surface waves by the phase-time method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.; Tung, Chi-Chao; Donelan, Mark A.; Yuan, Yeli; Lai, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach using phase information to view and study the properties of frequency modulation, wave group structures, and wave breaking is presented. The method is applied to ocean wave time series data and a new type of wave group (containing the large 'rogue' waves) is identified. The method also has the capability of broad applications in the analysis of time series data in general.

  12. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  13. Identification of rogue datasets in serial crystallography1

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Greta; Brehm, Wolfgang; Diederichs, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Advances in beamline optics, detectors and X-ray sources allow new techniques of crystallographic data collection. In serial crystallography, a large number of partial datasets from crystals of small volume are measured. Merging of datasets from different crystals in order to enhance data completeness and accuracy is only valid if the crystals are isomorphous, i.e. sufficiently similar in cell parameters, unit-cell contents and molecular structure. Identification and exclusion of non-isomorphous datasets is therefore indispensable and must be done by means of suitable indicators. To identify rogue datasets, the influence of each dataset on CC1/2 [Karplus & Diederichs (2012 ▸). Science, 336, 1030–1033], the correlation coefficient between pairs of intensities averaged in two randomly assigned subsets of observations, is evaluated. The presented method employs a precise calculation of CC1/2 that avoids the random assignment, and instead of using an overall CC1/2, an average over resolution shells is employed to obtain sensible results. The selection procedure was verified by measuring the correlation of observed (merged) intensities and intensities calculated from a model. It is found that inclusion and merging of non-isomorphous datasets may bias the refined model towards those datasets, and measures to reduce this effect are suggested. PMID:27275144

  14. Evaluation of streamflow records in Rogue River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Donald

    1952-01-01

    This report presents data which are, in general, supplementary to those the surface-water investigations made in the past by the U. S. Geological Survey. Those have been essentially investigations of the operation of the many gaging stations on the Rogue River and tributaries. The data presented were obtained from a detailed field investigation of the various #actors resulting from man-made structures that influence the quantity or regimen of the flow at the gaging stations. These factors include diversions from the stream, bypass channels carrying water around the gaging stations, return flow from irrigation or other projects, storage and release of flood waters, and other similar factors. Where feasible, the location, size, effect upon the streamflow periods of use, method of operation,, and similar information are. given. The information is divided into sections corresponding to areas determined by the location of gaging stations. An index of streamflow records is included. A section dealing with the adequacy of available water-resources data and containing location and period of record also is included. This information is given in general terms only, and is portrayed mainly by maps and graphs.

  15. TEACHING PHYSICS: Capillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Petrova, Hristina

    2000-07-01

    We examine capillary tubes with a variable cross section, in which there is a column of fully wetting or fully non-wetting liquid. The direction in which the liquid moves when the tubes are placed horizontally is determined by means of Pascal's law. We promote the idea that the conical capillary tube is a hydraulic machine, whose two pistons are the liquid column's free surfaces, which have different radii. We propose a new way of demonstrating the described capillary effects by means of flat models of capillary tubes, constructed from glass plates. The demonstrations are presented in front of a large audience using an overhead projector.

  16. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  17. Altimeter Observations of Baroclinic Oceanic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    For a wide range of nonlinear wave processes - from capillary to planetary waves - theory predicts the existence of Kolmogorov-type spectral cascades of energy and other conserved quantities occuring via nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions. So far, observations of wave turbulence (WT) have been limited to small-scale processes such as surface gravity and capillary-gravity waves.

  18. Reconstruction of arbitrary surface wave fields by refraction global method in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Heynert; Ludu, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    We use a new photographic procedure and design to construct reliable system for measurement and analysis of various surface water waves in a wave tank, including rogue and tsunami-like waves. The image of a grid placed at the bottom of the tank (3 feet maximum depth) is deformed by the surface waves and recorded on one or two cameras placed above the water. The measurement of the height and slope of the surface waves is determined by inverse refraction calculations plus the calibration information at four grouped points from capacitive level gauges. This research was supported by ERAU INTERNAL STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD.

  19. Capillary rheometry for thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malguarnera, S. C.; Carroll, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Capillary rheometry is effectively used with thermosets. Most important is providing a uniform temperature in the barrel. This was successfully accomplished by using a circulating hot oil system. Standard capillary rheometry methods provide the dependence of thermoset apparent viscosity on shear rate, temperature and time. Such information is very useful in evaluating resin processability and in setting preliminary fabrication conditions.

  20. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  1. NMD Against Rogue States-- Are We On the Right Track?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2001-04-01

    The national missile defense (NMD) under development at present will deploy 100-200 interceptor missiles in Alaska and North Dakota and conduct hit-to-kill mid-course intercepts of strategic payloads-- biological warfare agents (BW) or nuclear warheads. Mid-course intercept is vulnerable to penetration aids-- hundreds of BW bomblets dispensed just after the ICBM reaches its full speed; and decoy balloons (aided by an enclosing balloon on the re-entry vehicle of a nuclear warhead). The NMD organization has not seriously considered countermeasures, which I believe are much easier to build than the ICBMs themselves. Only now is NMD beginning to structure a program to evaluate and determine the response to such countermeasures. Defense against North Korean ICBMs can be obtained by boost-phase intercept, while the ICBM rocket engines are still burning. I will discuss a proposal to conduct such intercepts from a joint U.S.- Russian base south of Vladivostok, and with some interceptors based on U.S. military cargo ships hundreds of km from North Korea. A similar system would counter ICBMs from Iraq, with a base in Southeast Turkey; but the much larger country, Iran, would need at least two bases-- perhaps one in the Caspian Sea and U.S. ships in the Gulf of Oman. Simple countermeasures and possible responses to them will be discussed, together with some problems and characteristics of boost-phase intercept systems. For a given level of kill-vehicle technology, space-based boost-phase interceptors are inferior to surface-based for the "rogue nation" potential ICBM threat, and weapons in space are likely to provoke a severe response that would endanger critical U.S. satellites.

  2. Wave-current interaction in the northern Agulhas Current and shipping safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Louw

    2015-04-01

    The Agulhas Current along the south east coast of South Africa is well known for severe wave conditions and the occurrence of rogue waves. The statistical probability of rogue wave occurrence is a well-known topic, but the occurrence of rogue waves cannot be predicted. Similarly, interaction between the Agulhas Current and wave fields emanating from the south west is a known phenomenon, which results in the creation of modified waves that could be different from those predicted by standard models. Although this modelled interaction can contribute much to the research on rogue waves, the enhancement or attenuation of wave fields due to wave-current interaction, is seen as a stand-alone phenomenon. Currently, standard models generating wave field prediction do not make provision for the interaction between waves and currents. Modelling the wave-current interaction in a main shipping route and providing the results thereof for use in the shipping industry, is a necessity not widely available yet. This area spans a grid of 800 km by 240 km between Richards Bay in the north and Port Elizabeth in the south. Using a conventional model in an area that it was not necessarily intended for, can contribute significantly towards knowledge expansion in this field. The SWAN model is a near shore wave model that is widely used in the field of coastal engineering. This readily available model provides for wave-current interaction and its limited resource requirements makes it ideal to supply information on wave interaction to the shipping community. Although this may not be seen to be the best model to provide a final accurate product of wave interaction prediction to the shipping community, it does serve to provide a very good baseline for the provision of safety information. This safety information can be produced and used for the safe routing of ships as well as in the ship design process during the determination of Response Amplitude Operators (RAO).

  3. Rogue Community College Student Satisfaction Survey, Winter 2000. Management Report: Redwood and Riverside Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Nancy

    The Annual Student Satisfaction Survey at Oregon's Rogue Community College (RCC) allows the school to measure achievement in services, classes, and facilities. Three hundred and eleven students responded to this winter 2000 survey. Findings include: (1) seventeen percent of all respondents at the Redwood and Riverside campuses were very satisfied…

  4. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  5. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  6. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  7. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  8. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  9. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  10. Capillary saturation and desaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.; Armstrong, R. T.; Berg, S.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  11. Unsteady evolution of localized unidirectional deep-water wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Will; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2015-06-01

    We study the evolution of localized wave groups in unidirectional water wave envelope equations [the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLSE) and the modified NLSE (MNLSE)]. These localizations of energy can lead to disastrous extreme responses (rogue waves). We analytically quantify the role of such spatial localization, introducing a technique to reduce the underlying partial differential equation dynamics to a simple ordinary differential equation for the wave packet amplitude. We use this reduced model to show how the scale-invariant symmetries of the NLSE break down when the additional terms in the MNLSE are included, inducing a critical scale for the occurrence of extreme waves.

  12. Effect of rogue particles on the sub-surface damage of fused silica during grinding/polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Steele, R; Feit, M D; Wong, L; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J

    2007-05-02

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracks (i.e., sub-surface damage or scratching) on fused silica formed during grinding/polishing resulting from the addition of rogue particles in the base slurry has been investigated. Fused silica samples (10 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) were: (1) ground by loose abrasive grinding (alumina particles 9-30 {micro}m) on a glass lap with the addition of larger alumina particles at various concentrations with mean sizes ranging from 15-30 {micro}m, or (2) polished (using 0.5 {micro}m cerium oxide slurry) on various laps (polyurethanes pads or pitch) with the addition of larger rogue particles (diamond (4-45 {micro}m), pitch, dust, or dried Ceria slurry agglomerates) at various concentrations. For the resulting ground samples, the crack distributions of the as-prepared surfaces were determined using a polished taper technique. The crack depth was observed to: (1) increase at small concentrations (>10{sup -4} fraction) of rogue particles; and (2) increase with rogue particle concentration to crack depths consistent with that observed when grinding with particles the size of the rogue particles alone. For the polished samples, which were subsequently etched in HF:NH{sub 4}F to expose the surface damage, the resulting scratch properties (type, number density, width, and length) were characterized. The number density of scratches increased exponentially with the size of the rogue diamond at a fixed rogue diamond concentration suggesting that larger particles are more likely to lead to scratching. The length of the scratch was found to increase with rogue particle size, increase with lap viscosity, and decrease with applied load. At high diamond concentrations, the type of scratch transitioned from brittle to ductile and the length of the scratches dramatically increased and extended to the edge of the optic. The observed trends can explained semi-quantitatively in terms of the time needed for a rogue particle to penetrate into a

  13. Overcoming the effects of rogue taxa: Evolutionary relationships of the bee flies

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Michelle D.; Wiegmann, Brian M.; Yeates, David K

    2011-01-01

    Bombyliidae (5000 sp.), or bee flies, are a lower brachyceran family of flower-visiting flies that, as larvae, act as parasitoids of other insects. The evolutionary relationships are known from a morphological analysis that yielded minimal support for higher-level groupings. We use the protein-coding gene CAD and 28S rDNA to determine phylogeny and to test the monophyly of existing subfamilies, the divisions Tomophtalmae, and ‘the sand chamber subfamilies’. Additionally, we demonstrate that consensus networks can be used to identify rogue taxa in a Bayesian framework. Pruning rogue taxa post-analysis from the final tree distribution results in increased posterior probabilities. We find 8 subfamilies to be monophyletic and the subfamilies Heterotropinae and Mythicomyiinae to be the earliest diverging lineages. The large subfamily Bombyliinae is found to be polyphyletic and our data does not provide evidence for the monophyly of Tomophthalmae or the ‘sand chamber subfamilies’. PMID:21686308

  14. Overcoming the effects of rogue taxa: Evolutionary relationships of the bee flies.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Michelle D; Wiegmann, Brian M; Yeates, David K

    2011-01-01

    Bombyliidae (5000 sp.), or bee flies, are a lower brachyceran family of flower-visiting flies that, as larvae, act as parasitoids of other insects. The evolutionary relationships are known from a morphological analysis that yielded minimal support for higher-level groupings. We use the protein-coding gene CAD and 28S rDNA to determine phylogeny and to test the monophyly of existing subfamilies, the divisions Tomophtalmae, and 'the sand chamber subfamilies'. Additionally, we demonstrate that consensus networks can be used to identify rogue taxa in a Bayesian framework. Pruning rogue taxa post-analysis from the final tree distribution results in increased posterior probabilities. We find 8 subfamilies to be monophyletic and the subfamilies Heterotropinae and Mythicomyiinae to be the earliest diverging lineages. The large subfamily Bombyliinae is found to be polyphyletic and our data does not provide evidence for the monophyly of Tomophthalmae or the 'sand chamber subfamilies'. PMID:21686308

  15. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  16. Freak waves and electrostatic wavepacket modulation in a quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKerr, M.; Kourakis, I.; Haas, F.

    2014-03-01

    The occurrence of rogue waves (freak waves) associated with electrostatic wavepacket propagation in a quantum electron-positron-ion plasma is investigated from first principles. Electrons and positrons follow a Fermi-Dirac distribution, while the ions are subject to a quantum (Fermi) pressure. A fluid model is proposed and analyzed via a multiscale technique. The evolution of the wave envelope is shown to be described by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Criteria for modulational instability are obtained in terms of the intrinsic plasma parameters. Analytical solutions of the NLSE in the form of envelope solitons (of the bright or dark type) and localized breathers are reviewed. The characteristics of exact solutions in the form of the Peregrine soliton, the Akhmediev breather and the Kuznetsov-Ma breather are proposed as candidate functions for rogue waves (freak waves) within the model. The characteristics of the latter and their dependence on relevant parameters (positron concentration and temperature) are investigated.

