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Sample records for capn3 enhance mutation

  1. Mutations of CAPN3 in Korean Patients with Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Kim, Hyang-Suk; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Kyu-Hyun

    2007-01-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a recessively inherited disease caused by a mutation of the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3), and is considered one of the most prevalent subtypes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). In this study, we aimed to identify CAPN3 mutations and to characterize the phenotype of Korean patients with LGMD2A. Among 35 patients with LGMD, four patients, who showed calpain 3 deficiency on western blot analysis, were analyzed in this study. Total RNA extracted from frozen muscle tissue was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using six primer pairs covering all coding sequences of CAPN3, and direct sequencing was performed. Clinical and pathological features of the patients were also reviewed. We found four different mutations in five alleles from three patients. Of the pathogenic mutations identified, two were novel (c.2125T>C and c.2355-2357delTTC), and the others had been reported elsewhere (c.440G>C, c.1076C>T). All patients showed a high CK level with predominant proximal leg weakness, and the onset was in their childhood except for one patient. Among two novel CAPN3 mutations, one was a missense mutation (c.2125T>C [p.709Ser>Pro]), and the other was a small in-frame deletion causing omission of a single amino acid (c.2355-2357delTTC [p.786delPhe]). The clinical features of our patients were generally compatible with the characteristics of LGMD2A patients described in the previous studies. PMID:17596655

  2. Clinical and Pathological Heterogeneity of Korean Patients with CAPN3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Jung Hwan; Shin, Ha Young; Cho, Sung-Rae; Park, Kee Duk; Bang, Duhee; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the characteristics of Korean patients with calpainopathy. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients from ten unrelated families were diagnosed with calpainopathy via direct or targeted sequencing of the CAPN3 gene. Clinical, mutational, and pathological spectra were then analyzed. Results Nine different mutations, including four novel mutations (NM_000070: c.1524+1G>T, c.1789_1790inA, c.2184+1G>T, and c.2384C>T) were identified. The median age at symptom onset was 22 (interquartile range: 15-28). Common clinical findings were joint contracture in nine patients, winged scapula in four, and lordosis in one. However, we also found highly variable clinical features including early onset joint contractures, asymptomatic hyperCKemia, and heterogeneous clinical severity in three members of the same family. Four of nine muscle specimens revealed lobulated fibers, but three showed normal skeletal muscle histology. Conclusion We identified four novel CAPN3 mutations and demonstrated clinical and pathological heterogeneity in Korean patients with calpainopathy. PMID:26632398

  3. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a with mutation in CAPN3: the first report in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Hua; Liang, Wen-Chen; Minami, Narihiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2015-02-01

    The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is caused by mutations in the calpain 3 (CAPN3) gene, and it is characterized by selective atrophy and weakness of proximal limb and girdle muscles. We report a 33-year-old woman with initial presentations of exercise intolerance and running difficulty at age 15 years. At presentation, waddling gait, positive Gowers' sign, and marked muscle atrophy in pelvic and leg muscles were noted. Muscle computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated symmetric involvement of the posterior thigh muscles with relative sparing of vastus lateralis, sartorius, and gracilis. Muscle biopsy revealed a dystrophic change and many lobulated fibers on NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining. Genetic analysis of the CAPN3 gene identified a novel homozygous mutation of c2047_2050 del4, p.Lys683fs mutation, confirming the first LGMD2A patient in Taiwan. PMID:23597518

  4. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  5. An eccentric calpain, CAPN3/p94/calpain-3.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yasuko; Ojima, Koichi; Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Hata, Shoji; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Calpains are Ca(2+)-regulated proteolytic enzymes that are involved in a variety of biological phenomena. Calpains process substrates by limited proteolysis to modulate various protein functions in the cell, and are thus called "modulator proteases." CAPN3, previously called p94 or calpain-3, has unique features that are not found in any of the other 14 human calpains, or even in other proteases. For instance, CAPN3 undergoes extremely rapid and exhaustive autodegradation. CAPN3 is also the first (and so far, the only) intracellular enzyme found to depend on Na(+) for its activation. CAPN3 has both proteolytic and non-proteolytic functions. It has the interesting distinction of being the only protease, other than a few virus proteases, with the ability to regain protease function after its autolytic dissociation; this occurs through a process known as intermolecular complementation (iMOC). Gene mutations causing CAPN3 defects are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A). Unusual characteristics of CAPN3 have fascinated researchers, but have also hampered conventional biochemical analysis. In this review, we describe significant findings about CAPN3 from its discovery to the present, and suggest promising avenues for future CAPN3 research. PMID:26363099

  6. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Gammelgaard, Lise; Bindoff, Laurence A; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Judith; Wahl, Christoph M; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Dahlbom, Kathe; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Duno, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation screening. In this investigation, we report 37 individuals (age range: 21-85 years, 21 females and 16 males) from 10 families in whom only one mutation in CAPN3 could be identified; a 21-bp, in-frame deletion (c.643_663del21). This mutation co-segregated with evidence of muscle disease and autosomal dominant transmission in several generations. Evidence of muscle disease was indicated by muscle pain, muscle weakness and wasting, significant fat replacement of muscles on imaging, myopathic changes on muscle biopsy and loss of calpain 3 protein on western blotting. Thirty-one of 34 patients had elevated creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did not affect mRNA maturation. Calpain 3 expression in muscle, assessed by western blot, was below 15% of normal levels in the nine mutation carriers in whom this could be tested. Haplotype analysis in four families from three different countries suggests that the 21-bp deletion is a founder mutation. This study provides strong evidence that heterozygosity for the c.643_663del21 deletion in CAPN3 results in a dominantly inherited muscle disease. The normal expression of mutated mRNA and the severe loss of calpain 3 on western blotting, suggest a dominant negative effect with a loss-of-function mechanism affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings

  7. Report of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a in 6 Iranian patients, one with a novel deletion in CAPN3 gene.

    PubMed

    Fadaee, Mahsa; Kariminejad, Ariana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Godarzi, Hamed Reza; Beheshtian, Maryam; Vazehan, Raheleh; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Calpain3 is a calcium-dependent intracellular protease involved in an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Many pathogenic mutations have been identified in calpain3, encoded by the CAPN3 gene, which leads to weakness of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. In the present study, whole exome sequencing was performed on six unrelated Iranian families who presented with progressive muscle weakness, with a strong suspicion of Calpainopathies. Genetic analysis of CAPN3 gene revealed five causative variants which had not been reported in the Iranian population before including a novel 6 bp deletion (c.795_800delCATTGA) and four previously reported mutations (c.1939G > T, c.2243G > A, c.2257delGinsAA, and c.2380 + 2T > G). Our findings indicate that exome sequencing can be a very effective and affordable method to diagnose heterogeneous muscular dystrophies, especially in consanguineous populations such as Iran. PMID:27020652

  8. Identification and association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in calpain3 (CAPN3) gene with carcass traits in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zeng-Rong; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yao, Yong-Gang; Jiang, Xiao-Song; Du, Hua-Rui; Zhu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of chicken Calpain3 (CAPN3) gene and to analyze the potential association between CAPN3 gene polymorphisms and carcass traits in chickens. We screened CAPN3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 307 meat-type quality chicken from 5 commercial pure lines (S01, S02, S03, S05, and D99) and 4 native breeds from Guangdong Province (Huiyang Huxu chicken and Qingyuan Ma chicken) and Sichuan Province (Caoke chicken and Shandi Black-bone chicken), China. Results Two SNPs (11818T>A and 12814T>G) were detected by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method and were verified by DNA sequencing. Association analysis showed that the 12814T>G genotypes were significantly associated with body weight (BW), carcass weight (CW), breast muscle weight (BMW), and leg muscle weight (LMW). Haplotypes constructed on the two SNPs (H1, TG; H2, TT; H3, AG; and H4, AT) were associated with BW, CW (P < 0.05), eviscerated percentage (EP), semi-eviscerated percentage (SEP), breast muscle percentage (BMP), and leg muscle percentage (LMP) (P < 0.01). Diplotype H1H2 was dominant for BW, CW, and LMP, and H2H2 was dominant for EP, SEP, and BMP. Conclusion We speculated that the CAPN3 gene was a major gene affecting chicken muscle growth and carcass traits or it was linked with the major gene(s). Diplotypes H1H2 and H2H2 might be advantageous for carcass traits. PMID:19265533

  9. Investigation on CAST, CAPN1 and CAPN3 porcine gene polymorphisms and expression in relation to post-mortem calpain activity in muscle and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, G; Pomponio, L; Ertbjerg, P; Karlsson, A H; Nanni Costa, L; Lametsch, R; Russo, V; Davoli, R

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to detect variability in CAST, CAPN1 and CAPN3 porcine genes and to investigate the effect of CAST and CAPN1 polymorphisms on the activity of native and autolyzed μ-calpain and m-calpain, measured from 1 to 72 h post-mortem in Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of 30 pigs. Effects of polymorphisms on meat quality parameter such as pH, color and drip loss were also evaluated. Samples carrying CAST EU137105:g.76,872AA genotype showed higher autolyzed μ-calpain activity 24 and 72 h post-mortem, as well as lower drip loss values. Expression of CAST, CAPN1 and CAPN3 was assessed in LD muscles divergent for shear force. Higher CAST and CAPN3 expression was found in LD with high shear force (P<0.2), confirming a direct role for calpastatin but not for calpain 3 in meat tenderization. In conclusion, CAST gene affected post-mortem activation time of calpain and drip loss. PMID:21450414

  10. Disruption and molecular characterization of calpains-related (MoCAPN1, MoCAPN3 and MoCAPN4) genes in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irshad Ali; Wang, Yao; Li, Hai-Jiao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Calpains are intracellular, cysteine proteases found in plants, animals and fungi functioning as signal transduction components in different cellular pathways including sporulation and alkaline adaptation in fungi. Calpains-related MoCAPN1 (MGG_14872), MoCAPN3 (MGG_15810) and MoCAPN4 (MGG_04818) genes from Magnaporthe oryzae genome which are 2604, 3513 and 771-bp in length and encoding identical proteins of 867, 1170 and 256 amino acids were functionally characterized for different phenotypes through gene disruption method. All the mutants except those for MoCAPN1 showed normal phenotypes. In pathogenicity test, the mutants did not lead to any visible changes in phenotypes causing similar blast lesions on blast susceptible rice and barley leaves as those of the Guy-11 strain suggesting no major role in pathogenicity. Germ tubes formation, appressorium formation, mycelium radial growth and mating with 2539 strain were indistinguishable among the mutants and Guy-11 strains. Cell wall integrity (congo red) test, stress response under chemical pressure (ZnSO4, CuSO4 and CdCl2), osmotic and oxidative (NaCl and H2O2) stress response, growth response on glucose and nitrogen deficient media resulted in similar results in the mutants and Guy-11 strains. However, mutants for ΔMoCAPN1 gene produced reduced (0.57±0.15B and 0.54±0.05B) conidia compared to that (1.69±0.13A) of the Guy-11 strain showing its involvement in conidiation. PMID:24813949

  11. Characterisation of capn1, capn2-like, capn3 and capn11 genes in Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.): Transcriptional regulation across tissues and in skeletal muscle at distinct nutritional states.

    PubMed

    Macqueen, Daniel J; Meischke, Lara; Manthri, Sujatha; Anwar, Attia; Solberg, Christel; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-03-15

    The typical calpain proteases are a subset of a wider superfamily and regulate a broad spectrum of physiological processes. Here we characterised Atlantic halibut complete-coding orthologues of calpain-1, calpain-2-like, "muscle-specific" calpain-3, plus calpain-11, a recently recognised vertebrate-wide family member. Phylogenetic analysis established the relationship of each sequence within a comprehensive framework of vertebrate calpains, including teleost paralogues. This approach provided significant insight into the evolution of teleost calpains. For example, teleost sequences considered calpain-2 orthologues formed a monophyletic clade external to sister clades for tetrapod calpain-2 and vertebrate calpain-8. Thus, teleost "calpain-2" is likely not directly orthologous to tetrapod calpain-2 and represents a calpain-2-like protein. The characteristic domain structure of typical calpains was observed in each halibut sequence, although calpain-3, as for other teleosts, retained only one (IS2) of three further domains found in human calpain-3 (NS, IS1 and IS2). Transcripts for capn1, capn2-like and capn11 were widely detected across eleven halibut tissues, whereas capn3 was detected in striated muscles, spleen and ovary, but absent or relatively less abundant in other tissues. We assessed the transcript expression of each calpain gene in fast-twitch skeletal muscle where nutritional state was altered with 60days feed restriction, followed by 60days satiation refeeding. Measured by quantitative real-time PCR, capn1 transcript levels were highest during maximal fasting and then steadily decreased with refeeding, where muscle was in net positive protein balance. Conversely capn2-like showed little response, whereas capn3 and capn11 transcript levels were lowest at maximal fasting before being strongly constitutively upregulated with subsequent refeeding. Halibut capn3 transcript abundance was on average 6.5, 23.7 and 5.9 fold greater than capn1, capn2-like and capn

  12. Human Enhancers Are Fragile and Prone to Deactivating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the underlying mechanisms whereby noncoding variants affect transcriptional regulation, we identified nucleotides capable of disrupting binding of transcription factors and deactivating enhancers if mutated (dubbed candidate killer mutations or KMs) in HepG2 enhancers. On average, approximately 11% of enhancer positions are prone to KMs. A comparable number of enhancer positions are capable of creating de novo binding sites via a single-nucleotide mutation (dubbed candidate restoration mutations or RSs). Both KM and RS positions are evolutionarily conserved and tend to form clusters within an enhancer. We observed that KMs have the most deleterious effect on enhancer activity. In contrast, RSs have a smaller effect in increasing enhancer activity. Additionally, the KMs are strongly associated with liver-related Genome Wide Association Study traits compared with other HepG2 enhancer regions. By applying our framework to lymphoblastoid cell lines, we found that KMs underlie differential binding of transcription factors and differential local chromatin accessibility. The gene expression quantitative trait loci associated with the tissue-specific genes are strongly enriched in KM positions. In summary, we conclude that the KMs have the greatest impact on the level of gene expression and are likely to be the causal variants of tissue-specific gene expression and disease predisposition. PMID:25976354

  13. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Resulting From c.C479G and c.G1818A Mutations in the Calpain-3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Edwardo; Pardo, Sherly; Mas Rodríguez, Manuel F; Vélez, John

    2015-12-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive weakness of proximal muscles. Here, we describe a patient with clinical features consistent with LGMD2A who harbors 2 rare changes in the CAPN3 gene sequence of unknown clinical significance. Mechanisms by which these 2 mutations could affect the protein are discussed. The c.C479G mutation seems to affect the proteolytic domain of calpain-3. Whereas the novel mutation c.G1818A seems to affect mRNA translation of the protein region involved in titin binding. We strongly believe that these genomic variants in CAPN3 are indeed deleterious and thus are currently misclassified. Since LGMD2 is considered a disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, further population studies involving the molecular characterization of symptomatic patients must be performed as well as in vitro studies to ascertain the functional effects of these specific variants. PMID:26583491

  14. Differential evolution enhanced with multiobjective sorting-based mutation operators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahai; Liao, Jianjun; Zhou, Ying; Cai, Yiqiao

    2014-12-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple and powerful population-based evolutionary algorithm. The salient feature of DE lies in its mutation mechanism. Generally, the parents in the mutation operator of DE are randomly selected from the population. Hence, all vectors are equally likely to be selected as parents without selective pressure at all. Additionally, the diversity information is always ignored. In order to fully exploit the fitness and diversity information of the population, this paper presents a DE framework with multiobjective sorting-based mutation operator. In the proposed mutation operator, individuals in the current population are firstly sorted according to their fitness and diversity contribution by nondominated sorting. Then parents in the mutation operators are proportionally selected according to their rankings based on fitness and diversity, thus, the promising individuals with better fitness and diversity have more opportunity to be selected as parents. Since fitness and diversity information is simultaneously considered for parent selection, a good balance between exploration and exploitation can be achieved. The proposed operator is applied to original DE algorithms, as well as several advanced DE variants. Experimental results on 48 benchmark functions and 12 real-world application problems show that the proposed operator is an effective approach to enhance the performance of most DE algorithms studied. PMID:24802378

  15. An Enhanced Differential Evolution Algorithm Based on Multiple Mutation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wan-li; Meng, Xue-lei; An, Mei-qing; Li, Yin-zhen; Gao, Ming-xia

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution algorithm is a simple yet efficient metaheuristic for global optimization over continuous spaces. However, there is a shortcoming of premature convergence in standard DE, especially in DE/best/1/bin. In order to take advantage of direction guidance information of the best individual of DE/best/1/bin and avoid getting into local trap, based on multiple mutation strategies, an enhanced differential evolution algorithm, named EDE, is proposed in this paper. In the EDE algorithm, an initialization technique, opposition-based learning initialization for improving the initial solution quality, and a new combined mutation strategy composed of DE/current/1/bin together with DE/pbest/bin/1 for the sake of accelerating standard DE and preventing DE from clustering around the global best individual, as well as a perturbation scheme for further avoiding premature convergence, are integrated. In addition, we also introduce two linear time-varying functions, which are used to decide which solution search equation is chosen at the phases of mutation and perturbation, respectively. Experimental results tested on twenty-five benchmark functions show that EDE is far better than the standard DE. In further comparisons, EDE is compared with other five state-of-the-art approaches and related results show that EDE is still superior to or at least equal to these methods on most of benchmark functions. PMID:26609304

  16. Sensitive detection of KRAS mutations using enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR mutation enrichment and direct sequence identification.