  17. Will Russian Scientists Go Rogue? A Survey on the Threat and the Impact of Western Assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D Y; Gerber, T P

    2004-12-27

    The collapse of the Soviet Union sparked fears throughout the world that rogue nations and terrorist organizations would gain access to weapons of mass destruction (WMD). One specific concern has been 'WMD brain drain.' Russians with knowledge about nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons could now depart to any country of their choice, including rogue nations seeking to produce WMD. Meanwhile, Russian science fell into a protracted crisis, with plummeting salaries, little funding for research, and few new recruits to science. These developments increased both the incentives and the opportunities for scientists to sell their knowledge to governments and terrorist organizations with hostile intentions toward the United States. Recognizing the threat of WMD brain drain from Russia, the United States, and other governments implemented a host of programs designed to reduce the risk. Despite, or perhaps partly because of, massive assistance from the West to prevent scientists with WMD knowledge from emigrating, the threat of Russian WMD brain drain has recently faded from view. Yet we have seen no evidence that these programs are effective and little systematic assessment of the current threat of WMD migration. Our data from an unprecedented survey of 602 Russian physicists, biologists, and chemists suggest that the threat of WMD brain drain from Russia should still be at the forefront of our attention. Roughly 20 percent of Russian physicists, biologists, and chemists say they would consider working in rogue nations such as North Korea, Iran, Syria, or Iraq (still considered a rogue state at the time of the survey). At the same time, the data reveal that U.S. and Western nonproliferation assistance programs work. They significantly reduce the likelihood that Russian scientists would consider working in these countries. Moreover, Russian grants do not reduce scientists' propensity to 'go rogue'. These survey findings have clear policy implications: the U.S. and its

  18. Atom guiding in single mode optical fiber capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dorosz, Jan

    2006-10-01

    A relatively new method of atomic DeBroglie wave transmission in a hollow single mode optical fiber is presented. A slightly blue-detuned, from the atomic resonance, optical evanescent wave in the ring core of the capillary optical fiber creates a potential barrier for co-propagating or counter-propagating DeBroglie wave. The applied optical wavelength, associated with the used atomic transitions, was in the range 1100-400nm. Excited, metastable atoms of chromium, rubidium, cesium, helium, alkalis, etc., were transmitted in the capillary optical fiber. Initially the transmission was multimode and then single mode, with increasing efficiency. There are considered initial application perspectives of this transmission technology of DeBroglie wave for building of coherent cold sources of atoms, atom interferometers, and devices of the inverse lithography, which may possibly compete with the short-wave photo-lithography. The paper is a tutorial and has a teaching and technology review character.

  19. Numerical simulation of unidirectional irregular nonlinear waves in the basin of intermediate depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Sergeeva, Anna; Didenkulova, Ira

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we extend our study of intense irregular waves over infinitively deep water [1] to the situation of intermediate depth (in particular, conditions kph ≈ 2 and kph ≈ 1 are discussed, where kp is the peak wavenumber, and h is the water depth). We use a transition stage, when the nonlinearity is slowly enforcing during a few tens of wave periods, with the purpose to prepare 'natural' realizations of nonlinear waves in a quasi-stationary state. Then, the unidirectional waves are simulated by means of the High Order Spectral Method, what gives the complete data of wave evolution, and also the statistical data. Up to 100 realizations of wave trains were simulated for 20 minutes of physical time; each of the realization was about 10 km long and was characterized by the given JONSWAP spectrum. Small-scale artificial damping was introduced to eliminate the wave breaking effect. The simulation output data was collected providing sufficient resolution of the surface wave fields in time and space. The rogue wave events were identified on the basis of the wave data, and analyzed. One of the observations made in the case of infinitively deep water [1] was remarkably long lifetimes of the rogue events. This outcome was related to the formation of long-living wave groups due to two effects: absence of the transverse dimension (purely collinear waves), and nonlinear wave self-modulation. In the present study in one of the cases (i.e., kph ≈ 1 < 1.36) waves do not suffer from the Benjamin - Feir instability. Rather surprisingly, the lifetimes of the rogue waves do not show a clear dependence on the water depth. They seem to be somewhat shorter for the shallower water, but the difference is not definite. In general, the lifetime of rogue events may be up to 30-60 wave periods. The typical shape of the rogue waves was considered. Besides the crest-trough vertical asymmetry, which is natural for deep-water Stokes waves and becomes even more pronounced for intense

  20. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  1. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Michał J.; Bujak, Renata; Daghir, Emilia

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a widespread technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins in biological samples. CIEF is used to separate mixtures of compounds on the basis of differences in their isoelectric point. Aspects of sample preparation, capillary selection, zone mobilization procedures as well as various detection modes used have been described and discussed. Moreover CIEF, coupled to various types of detection techniques (MALDI or LIF), has increasingly been applied to the analysis of variety different high-molecular compounds. CIEF is considered as a highly specific analytical method which may be routinely used in the separation of rare hemoglobin variants. In addition, the application of CIEF in proteomic field have been discussed on the examples of analyses of glycoproteins and immunoglobins due to the meaning in clinical diagnostic.

  2. Semipreparative capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, J R; Zare, R N; Peters, E C; Svec, F; Frechét, J J

    2001-05-01

    Capillaries with inner diameters of 550 microm have successfully been packed with 1.5-microm octadecyl silica particles using frits made of macroporous polymers by the UV photopolymerization of a solution of glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate. This type of frit is found superior to one made of low-melting point poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) beads. Bubble formation is not observed to occur within these capillary columns under our experimental conditions. Separations can be achieved with sample injection volumes as high as 1 microL. To demonstrate its semipreparative use, a mixture of 500 nL of taxol (20 mM) and its precursor, baccatin III (30 mM), is separated using such a column with a Tris buffer. PMID:11354480

  3. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  4. Optical Rogue Wave Excitation and Modulation on a Bright Soliton Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Duan; Zhan-Ying, Yang; Chong, Liu; Wen-Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11475135 and 11547302, and the Doctoral Program Funds of the Ministry of Education of China under Grant No 20126101110004.

  5. Dissipative Rogue Waves Generated by Chaotic Pulse Bunching in a Mode-Locked Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecaplain, C.; Grelu, Ph.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Akhmediev, N.

    2012-06-01

    Rare events of extremely high optical intensity are experimentally recorded at the output of a mode-locked fiber laser that operates in a strongly dissipative regime of chaotic multiple-pulse generation. The probability distribution of these intensity fluctuations, which highly depend on the cavity parameters, features a long-tailed distribution. Recorded intensity fluctuations result from the ceaseless relative motion and nonlinear interaction of pulses within a temporally localized multisoliton phase.

  6. Fredholm and Wronskian representations of solutions to the KPI equation and multi-rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We construct solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (KPI) in terms of Fredholm determinants. We deduce solutions written as a quotient of Wronskians of order 2N. These solutions, called solutions of order N, depend on 2N - 1 parameters. When one of these parameters tends to zero, we obtain N order rational solutions expressed as a quotient of two polynomials of degree 2N(N + 1) in x, y, and t depending on 2N - 2 parameters. So we get with this method an infinite hierarchy of solutions to the KPI equation.

  7. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  8. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  9. Breakup of capillary jets with different disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moallemi, Nima; Li, Ri; Mehravaran, Kian

    2016-01-01

    The disturbance on a capillary jet can be imposed by radius modulation, velocity modulation, or jet vibration. The objective of the study is to understand the equivalence between the three types of disturbances. Theoretical analysis based on the Bernoulli equation for unsteady flows is conducted. It is found that a radius-modulated disturbance is equivalent to a velocity-modulated disturbance with the same wave number if the non-dimensional amplitude of the radius disturbance is 1.5 times that of the velocity disturbance. This is validated by carrying out numerical simulation based on velocity modulation and comparing with the linear theory based on radius modulation. It is also revealed that disturbance generated by a vibrating nozzle with small amplitude is equivalent to velocity disturbance. The non-dimensional amplitude of the equivalent velocity disturbance is a function of non-dimensional vibration amplitude and vibration wave number. The wave number of the velocity disturbance is shown to be twice of the vibration wave number. Validated by experimental observation, if the vibration wave number is less than 0.5, each nozzle vibration cycle generates two droplets. If the vibration wave number is between 0.5 and 1, each vibration cycle generates one droplet.

  10. Coaxial capillary and conductive capillary interfaces for collection of fractions isolated by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, R.W.; Walker, K.L.; Hagen, J.J.; Monning, C.A.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1995-11-15

    An instrument is described that allows the automated collection of fractions isolated by capillary electrophoresis. This instrument allows the electrical connection to be established with the separation capillary by using a coaxial capillary flow cell or by treating the outer surface of the capillary with a gold-filled epoxy to allow electrophoresis. The coaxial interface is most useful when the electroosmotic flow in the capillary is small, and the conductive capillary interface is favored when dilution and contamination of the sample must be minimized. Both geometries permit closely spaced fractions to be acquired with minimal cross-contamination and dilution. Sample recoveries were better than 80% and virtually independent of the chemical characteristics of the sample. Fractions isolated with this instrument were successfully analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Pair-tunneling induced localized waves in a vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Ling, Liming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Liu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    We investigate localized waves of coupled two-mode nonlinear Schrödinger equations with a pair-tunneling term representing strongly interacting particles can tunnel between the modes as a fragmented pair. Facilitated by Darboux transformation, we have derived exact solution of nonlinear vector waves such as bright solitons, Kuznetsov-Ma soliton, Akhmediev breathers and rogue waves and demonstrated their interesting temporal-spatial structures. A phase diagram that demarcates the parameter ranges of the nonlinear waves is obtained. Possibilities to observe these localized waves are discussed in a two species Bose-Einstein condensate.

  12. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  13. Movement and habitat use of green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris in the Rogue River, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.L.; North, J.A.; Hightower, J.E.; Weber, J.; Lauck, L.

    2002-01-01

    Green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) movement patterns and habitat use within the Rogue River, Oregon were evaluated using radio telemetry. Nineteen specimens ranging from 154 to 225 cm total length were caught by gill netting and tagged with radio transmitters during May-July 2000. One tagged green sturgeon was verified as a female near spawning condition. Individual green sturgeons spent more than 6 months in fresh water and traveled as far as river kilometer (rkm) 39.5. Green sturgeon preferred specific holding sites within the Rogue River during summer and autumn months. These sites were typically deep (> 5 m) low-gradient reaches or off-channel coves. Home ranges within holding sites were restricted. All tagged individuals emigrated from the system to the sea during the autumn and winter, when water temperatures dropped below 10??C and flows increased. This species is extremely vulnerable to habitat alterations and overfishing because it spawns in only a few North American rivers and individuals reside within extremely small areas for extended periods of time.

  14. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  15. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  16. Statistics of unidirectional random breaking water-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemer, Lev; Sergeeva, Anna

    2011-11-01

    Quasi-random wave groups were studied experimentally in a 300 m long Large Wave Chanel in Hannover. Multiple realizations of several spectral shapes each having random phases of individual harmonics were excited by a computer-controlled wavemaker. Wave field evolution along the tank was recorded by 28 wave gauges and the variation of waves' statistical parameters with the distance from the wavemaker was analyzed. An attempt was made to identify individual breaking events based on the spectrum variation between consecutive wave gauges. It was concluded that energy decay in the high frequency part of the spectrum can serve as a reliable criterion for breaking localization in each realization. The data processing based on the adopted criterion resulted in constructing separate ensembles of events with and without breaking. Statistical processing of those ensembles enabled to assess the effect of breaking on such wave field characteristics as probability of appearance of extremely steep (rogue, or freak) waves, as well on skewness and kurtosis.

  17. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  18. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  19. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  20. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  1. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  2. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  3. Capillary interconnect device

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-12-25

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) means for applying an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  4. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  5. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  6. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  7. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  8. Research of large-amplitude waves evolution in the framework of shallow water equations and their implication for people's safety in extreme situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Chaikovskaia, Natalya; Rodin, Artem

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the formation and evolution of shock wave in shallow water with no restrictions on its amplitude in the framework of the nonlinear shallow water equations. It is shown that in the case of large-amplitude waves appears a new nonlinear effect of reflection from the shock front of incident wave. These results are important for the assessment of coastal flooding by tsunami waves and storm surges. Very often the largest number of victims was observed on the coastline where the wave moved breaking. Many people, instead of running away, were just looking at the movement of the "raging wall" and lost time. This fact highlights the importance of researching the problem of security and optimal behavior of people in situations with increased risk. Usually there is uncertainty about the exact time, when rogue waves will impact. This fact limits the ability of people to adjust their behavior psychologically to the stressful situations. It concerns specialists, who are busy both in the field of flying activity and marine service as well as adults, young people and children, who live on the coastal zone. The rogue wave research is very important and it demands cooperation of different scientists - mathematicians and physicists, as well as sociologists and psychologists, because the final goal of efforts of all scientists is minimization of the harm, brought by rogue waves to humanity.

  9. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  10. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Arianna Ashby, Colin Cai, Thomas Cox, Genna Dorrell, Gabe FitzPatrick, Meaghan FitzPatrick, Jason Mars Liu, Mitchell Moczygemba, Kieran Rooney, Emry Timmons,; Ray You, students, (St. Mary's. School)

    2015-01-01

    Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark

  11. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  12. Supercontinuum and rogue soliton generation by induced modulational instability in photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Nengsong; Wang, Boyan; Tang, Pinghua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    We present an approach that enables active control of supercontinuum (SC) and rogue soliton (RS) generation through the modulation of a 500 fs input pulse by numerical simulations. The induced modulational instability contributes to the initial comb-like SC generation, which is fundamentally different from SC initiated by high-order soliton fission. The output spectrum shows great dependence on modulation frequencies and depths. It is interesting that we can manipulate the RS generation by adjusting the modulation parameters. And we also demonstrate the conditions which can be beneficial to RS generation: (i) very weak or large values of modulation depth; (ii) seeding in the vicinity of the peak of the modulational instability gain spectrum. Although RS degrades the smoothness of the SC, it is of great significance in the generation of tailored SC.

  13. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  14. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  17. Wind effects on the modulational instability of surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Maura; Kasparian, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The modulational instability is a fundamental mechanism for nonlinear exchanges of energy between carrier and sideband waves. It is one of the processes at the origin of rogue-wave formation in deep-water. Since the wind is the energy source in surface wave propagation, accurate modelling of the wind is critical for understanding rogue-wave phenomenon. We describe how different forcing terms, due to different modelling of the wind action, affect the band of positive gain of the modulational instability. In particular, we consider the wind-forced nonlinear Schrödinger equation obtained in the potential flow framework when the Miles growth rate is of the order of the wave steepness [1]. In this case, the form of the wind-forcing terms gives rise to the enhancement of the modulational instability and to a band of positive gain with infinite width [2]. This regime is characterised by the fact that the ratio between wave momentum and norm is not a constant of motion [2], in contrast to what happens in the standard case where the Miles growth rate is of the order of the steepness squared. References [1] M. Brunetti, N. Marchiando, N. Berti, J. Kasparian, 2014, Phys. Lett. A, 378, 1025-1030 [2] M. Brunetti, J. Kasparian, 2014, Phys. Lett. A, 378, 3626-3630

  18. Breather-to-soliton transitions, nonlinear wave interactions, and modulational instability in a higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Zi-Qi; Liu, Chong; Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear waves on constant backgrounds of the higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (HGNLS) equation describing the propagation of ultrashort optical pulse in optical fibers. We derive the breather, rogue wave, and semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation. Our results show that these three types of solutions can be converted into the nonpulsating soliton solutions. In particular, we present the explicit conditions for the transitions between breathers and solitons with different structures. Further, we investigate the characteristics of the collisions between the soliton and breathers. Especially, based on the semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation, we display the novel interactions between the rogue waves and other nonlinear waves. In addition, we reveal the explicit relation between the transition and the distribution characteristics of the modulation instability growth rate.

  19. Breather-to-soliton transitions, nonlinear wave interactions, and modulational instability in a higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Zi-Qi; Liu, Chong; Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear waves on constant backgrounds of the higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (HGNLS) equation describing the propagation of ultrashort optical pulse in optical fibers. We derive the breather, rogue wave, and semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation. Our results show that these three types of solutions can be converted into the nonpulsating soliton solutions. In particular, we present the explicit conditions for the transitions between breathers and solitons with different structures. Further, we investigate the characteristics of the collisions between the soliton and breathers. Especially, based on the semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation, we display the novel interactions between the rogue waves and other nonlinear waves. In addition, we reveal the explicit relation between the transition and the distribution characteristics of the modulation instability growth rate. PMID:26871080

  20. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J C T; Tas, N R; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-10-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because of decreased velocity gradients at the wall. Both these effects essentially stem from the spontaneous formation of an electric double layer (EDL) and the resulting streaming potential caused by the net capillary-flow-driven advection of ionic species within the EDL. Our results demonstrate that filling of charged capillaries also exhibits the well-known linear and Washburn regimes witnessed for uncharged capillaries, although the filling rate is always lower than that of the uncharged capillary. We attribute this to a competitive success of the lowering of the driving forces (because of electroviscous effects), in comparison to the effect of weaker drag forces. We further reveal that the time at which the transition between the linear and the Washburn regime occurs may become significantly altered with the introduction of surface charges, thereby altering the resultant capillary dynamics in a rather intricate manner. PMID:25375597

  1. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Rogue River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary assessment of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Rogue River basin, which encompasses 13,390 square kilometers (km2) along the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that: * The Rogue River in its lowermost 178.5 kilometers (km) alternates between confined and unconfined segments, and is predominately alluvial along its lowermost 44 km. The study area on the mainstem Rogue River can be divided into five reaches based on topography, hydrology, and tidal influence. The largely confined, active channel flows over bedrock and coarse bed material composed chiefly of boulders and cobbles in the Grants Pass (river kilometers [RKM] 178.5-152.8), Merlin (RKM 152.8-132.7), and Galice Reaches (RKM 132.7-43.9). Within these confined reaches, the channel contains few bars and has stable planforms except for locally wider segments such as the Brushy Chutes area in the Merlin Reach. Conversely, the active channel flows over predominately alluvial material and contains nearly continuous gravel bars in the Lobster Creek Reach (RKM 43.9-6.7). The channel in the Tidal Reach (RKM 6.7-0) is also alluvial, but tidally affected and unconfined until RKM 2. The Lobster Creek and Tidal Reaches contain some of the most extensive bar deposits within the Rogue River study area. * For the 56.6-km-long segment of the Applegate River included in this study, the river was divided into two reaches based on topography. In the Upper Applegate River Reach (RKM 56.6-41.6), the confined, active channel flows over alluvium and bedrock and has few bars. In the Lower Applegate River Reach (RKM 41.6-0), the active channel alternates between confined and unconfined segments, flows predominantly over alluvium, shifts laterally in unconfined sections, and contains more numerous and larger bars. * The 6.5-km segment of the lower

  2. Convective dominated flows in open capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Grah, Aleksander; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2010-05-01

    This paper is concerned with convective dominated liquid flows in open capillary channels. The channels consist of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. In the case of steady flow the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant pressure gas phase. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the adjusted volumetric flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces. The convective dominated flow regime is a special case of open capillary flow, since the viscous forces are negligibly small compared with the convective forces. Flows of this type are of peculiar interest since the free surfaces possess a quasisymmetry in the flow direction. This quasisymmetry enables the application of a new effective method for evaluation of the flow limit. The flow limit is caused by a choking effect. This effect is indicated by the speed index, S, which is defined by the ratio of the flow velocity and the longitudinal capillary wave speed. The speed index is defined analogously to Mach number and tends toward unity in the case of flow limitation, i.e., when the maximum flow rate is reached. Utilizing the quasisymmetry, a new approach for a very precise determination of the speed index is presented. This approach uses a new approximation for the curvature of the surfaces by means of the empirical surface profiles. On the basis of empirical and theoretical data, the paper discusses the typical features of the stable flow. The experiments were performed under microgravity aboard the sounding rockets TEXUS 41 and TEXUS 42. The experiment setup enables the approach to the flow limit through either increase in flow rate or channel length. The theoretical data have been gained from numerical solutions of a one-dimensional flow model. The empirical and theoretical results are in good agreement and both confirm the choking effect as cause of the flow limitation

  3. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  4. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  5. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, by St. Mary's School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Dorrell, Genna; Feng, James; Hicks, Sean; Mars Liu, Jason; Liu, Steven; Moczygemba, Mitchell; Sheng, Jason; Sternenburg, Leah; Than, Emi; Timmons, Emry; Wen, Jerry; Yaeger, Bella; You, Ruiyang

    2016-01-01

    The Rogue Valley in Southwest Oregon was known for its beautiful dark skies, but due to population growth the dark skies are vanishing. A light pollution chart using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project continued into 2015, incorporating suggestions made at the 2014 AAS Conference to improve the study by including more light meter data and community outreach. Students used light meters, Loss of the Night app, and the Dark Sky meter app. Students researched light pollution and its effects on the environment, measured night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, and completed a light audit in an area of their choice. They created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the GaN, Globe at Night, (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section of the website (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/).The 2014 survey and public outreach increased awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley and around the state of Oregon. Examples include a local senior project to change lighting at a baseball stadium and a 4-H club in Northeast Oregon starting a GaN survey in their area. GaN shows growth in the amount of data collected in Oregon from 8 data points in 2006 to 193 in 2014. The Rogue Valley magnitude data from the spring of 2015 indicates a drop from an average magnitude of 4 to an average magnitude of 2. This is due to hazy skies from smoke drifting into the valley from a Siberian wildfire. Data collection during the summer and fall was hampered due to smoke from local

  6. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  7. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  8. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  9. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  10. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  11. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  12. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  13. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  14. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  16. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  17. Numerical Considerations for Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models: Eliminating Rogue Trajectories, and the Importance of Numerical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian N.

    2016-07-01

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex atmospheric flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behaviour in the numerical solution. Here we discuss numerical strategies for solving the non-linear Langevin-based particle velocity evolution equation that eliminate such unphysical behaviour in both Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulation applications. Extremely large or `rogue' particle velocities are caused when the numerical integration scheme becomes unstable. Such instabilities can be eliminated by using a sufficiently small integration timestep, or in cases where the required timestep is unrealistically small, an unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme can be used. When the generalized anisotropic turbulence model is used, it is critical that the input velocity covariance tensor be realizable, otherwise unphysical behaviour can become problematic regardless of the integration scheme or size of the timestep. A method is presented to ensure realizability, and thus eliminate such behaviour. It was also found that the numerical accuracy of the integration scheme determined the degree to which the second law of thermodynamics or `well-mixed condition' was satisfied. Perhaps more importantly, it also determined the degree to which modelled Eulerian particle velocity statistics matched the specified Eulerian distributions (which is the ultimate goal of the numerical solution). It is recommended that future models be verified by not only checking the well-mixed condition, but perhaps more importantly by checking that computed Eulerian statistics match the Eulerian statistics specified as inputs.

  18. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  19. Highly extended oceanic lithosphere: The basement and wallrocks for the Late Jurassic Rogue-Chetco oceanic arc, Oregon Klamath Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, J.D.; Saleeby, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The superbly preserved, coeval Late Jurassic Rogue-Chetco oceanic arc and Josephine inter-arc basin exposed in the western Jurassic belt of the Oregon Klamath Mountains provide a unique opportunity to (1) directly observe the oceanic lithosphere upon which this oceanic arc was constructed, and (2) gain a better understanding of the pre-accretionary dynamic processes that shape oceanic arc and inter-arc basin lithosphere. Field relations exposed in the Roque, Illinois, and Chetco River areas show that (1) plutonic and volcanic rocks of the Rogue-Chetco arc both intruded and conformably overlapped fragmented composite blocks of oceanic crust and serpentinized, dike-filled depleted mantle rocks; and (2) arc growth occurred during regional oblique extension of the oceanic lithosphere resulting in the extreme fragmentation of oceanic crustal rocks and the local exposure of serpentinized mantle rocks on the sea floor. The Rogue-Chetco overlap sequence consists of rhythmically bedded volcanogenic turbidites, chert, argillite, and local deposits of polymict basal breccias. The clasts which comprise the distinctive basal breccias indicate derivation from a dominantly ophiolitic crust and serpentinized mantle source. Source materials for the basal breccias comprise the basement and wallrocks for the Roque-Chetco arc and consist of (1) rifted fragments of western Paleozoic and Triassic belt rocks (Yule and others, 1991) cut by heterogeneous mafic complexes inferred to represent early Josephine age rifting at approximately 165 Ma, (2) fault bounded blocks of massive gabbro, sheeted mafic dikes, pillow lava and breccia overlain by Callovian age chert, and (3) serpentinized depleted mantle peridotite cut by multiple generation of mafic and intermediate dikes. The basement rock types all share a pervasive brittle fragmentation and hydrothermal alteration history that is conspicuously absent in the arc volcanic and plutonic rocks.