    PubMed

    How Kit, Alexandre; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Daunay, Antoine; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Terris, Benoît; Tost, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    A number of methods allowing the detection of low levels of KRAS mutations have been developed in the last years. However, although these methods have become increasingly sensitive, they can rarely identify the mutated base directly without prior knowledge on the mutated base and are often incompatible with a sequencing-based read-out desirable in clinical practice. Here, we present a modified version of the ice-COLD-PCR assay called Enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR (E-ice-COLD-PCR) for KRAS mutation detection and identification, which allows the enrichment of the six most frequent KRAS mutations. The method is based on a nonextendable chemically modified blocker sequence, complementary to the wild-type (WT) sequence leading to the enrichment of mutated sequences. This assay permits the reliable detection of down to 0.1% mutated sequences in a WT background. A single genotyping assay of the amplification product by pyrosequencing directly following the E-ice-COLD-PCR is performed to identify the mutated base. This developed two-step method is rapid and cost-effective, and requires only a small amount of starting material permitting the sensitive detection and sequence identification of KRAS mutations within 3 hr. This method is applied in the current study to clinical colorectal cancer samples and enables detection of mutations in samples, which appear as WT using standard detection technologies. PMID:24038839

  17. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M.; Norton, Darrell D.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. Here we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222 bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of a MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved amongst birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements whose function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  18. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in Ig genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M; Norton, Darrell D; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-09-15

    Secondary Ig gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. In this study, we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222-bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of an MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved among birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements for which the function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  19. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  20. Mutations in RNA polymerase II enhance or suppress mutations in GAL4.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, L A; Ingles, C J

    1989-01-01

    The activation domains of eukaryotic DNA-binding transcription factors, such as GAL4, may regulate transcription by contacting RNA polymerase II. One potential site on RNA polymerase II for such interactions is the C-terminal tandemly repeated heptapeptide domain in the largest subunit (RPO21). We have changed the number of heptapeptide repeats in this yeast RPO21 C-terminal domain and have expressed these mutant RNA polymerase II polypeptides in yeast cells containing either wild-type or defective GAL4 proteins. Although the number of RPO21 heptapeptide repeats had no effect on the activity of wild-type GAL4, changing the length of the C-terminal domain modified the ability of mutant GAL4 proteins to activate transcription. Shorter or longer RPO21 C-terminal domains enhanced or partially suppressed, respectively, the effects of deletions in the transcriptional-activation domains of GAL4. The same RPO21 mutations also affected transcriptional activation by a GAL4-GCN4 chimera. These data suggest that the activation domains of DNA-binding transcription factors could interact, either directly or indirectly, with the heptapeptide repeats of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:2495535

  1. Enhancing Human Spermine Synthase Activity by Engineered Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing. PMID:23468611

  2. Enhanced Tumor Formation in Mice Heterozygous for Blm Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Risinger, Mary A.; Kordich, Jennifer J.; Sanz, Maureen M.; Straughen, Joel E.; Slovek, Lisa E.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; German, James; Boivin, Gregory P.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-09-01

    Persons with the autosomal recessive disorder Bloom syndrome are predisposed to cancers of many types due to loss-of-function mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a recQ-like helicase. Here we show that mice heterozygous for a targeted null mutation of Blm, the murine homolog of BLM, develop lymphoma earlier than wild-type littermates in response to challenge with murine leukemia virus and develop twice the number of intestinal tumors when crossed with mice carrying a mutation in the Apctumor suppressor. These observations indicate that Blm is a modifier of tumor formation in the mouse and that Blm haploinsufficiency is associated with tumor predisposition, a finding with important implications for cancer risk in humans.

  3. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Michael N; Cebola, Inês; Patch, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H; Lango Allen, Hana; Houghton, Jayne A L; Roth, Christian L; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole-genome sequencing can identify all noncoding variants, yet the discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole-genome sequences from individuals with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This analysis uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400-bp sequence located 25 kb downstream of PTF1A (encoding pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can thus uncover new noncoding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  4. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H.; Allen, Hana Lango; Houghton, Jayne AL.; Roth, Christian L.; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole genome sequencing can identify all non-coding variants, yet discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in hESC-derived embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole genome sequences from patients with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400bp sequence located 25kb downstream of PTF1A (pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can uncover novel non-coding elements underlying human development and disease. PMID:24212882

  5. Identification of factor-binding sites in the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer and in vivo effects of enhancer mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Mason, W S; Burch, J B

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (hepadnaviruses) can cause chronic, productive infections of hepatocytes. Analyses of the enhancers and promoters of these viruses in cell lines have suggested a requirement of these elements for liver-enriched transcription factors. In this study, a minimum of seven factor-binding sites on the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer were detected by DNase I footprinting using duck liver nuclear extracts. Among the sites that were tentatively identified were one C/EBP-, one HNF1-, and two HNF3-binding sites. Mutations of the HNF1- and HNF3-like sites, which eliminated factor binding, as assessed by both DNase I footprinting and competitive gel shift assays, were evaluated for their effects on enhancer activity. Using a construct in which human growth hormone was expressed from the viral enhancer and core gene promoter, we found that all of the mutations, either alone or in combination, reduced expression two- to fourfold in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. The mutations in the HNF1 site and one of the HNF3 sites, when inserted into the intact viral genome, also suppressed virus RNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures. Virus carrying the latter HNF3 mutation was also examined for its ability to infect and replicate in ducks. No significant inhibition of virus replication was observed in a short-term assay; however, virus with the HNF3 mutation was apparently unable to grow in the pancreas, a second site of duck hepatitis B virus replication in the duck. Images PMID:8139013

  6. Enhanced ratio of signals enables digital mutation scanning for rare allele detection.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2015-05-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  7. Structure-based protocol for identifying mutations that enhance protein-protein binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Eletr, Ziad M; Purbeck, Carrie; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2007-08-31

    The ability to manipulate protein binding affinities is important for the development of proteins as biosensors, industrial reagents, and therapeutics. We have developed a structure-based method to rationally predict single mutations at protein-protein interfaces that enhance binding affinities. The protocol is based on the premise that increasing buried hydrophobic surface area and/or reducing buried hydrophilic surface area will generally lead to enhanced affinity if large steric clashes are not introduced and buried polar groups are not left without a hydrogen bond partner. The procedure selects affinity enhancing point mutations at the protein-protein interface using three criteria: (1) the mutation must be from a polar amino acid to a non-polar amino acid or from a non-polar amino acid to a larger non-polar amino acid, (2) the free energy of binding as calculated with the Rosetta protein modeling program should be more favorable than the free energy of binding calculated for the wild-type complex and (3) the mutation should not be predicted to significantly destabilize the monomers. The performance of the computational protocol was experimentally tested on two separate protein complexes; Galpha(i1) from the heterotrimeric G-protein system bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif, and the E2, UbcH7, bound to the E3, E6AP from the ubiquitin pathway. Twelve single-site mutations that were predicted to be stabilizing were synthesized and characterized in the laboratory. Nine of the 12 mutations successfully increased binding affinity with five of these increasing binding by over 1.0 kcal/mol. To further assess our approach we searched the literature for point mutations that pass our criteria and have experimentally determined binding affinities. Of the eight mutations identified, five were accurately predicted to increase binding affinity, further validating the method as a useful tool to increase protein-protein binding affinities. PMID:17603074

  8. Variable Phenotype of Diabetes Mellitus in Siblings with a Homozygous PTF1A Enhancer Mutation.

    PubMed

    Gonc, E Nazlı; Ozon, Alev; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Ellard, Sian; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Kandemir, Nurgun

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diabetes is a rare form of diabetes, characterized by onset in the first 6 months of life. A number of cases are due to pancreas agenesis. Recently, PTF1A enhancer mutations have been shown to cause neonatal diabetes associated with pancreatic agenesis. Herein, we report the clinical features of two siblings with PTF1A enhancer mutations, one of whom had neonatal diabetes, whereas the elder sister had a milder form of the disease with onset of diabetes at 9 years of age. PMID:26184423

  9. Mutational analysis of a prokaryotic recombinational enhancer element with two functions.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, P; Arber, W

    1989-01-01

    The site-specific DNA inversion system Cin encoded by the bacteriophage P1 consists of a recombinase, two inverted crossing-over sites and a recombinational enhancer. The latter approximately 75 bp long genetic element is bifunctional due to its location within the 5' part of the cin gene encoding the recombinase. In order to determine the essential nucleotides for each of its two biological functions we randomly mutated the recombinational enhancer sequence sis(P1) and analysed both functions of the mutants obtained. Three distinct regions of this sequence were found to be important for the enhancer activity. One of them occupies the middle third of the enhancer sequence and it can suffer a number of functionally neutral base substitutions, while others are detrimental. The other two regions occupy the two flanking thirds of the enhancer. They coincide with binding sites of the host-coded protein FIS (Factor for Inversion Stimulation) needed for efficient DNA inversion in vitro. These sequences appear to be highly evolved allowing only a few mutations without affecting either of the biological functions. Taking the effect of mutations within these FIS binding sites into account a consensus sequence for the interaction with FIS was compiled. This FIS consensus implies a palindromic structure for the recombinational enhancer. This is in line with the orientation independence of enhancer action with respect to the crossing-over sites. Images PMID:2656257

  10. A Novel Mechanism of Inherited TBG Deficiency: Mutation in a Liver-Specific Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Pappa, Theodora; Fu, Jiao; Brown, Christopher D.; Peterson, April; Moeller, Lars C.; Wyne, Kathleen; White, Kevin P.; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Trubetskoy, Vassily; Nobrega, Marcelo; Weiss, Roy E.; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: T4-binding globulin (TBG), a protein secreted by the liver, is the main thyroid hormone (TH) transporter in human serum. TBG deficiency is characterized by reduced serum TH levels, but normal free TH and TSH and absent clinical manifestations. The inherited form of TBG deficiency is usually due to a mutation in the TBG gene located on the X-chromosome. Objective: Among the 75 families with X-chromosome-linked TBG deficiency identified in our laboratory, no mutations in the TBG gene were found in four families. The aim of the study was to identify the mechanism of TBG deficiency in these four families using biochemical and genetic studies. Design: Observational cohort, prospective. Setting: University research center. Patients: Four families with inherited TBG deficiency and no mutations in the TBG gene. Intervention: Clinical evaluation, thyroid function tests, and targeted resequencing of 1 Mb of the X-chromosome. Results: Next-generation sequencing identified a novel G to A variant 20 kb downstream of the TBG gene in all four families. In silico analysis predicted that the variant resides within a liver-specific enhancer. In vitro studies confirmed the enhancer activity of a 2.2-kb fragment of genomic DNA containing the novel variant and showed that the mutation reduces the activity of this enhancer. The affected subjects share a haplotype of 8 Mb surrounding the mutation, and the most recent common ancestor among the four families was estimated to be 19.5 generations ago (95% confidence intervals, 10.4–37). Conclusions: To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of an inherited endocrine disorder caused by a mutation in an enhancer region. PMID:25361180

  11. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  12. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  13. TP53 Mutational Analysis Enhances the Prognostic Accuracy of IHC4 and PAM50 Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Chen, I-Chiun; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hu, Fu-Chang; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Wu, Pei-Fang; Chang, Dwan-Ying; Wang, Ming-Yang; Chang, Chin-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wu; Lu, Yen-Shen; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2015-01-01

    IHC4 and PAM50 assays have been shown to provide additional prognostic information for patients with early breast cancer. We evaluated whether incorporating TP53 mutation analysis can further enhance their prognostic accuracy. We examined TP53 mutation and the IHC4 score in tumors of 605 patients diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer at National Taiwan University Hospital (the NTUH cohort). We obtained information regarding TP53 mutation and PAM50 subtypes in 699 tumors from the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) cohort. We found that TP53 mutation was significantly associated with high-risk IHC4 group and with luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like subtypes. Despite the strong associations, TP53 mutation independently predicted shorter relapse-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.63, P = 0.007) in the NTUH cohort and shorter breast cancer-specific survival (HR = 2.35, P = <0.001) in the METABRIC cohort. TP53 mutational analysis added significant prognostic information in addition to the IHC4 score (∆ LR-χ2 = 8.61, P = 0.002) in the NTUH cohort and the PAM50 subtypes (∆ LR-χ2 = 18.9, P = <0.001) in the METABRIC cohort. We conclude that incorporating TP53 mutation analysis can enhance the prognostic accuracy of the IHC4 and PAM50 assays. PMID:26671300

  14. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A resulting from homozygous G2338C transversion mutation in the calpain-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Surgan, Victoria; Grewal, Raji P

    2010-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy represents a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of myopathies. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A, which is transmitted in an autosomal-recessive pattern, is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. A number of mutations have been reported in patients from throughout the world but not in the Asian-Indian population. We describe a genotype/phenotype analysis of an Asian-Indian patient with a history, neurologic examination, and investigations consistent with muscular dystrophy. Genetic analysis of this patient showed a homozygous G2338C transversion resulting in an amino acid change from aspartic acid 780 histidine in the CAPN3 gene confirming Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A. Subsequent testing of the patient's family revealed that his parents and sister were heterozygous unaffected carriers. The G2338C transversion was detected as a compound heterozygous mutation in one patient in Germany. We report a homozygous case and expand the clinical spectrum of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A to include Asian-Indians. PMID:21386772

  15. Mutations in a translation initiation factor identify target of a memory-enhancing compound

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Yusuke; Zyryanova, Alisa; Crespillo-Casado, Ana; Fischer, Peter M.; Harding, Heather P.; Ron, David

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) modulates mRNA translation to regulate the mammalian unfolded protein response (UPR), immunity and memory formation. A chemical ISR inhibitor, ISRIB, enhances cognitive function and modulates the UPR in vivo. To explore mechanisms involved in ISRIB action we screened cultured mammalian cells for somatic mutations that reversed its effect on the ISR. Clustered missense mutations were found at the N-terminal portion of the delta subunit of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) eIF2B. When reintroduced by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing of wildtype cells, these mutations reversed both ISRIB-mediated inhibition of the ISR and its stimulatory effect on eIF2B GEF activity towards its substrate, eIF2, in vitro. Thus ISRIB targets an interaction between eIF2 and eIF2B that lies at the core of the ISR. PMID:25858979

  16. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  17. The H50Q Mutation Enhances α-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion, and Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Ossama; Fauvet, Bruno; Oueslati, Abid; Dikiy, Igor; Mahul-Mellier, Anne-Laure; Ruggeri, Francesco Simone; Mbefo, Martial K.; Vercruysse, Filip; Dietler, Giovanni; Lee, Seung-Jae; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the identification of missense mutations in the α-synuclein (α-Syn) gene SNCA in families with inherited Parkinson disease (PD) has reinforced the central role of α-Syn in PD pathogenesis. Recently, a new missense mutation (H50Q) in α-Syn was described in patients with a familial form of PD and dementia. Here we investigated the effects of this novel mutation on the biophysical properties of α-Syn and the consequences for its cellular function. We found that the H50Q mutation affected neither the structure of free or membrane-bound α-Syn monomer, its interaction with metals, nor its capacity to be phosphorylated in vitro. However, compared with the wild-type (WT) protein, the H50Q mutation accelerated α-Syn fibrillization in vitro. In cell-based models, H50Q mutation did not affect α-Syn subcellular localization or its ability to be phosphorylated by PLK2 and GRK6. Interestingly, H50Q increased α-Syn secretion from SHSY5Y cells into culture medium and induced more mitochondrial fragmentation in hippocampal neurons. Although the transient overexpression of WT or H50Q did not induce toxicity, both species induced significant cell death when added to the culture medium of hippocampal neurons. Strikingly, H50Q exhibited more toxicity, suggesting that the H50Q-related enhancement of α-Syn aggregation and secretion may play a role in the extracellular toxicity of this mutant. Together, our results provide novel insight into the mechanism by which this newly described PD-associated mutation may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD and related disorders. PMID:24936070

  18. DNA-Mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT): A Catalog of Clinically Relevant Cancer Mutations to Enable Genome-Directed Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Paul; Chen, Heidi; Andrews, Jenny; Naser, Riyad; Pao, William; Horn, Leora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumor gene mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of patients with cancer. A comprehensive catalog of tumor gene–response outcomes from individual patients is needed, especially for actionable mutations and rare variants. We created a proof-of-principle database [DNA-mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT)], starting with lung cancer-associated EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, to provide a resource for clinicians to prioritize treatment decisions based on a patient’s tumor mutations at the point of care. Methods A systematic search of literature published between June 2005 and May 2011 was conducted through PubMed to identify patient-level, mutation–drug response in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutant tumors. Minimum inclusion criteria included patient’s EGFR mutation, corresponding treatment, and an associated radiographic outcome. Results A total of 1,021 patients with 1,070 separate EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy responses from 116 different publications were included. About 188 unique EGFR mutations occurring in 207 different combinations were identified: 149 different mutation combinations were associated with disease control and 42 were associated with disease progression. Four secondary mutations, in 16 different combinations, were associated with acquired resistance. Conclusions As tumor sequencing becomes more common in oncology, this comprehensive electronic catalog can enable genome-directed anticancer therapy. DIRECT will eventually encompass all tumor mutations associated with clinical outcomes on targeted therapies. Users can make specific queries at http:// www.mycancergenome.org/about/direct to obtain clinically relevant data associated with various mutations. PMID:23344264

  19. Novel MYH11 and ACTA2 mutations reveal a role for enhanced TGFβ signaling in FTAAD

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Marjolijn; Callewaert, Bert; Baetens, Machteld; Campens, Laurence; MacDermot, Kay; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Bonduelle, Maryse; Dietz, Hal; Gaspar, Isabel Mendes; Cavaco, Diogo; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance; Coucke, Paul; Loeys, Bart; De Paepe, Anne; De Backer, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm / dissection (TAAD) is a common phenotype that may occur as an isolated manifestation or within the constellation of a defined syndrome. In contrast to syndromic TAAD, the elucidation of the genetic basis of isolated TAAD has only recently started. To date, defects have been found in genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins (fibrillin-1, FBN1; collagen type III alpha 1, COL3A1), proteins involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling (TGFβ receptor 1 and 2, TGFBR1/2; and SMAD3) or proteins that build up the contractile apparatus of aortic smooth muscle cells (myosin heavy chain 11, MYH11; smooth muscle actin alpha 2, ACTA2; and MYLK). Methods and results In 110 non-syndromic TAAD patients that previously tested negative for FBN1 or TGFBR1/2 mutations, we identified 7 ACTA2 mutations in a cohort of 43 familial TAAD patients, including 2 premature truncating mutations. Sequencing of MYH11 revealed an in frame splice-site alteration in one out of two probands with TAA(D) associated with PDA but none in the series of 22 probands from the cohort of 110 patients with non-syndromic TAAD. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining of aortic biopsies of a patient and a family member with MYH11 and patients with ACTA2 missense mutations showed upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Conclusions MYH11 mutations are rare and typically identified in patients with TAAD associated with PDA. ACTA2 mutations were identified in 16% of a cohort presenting familial TAAD. Different molecular defects in TAAD may account for a different pathogenic mechanism of enhanced TGFβ signaling. PMID:21937134

  20. Mutations in the pqe-1 Gene Enhance Transgene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchiya, Jun-ichi; Iino, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Although various genetic tools have been developed and used as transgenes, the expression of the transgenes often is hampered by negative regulators. Disrupting such negative regulators of gene expression is potentially a way to overcome the common problem of low expression of transgenes. To find such regulators whose mutations enhance transgene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans, we took advantage of a newly developed reporter transgene, lin-11pAΔ::venus. This transgene induces expression of a fluorescent protein, Venus, in specific neurons including AIZ, where the expression was stochastic. The frequency of reporter expression in AIZ seemed to be correlated with the strength of transgene expression. By using this system, in which a moderate increase of expression was converted to all-or-none expression states, we describe here a forward genetic screen for mutations that enhance the expression of transgenes. Through the screen, we found that mutations in the pqe-1 gene, which encodes a Q/P-rich nuclear protein with an exonuclease domain, increase the chance of reporter expression in AIZ. The fluorescence intensity in RIC, in which all lin-11pAΔ::venus animals show reporter expression, was increased in pqe-1 mutants, suggesting that pqe-1 reduces the expression level of the transgene. Expression of transgenes with other promoters, 3′UTR, or reporter genes was also enhanced by the pqe-1 mutation, suggesting that the effect was not specific to a particular type of transgenes, whereas the effect did not seem to extend to endogenous genes. We propose that pqe-1 mutants can be used to increase the expression of various useful transgenes. PMID:22870397

  1. Disruption of Autoregulatory Feedback by a Mutation in a Remote, Ultraconserved PAX6 Enhancer Causes Aniridia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Bengani, Hemant; Fish, Margaret; Brown, Alison; Divizia, Maria Teresa; de Marco, Riccardo; Damante, Guiseppe; Grainger, Robert; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2013-01-01

    The strictly regulated expression of most pleiotropic developmental control genes is critically dependent on the activity of long-range cis-regulatory elements. This was revealed by the identification of individuals with a genetic condition lacking coding-region mutations in the gene commonly associated with the disease but having a variety of nearby chromosomal abnormalities, collectively described as cis-ruption disease cases. The congenital eye malformation aniridia is caused by haploinsufficiency of the developmental regulator PAX6. We discovered a de novo point mutation in an ultraconserved cis-element located 150 kb downstream from PAX6 in an affected individual with intact coding region and chromosomal locus. The element SIMO acts as a strong enhancer in developing ocular structures. The mutation disrupts an autoregulatory PAX6 binding site, causing loss of enhancer activity, resulting in defective maintenance of PAX6 expression. These findings reveal a distinct regulatory mechanism for genetic disease by disruption of an autoregulatory feedback loop critical for maintenance of gene expression through development. PMID:24290376

  2. Migraine mutations impair hippocampal learning despite enhanced long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Dilekoz, Ergin; Houben, Thijs; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Balkaya, Mustafa; Lenselink, A Mariette; Whalen, Michael J; Spijker, Sabine; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Ayata, Cenk

    2015-02-25

    To explain cognitive and memory difficulties observed in some familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) patients, we examined hippocampal neurotransmission and plasticity in knock-in mice expressing the FHM type 1 (FHM1) R192Q gain-of function mutation in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A subunit of neuronal CaV2.1 channels. We determined stimulus intensity-response curves for anterior commissure-evoked hippocampal CA1 field potentials in strata pyramidale and radiatum and assessed neuroplasticity by inducing long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in anesthetized mice in vivo. We also studied learning and memory using contextual fear-conditioning, Morris water maze, and novel object recognition tests. Hippocampal field potentials were significantly enhanced in R192Q mice compared with wild-type controls. Stimulus intensity-response curves were shifted to the left and displayed larger maxima in the mutants. LTP was augmented by twofold in R192Q mice, whereas LTD was unchanged compared with wild-type mice. R192Q mice showed significant spatial memory deficits in contextual fear-conditioning and Morris water maze tests compared with wild-type controls. Novel object recognition was not impaired in R192Q mice; however, mice carrying the more severe S218L CACNA1A mutation showed marked deficits in this test, suggesting a genotype-phenotype relationship. Thus, whereas FHM1 gain-of-function mutations enhance hippocampal excitatory transmission and LTP, learning and memory are paradoxically impaired, providing a possible explanation for cognitive changes detected in FHM. Data suggest that abnormally enhanced plasticity can be as detrimental to efficient learning as reduced plasticity and highlight how genetically enhanced neuronal excitability may impact cognitive function. PMID:25716839

  3. Mutations in ash1 and trx enhance P-element-dependent silencing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Allen; Locke, John

    2016-08-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mini-w(+) transgene in Pci is normally expressed throughout the adult eye; however, when other P or KP elements are present, a variegated-eye phenotype results, indicating random w(+) silencing during development called P-element-dependent silencing (PDS). Mutant Su(var)205 and Su(var)3-7 alleles act as haplo-suppressors/triplo-enhancers of this variegated phenotype, indicating that these heterochromatic modifiers act dose dependently in PDS. Previously, we recovered a spontaneous mutation of P{lacW}ci(Dplac) called P{lacW}ci(DplacE1) (E1) that variegated in the absence of P elements, presumably due to the insertion of an adjacent gypsy element. From a screen for genetic modifiers of E1 variegation, we describe here the isolation of five mutations in ash1 and three in trx that enhance the E1 variegated phenotype in a dose-dependent and cumulative manner. These mutant alleles enhance PDS at E1, and in E1/P{lacW}ci(Dplac), but suppress position effect variegation (PEV) at In(1)w(m)(4). This opposite action is consistent with a model where ASH1 and TRX mark transcriptionally active chromatin domains. If ASH1 or TRX function is lost or reduced, heterochromatin can spread into these domains creating a sink that diverts heterochromatic proteins from other variegating locations, which then may express a suppressed phenotype. PMID:27373142

  4. Affinity- and specificity-enhancing mutations are frequent in multispecific interactions between TIMP2 and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Oz; Shirian, Jason; Grossman, Moran; Lebendiker, Mario; Sagi, Irit; Shifman, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Multispecific proteins play a major role in controlling various functions such as signaling, regulation of transcription/translation, and immune response. Hence, a thorough understanding of the atomic-level principles governing multispecific interactions is important not only for the advancement of basic science but also for applied research such as drug design. Here, we study evolution of an exemplary multispecific protein, a Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2) that binds with comparable affinities to more than twenty-six members of the Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) and the related ADAMs families. We postulate that due to its multispecific nature, TIMP2 is not optimized to bind to any individual MMP type, but rather embodies a compromise required for interactions with all MMPs. To explore this hypothesis, we perform computational saturation mutagenesis of the TIMP2 binding interface and predict changes in free energy of binding to eight MMP targets. Computational results reveal the non-optimality of the TIMP2 binding interface for all studied proteins, identifying many affinity-enhancing mutations at multiple positions. Several TIMP2 point mutants predicted to enhance binding affinity and/or binding specificity towards MMP14 were selected for experimental verification. Experimental results show high abundance of affinity-enhancing mutations in TIMP2, with some point mutations producing more than ten-fold improvement in affinity to MMP14. Our computational and experimental results collaboratively demonstrate that the TIMP2 sequence lies far from the fitness maximum when interacting with its target enzymes. This non-optimality of the binding interface and high potential for improvement might characterize all proteins evolved for binding to multiple targets. PMID:24710006

  5. Estimation and enhancement of real-time software reliability through mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, Robert; Offutt, A. J.; Harris, Frederick C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation-based technique for obtaining numerical estimates of the reliability of N-version, real-time software is presented. An extended stochastic Petri net is employed to represent the synchronization structure of N versions of the software, where dependencies among versions are modeled through correlated sampling of module execution times. Test results utilizing specifications for NASA's planetary lander control software indicate that mutation-based testing could hold greater potential for enhancing reliability than the desirable but perhaps unachievable goal of independence among N versions.

  6. Design of Novel Aminoglycoside Derivatives with Enhanced Suppression of Diseases-Causing Nonsense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sabbavarapu, Narayana Murthy; Shavit, Michal; Degani, Yarden; Smolkin, Boris; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor

    2016-04-14

    New pseudotrisaccharide derivatives of aminoglycosides that exploit additional interaction on the shallow groove face of the decoding-site rRNA of eukaryotic ribosome were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. Novel lead structures (6 and 7 with an additional 7'-OH), exhibiting enhanced specificity to eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosome, and superior nonsense mutation suppression activity than those of gentamicin, were discovered. The comparative benefit of new leads was demonstrated in four different nonsense DNA-constructs underling the genetic diseases cystic fibrosis, Usher syndrome, and Hurler syndrome. PMID:27096052

  7. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  8. Oncogene regulation. An oncogenic super-enhancer formed through somatic mutation of a noncoding intergenic element.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2014-12-12

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, that recruit much of the cell's transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits its H3K27 acetylase-binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, which suggests a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  9. Synthetic Aminoglycosides Efficiently Suppress Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Nonsense Mutations and Are Enhanced by Ivacaftor

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaojiao; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Tang, Liping; Biswas, Silpak; Jackson, Laura A.; Dai, Yanying; Belakhov, Valery; Shalev, Moran; Chen, Fuquan; Schacht, Jochen; J. Bridges, Robert; Baasov, Timor; Hong, Jeong

    2014-01-01

    New drugs are needed to enhance premature termination codon (PTC) suppression to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other diseases caused by nonsense mutations. We tested new synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives expressly developed for PTC suppression in a series of complementary CF models. Using a dual-luciferase reporter system containing the four most prevalent CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) nonsense mutations (G542X, R553X, R1162X, and W1282X) within their local sequence contexts (the three codons on either side of the PTC), we found that NB124 promoted the most readthrough of G542X, R1162X, and W1282X PTCs. NB124 also restored full-length CFTR expression and chloride transport in Fischer rat thyroid cells stably transduced with a CFTR–G542XcDNA transgene, and was superior to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides tested. NB124 restored CFTR function to roughly 7% of wild-type activity in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) CF cells (G542X/delF508), a highly relevant preclinical model with endogenous CFTR expression. Efficacy was further enhanced by addition of the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor (VX-770), to airway cells expressing CFTR PTCs. NB124 treatment rescued CFTR function in a CF mouse model expressing a human CFTR-G542X transgene; efficacy was superior to gentamicin and exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic properties, suggesting that in vitro results translated to clinical benefit in vivo. NB124 was also less cytotoxic than gentamicin in a tissue-based model for ototoxicity. These results provide evidence that NB124 and other synthetic aminoglycosides provide a 10-fold improvement in therapeutic index over gentamicin and other first-generation aminoglycosides, providing a promising treatment for a wide array of CFTR nonsense mutations. PMID:24251786

  10. Enhanced somatic mutation rates induced in stem cells of mice by low chronic exposure to ethylnitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver-Walker, P M; Urlando, C; Tao, K S; Zhang, X B; Heddle, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have found that the somatic mutation rate at the Dlb-1 locus increases exponentially during low daily exposure to ethylnitrosourea over 4 months. This effect, enhanced mutagenesis, was not observed at a lacI transgene in the same tissue, although the two loci respond very similarly to acute doses. Since both mutations are neutral, the mutant frequency was expected to increase linearly with time in response to a constant mutagenic exposure, as it did for lacI. Enhanced mutagenesis does not result from an overall sensitization of the animals, since mice that had first been treated with a low daily dose for 90 days and then challenged with a large acute dose were not sensitized to the acute dose. Nor was the increased mutant frequency due to selection, since animals that were treated for 90 days and then left untreated for up to 60 days showed little change from the 90-day frequency. The effect is substantial: about 8 times as many Dlb-1 mutants were induced between 90 and 120 days as in the first 30 days. This resulted in a reverse dose rate effect such that 90 mg/kg induced more mutants when delivered at 1 mg/kg per day than at 3 mg/kg per day. We postulate that enhanced mutagenesis arises from increased stem cell proliferation and the preferential repair of transcribed genes. Enhanced mutagenesis may be important for risk evaluation, as the results show that chronic exposures can be more mutagenic than acute ones and raise the possibility of synergism between chemicals at low doses. PMID:8524785

  11. Novel methods to enhance single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) senstivity and efficiency: Application to mutation detection in cystic fibrosis (CF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, D.J.; Snow, K.; Yuan, Z.; Thibodeau, S.N.

    1994-09-01

    For single gene defects in which there are a variety of mutations with significant frequencies, it is a challenge to find an efficient and sensitive method for mutation detection. For example, although 70% to 75% of CF chromosomes in a North American Caucasian population have the mutation {delta}F508, more than 400 mutations (mostly single base pair substitutions) are represented on the remaining chromosomes. SSCP analysis is a relatively straightforward procedure and therefore suitable for routine use in a clinical laboratory. However, previous reports have demonstrated suboptimal sensitivity rates in screening for mutations. We have developed a novel set of conditions which greatly enhances sensitivity and efficiency of SSCP. Our protocol incorporates multiplex PCR, stepping of wattages during electrophoresis and increased salt concentration at the anode relative to the gel. To screen for mutations in the CFTR gene, three multiplex PCR reactions are performed using identical thermocycler parameters. Sizes of PCR products range from 441 bp to 196 bp: size differences of > 30 bp are necessary to ensure separation during electrophoresis. All PCR products are separated by electrophoresis at room temperature on a single gel containing 8% (37.5:1) polyacrylamide, 5% glycerol and 1x TBE. Using an anode buffer with increased salt (2x TBE) sharpens smaller sized bands, and stepping watts from 5W to 20W during electrophoresis enhances sensitivity. Positive controls were used to demonstrate that mutations could be detected. Other mutations or polymorphisms were verified by cycle sequencing of PCR products or by alternative PCR-based assays for the more common mutations. Thus, using 3 PCR reactions per patient and one gel condition, we are able to achieve a CF mutation detection rate of approximately 90% in a North American Caucasian population.

  12. BLVRB redox mutation defines heme degradation in a metabolic pathway of enhanced thrombopoiesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Li, Zongdong; Gnatenko, Dmitri V; Zhang, Beibei; Zhao, Lu; Malone, Lisa E; Markova, Nedialka; Mantle, Timothy J; Nesbitt, Natasha M; Bahou, Wadie F

    2016-08-01

    Human blood cell counts are tightly maintained within narrow physiologic ranges, largely controlled by cytokine-integrated signaling and transcriptional circuits that regulate multilineage hematopoietic specification. Known genetic loci influencing blood cell production account for <10% of platelet and red blood cell variability, and thrombopoietin/cellular myeloproliferative leukemia virus liganding is dispensable for definitive thrombopoiesis, establishing that fundamentally important modifier loci remain unelucidated. In this study, platelet transcriptome sequencing and extended thrombocytosis cohort analyses identified a single loss-of-function mutation (BLVRB(S111L)) causally associated with clonal and nonclonal disorders of enhanced platelet production. BLVRB(S111L) encompassed within the substrate/cofactor [α/β dinucleotide NAD(P)H] binding fold is a functionally defective redox coupler using flavin and biliverdin (BV) IXβ tetrapyrrole(s) and results in exaggerated reactive oxygen species accumulation as a putative metabolic signal leading to differential hematopoietic lineage commitment and enhanced thrombopoiesis. These data define the first physiologically relevant function of BLVRB and implicate its activity and/or heme-regulated BV tetrapyrrole(s) in a unique redox-regulated bioenergetic pathway governing terminal megakaryocytopoiesis; these observations also define a mechanistically restricted drug target retaining potential for enhancing human platelet counts. PMID:27207795

  13. MspA Porin-Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies: Enhanced Binding through a Controlled Cysteine Mutation.