  20. Non-contact acoustic trapping in circular cross-section glass capillaries: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, Ian; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic particle manipulation has many applications in microfluidic systems. Such manipulation is achievable by establishing an ultrasonic standing wave in fluid filled micromachined chambers. In this work, the focus is on analyzing the trapping potential of water filled capillary tubes actuated ultrasonically. The curved walls necessitate the use of a finite element modeling approach. Multiple arrangements of the piezoelectric transducers were studied along with the effects of changing the capillary and piezoelectric transducer thicknesses. Additionally, different modes of driving the piezoelectric transducers were investigated. It was found that positioning four piezoelectric transducers equally spaced around the capillary tube provided the best force potential field for trapping polystyrene spheres in the center of the capillary. PMID:23145585

  1. Nonlinear coherent structures of Alfvén wave in a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sayanee; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    The Alfvén wave dynamics is investigated in the framework of two-fluid approach in a compressible collisional magnetized plasma. In the finite amplitude limit, the dynamics of the nonlinear Alfvén wave is found to be governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation (mKdVB). In this mKdVB equation, the electron inertia is found to act as a source of dispersion, and the electron-ion collision serves as a dissipation. The collisional dissipation is eventually responsible for the Burgers term in mKdVB equation. In the long wavelength limit, this weakly nonlinear Alfvén wave is shown to be governed by a damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, these nonlinear equations are analyzed by means of analytical calculation and numerical simulation to elucidate the various aspects of the phase-space dynamics of the nonlinear wave. Results reveal that nonlinear Alfvén wave exhibits the dissipation mediated shock, envelope, and breather like structures. Numerical simulations also predict the formation of dissipative Alfvénic rogue wave, giant breathers, and rogue wave holes. These results are discussed in the context of the space plasma.

  2. Shear stabilization of the capillary breakup of a cylindrical interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Mathew J.; Steen, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    A cylindrical interface containing a viscous liquid set into axial motion is subject to a capillary and to a surface-wave instability. Clues from previous studies suggest that, even though both mechanisms separately are destabilizing, under certain circumstances their mutual interaction can lead to a stable interface; shear can stabilize capillary breakup. Here, an axial flow through an annular cross section bounded on the inside by a rigid rod and on the outside by a deformable interface is considered. The competition between the two mechanisms is studied through the temporal growth of infinitesimal axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances. This examination of temporal stability shows that, indeed, for geometries corresponding to thin annular layers both instabilities can be completely suppressed (disturbances of all wavelengths decay).

  3. Experimental long term evolution of breathers in water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Oceanic rogue waves may occur, due to the modulation instability, also referred to as the Benjamin-Feir instability. This instability can be also discussed within the framework of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS), which describes the dynamics of unstable packets in deep-water. In particular, through exact breather solutions of the NLS. Breathers are currently under intensive study, since their recent experimental observation in optics, water waves and in plasma proved the validity of the NLS to describe strong localizations in nonlinear dispersive media. We present evolution characteristics of breather, propagating over a long propagation distance in deep-water. In addition, we present several analytical and promising techniques, based on the theory of nonlinear wave theory, how an early stage of breather dynamics may be detected, before the occurrence of strong wave focusing.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  5. Capillary Flow Limitations of Nanowicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Conan; Hidrovo, Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Thermal management is an important issue in microelectronic systems. The inaccessibility and diminishing size of these systems, however, requires that the heat management components be reliable and compact, such as is the case with heat pipes. In most intermediate temperature heat pipes typically found in microelectronics, the critical heat flux is governed by the capillary limit. Given the projected increases in computer chip heat fluxes, it is important to investigate the use of nanowicks as a means of raising this capillary limit. A theoretical model was developed to simulate flow through a vertical nanopillar array by balancing the capillary driving forces and the viscous losses in a quasi-steady state dynamic formulation. Based on this model, the maximum mass flow and its critical heat flux can be found for a wick given its microstructure geometry. These values were also found experimentally for commercially available wicks and nanowicks. We found that nanowicks provide lower mass flow rates than conventional wicks, mainly due to a reduced cross section. However, nanowicks achieved higher velocities and show promise over some conventional heat pipe wicks.

  6. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  7. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  8. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006); J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007)]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube. PMID:25353880

  9. Viscous peeling with capillary suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2014-11-01

    If an elastic tape is stuck to a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous fluid and then peeled off by pulling at a small angle to the horizontal, then both viscous and capillary forces affect the peeling speed (McEwan and Taylor, 1966). If there is no capillary meniscus (e.g. if the peeling is due to viscous fluid being injected under the tape), then the peeling speed is given by a Cox-Voinov-like law, and is an increasing function of the peeling angle. We show that, with a meniscus present, the effect of the capillary forces is to suck down the tape, reducing the effective peeling angle and hence the peeling speed. When surface tension dominates and the peeling speed tends to zero, the system transitions to a new state whose time-evolution can be described by a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. These asymptotic results are confirmed by numerical calculations. Similar results hold for the peeling-by-bending of elastic beams, with ``angle'' replaced by ``curvature'' (i.e. bending moment).

  10. A prescription for the rogue doctor: part I--begin with diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J; Nolan, Thomas E; Zembo, Michele

    2003-06-01

    Among the most serious problems a doctor can have may be those which are the result of a defect of character or a flaw in ethics. Under these circumstances, unacceptable behavior patterns may arise. Examples of unacceptable patterns of behavior include dishonesty, intentionally harming a patient, sexual harassment, and substance abuse. For years, doctors who have these patterns have been handled with kid gloves by those who educate, train, and supervise professionals in the healthcare industry. Counseling, coaching, training, supervising, transfers to less critical disciplines, disciplinary warnings, and offering opportunities to resign have been the typical protocols. Traditionally, outright firing of residents and doctors has been relatively taboo and too radical for the medical profession. Why has this been the case? Reasons may include unwillingness to get involved or to deal with the stress of disciplining a colleague, an unwillingness which often is grounded in fears of retaliation. In a litigious society, fears of slander lawsuits, for example, may be all-too-real. However, the implied paternalism and the practice of protecting doctors' careers by preserving their professional status as practicing doctors have become increasingly problematic. Aside from the fact that it is unethical, allowing problem doctors to continue to practice medicine may have an adverse impact on the well-being of patients and therefore may represent an enormous legal liability for organizations that employ them. In this first of a two-part series, problems that now exist and implementation of a performance management system as a starting point for removing rogues from the system are discussed. A subsequent paper will detail how such a system operates. PMID:12782892

  11. Titan under a red dwarf star and as a rogue planet: requirements for liquid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2011-07-01

    Titan has a surface temperature of 94 K and a surface pressure of 1.4 atmospheres. These conditions make it possible for liquid methane solutions to be present on the surface. Here, we consider how Titan could have liquid methane while orbiting around an M4 red dwarf star, and a special case of Titan orbiting the red dwarf star Gliese 581. Because light from a red dwarf star has a higher fraction of infrared than the Sun, more of the starlight will reach the surface of Titan because its atmospheric haze is more transparent to infrared wavelengths. If Titan was placed at a distance from a red dwarf star such that it received the same average flux as it receives from the Sun, we calculate the increased infrared fraction, which will warm surface temperatures by an additional ˜10 K. Compared to the Sun, red dwarf stars have less blackbody ultraviolet light but can have more Lyman α and particle radiation associated with flares. Thus depending on the details, the haze production may be much higher or much lower than for the current Titan. With the haze reduced by a factor of 100, Titan would have a surface temperature of 94 K at a distance of 0.23 AU from an M4 star and at a distance of 1.66 AU, for Gliese 581. If the haze is increased by a factor of 100 the distances become 0.08 and 0.6 AU for the M4-star and Gliese 581, respectively. As a rogue planet, with no incident stellar flux, Titan would need 1.6 W/m 2 of geothermal heat to maintain its current surface temperature, or an atmospheric opacity of 20× its present amount with 0.1 W/m 2 of geothermal heat. Thus Titan-like worlds beyond our solar system may provide environment supporting surface liquid methane.

  12. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  13. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  14. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet on a sea surface is analyzed analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet in relation to the problem of the so-called rogue waves. Within the Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2)-dimensional hyperbolic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived that describes the evolution of the coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description of the process of nonlinear spatiotemporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system of equations is integrated in quadratures, which allows one to better understand the qualitative differences between linear and nonlinear focusing regimes of a wave packet. Predictions of the Gaussian model are compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-crested waves.

  15. Giant waves in weakly crossing sea states

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2010-03-15

    The formation of rogue waves in sea states with two close spectral maxima near the wave vectors k{sub 0} {+-} {Delta}k/2 in the Fourier plane is studied through numerical simulations using a completely nonlinear model for long-crested surface waves [24]. Depending on the angle {theta} between the vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, which specifies a typical orientation of the interference stripes in the physical plane, the emerging extreme waves have a different spatial structure. If {theta} {<=} arctan(1/{radical}2), then typical giant waves are relatively long fragments of essentially two-dimensional ridges separated by wide valleys and composed of alternating oblique crests and troughs. For nearly perpendicular vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, the interference minima develop into coherent structures similar to the dark solitons of the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a two-dimensional killer wave looks much like a one-dimensional giant wave bounded in the transverse direction by two such dark solitons.

  16. Brain capillaries in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baloyannis, Stavros J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of irreversible dementia, affecting mostly the presenile and senile age, shaping a tragic profile in the epilogue of the life of the suffering people. Due to the severity and the social impact of the disease an ongoing research activity is in climax nowadays, associated with many legal, social, ethical, humanitarian, philosophical and economic considerations. From the neuropathological point of view the disease is characterized by dendritic pathology, loss of synapses and dendritic spines, affecting mostly selective neuronal networks of critical importance for memory and cognition, such as the basal forebrain cholinergic system, the medial temporal regions, the hippocampus and many neocortical association areas. Tau pathology consisted of intracellular accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorilated tau protein and accumulation of Aβ-peptide's deposits, defined as neuritic plaques, are the principal neuropathological diagnostic criteria of the disease. The neurotoxic properties of the oligomerics of the Aβ-peptide and tau mediated neurodegeneration are among the main causative factors of impaired synaptic plasticity, neuronal loss, dendritic alterations and tremendous synaptic loss. The gradual degeneration of the organelles, particularly mitochondria, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, visualized clearly by electron microscopy (EM), emphasize the importance of the oxidative stress and amyloid toxicity in the pathogenetic cascade of the disease. The vascular factor may be an important component of the whole spectrum of the pathogenesis of AD. It is of substantial importance the concept that the structural alterations of the brain capillaries, may contribute in the pathology of AD, given that the disruption of the BBB may induce exacerbation of AD pathology, by promoting inflammation around the blood capillaries and in the neuropile space diffusely. From the morphological point of view

  17. Microjet formation in a capillary by laser-induced cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-11-01

    A vapor bubble is created by focusing a laser pulse inside a capillary that is partially filled with water. Upon creation of the bubble, a shock wave travels through the capillary. When this shock wave meets the meniscus of the air-water interface, a thin jet is created that travels at very high speeds. A crucial ingredient for the creation of the jet is the shape of the meniscus, which is responsible for focusing the energy provided by the shock wave. We examine the formation of this jet numerically using a boundary integral method, where we prepare an initial interface at rest inside a tube with a diameter ranging from 50 to 500 μm. To simulate the effect of the bubble we then apply a short, strong pressure pulse, after which the jet forms. We investigate the influence of the shape of the meniscus, and pressure amplitude and duration on the jet formation. The jet shape and velocity obtained by the simulation compare well with experimental data, and provides good insight in the origin of the jet.

  18. Capillary Phenomena at Nanoscales: Electrowetting and Capillary Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Theories of capillary phenomena have traditionally been based on continuum approximations that break down as dimensions shrink to nanometer scales. Molecular simulations are used to test the limits of continuum theory in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and capillary adhesion between solids. In EWOD, a fluid drop is separated from an electrode by a dielectric. Increasing the voltage V between drop and electrode, decreases the contact angle θ, allowing the droplet to be manipulated. Simulations of nanoscale drops show the same behavior as experiments on millimeter drops. The contact angle follows the continuum Young-Lippmann equation (YLE) at low voltages and then saturates. The saturation mechanism has been difficult to identify in experiments. Simulations show that charged molecules are pulled from the drop by large electrostatic forces near the contact line. Saturation can be delayed by increasing molecular binding, lowering temperature or increasing dielectric constant. A local force balance equation is derived that agrees with the YLE below saturation and remains valid after saturation. Simulations of capillary adhesion examined the force between a spherical tip of radius R and a flat substrate. The shape of the meniscus agrees remarkably well with continuum theory down to nanometer separations, as does the adhesive force from interfacial tension. However, the total force may deviate by factors of two or have the opposite sign. While the component of the pressure along the substrate agrees with the Laplace pressure from continuum theory, the out-of âplane component does not. There may also be significant force oscillations associated with layering near the solids. The elastic response of the solid has little affect on adhesive forces. This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. CMS-0103408.

  19. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  20. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  1. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    PubMed Central

    John, Santosh G.; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Lacasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS). Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser's syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24765434

  2. Heuristic approach to capillary pressures averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Coca, B.P.

    1980-10-01

    Several methods are available to average capillary pressure curves. Among these are the J-curve and regression equations of the wetting-fluid saturation in porosity and permeability (capillary pressure held constant). While the regression equation seem completely empiric, the J-curve method seems to be theoretically sound due to its expression based on a relation between the average capillary radius and the permeability-porosity ratio. An analysis is given of each of these methods.