    PubMed

    Dani, Raj Kumar; Kang, Myungshim; Kalita, Mausam; Smith, Paul E; Bossmann, Stefan H; Chikan, Viktor

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the interactions of two gold nanoparticles of different sizes (average diameters of 3.7 +/- 2.6 and 17 +/- 3 nm) with octameric mycobacterial porin A from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MspA) and a mutant of MspA featuring a cysteine mutation in position 126 (Q126C) are investigated. From the observation of enhanced photoluminescence quenching, it is inferred that the presence of eight cysteines in the MspA Q126C mutant significantly enhances the binding of selected small gold nanoparticles within the inner pore of MspA. The large gold nanoparticle/porin complex shows photoluminescence enhancement, which is expected since the larger nanoparticles cannot dock within the homopore of MspA due to size exclusion. In addition to the fluorescence experiments, observation of energy transfer from the small gold nanoparticles to the MspA shows the close proximity of the small gold nanoparticles with the porin. Interestingly, the energy transfer of the large nanoparticle/MspA complex is completely missing. From high-performance liquid chromatography data, the estimated binding constants for small Au@MspA, large Au@MspA, small Au@MspAcys, and large Au@MspAcys are 1.3 x 10 (9), 2.22 x 10 (10), > 10 (12) (irreversible), and 1.7 x 10 (10), respectively. PMID:18318505

  14. Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamformer with Enhanced Nulling Level Control via Dynamic Mutated Artificial Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Salem, S. Balasem; Paw, Johnny Koh Siaw; Sankar, K. Prajindra

    2014-01-01

    In smart antenna applications, the adaptive beamforming technique is used to cancel interfering signals (placing nulls) and produce or steer a strong beam toward the target signal according to the calculated weight vectors. Minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming is capable of determining the weight vectors for beam steering; however, its nulling level on the interference sources remains unsatisfactory. Beamforming can be considered as an optimization problem, such that optimal weight vector should be obtained through computation. Hence, in this paper, a new dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS) is proposed to enhance MVDR beamforming for controlling the null steering of interference and increase the signal to interference noise ratio (SINR) for wanted signals. PMID:25003136

  15. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India. PMID:25595217

  16. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S. R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1–547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  17. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1-547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  18. Pyrosequencing®-Based Identification of Low-Frequency Mutations Enriched Through Enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A number of molecular diagnostic assays have been developed in the last years for mutation detection. Although these methods have become increasingly sensitive, most of them are incompatible with a sequencing-based readout and require prior knowledge of the mutation present in the sample. Consequently, coamplification at low denaturation (COLD)-PCR-based methods have been developed and combine a high analytical sensitivity due to mutation enrichment in the sample with the identification of known or unknown mutations by downstream sequencing experiments. Among these methods, the recently developed Enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR appeared as the most powerful method as it outperformed the other COLD-PCR-based methods in terms of the mutation enrichment and due to the simplicity of the experimental setup of the assay. Indeed, E-ice-COLD-PCR is very versatile as it can be used on all types of PCR platforms and is applicable to different types of samples including fresh frozen, FFPE, and plasma samples. The technique relies on the incorporation of an LNA containing blocker probe in the PCR reaction followed by selective heteroduplex denaturation enabling amplification of the mutant allele while amplification of the wild-type allele is prevented. Combined with Pyrosequencing(®), which is a very quantitative high-resolution sequencing technology, E-ice-COLD-PCR can detect and identify mutations with a limit of detection down to 0.01 %. PMID:26103893

  19. Enhancement of Phenol Biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through Ultraviolet-Induced Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhen; Yu, Chenyang; Xin, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane’s kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h−1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h−1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters. PMID:25837630

  20. Stress responses. Mutations in a translation initiation factor identify the target of a memory-enhancing compound.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yusuke; Zyryanova, Alisa; Crespillo-Casado, Ana; Fischer, Peter M; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David

    2015-05-29

    The integrated stress response (ISR) modulates messenger RNA translation to regulate the mammalian unfolded protein response (UPR), immunity, and memory formation. A chemical ISR inhibitor, ISRIB, enhances cognitive function and modulates the UPR in vivo. To explore mechanisms involved in ISRIB action, we screened cultured mammalian cells for somatic mutations that reversed its effect on the ISR. Clustered missense mutations were found at the amino-terminal portion of the delta subunit of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) eIF2B. When reintroduced by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing of wild-type cells, these mutations reversed both ISRIB-mediated inhibition of the ISR and its stimulatory effect on eIF2B GEF activity toward its substrate, the translation initiation factor eIF2, in vitro. Thus, ISRIB targets an interaction between eIF2 and eIF2B that lies at the core of the ISR. PMID:25858979

  1. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiajia; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of multiresistant bacteria has lead to an urgent need for novel antimicrobials. Based on single-point substitutions, we generated a series of mutants of micasin, a dermatophytic defensin, with enhanced activities against multiple clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species, including 4 antibiotic-resistant strains. We first mapped the functional surface of micasin by alanine-scanning mutational analysis of its highly exposed residues, through which we found that substitution of site 8 (acidic Glu) dramatically enhanced bacterial killing of this peptide. Structural analysis indicates that this single point mutation could result in a functional local amphipathic architecture. Four different types of side chains (hydrophobic, cationic polar, neutral polar, and acidic polar) were introduced at site 8 to clarify the role of this local architecture in micasin function. The results show that all mutants displayed increased antibacterial activity with the exception of the acidic replacement. These mutants with enhanced activity exhibited low hemolysis and cytotoxicity and showed high serum stability, indicating their therapeutic potential. Our work represents the first example of structural fine-tuning to largely improve the antibacterial potency of a dermatophytic defensin.-Wu, J., Gao, B., Zhu, S. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin. PMID:27084888

  2. Investigation of biochemical changes of the ovine calpain 3 exon-10 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Muto, Yukiyo; Morton, Jim; Palmer, David

    2015-12-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3) is a tissue specific calpain, and its mRNA is the most expressed calpain isoform in skeletal muscles. Many mutations and polymorphisms within the human CAPN3 gene have been reported and related to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Several reports link CAPN3 polymorphisms and meat quality. An association between three allele variants in exon-10 of ovine CAPN3 and the yield of fat trimmed meat cuts has been reported. This research investigated the biochemical significance of polymorphic variation in CAPN3. CAPN3 mRNA sequences were obtained from muscle samples collected from lambs which were homozygous for each of the three alleles. Four single base substitutions were found besides those in exon-10, but none of them, including the variations within exon-10, caused a change in amino acid sequence. The expression of CAPN3 mRNA and the amounts of CAPN3 protein were also compared among genotypes, and no significant differences were found. These results suggest that the reported association of specific allele variants within CAPN3 exon-10 to phenotype variations were not direct effects of CAPN3 polymorphisms. Interspecies analyses of the CAPN3 sequences indicated that the sequence reported here is more likely to be the correct common ovine CAPN3 sequence than the reference sequence. PMID:26363096

  3. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other patients). Methods and assay

  4. Mutation of the Dyslexia-Associated Gene Dcdc2 Enhances Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission Between Layer 4 Neurons in Mouse Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Che, Alicia; Truong, Dongnhu T; Fitch, R Holly; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2016-09-01

    Variants in DCDC2 have been associated with reading disability in humans, and targeted mutation of Dcdc2 in mice causes impairments in both learning and sensory processing. In this study, we sought to determine whether Dcdc2 mutation affects functional synaptic circuitry in neocortex. We found mutation in Dcdc2 resulted in elevated spontaneous and evoked glutamate release from neurons in somatosensory cortex. The probability of release was decreased to wild-type level by acute application of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists when postsynaptic NMDARs were blocked by intracellular MK-801, and could not be explained by elevated ambient glutamate, suggesting altered, nonpostsynaptic NMDAR activation in the mutants. In addition, we determined that the increased excitatory transmission was present at layer 4-layer 4 but not thalamocortical connections in Dcdc2 mutants, and larger evoked synaptic release appeared to enhance the NMDAR-mediated effect. These results demonstrate an NMDAR activation-gated, increased functional excitatory connectivity between layer 4 lateral connections in somatosensory neocortex of the mutants, providing support for potential changes in cortical connectivity and activation resulting from mutation of dyslexia candidate gene Dcdc2. PMID:26250775

  5. ESR1 mutations affect anti-proliferative responses to tamoxifen through enhanced cross-talk with IGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Gelsomino, Luca; Gu, Guowei; Rechoum, Yassine; Beyer, Amanda R; Pejerrey, Sasha M; Tsimelzon, Anna; Wang, Tao; Huffman, Kenneth; Ludlow, Andrew; Andò, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the role of ESR1 hormone-binding mutations in breast cancer. Soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, Western blot, ERE reporter transactivation assay, proximity ligation assay (PLA), coimmunoprecipitation assay, silencing assay, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), Kaplan-Meier analysis, and statistical analysis. It is now generally accepted that estrogen receptor (ESR1) mutations occur frequently in metastatic breast cancers; however, we do not yet know how to best treat these patients. We have modeled the three most frequent hormone-binding ESR1 (HBD-ESR1) mutations (Y537N, Y537S, and D538G) using stable lentiviral transduction in human breast cancer cell lines. Effects on growth were examined in response to hormonal and targeted agents, and mutation-specific changes were studied using microarray and Western blot analysis. We determined that the HBD-ESR1 mutations alter anti-proliferative effects to tamoxifen (Tam), due to cell-intrinsic changes in activation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway and levels of PIK3R1/PIK3R3. The selective estrogen receptor degrader, fulvestrant, significantly reduced the anchorage-independent growth of ESR1 mutant-expressing cells, while combination treatments with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus, or an inhibitor blocking IGF1R, and the insulin receptor significantly enhanced anti-proliferative responses. Using digital drop (dd) PCR, we identified mutations at high frequencies ranging from 12 % for Y537N, 5 % for Y537S, and 2 % for D538G in archived primary breast tumors from women treated with adjuvant mono-tamoxifen therapy. The HBD-ESR1 mutations were not associated with recurrence-free or overall survival in response in this patient cohort and suggest that knowledge of other cell-intrinsic factors in combination with ESR1 mutation status will be needed determine anti-proliferative responses to Tam. PMID:27178332

  6. A tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 gain-of-function mutation enhances malignancy of breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Haoshu; Liu, Yakun; Chen, Danlei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Xia; Wei, Daoyan; Qu, Chengkui; Wang, Siying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that Src homologous protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (SHP2) mutations promote cancer development in several solid tumours. In this study, we focused on the in vivo and in vitro effects of an SHP2 mutation on the breast cancer phenotype to determine whether this mutation is correlated with a malignant phenotype. Methods: Mutant PTPN11 cDNA (D61G) was transduced into MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 cells. The effects of the D61G mutation on tumourigenesis and malignant behaviours, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion, were examined. Potential underlying molecular mechanisms, i.e., activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis, were also examined. Results: In vitro experiments revealed that tumour adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly increased in the SHP2 D61G mutant groups. Consistently, in vivo experiments also showed that the tumour sizes and weights were increased significantly in the SHP2 D61G-MB231 group (p < 0.001) in association with tumour metastasis. Mechanistically, the PTPN11 mutation resulted in activation of the Ras-ErK pathway. The binding between Gab1 and mutant SHP2 was significantly increased. Conclusion: Mutant SHP2 significantly promotes tumour migration and invasion at least partially through activation of the Gab1-Ras-Erk axis. This finding could have direct implications for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26673822

  7. Sensitive and Efficient Detection of RB1 Gene Mutations Enhances Care for Families with Retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Suzanne; Vandezande, Kirk; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Katherine; Sutherland, Joanne; Anderson, Julie; Han, Liping; Panton, Rachel; Branco, Patricia; Gallie, Brenda

    2003-01-01

    Timely molecular diagnosis of RB1 mutations enables earlier treatment, lower risk, and better health outcomes for patients with retinoblastoma; empowers families to make informed family-planning decisions; and costs less than conventional surveillance. However, complexity has hindered clinical implementation of molecular diagnosis. The majority of RB1 mutations are unique and distributed throughout the RB1 gene, with no real hot spots. We devised a sensitive and efficient strategy to identify RB1 mutations that combines quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction (QM-PCR), double-exon sequencing, and promoter-targeted methylation-sensitive PCR. Optimization of test order by stochastic dynamic programming and the development of allele-specific PCR for four recurrent point mutations decreased the estimated turnaround time to <3 wk and decreased direct costs by one-third. The multistep method reported here detected 89% (199/224) of mutations in bilaterally affected probands and both mutant alleles in 84% (112/134) of tumors from unilaterally affected probands. For 23 of 27 exons and the promoter region, QM-PCR was a highly accurate measure of deletions and insertions (accuracy 95%). By revealing those family members who did not carry the mutation found in the related proband, molecular analysis enabled 97 at-risk children from 20 representative families to avoid 313 surveillance examinations under anesthetic and 852 clinic visits. The average savings in direct costs from clinical examinations avoided by children in these families substantially exceeded the cost of molecular testing. Moreover, health care savings continue to accrue, as children in succeeding generations avoid unnecessary repeated anaesthetics and examinations. PMID:12541220

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  9. Mutations in a delta9-Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase Gene Are Associated with Enhanced Stearic Acid Levels in Soybean Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Shanklin, J.; Burton, J. W.; Upchurch, R. G.; Whittle, E.; Dewey, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Stearic acid (18:0) is typically a minor component of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil, accounting for only 2 to 4% of the total fatty acid content. Increasing stearic acid levels of soybean oil would lead to enhanced oxidative stability, potentially reducing the need for hydrogenation, a process leading to the formation of undesirable trans fatty acids. Although mutagenesis strategies have been successful in developing soybean germplasm with elevated 18:0 levels in the seed oil, the specific gene mutations responsible for this phenotype were not known. We report a newly identified soybean gene, designated SACPD-C, that encodes a unique isoform of {Delta}{sup 9}-stearoyl-ACP-desaturase, the enzyme responsible for converting stearic acid to oleic acid (18:1). High levels of SACPD-C transcript were only detected in developing seed tissue, suggesting that the encoded desaturase functions to enhance oleic acid biosynthetic capacity as the immature seed is actively engaged in triacylglycerol production and storage. The participation of SACPD-C in storage triacylglycerol synthesis is further supported by the observation of mutations in this gene in two independent sources of elevated 18:0 soybean germplasm, A6 (30% 18:0) and FAM94-41 (9% 18:0). A molecular marker diagnostic for the FAM94-41 SACPD-C gene mutation strictly associates with the elevated 18:0 phenotype in a segregating population, and could thus serve as a useful tool in the development of cultivars with oils possessing enhanced oxidative stability.

  10. N-carbamylglutamate enhancement of ureagenesis leads to discovery of a novel deleterious mutation in a newly defined enhancer of the NAGS gene and to effective therapy.

    PubMed

    Heibel, Sandra K; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2011-10-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of glutamate and acetyl-CoA to NAG, the essential allosteric activator of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, the first urea cycle enzyme in mammals. A 17-year-old female with recurrent hyperammonemia attacks, the cause of which remained undiagnosed for 8 years in spite of multiple molecular and biochemical investigations, showed markedly enhanced ureagenesis (measured by isotope incorporation) in response to N-carbamylglutamate (NCG). This led to sequencing of the regulatory regions of the NAGS gene and identification of a deleterious single-base substitution in the upstream enhancer. The homozygous mutation (c.-3064C>A), affecting a highly conserved nucleotide within the hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism databases and in a screen of 1,086 alleles from a diverse population. Functional assays demonstrated that this mutation decreases transcription and binding of HNF-1 to the NAGS gene, while a consensus HNF-1 binding sequence enhances binding to HNF-1 and increases transcription. Oral daily NCG therapy restored ureagenesis in this patient, normalizing her biochemical markers, and allowing discontinuation of alternate pathway therapy and normalization of her diet with no recurrence of hyperammonemia. Inc. PMID:21681857

  11. Suppression of Parkin enhances nigrostriatal and motor neuron lesion in mice over-expressing human-mutated tau protein.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Rodríguez-Navarro, J A; Solano, R M; Casarejos, M J; Rodal, I; Guerrero, R; Sánchez, M P; Avila, J; Mena, M A; de Yébenes, J G

    2006-07-01

    Abnormal deposition of protein tau takes place in the brain of patients with several neurodegenerative diseases. Few of these patients present frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism and amyotrophy (FTDPA-17), an autosomal dominant tauopathy related to mutations of the gene that codes for protein tau, localized in chromosome 17. The great majority of patients with tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, sporadic frontotemporal dementia or progressive supranuclear palsy do not show a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. We have occasionally seen tauopathies in patients with parkin mutations and, therefore, hypothesized that the protein tau interacts with parkin. We have tested that hypothesis in mice with combined genetic modifications of tau (over-expression of human tau with three mutations known to produce FTDPA-17) and parkin (deleted) proteins. Homozygote parkin null or over-expressing mutated-human tau mice have subtle behavioral and molecular abnormalities but do not express a clinical phenotype of neurodegenerative disease. Mice with combined homozygous mutations of these two genes show progressively abnormal walking already noticeable at 3 months of age, loss of dopamine and dopamine markers in striatum, nuclear tau immunoreactive deposits in motor neurons of the spinal cord, abnormal expression of glial markers and enhanced levels of pro-apoptotic proteins; findings that were absent or less pronounced in homozygote animals with deletions of parkin or over-expression of tau. The double transgenic mice do not express normal mechanisms of adaptation to stress such as increased levels of GSH and Hsp-70. In addition, they have reduced levels of CHIP-Hsc70, a complex known to attenuate aggregation of tau and to enhance ubiquitination of phosphorylated tau. We have found high levels of phosphorylated tau in parkin-/-+tau(VLW) mice and a relative decrease of the inactivated pSer9 to total GSK-3 levels. Our data reveal that there are interactions between tau and

  12. Human Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Mutations Associated with X-Linked Protoporphyria Disrupt the Conformational Equilibrium and Enhance Product Release.