  3. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey. PMID:17851250

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Nonlinear Water-Waves: A Perspective of an Experimentalist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemer, Lev

    In the present review the emphasis is put on laboratory studies of propagating water waves where experiments were designed with the purpose to enable juxtaposing the measurement results with the theoretical predictions, thus providing a basis for evaluation of the domain of validity of various nonlinear theoretical model of different complexity. In particular, evolution of deterministic wave groups of different shapes and several values of characteristic nonlinearity is studied in deep and intermediate-depth water. Experiments attempting to generate extremely steep (rogue) waves are reviewed in greater detail. Relation between the kinematics of steep nonlinear waves and incipient breaking is considered. Discussion of deterministic wave systems is followed by review of laboratory experiments on propagation of numerous realizations of random wave groups with different initial spectra. The experimental results are compared with the corresponding Monte-Carlo numerical simulations based on different models.

  5. Capillary rise kinetics of some building materials.

    PubMed

    Karoglou, M; Moropoulou, A; Giakoumaki, A; Krokida, M K

    2005-04-01

    The presence of water in masonry is one of the main factors in deterioration. Capillary rise is the most usual mechanism of water penetration into building materials. In this study the kinetics of the capillary rise phenomenon was studied for various building materials: four stones, two bricks, and six plasters. A first-order kinetic model was proposed, in which the equilibrium moisture height derived from Darcy law. The capillary height time constant found to be strongly affected by the material characteristics. Moreover, the capillary height time constant can be predicted if the average pore radius of the materials is known. PMID:15752811

  6. Capillaroscopy and the measurement of capillary pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Angela C

    2000-01-01

    Capillaries play a critical role in cardiovascular function as the point of exchange of nutrients and waste products between the tissues and circulation. Studies of capillary function in man are limited by access to the vascular bed. However, skin capillaries can readily be studied by the technique of capillaroscopy which enables the investigator to assess morphology, density and blood flow velocity. It is also possible to estimate capillary pressure by direct cannulation using glass micropipettes. This review will describe the techniques used to make these assessments and will outline some of the changes that are seen in health and disease. PMID:11136289

  7. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  8. Dissipation regimes for short wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulliez, Guillemette

    2013-02-01

    The dissipation processes affecting short wind waves of centimeter and decimeter scales are investigated experimentally in laboratory. The processes include damping due to molecular viscosity, generation of capillary waves, microbreaking, and breaking. The observations were made in a large wind wave tank for a wide range of fetches and winds, using a laser sheet and a high-resolution video camera. The work aims at constructing a comprehensive picture of dissipative processes in the short wind wave field, to find for which scales particular dissipative mechanism may become important. Four distinct regimes have been identified. For capillary-gravity wave fields, i.e., for dominant waves with scales below 4 cm, viscous damping is found to be the main dissipation mechanism. The gravity-capillary wave fields with dominant wavelength less than 10 cm usually exhibit a train of capillary ripples at the crest wavefront, but no wave breaking. For such waves, the main dissipation process is molecular viscosity occurring through nonlinear energy cascade toward high-frequency motions. Microscale breaking takes place for waves longer than 10 cm and manifests itself in a very localized surface disruption on the forward face of the crest. Such events generate turbulent motions in water and thus enhance wave dissipation. Plunging breaking, characterized by formation of a crest bulge, a microjet hitting the water surface and a splash-up, occurs for short gravity waves of wavelength exceeding 20 cm. Macroscale spilling breaking is also observed for longer waves at high winds. In both cases, the direct momentum transfer from breaking waves to the water flow contributes significantly to wave damping.

  9. Microfoam formation in a capillary.

    PubMed

    Kotopoulis, Spiros; Postema, Michiel

    2010-02-01

    The ultrasound-induced formation of bubble clusters may be of interest as a therapeutic means. If the clusters behave as one entity, i.e., one mega-bubble, its ultrasonic manipulation towards a boundary is straightforward and quick. If the clusters can be forced to accumulate to a microfoam, entire vessels might be blocked on purpose using an ultrasound contrast agent and a sound source. In this paper, we analyse how ultrasound contrast agent clusters are formed in a capillary and what happens to the clusters if sonication is continued, using continuous driving frequencies in the range 1-10 MHz. Furthermore, we show high-speed camera footage of microbubble clustering phenomena. We observed the following stages of microfoam formation within a dense population of microbubbles before ultrasound arrival. After the sonication started, contrast microbubbles collided, forming small clusters, owing to secondary radiation forces. These clusters coalesced within the space of a quarter of the ultrasonic wavelength, owing to primary radiation forces. The resulting microfoams translated in the direction of the ultrasound field, hitting the capillary wall, also owing to primary radiation forces. We have demonstrated that as soon as the bubble clusters are formed and as long as they are in the sound field, they behave as one entity. At our acoustic settings, it takes seconds to force the bubble clusters to positions approximately a quarter wavelength apart. It also just takes seconds to drive the clusters towards the capillary wall. Subjecting an ultrasound contrast agent of given concentration to a continuous low-amplitude signal makes it cluster to a microfoam of known position and known size, allowing for sonic manipulation. PMID:19875143

  10. Exotic containers for capillary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses 'exotic' rotationally symmetric containers that admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium capillary free surfaces. The paper extends earlier work to a larger class of parameters and clarifies and simplifies the governing differential equations, while expressing them in a parametric form appropriate for numerical integration. A unified presentation suitable for both zero and nonzero gravity is given. Solutions for the container shapes are depicted graphically along with members of the free-surface continuum, and comments are given concerning possible physical experiments.

  11. Microbeam-coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Garty, G; Ehsan, M U; Buonanno, M; Yang, Z; Sweedler, J V; Brenner, D J

    2015-09-01

    Within the first few microseconds following a charged particle traversal of a cell, numerous oxygen and nitrogen radicals are formed along the track. Presented here is a method, using capillary electrophoresis, for simultaneous measurement, within an individual cell, of specific reactive oxygen species, such as the superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]) as well as the native and oxidised forms of glutathione, an ubiquitous anti-oxidant that assists the cell in coping with these species. Preliminary data are presented as well as plans for integrating this system into the charged particle microbeam at Columbia University. PMID:25870435

  12. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis in metallodrug development.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a separation method based on differential migration of analytes in electric fields. The compatibility with purely aqueous separation media makes it a versatile tool in metallodrug research. Many metallodrugs undergo ligand exchange reactions that can easily be followed with this method and the information gained can even be improved by coupling the CE to advanced detectors, such as mass spectrometers. This gives the method high potential to facilitate the development of metallodrugs, especially when combined with innovative method development and experimental design. PMID:26547417

  14. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  15. Ocean dynamics studies. [of current-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Both the theoretical and experimental investigations into current-wave interactions are discussed. The following three problems were studied: (1) the dispersive relation of a random gravity-capillary wave field; (2) the changes of the statistical properties of surface waves under the influence of currents; and (3) the interaction of capillary-gravity with the nonuniform currents. Wave current interaction was measured and the feasibility of using such measurements for remote sensing of surface currents was considered. A laser probe was developed to measure the surface statistics, and the possibility of using current-wave interaction as a means of current measurement was demonstrated.

  16. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  17. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  18. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  19. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  20. Solutions of the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy equations of the "rogue wave" type: A unified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. B.; Smirnov, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a unified structure of solutions for all equations of the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy and their combinations. We give examples of solutions that satisfy different equations for different parameter values. In particular, we consider a rank-2 quasirational solution that can be used to investigate many integrable models in nonlinear optics. An advantage of our approach is the possibility to investigate changes in the behavior of a solution resulting from changing the model.

  1. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  2. Capillary Movement in Granular Beds in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yendler, Boris S.; Bula, Ray J.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of capillary flow through unsaturated porous media is very important for the development of an effective water and nutrient delivery system for growing plants in microgravity and chemical engineering applications. Experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle during the STS-63 mission using three experimental cuvettes called "Capillary Testbed-M." These experiments studied the effect of bead diameter on capillary flow by comparing the capillary flow in three different granular beds. It was observed that the speed of water propagation in the granular bed consisting of 1.5 mm diameter particles was less than that in the bed consisting of 1.0 mm. diameter particles. Such results contradict the existing theory of capillary water propagation in granular beds. It was found also that in microgravity water propagates independently in adjacent layers of a layered granular bed .

  3. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  4. Modeling capillary barriers in unsaturated fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, W.; Pan, Lehua; Hinds, Jennifer; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2002-11-01

    This work presents a series of numerical modeling studies that investigate the hydrogeologic conditions required to form capillary barriers and the effect that capillary barriers have on fluid flow and tracer transport processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. The numerical modeling results showed that effective capillary barriers can develop where both matrix and fracture capillary gradients tend to move water upward. Under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary barrier effects exist for diverting a significant amount of moisture flow through the relatively shallow Paintbrush nonwelded unit, with major faults observed at the site serving as major downward pathways for laterally diverted percolation fluxes. In addition, we used observed field liquid saturation and goechemical isotopic data to check model results and found consistent agreement.

  5. The liberal state and the rogue agency: FDA’s regulation of drugs for mood disorders, 1950s–1970s☆

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The theory of the liberal state does not generally contemplate the possibility that regulatory agencies will turn into “rogues,” regulating against the interests of their clients and, indeed, the public interest. In the years between circa 1955 and 1975 this seems to have happened to one of the prime regulatory agencies of the US federal government: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Intent upon transforming itself from a traditional “cop” agency to a regulatory giant, the FDA campaigned systematically to bring down some safe and effective drugs. This article concentrates on hearings in the area of psychopharmacology regarding several antianxiety drugs, namely meprobamate (Miltown), chlordiazepoxide (Librium) and diazepam (Valium). In addition, from 1967 to 1973 this regulatory vengefulness occurred on a broad scale in the Drug Efficacy Study Implementation (DESI), an administrative exercise that removed from the market almost half of the psychopharmacopoeia. The article explores possible bureaucratic motives for these actions. PMID:18343498

  6. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  7. The Capillary Fluidics of Espresso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Nathan; Wollman, Drew; Graf, John; Weislogel, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Espresso is enjoyed by tens of millions of people daily. The coffee is distinguished by a complex low density colloid of emulsified oils. Due to gravity, these oils rise to the surface forming a foam lid called the crema. In this work we present a variety of large length scale capillary fluidic effects for espresso in a gravity-free environment. Drop tower tests are performed to establish brief microgravity conditions under which spontaneous capillarity-driven behavior is observed. Because the variety of espresso drinks is extensive, specific property measurements are made to assess the effects of wetting and surface tension for `Italian' espresso, caffe latte, and caffe Americano. To some, the texture and aromatics of the crema play a critical role in the overall espresso experience. We show how in the low-g environment this may not be possible. We also suggest alternate methods for enjoying espresso aboard spacecraft. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  8. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the propagation of weakly nonlinear waves in optical fibers and on the water surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chabchoub, A.; Kibler, B.; Finot, C.; Millot, G.; Onorato, M.; Dudley, J.M.; Babanin, A.V.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of waves in weakly nonlinear dispersive media can be described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). An important feature of the equation is that it can be derived in a number of different physical contexts; therefore, analogies between different fields, such as for example fiber optics, water waves, plasma waves and Bose–Einstein condensates, can be established. Here, we investigate the similarities between wave propagation in optical Kerr media and water waves. In particular, we discuss the modulation instability (MI) in both media. In analogy to the water wave problem, we derive for Kerr-media the Benjamin–Feir index, i.e. a nondimensional parameter related to the probability of formation of rogue waves in incoherent wave trains.

  9. Geometry of the capillary net in human hearts.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Spatenka, J; Samánek, M

    1997-01-01

    The geometry of the coronary capillary bed in human hearts was studied using samples obtained during cardiac surgery of children operated for tetralogy of Fallot and samples from fresh normal hearts used for valve harvesting. The results revealed a similar coronary capillary density and heterogeneity of capillary spacing in samples from both groups. A double-staining method was used to distinguish between capillary segments close to the feeding arteriole (proximal capillaries) and segments distant from the arteriole (distal capillaries). In both groups of hearts, capillary segment length was consistently shorter on the venular than the arteriolar portion of the capillary. Similarly, capillary domain areas were also smaller and the resulting capillary supply unit was smaller along venular portions compared to arteriolar regions of the capillary bed. This distinctive geometry would provide advantageous geometric conditions for tissue oxygen supply. PMID:9176723

  10. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  11. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides.

    PubMed

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  12. Identifying unstable taxa: Efficient implementation of triplet-based measures of stability, and comparison with Phyutility and RogueNaRok.

    PubMed

    Goloboff, Pablo A; Szumik, Claudia A

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes an efficient implementation of triplet-based measures of stability, in the program TNT. The only available implementations of such measures are much slower than the present one, either because of an inefficient implementation (Phyutility, Thor) or because the stability is evaluated with quartets (RogueNaRok, requiring O(t(4)), instead of the O(t(3)) possible for triplets). The method to quickly calculate triplets is applied to solving IterPCR (Pol and Escapa, 2009). It is shown that, in some cases, IterPCR or other algorithms in the program TNT (e.g. commands prunnelsen, prunmajor, or chkmoves) produce more informative results than analysis with RogueNaRok. PMID:25865266

  13. "Rogue" lymphocytes among Ukrainians not exposed to radioactive fall-out from the Chernobyl accident: the possible role of this phenomenon in oncogenesis, teratogenesis, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Neel, J V; Awa, A A; Kodama, Y; Nakano, M; Mabuchi, K

    1992-08-01

    Cultured lymphocytes exhibiting extreme cytogenetic damage (rogue cells) were observed in preparations from 8 of 24 individuals sampled in Krasilovka, a Ukrainian village receiving little or no increased radiation after the Chernobyl disaster, but were not observed in an additional 24 persons from two Russian towns in the more contaminated area. This observation cements the worldwide occurrence of these cells. The present data plus a review of the literature establish that rogue cells appear in brief bursts simultaneously in certain individuals of discrete populations. We suggest that the pattern is consistent with the action of a viral trigger that acts directly or indirectly--the latter possibly through the activation of latent chromosomal retroposons. If this phenomenon occurs in other tissues, it may have important implications for oncogenesis, teratogenesis, mutagenesis, and evolution. PMID:1495988

  14. Experimental demonstration of wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing for TDM/WDM optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jie Hyun; Park, Heuk; Kang, Sae-Kyoung; Lee, Joon Ki; Chung, Hwan Seok

    2015-11-30

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing of downstream and upstream signals for time/wavelength division-multiplexed optical access networks. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter is aligned to the upstream wavelength channel by aligning it to one of the downstream wavelength channels. Wavelength-pairing is implemented with a compact and cyclic Si-AWG integrated with a Ge-PD. The pairing filter covered four 100 GHz-spaced wavelength channels. The feasibility of the wavelength domain rogue-free operation is investigated by emulating malfunction of the misaligned laser. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter based on the Si-AWG blocks the upstream signal in the non-assigned wavelength channel before data collision with other ONUs. PMID:26698745

  15. Prospect of Nonlinear Freak Tsunami Waves from Stochastic Earthquake Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The prospect of freak (or rogue) tsunami edge waves from continental subduction zone earthquakes is examined. Although the hydrodynamics that govern tsunamis are formulated from the shallow-water wave equations, the dispersion relation for edge waves is similar to that for deep-water waves. As a result, freak waves can result from many of the same mechanisms as for deep-water waves: spatial focusing, dispersive (temporal) focusing, modulation instability, and mode coupling from resonant interaction. The focus of this study is on determining the likelihood of freak edge waves from the two nonlinear mechanisms: modulation instability and mode coupling. The initial conditions are provided by coseismic vertical displacement from a subduction thrust earthquake. A two-dimensional stochastic slip model is used to generate a range of coseismic displacement realizations. The slip model is defined by a power-law wavenumber spectrum and Lévy-law distributed random variables. Tsunami edge waves produced by this source model have a broader spectrum with energy distributed across many more modes compared to edge waves derived from the simplified earthquake sources used in the past. To characterize modulation instability, methods developed for a random sea are modified for seismogenic edge waves. The Benjamin-Feir parameter constrains how many unstable wave packets are possible in a time series of finite length. In addition, because seismogenic tsunami edge wave energy is distributed across a number of modes, nonlinear mode coupling can result both in the collinear case and in the counter-propagating case where edge waves are reflected by coastline irregularities. Mode coupling results in the appearance of a third edge wave mode that can greatly increase the variability in wave heights. Determination of possible freak tsunami edge waves is important for assessing the tsunami hazard at longshore locations distant from the rupture zone of continental subduction zone earthquakes.

  16. Evaporation dynamics of femtoliter water capillary bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Kim, Jung Gu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in confined space between two solid surfaces and particularly they have lower internal pressure than 1 atm at femtoliter scales. Femtoliter capillary bridges exhibit rapid evaporation rates. To quantify detailed evaporation kinetics of femtoliter bridges, we present a feasible protocol to directly visualize femtoliter water bridges that evaporate in still air between a microsphere and a flat substrate by utilizing transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation kinetics for water bridges indicate that lower water pressure than 1 atm can significantly decelerate evaporation by suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding would provide a consensus to understand evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges.

  17. Arrested segregative phase separation in capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R Hans; Lindhoud, Saskia

    2006-09-01

    Phase separation in a capillary tube with one of the phases fully wetting the capillary wall is arrested when the typical size of the phase domains reaches the value of the diameter of the tube. The arrested state consists of an alternating sequence of concave-capped and convex-capped cylindrical domains, called "plugs," "bridges," or "lenses," of wetting and nonwetting phase, respectively. A description of this arrested plug state for an aqueous mixture of two polymer solutions is the subject of this work. A phase separating system consisting of two incompatible polymers dissolved in water was studied. The phase volume ratio was close to unity. The initial state from which plugs evolve is characterized by droplets of wetting phase in a continuous nonwetting phase. Experiments show the formation of plugs by a pathway that differs from the theoretically well-described instabilities in the thickness of a fluid thread inside a confined fluid cylinder. Plugs appear to form after the wetting layer (the confined fluid cylinder) has become unstable after merging of droplet with the wetting layer. The relative density of the phases could be set by the addition of salt, enabling density matching. As a consequence, the capillary length can in principle be made infinitely large and the Bond number (which represents the force of gravity relative to the capillary force) zero, without considerably changing the interfacial tension. Using the possibility of density matching, the relations among capillary length and capillary diameter on the one hand, and the presence of plugs and their average size on the other were studied. It was found that stable plugs are present when the capillary radius does not exceed a certain value, which is probably smaller than the capillary length. However, the average plug size is independent of capillary length. At constant capillary length, average plug size was found to scale with the capillary diameter to a power 1.3, significantly higher than the

  18. Cytokine Analysis by Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Mark; Kalish, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis (ICE) is a powerful tool used to detect and quantify target proteins of interest in complex biological fluids. The target analyte is captured and bound to antibodies immobilized onto the wall of a capillary, labeled in situ with a fluorescent dye, eluted and detected online using laser-induced fluorescence following electrophoretic separation. Here, we illustrate how to construct an immunoaffinity capillary and utilize it to run ICE in order to capture and quantify target cytokines and chemokines from a clinical sample. PMID:22976107

  19. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  20. Capillary waves on an ɛ-dimensional interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Dieter; Gabriunas, Aldona

    1981-05-01

    Calculations on the field-theoretic model of an interface, recently proposed by Wallace and Zia, are extended to three-loop order, in an expansion in ɛ=d-1, where d is the bulk dimension. Extended to d=2, we find a correlation-length exponent ν=1 near the critical point, in satisfying agreement with the two-dimensional Ising model. We also prove a Ward identity for the Gibbs free energy of the interface which allows a dramatic reduction of the calculational labor involved.

  1. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  2. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  3. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  4. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  5. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  6. Suppressed conductometric capillary electrophoresis separation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Bao, L. )

    1993-04-15

    A tubular cation-exchange membrane is installed at the end of a 60-cm-long 75-[mu]m-bore fused-silica capillary. A static dilute acid regenerant solution surrounds the membranes that functions as a suppressor. With positive high voltage applied to the capillary inlet and the regenerant solution grounded, effective suppression of electrolytes such as solutions of alkalic metal borate, glycinate, or cyanide is observed. Electroosmotic flow carries the capillary effluent past the suppressor into a conductivity detection cell constituted by two platinum wires inserted through the wall of a poly(vinyl chloride) capillary. The system provides detection limits in the 10--20 [mu]g/L range for a variety of anions; a typical separation requires 15 min. Applicability to a variety of real samples is demonstrated. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  8. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  9. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  10. Newly developed software for capillary blood pressure analysis in microcirculatory research.

    PubMed

    Hahn, M; Klyscz, T; Shore, A C; Jünger, M

    1996-01-01

    The introduction of the servonulling technique by Wiederhielm in 1963 allowed for the first time continuous and dynamic recording of capillary blood pressure (CP). In 1979 Mahler used this technique for the first measurements in humans. Data analysis was limited to manual analysis of chart recordings. Nowadays fast analog-digital converters with ay high sampling frequency are used for data recordings, and consequently there is a need for an easy-to-use software for data analysis of CP data. The presented newly developed computer software allows analysis of mean CP, taking into account the zero pressure measured before and after capillary cannulation. The simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram R wave is used as a marker for the calculation of the mean capillary pulse pressure waves and of their characteristic data. This may help determine the significance of the capillary pulse waveform for microvascular function. Changes in the pulse waveform may be the only detectable difference between patients and healthy controls. Analysis of simultaneously recorded temperature, the display of markers for valid readings, and the possibility of excluding nonvalid data or artefacts from analysis are additional features. PMID:8856386

  11. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Walter; Wayne, Clarence E.

    2007-06-01

    The theory of the motion of a free surface over a body of water is a fascinating subject, with a long history in both applied and pure mathematical research, and with a continuing relevance to the enterprises of mankind having to do with the sea. Despite the recent advances in the field (some of which we will hear about during this Workshop on Mathematical Hydrodynamics at the Steklov Institute), and the current focus of the mathematical community on the topic, many fundamental mathematical questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model equations and by computer simulations, the detailed dynamics of wave interactions, such as would produce rogue waves in an open ocean, and the theory (partially probabilistic) of approximating wave fields over large regions by averaged `macroscopic' quantities which satisfy essentially kinetic equations of motion. In this note we would like to point out open problems and some of the directions of current research in the field. We believe that the introduction of new analytical techniques and novel points of view will play an important rôle in the future development of the area.

  12. Capillary Movement in Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Duffie, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for a number of space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity would significantly enhance the development and understanding of how a matrix based nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants would function in a microgravity environment. Thus, such information is of interest from the theoretical as well as practical point of view.

  13. DNA Sequencing by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Karger, Barry L.; Guttman, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA sequencing methods have evolved from the labor intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multicapillary electrophoresis systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the “next generation” technologies of cyclic array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes was only possible by the advent of modern sequencing technologies that was a result of step by step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next generation sequencing is moving ahead at break-neck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of capillary electrophoresis in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal. PMID:19517496

  14. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  15. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  16. Unexpected surface chemistry in capillaries for electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, S; Bubert, H; Baur, L; Nelson, G; Wätzig, H

    2000-10-13

    Good and reproducible capillary quality is needed to develop robust methods and to facilitate method transfer in CE. Physical surface defects no longer play a major role in variability of fused-silica capillaries. Nevertheless, problems are frequently being reported when buffers in the pH range between 4 and 7 are used. Thus the surface chemistry has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon-carbon bindings have been found on inner capillary surfaces for electrophoresis. This binding type is not completely removed by pre-conditioning with 1 M NaOH for 30 min. This corresponds to the result, that capillaries provide more stable migration times, especially in the pH range 4-7, when they are pre-conditioned for longer than 1 h. The origin of this Si-C bond is still not quite clear. They could be caused by graphite which is used during the fabrication of the raw cylinders prior to capillary drawing. Further investigations are intended in order to understand if there are any differences in surface carbon content from batch to batch and if this can influence experimental results in CE. A better understanding of the surface chemistry should not only improve robustness in CE, but also help to facilitate and accelerate capillary pre-conditioning and rinsing procedures to remove strongly adsorbed analytes or matrices. PMID:11100849

  17. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  18. Dirt Cheap and Without Prescription: How Susceptible are Young US Consumers to Purchasing Drugs From Rogue Internet Pharmacies?