    PubMed

    Fratz, Erica J; Clayton, Jerome; Hunter, Gregory A; Ducamp, Sarah; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2015-09-15

    Regulation of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) is at the origin of balanced heme production in mammals. Mutations in the C-terminal region of human erythroid-specific ALAS (hALAS2) are associated with X-linked protoporphyria (XLPP), a disease characterized by extreme photosensitivity, with elevated blood concentrations of free protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin. To investigate the molecular basis for this disease, recombinant hALAS2 and variants of the enzyme harboring the gain-of-function XLPP mutations were constructed, purified, and analyzed kinetically, spectroscopically, and thermodynamically. Enhanced activities of the XLPP variants resulted from increases in the rate at which the product 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) was released from the enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the XLPP mutations altered the microenvironment of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor, which underwent further and specific alterations upon succinyl-CoA binding. Transient kinetic analyses of the variant-catalyzed reactions and protein fluorescence quenching upon binding of ALA to the XLPP variants demonstrated that the protein conformational transition step associated with product release was predominantly affected. Of relevance is the fact that XLPP could also be modeled in cell culture. We propose that (1) the XLPP mutations destabilize the succinyl-CoA-induced hALAS2 closed conformation and thus accelerate ALA release, (2) the extended C-terminus of wild-type mammalian ALAS2 provides a regulatory role that allows for allosteric modulation of activity, thereby controlling the rate of erythroid heme biosynthesis, and (3) this control is disrupted in XLPP, resulting in porphyrin accumulation. PMID:26300302

  13. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  14. Sequential adaptive mutations enhance efficient vector switching by Chikungunya virus and its epidemic emergence.

    PubMed

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A; Weaver, Scott C

    2011-12-01

    The adaptation of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to a new vector, the Aedes albopictus mosquito, is a major factor contributing to its ongoing re-emergence in a series of large-scale epidemics of arthritic disease in many parts of the world since 2004. Although the initial step of CHIKV adaptation to A. albopictus was determined to involve an A226V amino acid substitution in the E1 envelope glycoprotein that first arose in 2005, little attention has been paid to subsequent CHIKV evolution after this adaptive mutation was convergently selected in several geographic locations. To determine whether selection of second-step adaptive mutations in CHIKV or other arthropod-borne viruses occurs in nature, we tested the effect of an additional envelope glycoprotein amino acid change identified in Kerala, India in 2009. This substitution, E2-L210Q, caused a significant increase in the ability of CHIKV to develop a disseminated infection in A. albopictus, but had no effect on CHIKV fitness in the alternative mosquito vector, A. aegypti, or in vertebrate cell lines. Using infectious viruses or virus-like replicon particles expressing the E2-210Q and E2-210L residues, we determined that E2-L210Q acts primarily at the level of infection of A. albopictus midgut epithelial cells. In addition, we observed that the initial adaptive substitution, E1-A226V, had a significantly stronger effect on CHIKV fitness in A. albopictus than E2-L210Q, thus explaining the observed time differences required for selective sweeps of these mutations in nature. These results indicate that the continuous CHIKV circulation in an A. albopictus-human cycle since 2005 has resulted in the selection of an additional, second-step mutation that may facilitate even more efficient virus circulation and persistence in endemic areas, further increasing the risk of more severe and expanded CHIK epidemics. PMID:22174678

  15. BRCA1 185delAG Mutation Enhances Interleukin-1β Expression in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woolery, Kamisha T.; Mohamed, Mai; Linger, Rebecca J.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Roman, Jesse; Kruk, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Familial history remains the strongest risk factor for developing ovarian cancer (OC) and is associated with germline BRCA1 mutations, such as the 185delAG founder mutation. We sought to determine whether normal human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells expressing the BRCA1 185delAG mutant, BRAT, could promote an inflammatory phenotype by investigating its impact on expression of the proinflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Cultured OSE cells with and without BRAT were analyzed for differential target gene expression by real-time PCR, western blot, ELISA, luciferase reporter, and siRNA assays. We found that BRAT cells expressed increased cellular and secreted levels of active IL-1β. BRAT-expressing OSE cells exhibited 3-fold enhanced IL-1β mRNA expression, transcriptionally regulated, in part, through CREB sites within the (−1800) to (−900) region of its promoter. In addition to transcriptional regulation, BRAT-mediated IL-1β expression appears dualistic through enhanced inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 cleavage and activation of IL-1β. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) of BRAT-mediated IL-1β expression since increased IL-1β expression may represent an early step contributing to OC. PMID:26357657

  16. BRCA1 185delAG Mutation Enhances Interleukin-1β Expression in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Woolery, Kamisha T; Mohamed, Mai; Linger, Rebecca J; Dobrinski, Kimberly P; Roman, Jesse; Kruk, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Familial history remains the strongest risk factor for developing ovarian cancer (OC) and is associated with germline BRCA1 mutations, such as the 185delAG founder mutation. We sought to determine whether normal human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells expressing the BRCA1 185delAG mutant, BRAT, could promote an inflammatory phenotype by investigating its impact on expression of the proinflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Cultured OSE cells with and without BRAT were analyzed for differential target gene expression by real-time PCR, western blot, ELISA, luciferase reporter, and siRNA assays. We found that BRAT cells expressed increased cellular and secreted levels of active IL-1β. BRAT-expressing OSE cells exhibited 3-fold enhanced IL-1β mRNA expression, transcriptionally regulated, in part, through CREB sites within the (-1800) to (-900) region of its promoter. In addition to transcriptional regulation, BRAT-mediated IL-1β expression appears dualistic through enhanced inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 cleavage and activation of IL-1β. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) of BRAT-mediated IL-1β expression since increased IL-1β expression may represent an early step contributing to OC. PMID:26357657

  17. Mutant Rep protein of the porcine circovirus type 2 N-glycosylation:23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianli; Peng, Zhe; Fu, Fang; Xu, Shaojian; Xu, Shengnan; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jiaqiang; Sun, Wenbo; Du, Yijun; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao

    2015-06-12

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Rep protein and the splice variant Rep' protein impact genome replication. The Rep protein contains three potential N-glycosylation at positions 23-25aa (NPS), 256-258aa (NQT) and 286-288aa (NAT). Three double copy infectious clones with Rep protein N-glycosylation at positions mutations 23-25aa (DPS), 256-258aa (DQT) and 286-288aa (DAT) were constructed and their function in virus replication in PK-15 cells was investigated. The results showed that the double copy infectious clone with N-glycosylation site mutation could be rescued in vitro and 23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication. PMID:25829242

  18. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Vera J.; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  19. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  20. Noonan Syndrome/Leukemia-associated Gain-of-function Mutations in SHP-2 Phosphatase (PTPN11) Enhance Cell Migration and Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siying; Yu, Wen-Mei; Zhang, Wanming; McCrae, Keith R.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SHP-2 phosphatase (PTPN11) that cause hyperactivation of its catalytic activity have been identified in Noonan syndrome and various childhood leukemias. Recent studies suggest that the gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of SHP-2 play a causal role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GOF mutations of SHP-2 induce these phenotypes are not fully understood. Here, we show that GOF mutations in SHP-2, such as E76K and D61G, drastically increase spreading and migration of various cell types, including hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. More importantly, in vivo angiogenesis in SHP-2 D61G knock-in mice is also enhanced. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased cell migration is attributed to the enhanced β1 integrin outside-in signaling. In response to β1 integrin cross-linking or fibronectin stimulation, activation of ERK and Akt kinases is greatly increased by SHP-2 GOF mutations. Also, integrin-induced activation of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases is elevated. Interestingly, mutant cells with the SHP-2 GOF mutation (D61G) are more sensitive than wild-type cells to the suppression of cell motility by inhibition of these pathways. Collectively, these studies reaffirm the positive role of SHP-2 phosphatase in cell motility and suggest a new mechanism by which SHP-2 GOF mutations contribute to diseases. PMID:19008228

  1. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E.

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  2. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cahn, J K B; Baumschlager, A; Brinkmann-Chen, S; Arnold, F H

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  3. Enhanced group II intron retrohoming in magnesium-deficient Escherichia coli via selection of mutations in the ribozyme core

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Sidote, David J.; Russell, Rick; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons thought to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of a catalytically active intron RNA (“ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote RNA splicing and intron mobility via reverse splicing of the intron RNA into new DNA sites (“retrohoming”). Although group II introns are active in bacteria, their natural hosts, they function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where lower free Mg2+ concentrations decrease their ribozyme activity and constitute a natural barrier to group II intron proliferation within nuclear genomes. Here, we show that retrohoming of the Ll.LtrB group II intron is strongly inhibited in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the Mg2+ transporter MgtA, and we use this system to select mutations in catalytic core domain V (DV) that partially rescue retrohoming at low Mg2+ concentrations. We thus identified mutations in the distal stem of DV that increase retrohoming efficiency in the MgtA mutant up to 22-fold. Biochemical assays of splicing and reverse splicing indicate that the mutations increase the fraction of intron RNA that folds into an active conformation at low Mg2+ concentrations, and terbium-cleavage assays suggest that this increase is due to enhanced Mg2+ binding to the distal stem of DV. Our findings indicate that DV is involved in a critical Mg2+-dependent RNA folding step in group II introns and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting intron variants that function more efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations, with implications for evolution and potential applications in gene targeting. PMID:24043808

  4. Structural insights into chaperone-activity enhancement by a K354E mutation in tomato acidic leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    DuPrez, Kevin T; Scranton, Melissa A; Walling, Linda L; Fan, Li

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plants express acidic leucine aminopeptidase (LAP-A) in response to various environmental stressors. LAP-A not only functions as a peptidase for diverse peptide substrates, but also displays chaperone activity. A K354E mutation has been shown to abolish the peptidase activity but to enhance the chaperone activity of LAP-A. To better understand this moonlighting function of LAP-A, the crystal structure of the K354E mutant was determined at 2.15 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the K354E mutation destabilizes an active-site loop and causes significant rearrangement of active-site residues, leading to loss of the catalytic metal-ion coordination required for the peptidase activity. Although the mutant was crystallized in the same hexameric form as wild-type LAP-A, gel-filtration chromatography revealed an apparent shift from the hexamer to lower-order oligomers for the K354E mutant, showing a mixture of monomers to trimers in solution. In addition, surface-probing assays indicated that the K354E mutant has more accessible hydrophobic areas than wild-type LAP-A. Consistently, computational thermodynamic estimations of the interfaces between LAP-A monomers suggest that increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces occurs upon hexamer breakdown. These results suggest that the K354E mutation disrupts the active-site loop, which also contributes to the hexameric assembly, and destabilizes the hexamers, resulting in much greater hydrophobic areas accessible for efficient chaperone activity than in the wild-type LAP-A. PMID:27139632

  5. Suppression and Enhancement of the Aspergillus Nidulans Medusa Mutation by Altered Dosage of the Bristle and Stunted Genes

    PubMed Central

    Busby, T. M.; Miller, K. Y.; Miller, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Asexual reproduction in Aspergillus nidulans is characterized by the orderly differentiation of multicellular reproductive structures (conidiophores) and chains of uninucleate conidia (spores). Mutations in the developmental modifier medusa (medA) result in aberrant conidiophores with branching chains of reiterated reproductive cells (metulae), delayed conidial differentiation and frequent reinitiation of secondary conidiophores. We show that incorrect morphology is in part a consequence of modified bristle (brlA) and abacus (abaA) expression, key regulators of the core genetic pathway directing conidial differentiation. First, correct temporal expression of both brlA transcripts (brlAα and brlAβ) requires MedAp. Second, MedAp functions as a coactivator required for normal levels of abaA expression. Finally, we show that wild-type morphology results from a finely tuned balance in the expression of brlA, medA and the developmental modifier stunted (stuA). One extra copy of brlA suppresses medA mutations and restores normal abaA mRNA abundance. In contrast, an extra copy of stuA in a medA(-) strain results in an enhanced medusoid phenotype with extensive metulae proliferation and nearly complete absence of conidia. abaA and brlAα transcription are completely repressed in these strains. In general, low stuA:brlA ratios promoted conidiation while high ratios caused proliferation of unicellular sterigmata and inhibited conidiation. PMID:8722771

  6. Direct functional consequences of ZRS enhancer mutation combine with secondary long range SHH signalling effects to cause preaxial polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edward J.; Neely, David M.; Dunn, Ian C.; Davey, Megan G.

    2014-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) plays a central role in patterning numerous embryonic tissues including, classically, the developing limb bud where it controls digit number and identity. This study utilises the polydactylous Silkie (Slk) chicken breed, which carries a mutation in the long range limb-specific regulatory element of SHH, the ZRS. Using allele specific SHH expression analysis combined with quantitative protein analysis, we measure allele specific changes in SHH mRNA and concentration of SHH protein over time. This confirms that the Slk ZRS enhancer mutation causes increased SHH expression in the posterior leg mesenchyme. Secondary consequences of this increased SHH signalling include increased FGF pathway signalling and growth as predicted by the SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop and the Growth/Morphogen models. Manipulation of Hedgehog, FGF signalling and growth demonstrate that anterior-ectopic expression of SHH and induction of preaxial polydactyly is induced secondary to increased SHH signalling and Hedgehog-dependent growth directed from the posterior limb. We predict that increased long range SHH signalling acts in combination with changes in activation of SHH transcription from the Slk ZRS allele. Through analysis of the temporal dynamics of anterior SHH induction we predict a gene regulatory network which may contribute to activation of anterior SHH expression from the Slk ZRS. PMID:24907417

  7. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Arpino, James A. J.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190Δ} and EGFP{sup A227Δ} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190Δ} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227Δ} revealed that a ‘flipping’ mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  8. Detection of rarely identified multiple mutations in MECP2 gene do not contribute to enhanced severity in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Christopher A; Lane, Jane; Kirwin, Susan M; Schanen, Carolyn; Vinette, Kathy M B; Stubbolo, Danielle; MacLeod, Patrick; Glaze, Daniel G; Motil, Kathleen J; Neul, Jeffrey L; Skinner, Steven A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Percy, Alan K

    2013-07-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize the influence of multiple mutations in the MECP2 gene in a cohort of individuals with Rett syndrome. Further analysis demonstrated that nearly all resulted from de novo in cis mutations, where the disease severity was indistinguishable from single mutations. Our methods involved enrolling participants in the RTT Natural History Study (NHS). After providing informed consent through their parents or principal caretakers, additional molecular assessments were performed in the participants and their parents to assess the presence and location of more than one mutation in each. Clinical severity was assessed at each visit in those participants in the NHS. Non-contiguous MECP2 gene variations were detected in 12 participants and contiguous mutations involving a deletion and insertion in three participants. Thirteen of 15 participants had mutations that were in cis; four (of 13) had three MECP2 mutations; two (of 15) had mutations that were both in cis and in trans (i.e., on different alleles). Clinical severity did not appear different from NHS participants with a single similar mutation. Mutations in cis were identified in most participants; two individuals had mutations both in cis and in trans. The presence of multiple mutations was not associated with greater severity. Nevertheless, multiple mutations will require greater thought in the future, if genetic assignment to drug treatment protocols is considered. PMID:23696494

  9. A single-point mutation enhances dual functionality of a scorpion toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom represents a tremendous, hitherto partially explored peptide library that has been proven to be useful not only for understanding ion channels but also for drug design. MeuTXKα3 is a functionally unknown scorpion toxin-like peptide. Here we describe new transcripts of this gene arising from alternative polyadenylation and its biological function as well as a mutant with a single-point substitution at site 30. Native-like MeuTXKα3 and its mutant were produced in Escherichia coli and their toxic function against Drosophila Shaker K(+) channel and its mammalian counterparts (rKv1.1-rKv1.3) were assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The results show that MeuTXKα3 is a weak toxin with a wide-spectrum of activity on both Drosophila and mammalian K(+) channels. The substitution of a proline at site 30 by an asparagine, an evolutionarily conserved functional residue in the scorpion α-KTx family, led to an increased activity on rKv1.2 and rKv1.3 but a decreased activity on the Shaker channel without changing the potency on rKv1.1, suggesting a key role of this site in species selectivity of scorpion toxins. MeuTXKα3 was also active on a variety of bacteria with lethal concentrations ranging from 4.66 to 52.01μM and the mutant even had stronger activity on some of these bacterial species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a bi-functional short-chain peptide in the lesser Asian scorpion venom. Further extensive mutations of MeuTXKα3 at site 30 could help improve its K(+) channel-blocking and antibacterial functions. PMID:26358403

  10. Impact of Nucleotide Mutations at the HNF3- and HNF4-Binding Sites in Enhancer 1 on Viral Replication in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-young; Kim, Hyung-jin; Park, Channy; So, Hong-seob; Park, Rae Kil

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome contains binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF) 3 and 4 in the core domain of enhancer 1 (Enh1), and mutations in this domain have a strong impact on virus replication. We aimed to identify frequent base-mutation sites in the core domain of Enh1 and to examine the impact of these mutations on viral replication. Methods We studied virological characteristics and genetic sequences in 387 patients with chronic hepatitis B. We evaluated functional differences associated with specific mutations within the core domain of Enh1. Results Mutations in the core domain were found with significant frequency in C1126 (122/387 [31.5%], the binding site for HNF3) and in C1134 (106/387 [27.4%], the binding site for HNF4). A single mutation at nt 1126 (C1126) was identified in 17/123 (13.8%), and 105/123 (85.4%) had double mutations (C1126/1134). The level of HBV DNA (log10 copies/mL) was lower in single mutants (C1126, 5.81±1.25) than in wild (6.80±1.65) and double mutants (C1126/1134, 6.81±1.54). Similarly, the relative luciferase activity of C1126 and C1126/C1134 was 0.18 and 1.12 times that of the wild-type virus, respectively. Conclusions Mutations in the HNF3 binding site inhibit viral replication, whereas mutations at the HNF4 binding site restore viral replication. PMID:24073315