    PubMed Central

    Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; O´Boyle, Irene; Vibbert, Danielle; Erofeev, Dmitry; Fulton, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background Websites of many rogue sellers of medications are accessible through links in email spam messages or via web search engines. This study examined how well students enrolled in a U.S. higher education institution could identify clearly unsafe pharmacies. Objective The aim is to estimate these health consumers´ vulnerability to fraud by illegitimate Internet pharmacies. Methods Two Internet pharmacy websites, created specifically for this study, displayed multiple untrustworthy features modeled after five actual Internet drug sellers which the authors considered to be potentially dangerous to consumers. The websites had none of the safe pharmacy signs and nearly all of the danger signs specified in the Food and Drug Administration´s (FDA´s) guide to consumers. Participants were told that a neighborhood pharmacy charged US$165 for a one-month supply of Beozine, a bogus drug to ensure no pre-existing knowledge. After checking its price at two Internet pharmacies—$37.99 in pharmacy A and $57.60 in pharmacy B—the respondents were asked to indicate if each seller was a good place to buy the drug. Responses came from 1,914 undergraduate students who completed an online eHealth literacy assessment in 2005-2008. Participation rate was 78%. Results In response to "On a scale from 0-10, how good is this pharmacy as a place for buying Beozine?" many respondents gave favorable ratings. Specifically, 50% of students who reviewed pharmacy A and 37% of students who reviewed pharmacy B chose a rating above the scale midpoint. When explaining a low drug cost, these raters related it to low operation costs, ad revenue, pressure to lower costs due to comparison shopping, and/or high sales volume. Those who said that pharmacy A or B was "a very bad place" for purchasing the drug (25%), as defined by a score of 1 or less, related low drug cost to lack of regulation, low drug quality, and/or customer information sales. About 16% of students thought that people should be

  19. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  20. A capillary holder for scanning detection of capillary isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsuyoshi; Maruo, Yuji; Kitamori, Takehiko; Shimura, Kiyohito

    2009-02-01

    A holder for a 12 cm long capillary was designed for scanning LIF detection of CIEF. The polyimide coat of a fused-silica capillary has been removed, and 1.5 mm diameter flanges have been attached near both ends. The holder is fixed on the stage of a fluorescence microscope via a translational stage, and a capillary guide is directly fixed on the microscope stage. The guide has a groove and a pressure plate for the capillary to slide in. The holder has two pulling plates with slits of 1 mm to accept the capillary just inside the flanges. The slits and the groove of the guide have been aligned. The motion of the translational stage brings the pulling plate into contact with the flange at the pulled side, and slides the capillary through the guide. The other end of the capillary is free and produces no strain on the capillary. When the motion of the stage is reversed, an unstrained contact is achieved at the other end. The baseline noise from scanning was only 50% larger than that without scanning. The fluorescence-signal variation during scanning was about 4% of the total signal, which was about twice that without scanning. PMID:19142915

  1. Gold nanoparticle-coated capillaries for protein and peptide analysis on open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mariana; Yone, Angel; Rezzano, Irene

    2012-01-01

    We report a new method of immobilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a fused-silica capillary through covalent binding. The resulting modified capillary was applied to electrophoretic systems to improve the efficiency of separation and the selectivity of selected solutes. The immobilization of AuNPs on the capillary wall was performed in a very simple and fast way without requiring heating. The surface features of an AuNP-coated capillary column were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. The chromatographic properties of AuNP-coated capillaries were investigated through variation of the buffer pH and separation voltage. Effective separations of synthetic peptides mixture were obtained on the AuNP-coated capillaries. The method shows a remarkable stability since it was reused about 900 times. The capacity factor was duplicated. Therefore, this modification is stable and can be applied to different separation purposes. A complex mixture of tryptic peptide fragments of HSA was analyzed in both the bare- and the AuNP-coated capillaries. Better electrophoretic peptide profile was observed when using the AuNP-coated capillary. PMID:22222978

  2. Use of capillary electrophoresis and indirect detection to quantitate in-capillary enzyme-catalyzed microreactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; el-Maghrabi, M R; Gomez, F A

    2000-04-01

    The use of capillary electrophoresis and indirect detection to quantify reaction products of in-capillary enzyme-catalyzed microreactions is described. Migrating in a capillary under conditions of electrophoresis, plugs of enzyme and substrate are injected and allowed to react. Capillary electrophoresis is subsequently used to measure the extent of reaction. This technique is demonstrated using two model systems: the conversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate by fructose-biphosphate aldolase (ALD, EC 4.1.2.13), and the conversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate by fructose-1,6-bisphospatase (FBPase, EC 3.1.3.11). These procedures expand the use of the capillary as a microreactor and offer a new approach to analyzing enzyme-mediated reactions. PMID:10892022

  3. Acoustophoretic particle motion in a square glass capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnkob, Rune; Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2014-11-01

    Acoustofluidics applications often use complex resonator geometries and complex acoustic actuation, which complicates the prediction of the acoustic resonances and the induced forces from the acoustic radiation and the acoustic streaming. Recently, it was shown that simultaneous actuation of two perpendicular half-wave resonances in a square channel can lead to acoustic streaming that will spiral small particles towards the pressure nodal center (Antfolk, Anal. Chem. 84, 2012). This we investigate in details experimentally by examining a square glass capillary with a 400- μm microchannel acoustically actuated around its 2-MHz half-wave transverse resonance. The acoustic actuation leads to the formation of a half-wave resonance in both the vertical and horizontal direction of the microchannel. Due to viscous and dissipative losses both resonances have finite widths, but are shifted in frequency due to asymmetric actuation and fabrication tolerances making the channel not perfectly square. We determine the resonance widths and shift by measuring the 3D3C trajectories of large particles whose motion is fully dominated by acoustic radiation forces, while the induced acoustic streaming is determined by measuring smaller particles weakly influenced by the acoustic radiation force. DFG KA 1808/16-1.

  4. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  5. Numerical simulation of surface waves instability on a homogeneous grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Dyachenko, Alexander I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.

    2016-05-01

    We performed full-scale numerical simulation of instability of weakly nonlinear waves on the surface of deep fluid. We show that the instability development leads to chaotization and formation of wave turbulence. Instability of both propagating and standing waves was studied. We separately studied pure capillary wave, that was unstable due to three-wave interactions and pure gravity waves, that were unstable due to four-wave interactions. The theoretical description of instabilities in all cases is included in the article. The numerical algorithm used in these and many other previous simulations performed by the authors is described in detail.

  6. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  7. Simulations of Slow Capillary Discharges for BELLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Colella, Phillip; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Mittelberger, Daniel; Bulanov, Stepan; Stoltz, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Capillary plasma channels are used to extend the propagation distance of relativistically intense laser pulses for laser plasma acceleration [1], and axial density modulation has been used to stabilize injection at LBNL. Channel formation is a complex process in which a gas is ionized via a slow discharge, and subsequently stabilized by a capillary wall via heat transfer. Here we describe simulations using a multi-species, 2-temperature plasma model to study the effects of electrical and thermal conduction, species diffusion, and externally-applied magnetic fields on this process for present experiments and to plan m-scale capillaries at reduced densities for the BELLA laser. These radially-symmetric simulations, performed with the 1D cylindrical code SCYLLA from LBNL, resolve the radial behavior of the plasma within the capillary but do not accurately describe dynamics near the ends of the capillary or near gas feed slots or jets. To understand these regions, we present results of simulations using the 3-dimensional hydrodynamics code HYDRA from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We discuss work in progress on a multi-dimensional plasma model that leverages results from these simulations. References: [1] W. Leemans et al., Nat. Phys. 2, 696 (2006)

  8. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  9. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  10. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  11. Capillary effects on floating cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harish N.; Homsy, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we develop a systematic perturbation procedure in the small parameter, B1/2, where B is the Bond number, to study capillary effects on small cylindrical particles at interfaces. Such a framework allows us to address many problems involving particles on flat and curved interfaces. In particular, we address four specific problems: (i) capillary attraction between cylinders on flat interface, in which we recover the classical approximate result of Nicolson ["The interaction between floating particles," Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 45, 288-295 (1949), 10.1017/S0305004100024841], thus putting it on a rational basis; (ii) capillary attraction and aggregation for an infinite array of cylinders arranged on a periodic lattice, where we show that the resulting Gibbs elasticity obtained for an array can be significantly larger than the two cylinder case; (iii) capillary force on a cylinder floating on an arbitrary curved interface, where we show that in the absence of gravity, the cylinder experiences a lateral force which is proportional to the gradient of curvature; and (iv) capillary attraction between two cylinders floating on an arbitrary curved interface. The present perturbation procedure does not require any restrictions on the nature of curvature of the background interface and can be extended to other geometries.

  12. EUV radiation from nitrogen capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav

    2014-08-01

    In the last decade EUV sources attract interest from researchers over the world. One of the main motivations is EUV lithography, which could lead to further miniaturization in electronics. Nitrogen recombination laser at wavelength of 13.4 nm based on capillary discharge Z-pinch configuration could be used in experiments with testing of resolution of photoresist for EUV lithography (close to wavelength of 13.5 nm Si/Mo multilayer mirrors have a high reflectivity at normal incidence angles). In this work, pinching of nitrogen-filled capillary discharge is studied for the development of EUV laser, which is based on recombination pumping scheme. The goal of this study is achieving the required plasma conditions using a capillary discharge Z-pinch apparatus. In experiments with nitrogen, the capillary length was shortened from 232 mm to 90 mm and current quarter-period was changed from 60 ns to 50 ns in contrast with early experiments with Ne-like argon laser. EUV radiation from capillary discharge was registered by X-ray vacuum diode for different pressure, amplitude and duration of pre-pulse and charging voltage of the Marx generator.

  13. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  14. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, K; Kurz, V; Dong, Z; Tanaka, T; Penny, S; Timp, G

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using "live cell lithography"(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision-no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  15. Capillary xray compressor: principle versus practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Barg, Bill; Brown, Frederick C.; Kim, Kyungha H.; Stern, Edward A.

    1995-09-01

    Guiding x rays down the inside of tapered capillaries is a means to increase the flux density of x rays from synchrotron light sources without some of the disadvantages inherent in other techniques. We have demonstrated that a process based on techniques for fabrication of glass fibers may be used to produce tapered capillaries with inlet diameters on the order of 150 micrometers or more, and outlets on the order of 1 micrometer or less. We present a description of the capillary fabrication and results of tests of the performance of several capillaries, along with a comparison with calculations of performance. We also summarize refinements to the fabrication process that will provide additional improvements. The transmission of x rays from linear capillaries with inlet diameters of approximately 150 micrometers and outlet diameters of 1.3 - 1.4 micrometer is on the order of 2%, with corresponding intensity gains of up to 274. Initial results indicate that the capability exists for producing convex profiles necessary for optimal transmission. Calculated and measured transmission efficiencies are in fairly good agreement, leading to the expectation that efficiencies predicted by calculations to be attainable from optimal profiles are a realistic goal, given the ability to manufacture these profiles.

  16. Capillary self-assembly of floating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Thompson, Paul; Bush, John

    2007-11-01

    We study the self-assembly of bodies supported on the water surface by surface tension. Attractive and repulsive capillary forces exist between menisci of, respectively, the same and opposite signs. In nature, floating objects (e.g. mosquito larvae) thus interact through capillary forces to form coherent packings on the water surface. We here present the results of an experimental investigation of such capillary pattern formation. Thin elliptical metal sheets were designed to have variable shape, flexibility and mass distribution. On the water surface, mono-, bi-, or tri-polar menisci could thus be achieved. The influence of the form of the menisci on the packings arising from the interaction of multiple floaters is explored. Biological applications are discussed.

  17. Deformation of vesicles flowing through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkova, V.; Mader, M.; Podgorski, T.

    2004-11-01

    The flow of giant lipid vesicles through cylindrical capillaries is experimentally investigated. Vesicles are deflated with reduced volumes between 0.8 and 1, corresponding to prolate spheroidal equilibrium shapes. Both interior and exterior fluids are sugar solutions with viscosities close to 10-3 Pa s. Vesicles are aspirated into a capillary tube with a diameter close to the vesicle size and a constant flow rate is imposed. Significant deformation of the membrane occurs and increases when the velocity, confinement or deflation of the vesicle are increased. The mobility of vesicles, defined as the ratio of their velocity to the average velocity of the fluid is a decreasing function of confinement. Our experimental system provides a controllable and flexible tool to investigate deformability effects responsible for crucial aspects of blood rheology in capillaries.

  18. Prediction of tilted capillary barrier performance

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.; McCord, J.T.; Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-04-01

    Capillary barriers, consisting of tilted fine-over-coarse layers under unsaturated conditions, have been suggested as landfill covers to divert water infiltration away from sensitive underground regions, especially for arid and semi-arid regions. The Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code is an evaluation tool for landfill covers used by designers and regulators. HELP is a quasi-two-dimensional model that predicts moisture movement into and through the underground soil and waste layers. Processes modeled within HELP include precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, unsaturated vertical drainage, saturated lateral drainage, and leakage through liners. Unfortunately, multidimensional unsaturated flow phenomena that are necessary for evaluating tilted capillary barriers are not included in HELP. Differences between the predictions of the HELP and those from a multidimensional unsaturated flow code are presented to assess the two different approaches. Comparisons are presented for the landfill covers including capillary barrier configurations at the Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD) being conducted at Sandia.

  19. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  20. Electromagnetic waves in optical fibres in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Burdanova, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    A new method is reported of recording the secondary radiation of luminescent substances based on the use of capillary fibres of great length. Theoretical analysis of the dispersion curves of electromagnetic radiation in capillary fibres doped with erbium ions Er3+ has been established. The Lorentz model is used for describing the dispersion properties of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous medium doped with rare-earth ions. The dispersion dependencies of polariton and axion-polariton waves in erbium nitrate hydrate are determined on the basis of the model of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and the resonance electronic states of erbium ions in the absence and presence of a magnetic field.

  1. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  2. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  3. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  4. Capillary origami and superhydrophobic membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldi, N. R.; Ouali, F. F.; Morris, R. H.; McHale, G.; Newton, M. I.

    2013-05-01

    Capillary origami uses surface tension to fold and shape solid films and membranes into three-dimensional structures. It uses the fact that solid surfaces, no matter how hydrophobic, will tend to adhere to and wrap around the surface of a liquid. In this work, we report that a superhydrophobic coating can be created, which can completely suppress wrapping as a contacting water droplet evaporates. We also show that using a wetting azeotropic solution of allyl alcohol, which penetrates the surface features, can enhance liquid adhesion and create more powerful Capillary Origami. These findings create the possibility of selectively shaping membrane substrates.