  11. C. elegans ten-1 is synthetic lethal with mutations in cytoskeleton regulators, and enhances many axon guidance defective mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Teneurins are transmembrane proteins that assist morphogenetic processes in many organisms. ten-1 is the C. elegans teneurin homolog with two transcripts, ten-1a and ten-1b, that respectively encode a long (TEN-1L) and short (TEN-1S) form of the protein. We previously isolated a C. elegans mutant where one pharyngeal neuron was frequently misplaced, and now show that it corresponds to a novel allele of ten-1. Results The novel ten-1(et5) allele is a hypomorph since its post-embryonic phenotype is weaker than the null alleles ten-1(ok641) and ten-1(tm651). ten-1 mutants have defects in all pharyngeal neurons that we examined, and in vivo reporters show that only the long form of the ten-1 gene is expressed in the pharynx, specifically in six marginal cells and the M2 neurons. Defects in the pharyngeal M2 neurons were enhanced when the ten-1(ok641) mutation was combined with mutations in the following genes: mig-14, unc-5, unc-51, unc-52 and unc-129. None of the body neurons examined show any defects in the ten-1(ok641) mutant, but genetic interaction studies reveal that ten-1(ok641) is synthetic lethal with sax-3, unc-34 and unc-73, and examination of the hypodermal cells in embryos of the ten-1(ok641) mutant point to a role of ten-1 during hypodermal cell morphogenesis. Conclusions Our results are consistent with ten-1 normally providing a function complementary to the cytoskeletal remodeling processes that occur in migrating cells or cells undergoing morphogenesis. It is possible that ten-1 influences the composition/distribution of extracellular matrix. PMID:20497576

  12. Patient derived mutation W257G of PPP2R1A enhances cancer cell migration through SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Han, Sora; Lee, Sunyi; Su Park, Jeong; Lu, Yiling; Yu, Shuangxing; Li, Jane; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Young

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of PPP2R1A has been observed at high frequency in endometrial serous carcinomas but at low frequency in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. However, the biological role of mutation of PPP2R1A in ovarian and endometrial cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PPP2R1A expression is elevated in high-grade primary tumor patients with papillary serous tumors of the ovary. To determine whether increased levels or mutation of PPP2R1A might contribute to cancer progression, the effects of overexpression or mutation of PPP2R1A on cell proliferation, migration, and PP2A phosphatase activity were investigated using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Among the mutations, PPP2R1A-W257G enhanced cell migration in vitro through activating SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Overexpression of wild type (WT) PPP2R1A increased its binding ability with B56 regulatory subunits, whereas PPP2R1A-mutations lost the ability to bind to most B56 subunits except B56δ. Total PP2A activity and PPP2R1A-associated PP2Ac activity were significantly increased in cells overexpressing PPP2R1A-WT. In addition, overexpression of PPP2R1A-WT increased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27272709

  13. Identification of a novel erythroid-specific enhancer for the ALAS2 gene and its loss-of-function mutation which is associated with congenital sideroblastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kiriko; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid-specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS2) is the rate-limiting enzyme for heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells, and a missense mutation of the ALAS2 gene is associated with congenital sideroblastic anemia. However, the gene responsible for this form of anemia remains unclear in about 40% of patients. Here, we identify a novel erythroid-specific enhancer of 130 base pairs in the first intron of the ALAS2 gene. The newly identified enhancer contains a cis-acting element that is bound by the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA1, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in vivo and by electrophoretic mobility shift assay in vitro. A promoter activity assay in K562 human erythroleukemia cells revealed that the presence of this 130-base pair region increased the promoter activity of the ALAS2 gene by 10–15-fold. Importantly, two mutations, each of which disrupts the GATA-binding site in the enhancer, were identified in unrelated male patients with congenital sideroblastic anemia, and the lower expression level of ALAS2 mRNA in bone marrow erythroblasts was confirmed in one of these patients. Moreover, GATA1 failed to bind to each mutant sequence at the GATA-binding site, and each mutation abolished the enhancer function on ALAS2 promoter activity in K562 cells. Thus, a mutation at the GATA-binding site in this enhancer may cause congenital sideroblastic anemia. These results suggest that the newly identified intronic enhancer is essential for the expression of the ALAS2 gene in erythroid cells. We propose that the 130-base pair enhancer region located in the first intron of the ALAS2 gene should be examined in patients with congenital sideroblastic anemia in whom the gene responsible is unknown. PMID:23935018

  14. Point mutations in the tumor suppressor Smad4/DPC4 enhance its phosphorylation by GSK3 and reversibly inactivate TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Demagny, Hadrien; De Robertis, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Smad4/DPC4 is an essential transcription factor in the TGF-β pathway and is frequently mutated or deleted in prostate, colorectal, and pancreatic carcinomas. We recently discovered that Smad4 activity and stability are regulated by the FGF/EGF and Wnt signaling pathways through a series of MAPK and GSK3 phosphorylation sites located in its linker region. In the present study, we report that loss-of-function associated with 2 point mutations commonly found in colorectal and pancreatic cancers results from enhanced Smad4 phosphorylation by GSK3, generating a phosphodegron that leads to subsequent β-TrCP–mediated polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Using chemical GSK3 inhibitors, we show that Smad4 point mutant proteins can be stabilized and TGF-β signaling restored in cancer cells harboring such mutations. PMID:27308538

  15. Temperature- and flow-enhanced detection specificity of mutated DNA against the wild type with reporter microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kirimli, Ceyhun E; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y

    2013-10-21

    Detection of mutated (MT) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) amongst the wild type (WT) requires the probe DNA (pDNA) that is complementary to the MT to discriminate the WT by one or two nucleotide mismatches. Traditionally this is achieved by raising the temperature to above the melting temperature (Tm) of the WT (TWT) but below that of the MT (TMT). However, a raised temperature is also accompanied by a weakened binding of the MT to the pDNA which can reduce the detection sensitivity. In this study, we investigated flow as a way to enhance MT detection specificity at a lower temperature. Gold-coated glass (GCG) slides immobilized with pDNA complementary to the target MT were placed at the center of the flow cell. The detection was done by flowing MT or WT at various concentrations followed by flowing 10(5) ml(-1) fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) that were 6 μm in size and coated with reporter DNA complementary to the MT or WT but different from the pDNA at various flow rates and temperatures. The detection of MT or WT was characterized by counting the FRMs captured on the GCG. Hepatitis B virus 1762/1764 double mutation (HBV DM) was the model MT and the TMT and TWT were 47 °C and 22 °C, respectively. It was shown that at room temperature, flow initially increased the binding of both the MT and WT at lower flow rates but decreased the binding at flow rates ≥4 ml min(-1) due to the increase in the flow-induced impingement force on the FRMs to overcome the binding of the MT and the WT to the GCG at higher flow rates. At ≥30 °C the decrease in binding of the WT with an increasing flow rate was more than that of the MT because 30 °C was above the TWT but still well below the TMT. As a result, the detection of MT at 30 °C with a flow rate of 4 ml min(-1) was more specific than at 35 °C without flow. These results indicate that flow can diminish WT binding at a lower temperature than without flow and allow MT detection to occur at a lower temperature with

  16. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  17. Silencing of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated by siRNA enhances the in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Luchun; Li, Bo; Wu, Zhijuan; Wu, Yongzhong; Wang, Ying; Jin, Fu; Li, Dairong; Ma, Huiwen; Wang, Donglin

    2016-06-01

    It is reported that high expression of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is linked with radioresistance in glioma. We hypothesized that the radiosensitivity of this brain tumor is enhanced by silencing of the ATM gene. We transfected the glioma cell line U251 with the siRNA-ATMpuro (group A) lentivirus or the siRNA-HKpuro (group N, negative control) lentivirus before irradiation. RT-qPCR and western blotting were performed to verify the efficiency of siRNA‑mediated ATM silencing. Expression levels of the ATM gene and protein were obviously downregulated after transfection. Moreover, the expression of the p53, PCNA and survivin genes, which are related to radiosensitivity, was also decreased. CCK-8 and colony formation assays showed lower cell proliferation and survival in group A than in groups N and C (control group that was not transfected with any siRNA). The level of double-stranded DNA breaks was also greater in group A, as determined by the comet tail assay. Flow cytometry showed a higher rate of cell apoptosis and a higher number of cells in the G2 phase in group A. Furthermore, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity was also higher in group A. In vivo analysis in mouse models created by implantation of the transfected cell lines showed that the amount of necrosis and hemorrhage was higher in group A than that in the control groups. In conclusion, silencing of ATM via the siRNA technique could improve the in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of glioma cells. PMID:27108486

  18. A novel COLD-PCR/FMCA assay enhances the detection of low-abundance IDH1 mutations in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pang, Brendan; Durso, Mary B; Hamilton, Ronald L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2013-03-01

    Point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) have been identified in many gliomas. The detection of IDH1 mutations becomes challenging on suboptimal glioma biopsies when a limited number of tumor cells is available for analysis. Coamplification at lower denaturing-polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a PCR technique that deliberately lowers the denaturing cycle temperature to selectively favor amplification of mutant alleles, allowing for the sensitive detection of low-abundance mutations. We developed a novel COLD-PCR assay on the LightCycler platform (Roche, Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN), using post-PCR fluorescent melting curve analysis (FMCA) for the detection of mutant IDH1 with a detection limit of 1%. Thirty-five WHO grade I to IV gliomas and 9 non-neoplastic brain and spinal cord biopsies were analyzed with this technique and the results were compared with the conventional real-time PCR and the Sanger sequencing analysis. COLD-PCR/FMCA was able to detect the most common IDH1 R132H mutation and rare mutation types including R132H, R132C, R132L, R132S, and R132G mutations. Twenty-five glioma cases were positive for IDH1 mutations by COLD-PCR/FMCA, and 23 gliomas were positive by the conventional real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing. A pilocytic astrocytoma (PA I) and a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM IV) showed low-abundance IDH1 mutations detected by COLD-PCR/FMCA. The remaining 10 glioma and 9 non-neoplastic samples were negative by all the 3 methods. In summary, we report a novel COLD-PCR/FMCA method that provides rapid and sensitive detection of IDH1 mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and can be used in the clinical setting to assess the small brain biopsies. PMID:23370430

  19. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  20. The VP1 S154D mutation of type Asia1 foot-and-mouth disease virus enhances viral replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Zixiang; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Liu, Huanan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-04-01

    One of the proteins encoded by the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the VP1 protein, a capsid protein, plays an important role in integrin receptor attachment and humoral immunity-mediated host responses. The integrin receptor recognition motif and an important antigenic epitope exist within the G-H loop, which is comprised of amino acids 134-160 of the VP1 protein. FMDV strain, Asia1/HN/CHA/06, isolated from a pig, was passaged four times in suckling mice and sequenced. Sequencing analyses showed that there was a mutation of the integrin receptor recognition motif Arg-Gly-Asp/Arg-Asp-Asp (RGD/RDD, VP1 143-145) and a VP1 154 serine/Asp (VP1 S154D) mutation in the G-H loop of the VP1 protein. The influence of the RGD/RDD mutation on Asia1 FMDV disease phenotype has been previously studied. In this study, to determine the influence of the VP1 S154D mutation on FMDV Asia1 replication and pathogenicity, two recombinant FMDVs with different residues only at the VP1 154 site were rescued by reverse genetics techniques and their infectious potential in host cells and pathogenicity in pigs were compared. Our data indicates that the VP1 S154D mutation increases the replication level of FMDV Asia1/HN/CHA/06 in BHK-21, IB-RS-2, and PK-15 cells and enhances pathogenicity in pigs. Through the transient transfection-infection assay to compare integrin receptor usage of two recombinant viruses, the result shows that the VP1 S154D mutation markedly increases the ability of type Asia1 FMDV to use the integrin receptors αυβ6 and αυβ8 from pig. This study identifies a key research target for illuminating the role of residues located at G-H loop in FMDV pathogenicity. PMID:26792712

  1. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs. PMID:25999284

  2. Coexistence of 2282del4 FLG gene mutation and IL-18 –137G/C gene polymorphism enhances the risk of atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gleń, Jolanta; Rębała, Krzysztof; Bandurski, Tadeusz; Sikorska, Monika; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis (AD) pathogenesis appears in the context of the correlation between cornified envelope proteins and immunological factors. Aim To estimate the association between FLG R501X and 2282del4 gene mutations, –137 G/C IL-18 and –1112 C/T IL-13 gene polymorphisms and their influence on AD course and the risk in the Polish population. Material and methods One hundred and fifty-two AD patients and 123 healthy volunteers were included into the study. Amplification refractory mutation system – polymerase chain reaction method was used. Results 2282del4 FLG mutation, predominant (p = 0.04) in Polish AD patients, enhanced the risk of AD (OR = 2.35; p = 0.01) and was associated with itch (p = 0.023). GG genotype of IL-18 was prevailing in AD (p < 0.0001), associated with elevated IgE levels (p = 0.00074) and pruritus (p < 0.0001). GG genotype and G-allele in –137 position of IL-18 increased AD risk (OR = 5.4; p = 0.0001, respectively, OR = 5.3; p = 0.000029). –1112 C/T polymorphism of IL-13 was associated with elevated IgE levels (p = 0.00049), pruritus (p = 0.0005), SCORAD score (p = 0.02), concomitant asthma (p = 0.0087) and AD risk (OR = 2.02; p = 0.012). Coexistence of 2282del4 or R501X FLG gene mutation with GG genotype of IL-18 was associated with a 6-fold higher risk of AD (OR = 5.8; p = 0.00013), contrary to combined occurrence of FLG mutations with T-allele in –1112 position of IL-13 gene (OR = 0.12; p = 0.1). Conclusions 2282del4 FLG mutation similarly to GG genotype and G-allele in –137 position of IL-18 gene enhance the risk of AD in the Polish population. Coexistence of FLG mutations with GG genotype of IL-18 may be helpful to estimate chances of AD development. PMID:26985181

  3. Sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster with surface-enhanced raman scattering in detecting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status of malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Ting; Lu, Qiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Zhong, Daixing; Zhang, Zhipei; Ni, Yunfeng; Han, Yong; Cui, Daxiang; Li, Xiaofei; Huang, Lijun

    2015-01-14

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are common in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and are associated with sensitivity to the small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). For 10%-50% of the patients who experienced malignant pleural effusion (MPE), pathological diagnosis might rely exclusively on finding lung cancer cells in the MPE. Current methods based on polymerase chain reaction were utilized to test EGFR mutation status of MPE samples, but the accuracy of the test data was very low, resulting in many patients losing the chance of TKIs treatment. Herein, we synthesized the sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster (AuNC) with an average diameter of 92.4 nm, composed of 15-nm nanopricks. By introducing abundant sharp nanopricks, the enhancement factor of AuNC reached at 1.97 × 10(7). After capped with crystal violet (CV), polyethylene glycol, and EGFR mutation specific antibody, the AuNC-EGFR had excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and EGFR mutation targeted recognition capability in lung cancer cells. Characteristic SERS signal at 1617 cm(-1) of CV was linear correlation with the number of H1650 cells, demonstrating the minimum detection limit as 25 cells in a 1-mL suspension. The gold mass in single H1650 cells exposed to AuNC-E746_750 for 2 h ranged from 208.6 pg to 231.4 pg, which approximately corresponded to 56-62 AuNCs per cell. Furthermore, SERS was preclinically utilized to test EGFR mutation status in MPE samples from 35 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Principal component analysis (PCA) and the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm were constructed for EGFR mutation diagnostic analysis, yielding an overall accuracy of 90.7%. SERS measurement based on sea-urchin-like AuNC was an efficient method for EGFR mutation detection in MPE, and it might show great potential in applications such as predicting gene typing of clinical lung cancer in the near future. PMID:25495142

  4. Enhancing the Predictive Power of Mutations in the C-Terminus of the KCNQ1-Encoded Kv7.1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tseng, Andrew S.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overrepresentation of Kv7.1 mutations among patients with a robust diagnosis of LQTS, a background rate of innocuous Kv7.1 missense variants observed in healthy controls creates ambiguity in the interpretation of LQTS genetic test results. A recent study showed the probability of pathogenicity for rare missense mutations depends in part on the topological location of the variant in Kv7.1’s various structure-function domains. Since the Kv7.1 C-terminus accounts for nearly 50% of the overall protein and nearly 50% of the overall background rate of rare variants falls within the C-terminus, further enhancement in mutation calling may provide guidance in distinguishing pathogenic LQT1-causing mutations from non-disease causing rare variants in Kv7.1’s C-terminus. Therefore, we have used conservation analysis and a large case/control study to generate topology-based estimative predictive values to aid in interpretation; identifying three regions of high conservation within the Kv7.1 C-terminus which have a high probability of LQT1 pathogenicity. PMID:25854863

  5. Enhancement of malate-production and increase in sensitivity to dimethyl succinate by mutation of the VID24 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji

    2016-06-01

    Malate in sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage) is an important component for taste that is produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. To date, many researchers have developed methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeasts; however, genes responsible for the high-acidity phenotype are not known. We determined the mutated gene involved in high malate production in yeast, isolated as a sensitive mutant to dimethyl succinate. In the comparative whole genome analysis between high-malate-producing strain and its parent strain, one of the non-synonymous substitutions was identified in the VID24 gene. The mutation of VID24 resulted in enhancement of malate-productivity and sensitivity to dimethyl succinate. The mutation appeared to lead to a deficiency in Vid24p function. Furthermore, disruption of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh2p) gene in the VID24 mutant inhibited the high-malate-producing phenotype. Vid24p is known as a component of the multisubunit ubiquitin ligase and participates in the degradation of gluconeogenic enzymes such as Mdh2p. We suggest that the enhancement of malate-productivity results from an accumulation of Mdh2p due to the loss of Vid24p function. These findings propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of organic acid production in yeast cells by the component of ubiquitin ligase, Vid24p. PMID:26983942

  6. Immunotherapy with mutated onchocystatin fails to enhance the efficacy of a sub-lethal oxytetracycline regimen against Onchocerca ochengi.

    PubMed

    Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-15

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, has been successfully controlled by a single drug, ivermectin, for over 25 years. Ivermectin prevents the disease symptoms of severe itching and visual impairment by killing the microfilarial stage, but does not eliminate the adult parasites, necessitating repeated annual treatments. Mass drug administration with ivermectin does not always break transmission in forest zones and is contraindicated in individuals heavily co-infected with Loa loa, while reports of reduced drug efficacy in Ghana and Cameroon may signal the development of resistance. An alternative treatment for onchocerciasis involves targeting the essential Wolbachia symbiont with tetracycline or its derivatives, which are adulticidal. However, implementation of antibiotic therapy has not occurred on a wide scale due to the prolonged treatment regimen required (several weeks). In the bovine Onchocerca ochengi system, it has been shown previously that prolonged oxytetracycline therapy increases eosinophil counts in intradermal nodules, which kill the adult worms by degranulating on their surface. Here, in an "immunochemotherapeutic" approach, we sought to enhance the efficacy of a short, sub-lethal antibiotic regimen against O. ochengi by prior immunotherapy targeting onchocystatin, an immunomodulatory protein located in the adult female worm cuticle. A key asparagine residue in onchocystatin was mutated to ablate immunomodulatory activity, which has been demonstrated previously to markedly improve the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate when used as an immunoprophylactic. The immunochemotherapeutic regimen was compared with sub-lethal oxytetracycline therapy alone; onchocystatin immunotherapy alone; a gold-standard prolonged, intermittent oxytetracycline regimen; and no treatment (negative control) in naturally infected Cameroonian cattle. Readouts were collected over one year and comprised adult

  7. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Sorensen, Jonna; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2007-05-25

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral enhancer strength.

  8. Impact of the F508del mutation on ovine CFTR, a Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent gating

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiwei; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Khuituan, Pissared; Mutolo, Michael J; Boinot, Clément; Liu, Beihui; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Callebaut, Isabelle; Harris, Ann; Sheppard, David N

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species comparative studies are a powerful approach to understanding the epithelial Cl− channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which is defective in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we investigate the single-channel behaviour of ovine CFTR and the impact of the most common CF mutation, F508del-CFTR, using excised inside-out membrane patches from transiently transfected CHO cells. Like human CFTR, ovine CFTR formed a weakly inwardly rectifying Cl− channel regulated by PKA-dependent phosphorylation, inhibited by the open-channel blocker glibenclamide. However, for three reasons, ovine CFTR was noticeably more active than human CFTR. First, single-channel conductance was increased. Second, open probability was augmented because the frequency and duration of channel openings were increased. Third, with enhanced affinity and efficacy, ATP more strongly stimulated ovine CFTR channel gating. Consistent with these data, the CFTR modulator phloxine B failed to potentiate ovine CFTR Cl− currents. Similar to its impact on human CFTR, the F508del mutation caused a temperature-sensitive folding defect, which disrupted ovine CFTR protein processing and reduced membrane stability. However, the F508del mutation had reduced impact on ovine CFTR channel gating in contrast to its marked effects on human CFTR. We conclude that ovine CFTR forms a regulated Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent channel gating. This phylogenetic analysis of CFTR structure and function demonstrates that subtle changes in structure have pronounced effects on channel function and the consequences of the CF mutation F508del. Key points Malfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a gated pathway for chloride movement, causes the common life-shortening genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Towards the development of a sheep model of CF, we have investigated the function of sheep CFTR. We found that

  9. A Colanic Acid Operon Deletion Mutation Enhances Induction of Early Antibody Responses by Live Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Shi, Huoying; Li, Yuhua; Shi, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Xin; Baek, Chang-Ho; Mothershead, Tabor

    2013-01-01

    Colanic acid (CA) is a common exopolysaccharide produced by many genera in the Enterobacteriaceae. It is critical for biofilm formation on HEp-2 cells and on chicken intestinal tissue by Salmonella. In this study, we generated different CA synthesis gene mutants and evaluated the immune responses induced by these mutants. One of these mutations, Δ(wza-wcaM)8, which deleted the whole operon for CA synthesis, was introduced into two Salmonella vaccine strains attenuated by auxotrophic traits or by the regulated delayed attenuation strategy (RDAS). The mice immunized with the auxotrophic Salmonella vaccine strain with the deletion mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 developed higher vaginal IgA titers against the heterologous protective antigen and higher levels of antigen-specific IgA secretion cells in lungs. In Salmonella vaccine strains with RDAS, the strain with the Δ(wza-wcaM)8 mutation resulted in higher levels of protective antigen production during in vitro growth. Mice immunized with this strain developed higher serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses at 2 weeks. This strain also resulted in better gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses than the strain without this deletion at doses of 108 and 109 CFU. Thus, the mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 will be included in various recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with RDAS derived from Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi to induce protective immunity against bacterial pathogens. PMID:23774599

  10. Enhancement of lipid peroxidation and its amelioration by vitamin E in a subject with mutations in the SBP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hamajima, Takashi; Ishida, Noriko; Mita, Yuichiro; Nakao, Shohei; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Niki, Etsuo; Noguchi, Noriko

    2015-11-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) insertion sequence-binding protein 2 (SBP2) is essential for the biosynthesis of Sec-containing proteins, termed selenoproteins. Subjects with mutations in the SBP2 gene have decreased levels of several selenoproteins, resulting in a complex phenotype. Selenoproteins play a significant role in antioxidative defense, and deficiencies in these proteins can lead to increased oxidative stress. However, lipid peroxidation and the effects of antioxidants in subjects with SBP2 gene mutations have not been studied. In the present study, we evaluated the lipid peroxidation products in the blood of a subject (the proband) with mutations in the SBP2 gene. We found that the proband had higher levels of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation products, such as 7β-hydroxycholesterol, than the control subjects. Treatment of the proband with vitamin E (α-tocopherol acetate, 100 mg/day), a lipid-soluble antioxidant, for 2 years reduced lipid peroxidation product levels to those of control subjects. Withdrawal of vitamin E treatment for 7 months resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation products. Collectively, these results clearly indicate that free radical-mediated oxidative stress is increased in the subject with SBP2 gene mutations and that vitamin E treatment effectively inhibits the generation of lipid peroxidation products. PMID:26411970

  11. A colanic acid operon deletion mutation enhances induction of early antibody responses by live attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shifeng; Shi, Huoying; Li, Yuhua; Shi, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Xin; Baek, Chang-Ho; Mothershead, Tabor; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-09-01

    Colanic acid (CA) is a common exopolysaccharide produced by many genera in the Enterobacteriaceae. It is critical for biofilm formation on HEp-2 cells and on chicken intestinal tissue by Salmonella. In this study, we generated different CA synthesis gene mutants and evaluated the immune responses induced by these mutants. One of these mutations, Δ(wza-wcaM)8, which deleted the whole operon for CA synthesis, was introduced into two Salmonella vaccine strains attenuated by auxotrophic traits or by the regulated delayed attenuation strategy (RDAS). The mice immunized with the auxotrophic Salmonella vaccine strain with the deletion mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 developed higher vaginal IgA titers against the heterologous protective antigen and higher levels of antigen-specific IgA secretion cells in lungs. In Salmonella vaccine strains with RDAS, the strain with the Δ(wza-wcaM)8 mutation resulted in higher levels of protective antigen production during in vitro growth. Mice immunized with this strain developed higher serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses at 2 weeks. This strain also resulted in better gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses than the strain without this deletion at doses of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU. Thus, the mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 will be included in various recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with RDAS derived from Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi to induce protective immunity against bacterial pathogens. PMID:23774599

  12. SPOP Mutations or ERG Rearrangements Result in Enhanced Levels of ERG to Promote Cell Invasion in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shanshan; Pagano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In this issue, An et al. (2015) and Gan et al. (2015) reveal that the CRL3SPOP ubiquitin ligase mediates the degradation of the transcription factor ERG and that translocations of ERG or mutations in SPOP prevent CRL3SPOP -dependent degradation of ERG in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26384661

  13. Mechanistic study of CuZn-SOD from Ipomoea carnea mutated at dimer interface: enhancement of peroxidase activity upon monomerization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Panchanand; Dixit, Anshuman; Ray, Mamata; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2014-02-01

    The enzymatically active monomeric form of CuZn-superoxide dismutase has always been of interest to decipher the structure-function relationship in this class of enzymes. In the present study, spectroscopic and enzymatic characteristics of the dimeric and monomeric forms of recombinant Ipomoea carnea CuZn-superoxide dismutase were made to decipher their stability and altered catalytic properties. The monomeric form of protein was produced through site directed mutagenesis by replacing a conserved hydrophobic leucine with a polar lysine residue at the dimer-interface. Spectral characteristics of both the forms (monomer and dimer) showed the presence of novel electronic transitions. Superoxide scavenging activity of the mutated form was reduced to nearly half of the activity found in the native enzyme. Concomitantly, compared to native form the mutated enzyme showed an increase in peroxidase activity. High temperature dependent circular dichroism spectral analysis, differential scanning calorimetric profile, and the measurement of temperature dependent superoxide scavenging activity indicated an increased susceptibility of the mutated form to higher temperature as compared to the native form. The inhibitor studies like hydrogen peroxide, diethyldithiocarbamate and phenylglyoxal also indicate higher susceptibility, which might be due to, altered arrangement of active site residues as a consequence of the mutation. Molecular modeling and MD simulation studies further indicated that this specific mutation induces loss of hydrophobic interaction at dimer interface, resulting in the observed instability of the dimeric form. Increased peroxidative activity of the enzyme, upon monomerization may have physiological implication essentially in presence of high concentration of H2O2, as in case of plant cells specifically under stress conditions. PMID:24513093

  14. Short-term infection with Helicobacter pylori and 1 week exposure to metronidazole does not enhance gastric mutation frequency in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Touati, E; Hofnung, M; Thiberge, J M; Michel, V; Labigne, A; Jenks, P J

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure of Helicobacter pylori-infected mice to metronidazole resulted in the delivery of mutagenic compounds to the gastric epithelium via the oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA) of H. pylori. C57BL/6 transgenic mice containing the lambda/lacI transgene were inoculated with peptone trypsin broth, H. pylori SS1 or SS1-rdxA(-), an SS1-derived mutant in rdxA. Twelve weeks after inoculation, the mice were treated for 7 days with a control solution or with the mouse equivalent of a human dose of metronidazole 1 g od. Three weeks after completion of treatment, the animals were killed and mutations in the target lacI gene assessed by a transgenic mutagenesis assay system. There was no increase in lacI mutations in cells harvested from mice infected with H. pylori and/or exposed to metronidazole. These data suggest that short-term infection with H. pylori and exposure to metronidazole does not enhance the mutation frequency in the gastric cells of mice. Whether chronic infection and/or repeated exposure to metronidazole or other nitroaromatic compounds causes genetic damage to gastric epithelial cells remains to be determined. PMID:11102419

  15. The Δ14 Mutation of Human Cardiac Troponin T Enhances ATPase Activity and Alters the Cooperative Binding of S1-ADP to Regulated Actin†

    PubMed Central

    Gafurov, Boris; Fredricksen, Scott; Cai, Anmei; Brenner, Bernhard; Chase, P. Bryant; Chalovich, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The complex of tropomyosin and troponin binds to actin and inhibits activation of myosin ATPase activity and force production of striated muscles at low free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2+ stimulates ATP activity, and at subsaturating actin concentrations, the binding of NEM-modified S1 to actin–tropomyosin–troponin increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis even further. We show here that the Δ14 mutation of troponin T, associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, results in an increase in ATPase rate like that seen with wild-type troponin in the presence of NEM-S1. The enhanced ATPase activity was not due to a decreased incorporation of mutant troponin T with troponin I and troponin C to form an active troponin complex. The activating effect was more prominent with a hybrid troponin (skeletal TnI, TnC, and cardiac TnT) than with all cardiac troponin. Thus it appears that changes in the troponin–troponin contacts that result from mutations or from forming hybrids stabilize a more active state of regulated actin. An analysis of the effect of the Δ14 mutation on the equilibrium binding of S1-ADP to actin was consistent with stabilization of an active state of actin. This change in activation may be important in the development of cardiac disease. PMID:15568820

  16. Mutagenesis by site-specific arylamine adducts in plasmid DNA: Enhancing replication of the adducted strand alters mutation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, T.M.; Lee, Meisie; King, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    Site specifically modified plasmids were used to determine the mutagenic effects of single arylamine adducts in bacterial cells. A synthetic heptadecamer bearing a single N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (AF) or N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (AAF) adduct was used to introduce the adducts into a specific site in plasmid DNA that contained a 17-base single-stranded region complementary to the modified oligonucleotide. Following transformation of bacterial cells with the adduct-bearing DNA, putative mutants were detected by colony hybridization techniques that allowed unbiased detection of all mutations at or near the site of the adduct. The site-specific AF or AAF adducts were also placed into plasmid DNA that contained uracil residues on the strand opposite that bearing the lesions. The presence of uracil in one strand of the DNA decreases the ability of the bacterial replication system to use the uracil-containing strand, thereby favoring the use of the strand bearing the adducts. In a comparison of the results obtained with site specifically modified DNA, either with or without uracil, the presence of the uracil increased the mutation frequencies of the AF adduct by >7-fold to 2.9% and of the AAF adduct by >12-fold to 0.75%. The AF adduct produced primarily single-base deletions in the absence of uracil but only base substitutions in the uracil-containing constructs. The AAF adduct produced mutations only in the uracil-containing DNA, which included both frame shifts and base substitutions. Mutations produced by both adducts were SOS dependent.

  17. FLT3 mutations confer enhanced proliferation and survival properties to multipotent progenitors in a murine model of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin H.; Tothova, Zuzana; Levine, Ross L.; Anderson, Kristina; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Cullen, Dana E.; McDowell, Elizabeth P.; Adelsperger, Jennifer; Fröhling, Stefan; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Beran, Miloslav; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite their known transforming properties, the effects of leukemogenic FLT3-ITD mutations on hematopoietic stem and multipotent progenitor cells and on hematopoietic differentiation are not well understood. We report a mouse model harboring an ITD in the murine Flt3 locus that develops myeloproliferative disease resembling CMML and further identified FLT3-ITD mutations in a subset of human CMML. These findings correlated with an increase in number, cell cycling and survival of multipotent stem and progenitor cells in an ITD dose-dependent manner in animals that exhibited alterations within their myeloid progenitor compartments and a block in normal B-cell development. This model provides insights into the consequences of constitutive signaling by an oncogenic tyrosine kinase on hematopoietic progenitor quiescence, function, and cell fate. SIGNIFICANCE Activating FLT3 mutations are among the most common genetic events in AML and confer a poor clinical prognosis. Essential to our understanding of how these lesions contribute to myeloid leukemia is the development of a Flt3-ITD ‘knock-in’ murine model that has allowed examination of the consequences of constitutive FLT3 signaling on primitive hematopoietic progenitors when expressed at appropriate physiologic levels. These animals informed us to the existence of FLT3-ITD-positive human CMML, which has clinical importance given the availability of FLT3 small molecule inhibitors. This model will not only serve as a powerful biological tool to identify mutations that cooperate with FLT3 in leukemogenesis, but also to assess molecular therapies that target either FLT3 or components of its signaling pathways. PMID:17936561

  18. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of TDP-43 is toxic to neurons and enhanced by a mutation associated with familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Barmada, Sami J.; Skibinski, Gaia; Korb, Erica; Rao, Elizabeth J.; Wu, Jane Y.; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 — the major protein component of neuronal aggregates characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies (FTLDu) — have been linked to familial forms of both disorders. Aggregates of TDP-43 in cortical and spinal motoneurons in ALS, or in neurons of the frontal and temporal cortices in FTLD, are closely linked to neuron loss and atrophy in these areas. However, the mechanism by which TDP-43 mutations lead to neurodegeneration is unclear. To investigate the pathogenic role of TDP-43 mutations, we established a model of TDP-43 proteinopathies by expressing fluorescently tagged wildtype and mutant TDP-43 in primary rat cortical neurons. Expression of mutant TDP-43 was toxic to neurons, and mutant-specific toxicity was associated with increased cytoplasmic mislocalization of TDP-43. Inclusion bodies were not necessary for the toxicity and did not affect the risk of cell death. Cellular survival was unaffected by the total amount of exogenous TDP-43 in the nucleus, but the amount of cytoplasmic TDP-43 was a strong and independent predictor of neuronal death. These results suggest that mutant TDP-43 is mislocalized to the cytoplasm, where it exhibits a toxic gain-of-function and induces cell death. PMID:20071528

  19. Enhancer of splitD, a dominant mutation of Drosophila, and its use in the study of functional domains of a helix-loop-helix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, K; Oellers, N; Knust, E

    1992-01-01

    Helix-loop-helix proteins play important roles in developmental processes, such as myogenesis, neurogenesis, and sex determination. The gene Enhancer of split [E(spl)] of Drosophila, a member of a gene complex that is involved in early neurogenesis, encodes a protein with a basic domain and a helix-loop-helix motif. We took advantage of a dominant mutation of this gene, E(spl)D, to define in vivo structural features of this protein for proper function. The mutation renders the otherwise recessive eye phenotype of spl dominant. By germ-line transformation of different in vitro mutagenized versions of the E(spl) gene, we could demonstrate that the basic domain of this helix-loop-helix protein is functional and necessary for expression of the dominant phenotype. These results are supported by in vitro DNA-binding assays, which showed that the basic domain is in fact necessary for DNA binding, despite the presence of a proline residue. Furthermore, we could show that the dominant enhancement of spl is caused by truncation of the E(SPL)D protein in combination with deletion of a putative regulatory element. Images PMID:1631102

  20. Changes in membrane fatty acid composition through proton-induced fabF mutation enhancing 1-butanol tolerance in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Sun Hong; Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Keun Chul

    2012-07-01

    While a rational approach based on genomic data has become the preferred method for microbial strain development, radiation-induced random mutagenesis is still a robust method for organisms such as plants whose genome or target gene information is unavailable. We previously reported on a combined approach that consists of proton irradiation and a long-term experimental evolution to enhance 1-butanol tolerance of the E. coli C strain so that it can be used as a basal strain for the production of 1-butanol, a potential biofuel along with ethanol. Genome sequencing of one randomly chosen clone (PKH5000) from the endpoint population revealed eleven mutations occurring in the coding regions, and we found that a mutation (F74C) in fabF gene encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases II is associated with a twofold increase in the major unsaturated fatty acid, cis-vaccenic acid. The increase of cis-vaccenic acid by wild-type FabF, which is more active at low temperatures or in the presence of organic compounds, is considered to be a protective mechanism against cold stress. A structural analysis of the FabF protein suggests that the F74C mutation may affect the enzyme activity through a change in flexibility around the catalytic site. The expression of a plasmid that harbors mutant fabF gene in the fabF knockout strain enhanced growth in a medium containing butanol with a concomitant elevation of the cis-vaccenic acid level. Among the eight available Keio knockout strains for genes that have amino acid substitution in the PKH5000 strain, the fabF mutant showed the slowest growth in the presence of 0.7% butanol. We propose that fabF, as probably the gene most responsible for butanol tolerance in wild-type form, contributes further when converted into a F74C missense mutation, which is beneficial as it increases the level of cis-vaccenic acid.