  5. Analysis of Stevia glycosides by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mauri, P; Catalano, G; Gardana, C; Pietta, P

    1996-02-01

    The determination of diterpene glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana leaves using capillary electrophoresis is described. Analyses were performed on fused silica capillaries with 20 mM sodium tetraborate buffer, pH 8.3, and 30 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate. The effect of the organic solvent injected with the sample solution on the electrophoretic solution has been confirmed, and an absolute amount of 1.6 nL per injected sample was optimal. Rebaudioside A and steviolbioside were isolated by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and their structure was assessed by mass spectrometry. PMID:8900944

  6. Studies related to ocean dynamics. Task 3.2: Aircraft Field Test Program to investigate the ability of remote sensing methods to measure current/wind-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Flood, W. A.; Brown, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of remote sensing of current flows in the ocean and the remote sensing of ocean currents by backscattering cross section techniques was studied. It was established that for capillary waves, small scale currents could be accurately measured through observation of wave kinematics. Drastic modifications of waves by changing currents were noted. The development of new methods for the measurement of capillary waves are discussed. Improvement methods to resolve data processing problems are suggested.

  7. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  8. Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Eric; Aumaître, Sébastien; Falcón, Claudio; Laroche, Claude; Fauve, Stéphan

    2008-02-15

    We report that the power driving gravity and capillary wave turbulence in a statistically stationary regime displays fluctuations much stronger than its mean value. We show that its probability density function (PDF) has a most probable value close to zero and involves two asymmetric roughly exponential tails. We understand the qualitative features of the PDF using a simple Langevin-type model. PMID:18352479

  9. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, Daniel R.; Hart, John E.; Weidman, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    We are beginning laboratory experiments using magnetically active ferrofluids to study surface waves in novel geometries. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics, and the magnetic body force felt by ferrofluid in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is used to create a geopotential field which is a section of or an entire sphere or cylinder. New optical, electromagnetic and ultrasonic diagnostic techniques are under development to initially study capillary-gravity wave propagation and interaction in such geometries.

  10. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  11. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  12. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  13. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  14. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  15. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    PubMed

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26563470

  16. Capillary migration of microdisks on curved interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-07-01

    The capillary energy landscape for particles on curved fluid interfaces is strongly influenced by the particle wetting conditions. Contact line pinning has now been widely reported for colloidal particles, but its implications in capillary interactions have not been addressed. Here, we present experiment and analysis for disks with pinned contact lines on curved fluid interfaces. In experiment, we study microdisk migration on a host interface with zero mean curvature; the microdisks have contact lines pinned at their sharp edges and are sufficiently small that gravitational effects are negligible. The disks migrate away from planar regions toward regions of steep curvature with capillary energies inferred from the dissipation along particle trajectories which are linear in the deviatoric curvature. We derive the curvature capillary energy for an interface with arbitrary curvature, and discuss each contribution to the expression. By adsorbing to a curved interface, a particle eliminates a patch of fluid interface and perturbs the surrounding interface shape. Analysis predicts that perfectly smooth, circular disks do not migrate, and that nanometric deviations from a planar circular, contact line, like those around a weakly roughened planar disk, will drive migration with linear dependence on deviatoric curvature, in agreement with experiment. PMID:25618486

  17. Design criteria for SW-205 capillary system

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This design criteria covers the converting of the SW-250 Capillary System from fumehood manual operation to sealed glovebox automated operation. The design criteria contains general guidelines and includes drawings reflecting a similar installation at another site. Topics include purpose and physical description, architectural-engineering requirements, reference document, electrical, fire protection, occupational safety and health, quality assurance, and security.

  18. DNA ADDUCT RESEARCH WITH CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA's central importance in all biological systems dictates a wide variety of DNA-related research. or much of this research, the utilization of capillary electrophoresis (CE) can be of significant advantage. pen-tube CE yields excellent separations of DNA components, which can b...

  19. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, C.; Nikelly, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  1. Microfluidic Breadboard Approach to Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Koenka, Israel Joel; Sáiz, Jorge; Rempel, Paul; Hauser, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    A breadboard approach for electrophoretic separations with contactless conductivity detection is presented. This is based on miniature off-the-shelf components such as syringe pumps, valves, and pressure controllers which could be set up in a very compact overall arrangement. It has a high flexibility for different tasks at hand, and the common operations of hydrodynamic injection and capillary flushing are automated. For demonstration of the versatility of the proposition, several very diverse configurations and modes of electrophoresis were successfully implemented, namely, standard capillary zone electrophoresis, pressure assisted zone electrophoresis, the simultaneous separation of cations and anions by dual-capillary zone electrophoresis, the separation of cationic amino acids by isotachophoresis, as well as the separation of small carboxylic acids by gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis. The system also allows fast separations, as demonstrated by the analysis of six inorganic cations within 35 s. The approach addresses respective limitations of either conventional capillary electrophoresis instruments as well as electrophoretic lab-on-chip devices, while maintaining a performance in terms of detection limits and reproducibility comparable to standard instrumentation. PMID:26926522

  2. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  3. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  4. Planetary In Situ Capillary Electrophoresis System (PISCES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. A.; Stockton, A. M.; Mora, M. F.; Cable, M. L.; Bramall, N. E.; Jensen, E. C.; Jiao, H.; Lynch, E.; Mathies, R. A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose to develop PISCES, a 3-kg, 2W, flight-capable microfluidic lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis analyzer capable of ingesting solid, liquid, or gas samples and performing a suite of chemical analyses with parts per trillion sensitivity.

  5. A Capillary Viscometer with a Bellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kurano, Yasumitsu

    1991-06-01

    A new capillary viscometer using a bellows as a pressure supplier and a flow meter was developed. After calibration of the viscometer using distilled water, the viscosity of a viscosity standard oil JS 2.5 at 20°C was obtained with the accuracy of a few %.

  6. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Christian; Harwigsson, Ian; Becker, Kristian; Kutter, Jörg P; Birnbaum, Staffan; Nilsson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas, 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence of nanoparticles, i.e. in CE mode, the protein samples adsorbed completely to the capillary walls and could not be recovered. In contrast, nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation resolved green fluorescent protein from several of its impurities within 1 min. Furthermore, a mixture of native green fluorescent protein and two of its single-amino-acid-substituted variants was separated within 2.5 min with efficiencies of 400 000 plates/m. The nanoparticles prevent adsorption by introducing a large interacting surface and by obstructing the attachment of the protein to the capillary wall. A one-step procedure based on self-assembly of lipids was used to prepare the nanoparticles, which benefit from their biocompatibility and suspension stability at high concentrations. An aqueous tricine buffer at pH 7.5 containing lipid-based nanoparticles (2% w/w) was used as electrolyte, enabling separation at protein friendly conditions. The developed capillary-based method facilitates future electrochromatography of proteins on polymer-based microchips under physiological conditions and enables the initial optimization of separation conditions in parallel to the chip development. PMID:20119954

  7. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  8. Early capillary flux homogenization in response to neural activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Boas, David A

    2016-02-01

    This Brief Communication reports early homogenization of capillary network flow during somatosensory activation in the rat cerebral cortex. We used optical coherence tomography and statistical intensity variation analysis for tracing changes in the red blood cell flux over hundreds of capillaries nearly at the same time with 1-s resolution. We observed that while the mean capillary flux exhibited a typical increase during activation, the standard deviation of the capillary flux exhibited an early decrease that happened before the mean flux increase. This network-level data is consistent with the theoretical hypothesis that capillary flow homogenizes during activation to improve oxygen delivery. PMID:26661145

  9. Characteristics of offshore extreme wind-waves detected by surface drifters with a low-cost GPS wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kosei

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, mo-mentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious dis-asters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal re-gions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and di-rection sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by

  10. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2). PMID:26738739

  11. Optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through thick tissue with a thin capillary as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandoux, Olivier; Stasio, Nicolino; Gateau, Jérome; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to guide high-frequency photoacoustic waves through thick tissue with a water-filled silica-capillary (150 μm inner diameter and 30 mm long). An optical-resolution photoacoustic image of a 30 μm diameter absorbing nylon thread was obtained by guiding the acoustic waves in the capillary through a 3 cm thick fat layer. The transmission loss through the capillary was about -20 dB, much lower than the -120 dB acoustic attenuation through the fat layer. The overwhelming acoustic attenuation of high-frequency acoustic waves by biological tissue can therefore be avoided by the use of a small footprint capillary acoustic waveguide for remote detection. We finally demonstrate that the capillary can be used as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide, paving the way for the development of minimally invasive optical-resolution photoacoustic endoscopes free of any acoustic or optical elements at their imaging tip.

  12. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  13. Sterility Testing by Capillary Electrophoresis: A Comparison of On-line Preconcentration Approaches in Capillaries with Greater Internal Diameters

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Jan; Jiang, Chunxia; Sevcik, Juraj; Tesarova, Eva; Armstrong, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of microbial contamination is of critical importance in the medical and the food industry. Rapid tests for the absence or presence of viable microorganisms are in urgent demand. Capillary electrophoresis is a modern analytical technique that can be adapted for rapid screening of microbial contamination. However, the small dimensions of capillaries allow introduction of only a small fraction of the sample, which can be problematic when examining large samples. In this article, we examine the possibilities of introducing larger sample volumes using capillaries with greater internal diameters (i.d.) together with different stacking techniques. The use of 0.32 mm i.d. capillary and the injection of 60 % of the capillary volume led to approximately 120-fold improvement of the injected sample volume over the classical injection 5% of a 0.10 mm i.d. capillary. The setup we described opens new possibilities in sterility testing using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:19847804

  14. a Comprehensive Model for Capillary Pressure Difference across a Drop/bubble Flowing Through a Constricted Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mingchao; Wei, Junhong; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Chengguo; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    The capillary pressure is one of the crucial parameters in many science and engineering applications such as composite materials, interface science, chemical engineering, oil exploration, etc. The drop/bubble formation and its mechanisms that affect the permeability of porous media have steadily attracted much attention in the past. When a drop/bubble moves from a larger capillary to a smaller one, it is often obstructed by an additional pressure difference caused by the capillary force. In this paper, a comprehensive model is derived for the capillary pressure difference when a drop/bubble flows through a constricted capillary, i.e. a geometrically constricted passage with an abrupt change in radius. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the smaller capillary radius, pore-throat ratio, contact angle, surface tension and length of the drop/bubble in the smaller capillary. The model predictions are compared with the available experimental data, and good agreement is found between them.

  15. Capillary flow through heat-pipe wicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are obtained for the capillary-pressure limit and permeability of a fibrous wick in terms of the porosity and fiber diameter. Hysteresis in capillary pressure is included through the introduction of an empirical hysteresis constant. A partial-saturation model based on the statistical distribution of local porosity requires an additional empirical constant, the standard deviation. The theory is compared to results of a beta-ray absorption experiment that measured the liquid content of a partially saturated wick and to results of permeability measurements on partially and fully saturated wicks. A simple wick-weighing experiment is described that yields values for the empirical hysteresis constant and the standard deviation. Theoretical results are used to design an optimum wick.

  16. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  18. Wetting kinetics in surface capillary grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.; Yost, F.G.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1996-10-02

    For V-shaped surface grooves in copper, we have obtained the capillary driven flow kinetics for two liquids: unreactive 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn/Pb solder, which is known to react with copper. We show experimentally that the flow of both liquids in these grooves follows the classical Washburn kinetics, i.e., a Poiseuille flow process, modified to include a dynamic contact angle. Because no subsidiary processes are necessary to fit our data, we propose that in this geometry capillary driven solder flow is too rapid for reaction to provide an appreciable effect. Thus, to observe the effects of Sn/Cu reaction kinetics, the flow rate must be decreased, which the present experiments allow through redesign of the groove geometry and size. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Capillary Hemangioma of the Fallopian Tube.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Richa; Patne, Shashikant C U; Bharti, Shreekant; Jain, Madhu

    2016-04-01

    Neoplastic lesions of the fallopian tube are rarely seen by surgical pathologists. Haemangioma of the fallopian tube is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. A 30-year-old lady with polymenorrhea and dysmenorrhea underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Her left fallopian tube showed a 2mm sized solid nodule in the wall. Histopathological examination revealed a well-defined vascular lesion in the left fallopian tube, consistent with capillary haemangioma. The vascular endothelium was highlighted by CD34 immunostaining. Our literature review has identified 10 cases of cavernous haemangioma of the fallopian tube. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first ever case of capillary haemangioma of the fallopian tube. This is also the smallest detected haemangioma in the fallopian tube. PMID:27190899

  20. Capillary Hemangioma of the Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Richa; Bharti, Shreekant; Jain, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic lesions of the fallopian tube are rarely seen by surgical pathologists. Haemangioma of the fallopian tube is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. A 30-year-old lady with polymenorrhea and dysmenorrhea underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Her left fallopian tube showed a 2mm sized solid nodule in the wall. Histopathological examination revealed a well-defined vascular lesion in the left fallopian tube, consistent with capillary haemangioma. The vascular endothelium was highlighted by CD34 immunostaining. Our literature review has identified 10 cases of cavernous haemangioma of the fallopian tube. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first ever case of capillary haemangioma of the fallopian tube. This is also the smallest detected haemangioma in the fallopian tube. PMID:27190899