  1. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  2. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-08-31

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser(78) to Cys(78) resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys(78) in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  3. AUTO-MUTE 2.0: A Portable Framework with Enhanced Capabilities for Predicting Protein Functional Consequences upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Masso, Majid; Vaisman, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    The AUTO-MUTE 2.0 stand-alone software package includes a collection of programs for predicting functional changes to proteins upon single residue substitutions, developed by combining structure-based features with trained statistical learning models. Three of the predictors evaluate changes to protein stability upon mutation, each complementing a distinct experimental approach. Two additional classifiers are available, one for predicting activity changes due to residue replacements and the other for determining the disease potential of mutations associated with nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in human proteins. These five command-line driven tools, as well as all the supporting programs, complement those that run our AUTO-MUTE web-based server. Nevertheless, all the codes have been rewritten and substantially altered for the new portable software, and they incorporate several new features based on user feedback. Included among these upgrades is the ability to perform three highly requested tasks: to run “big data” batch jobs; to generate predictions using modified protein data bank (PDB) structures, and unpublished personal models prepared using standard PDB file formatting; and to utilize NMR structure files that contain multiple models. PMID:25197272

  4. AUTO-MUTE 2.0: A Portable Framework with Enhanced Capabilities for Predicting Protein Functional Consequences upon Mutation.

    PubMed

    Masso, Majid; Vaisman, Iosif I

    2014-01-01

    The AUTO-MUTE 2.0 stand-alone software package includes a collection of programs for predicting functional changes to proteins upon single residue substitutions, developed by combining structure-based features with trained statistical learning models. Three of the predictors evaluate changes to protein stability upon mutation, each complementing a distinct experimental approach. Two additional classifiers are available, one for predicting activity changes due to residue replacements and the other for determining the disease potential of mutations associated with nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in human proteins. These five command-line driven tools, as well as all the supporting programs, complement those that run our AUTO-MUTE web-based server. Nevertheless, all the codes have been rewritten and substantially altered for the new portable software, and they incorporate several new features based on user feedback. Included among these upgrades is the ability to perform three highly requested tasks: to run "big data" batch jobs; to generate predictions using modified protein data bank (PDB) structures, and unpublished personal models prepared using standard PDB file formatting; and to utilize NMR structure files that contain multiple models. PMID:25197272

  5. Single tyrosine mutation in AAV8 and AAV9 capsids is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to skeletal muscle and heart.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Yuan, Zhenhua; Li, Jianbin; Tang, Ruhang; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2012-02-01

    Site-directed mutations of tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) on the surface of adeno-associated viral (AAV) capsids have been reported as a simple method to greatly enhance gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. To determine whether the Y-to-F mutation could also enhance AAV8 and AAV9 gene transfer in skeletal muscle and heart to facilitate muscular dystrophy gene therapy, we investigated four capsid mutants of AAV8 (Y447F or Y733F) and AAV9 (Y446F or Y731F). The mutants and their wild-type control AAV8 and AAV9 capsids were used to package reporter genes (luciferase or β-galactosidase) resulting in similar vector yields. To evaluate gene delivery efficiencies, especially in muscle and heart, the vectors were compared side by side in a series of experiments in vivo in two different strains of mice, the outbred ICR and the inbred C57BL/6. Because AAV8 and AAV9 are among the most effective in systemic gene delivery, we first examined the mutant and wild-type vectors in neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection, or in adult mice by intravenous injection. To our surprise, no statistically significant differences in transgene expression were observed between the mutant and wild-type vectors, regardless of the reporter genes, vector doses, and the ages and strains of mice used. In addition, quantitative analyses of vector DNA copy number in various tissues from mice treated with mutant and wild-type vectors also showed similar results. Finally, direct intramuscular injection of the above-described vectors with the luciferase gene into the hind limb muscles revealed the same levels of gene expression between mutant and wild-type vectors. Our results thus demonstrate that a single mutation of Y447F or Y733F on capsids of AAV8, and of Y446F or Y731F on AAV9, is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to the skeletal muscle and heart. PMID:22428978

  6. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  7. Engineered human angiogenin mutations in the placental ribonuclease inhibitor complex for anticancer therapy: Insights from enhanced sampling simulations.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Cremer, Christian; Nachreiner, Thomas; Barth, Stefan; Carloni, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Targeted human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs) represent a new generation of immunotoxins (ITs) for the specific targeting and elimination of malignant cell populations. Unlike conventional ITs, hCFPs comprise a human/humanized target cell-specific binding moiety (e.g., an antibody or a fragment thereof) fused to a human proapoptotic protein as the cytotoxic domain (effector domain). Therefore, hCFPs are humanized ITs expected to have low immunogenicity. This reduces side effects and allows long-term application. The human ribonuclease angiogenin (Ang) has been shown to be a promising effector domain candidate. However, the application of Ang-based hCFPs is largely hampered by the intracellular placental ribonuclease inhibitor (RNH1). It rapidly binds and inactivates Ang. Mutations altering Ang's affinity for RNH1 modulate the cytotoxicity of Ang-based hCFPs. Here we perform in total 2.7 µs replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to investigate some of these mutations-G85R/G86R (GGRRmut ), Q117G (QGmut ), and G85R/G86R/Q117G (GGRR/QGmut ). GGRRmut turns out to perturb greatly the overall Ang-RNH1 interactions, whereas QGmut optimizes them. Combining QGmut with GGRRmut compensates the effects of the latter. Our results explain the in vitro finding that, while Ang GGRRmut -based hCFPs resist RNH1 inhibition remarkably, Ang WT- and Ang QGmut -based ones are similarly sensitive to RNH1 inhibition, whereas Ang GGRR/QGmut -based ones are only slightly resistant. This work may help design novel Ang mutants with reduced affinity for RNH1 and improved cytotoxicity. PMID:27110669

  8. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  9. The G2019S LRRK2 mutation increases myeloid cell chemotactic responses and enhances LRRK2 binding to actin-regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Moehle, Mark S.; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Abdelmotilib, Hisham A.; Mobley, James; Kannarkat, George T.; Tansey, Malú G.; West, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is genetically and biochemically linked to several diseases that involve innate immunity. LRRK2 protein is highly expressed in phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, most notably in myeloid cells capable of mounting potent pro-inflammatory responses. Knockdown of LRRK2 protein in these cells reduces pro-inflammatory responses. However, the effect of LRRK2 pathogenic mutations that cause Parkinson's disease on myeloid cell function is not clear but could provide insight into LRRK2-linked disease. Here, we find that rats expressing G2019S LRRK2 have exaggerated pro-inflammatory responses and subsequent neurodegeneration after lipopolysaccharide injections in the substantia nigra, with a marked increase in the recruitment of CD68 myeloid cells to the site of injection. While G2019S LRRK2 expression did not affect immunological homeostasis, myeloid cells expressing G2019S LRRK2 show enhanced chemotaxis both in vitro in two-chamber assays and in vivo in response to thioglycollate injections in the peritoneum. The G2019S mutation enhanced the association between LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins that control chemotaxis. The interaction between G2019S LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins can be blocked by LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, although we did not find evidence that LRRK2 phosphorylated these interacting proteins. These results suggest that the primary mechanism of G2019S LRRK2 with respect to myeloid cell function in disease may be related to exaggerated chemotactic responses. PMID:25926623

  10. Destabilizing missense mutations in the tumour suppressor protein p53 enhance its ubiquitination in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Harumi; Saliba, David; Wallace, Maura; Finlan, Lee; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R. R.; Hupp, Ted R.

    2006-01-01

    p53 ubiquitination catalysed by MDM2 (murine double minute clone 2 oncoprotein) provides a biochemical assay to dissect stages in E3-ubiquitin-ligase-catalysed ubiquitination of a conformationally flexible protein. A mutant form of p53 (p53F270A) containing a mutation in the second MDM2-docking site in the DNA-binding domain of p53 (F270A) is susceptible to modification of long-lived and high-molecular-mass covalent adducts in vivo. Mutant F270A is hyperubiquitinated in cells as defined by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with an anti-ubiquitin antibody. Transfection of His-tagged ubiquitin along with p53R175H or p53F270A also results in selective hyperubiquitination in cells under conditions where wild-type p53 is refractory to covalent modification. The extent of mutant p53R175H or p53F270A unfolding in cells as defined by exposure of the DO-12 epitope correlates with the extent of hyperubiquitination, suggesting a link between substrate conformation and E3 ligase function. The p53F270A:6KR chimaeric mutant (where 6KR refers to the simultaneous mutation of lysine residues at positions 370, 372, 373, 381, 382 and 386 to arginine) maintains the high-molecular-mass covalent adducts and is modified in an MDM2-dependent manner. Using an in vitro ubiquitination system, mutant p53F270A and the p53F270A:6KR chimaeric mutant is also subject to hyperubiquitination outwith the C-terminal domain, indicating direct recognition of the mutant p53 conformation by (a) factor(s) in the cell-free ubiquitination system. These data identify an in vitro and in vivo assay with which to dissect how oligomeric protein conformational alterations are linked to substrate ubiquitination in cells. This has implications for understanding the recognition of misfolded proteins during aging and in human diseases such as cancer. PMID:16579792

  11. Mutations in a novel 9-stearoyl-ACP-desaturase gene are associated with enhanced stearic acid levels in soybean seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stearic acid (18:0) is typically a minor component of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil, accounting for only 2-4 % of the total fatty acid content. Increasing stearic acid levels of soybean oil would lead to enhanced oxidative stability, potentially reducing the need for hydrogenation, a process...

  12. Modified bean seed protein phaseolin did not accumulate stably in transgenic tobacco seeds after methionine enhancement mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major seed storage protein phaseolin of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is deficient in methionine, an essential amino acid for human and animal health. To improve the nutritional quality of common bean, we designed methionine enhancement of phaseolin based on the three dimensional structure...

  13. Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Yue, Wenhao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Wenmin; Zhou, Lian; Shou, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice. PMID:27148296

  14. Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai; Yue, Wenhao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Wenmin; Zhou, Lian; Shou, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice. PMID:27148296

  15. Enhanced cytotoxicity of PARP inhibition in mantle cell lymphoma harbouring mutations in both ATM and p53.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chris T; Kubota, Eiji; Hamill, Jeffrey D; Klimowicz, Alexander; Ye, Ruiqiong; Muzik, Huong; Dean, Michelle; Tu, LiRen; Gilley, David; Magliocco, Anthony M; McKay, Bruce C; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2012-06-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promise in the treatment of human malignancies characterized by deficiencies in the DNA damage repair proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 and preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in targeting ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-deficient tumours. Here, we show that mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells deficient in both ATM and p53 are more sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib than cells lacking ATM function alone. In ATM-deficient MCL cells, olaparib induced DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 as well as expression of p53-responsive cell cycle checkpoint regulators, and inhibition of DNA-PK reduced the toxicity of olaparib in ATM-deficient MCL cells. Thus, both DNA-PK and p53 regulate the response of ATM-deficient MCL cells to olaparib. In addition, small molecule inhibition of both ATM and PARP was cytotoxic in normal human fibroblasts with disruption of p53, implying that the combination of ATM and PARP inhibitors may have utility in targeting p53-deficient malignancies. PMID:22416035

  16. tRNA structure and ribosomal function. I. tRNA nucleotide 27-43 mutations enhance first position wobble.

    PubMed

    Schultz, D W; Yarus, M

    1994-02-01

    Transfer RNA su7 G36 is a derivative of tRNA(Trp) with a 3'GUC anticodon complementary to the glutamine codon CAG. This tRNA requires a normally forbidden G-U wobble at the first codon position to suppress a UAG (amber) termination codon. Measurement of amber suppression by mutated su7 G36 tRNAs and correction for tRNA levels and aminoacylation allowed calculation of KUAG, a linearized index of in vivo ribosomal function. Following saturating mutagenesis of the anticodon arm of su7 G36, screening for UAG suppression using a lacZ reporter yielded tRNAs with up to 40-fold increased first position G-U wobble, judged from KUAG. The parental anticodon helix has minimized this type of miscoding, and virtually all changes in the top base-pair of the anticodon helix, nucleotides (nt) 27-43, increased the error. Thus, misincorporation of amino acids due to aberrant first position wobble is apparently prevented by normal tRNA structure, which is specifically altered by substitution at nt 27-43, the top base-pair of the anticodon helix. All 16 permutations of nt 27-43, the hotspot for increased wobble, were subsequently constructed and compared. Comparison of values for tRNA coding function, tRNA level, and aminoacylation for the 16 suggest that a tRNA conformational change, specifically involving both nt 27-43, differentially affects all these tRNA functions. This conformational alteration, which presumably occurs normally on the ribosome, appears more complex than simple breakage of the normal 27-43 base-pair. We suggest that the change is in the angle and/or flexibility of the tRNA L-shape. Among these 16 tRNAs, efficient wobble is strongly and inversely correlated with good aminoacylation and high tRNA levels; this quality may have been selected. Constraints on the sequences of natural tRNAs suggest that nt 27-43 have effects on function in many tRNAs. PMID:8107080

  17. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  18. A Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Mutation in an Invariant Proline at the Myosin Head/Rod Junction Enhances Head Flexibility and Function, Yielding Muscle Defects in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Achal, Madhulika; Trujillo, Adriana S; Melkani, Girish C; Farman, Gerrie P; Ocorr, Karen; Viswanathan, Meera C; Kaushik, Gaurav; Newhard, Christopher S; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Melkani, Anju; Suggs, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey R; Swank, Douglas M; Bodmer, Rolf; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2016-06-01

    An "invariant proline" separates the myosin S1 head from its S2 tail and is proposed to be critical for orienting S1 during its interaction with actin, a process that leads to muscle contraction. Mutation of the invariant proline to leucine (P838L) caused dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy in a pediatric patient (Karam et al., Congenit. Heart Dis. 3:138-43, 2008). Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to model this mutation and dissect its effects on the biochemical and biophysical properties of myosin, as well as on the structure and physiology of skeletal and cardiac muscles. P838L mutant myosin isolated from indirect flight muscles of transgenic Drosophila showed elevated ATPase and actin sliding velocity in vitro. Furthermore, the mutant heads exhibited increased rotational flexibility, and there was an increase in the average angle between the two heads. Indirect flight muscle myofibril assembly was minimally affected in mutant homozygotes, and isolated fibers displayed normal mechanical properties. However, myofibrils degraded during aging, correlating with reduced flight abilities. In contrast, hearts from homozygotes and heterozygotes showed normal morphology, myofibrillar arrays, and contractile parameters. When P838L was placed in trans to Mhc(5), an allele known to cause cardiac restriction in flies, it did not yield the constricted phenotype. Overall, our studies suggest that increased rotational flexibility of myosin S1 enhances myosin ATPase and actin sliding. Moreover, instability of P838L myofibrils leads to decreased function during aging of Drosophila skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle, despite the strong evolutionary conservation of the P838 residue. PMID:27107639

  19. Mutations Derived from the Thermophilic Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase PhaC Enhance the Thermostability and Activity of PhaC from Cupriavidus necator H16

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lai, Yung-Wei; Chang, Rey-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The thermophile Cupriavidus sp. strain S-6 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from glucose at 50°C. A 9.0-kbp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genomic DNA of Cupriavidus sp. S-6 enabled Escherichia coli XL1-Blue to synthesize PHB at 45°C. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed a pha locus in the clone. The thermophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase (PhaCCsp) shared 81% identity with mesophilic PhaC of Cupriavidus necator H16. The diversity between these two strains was found dominantly on their N and C termini, while the middle regions were highly homologous (92% identity). We constructed four chimeras of mesophilic and thermophilic phaC genes to explore the mutations related to its thermostability. Among the chimeras, only PhaCH16β, which was PhaCH16 bearing 30 point mutations derived from the middle region of PhaCCsp, accumulated a high content of PHB (65% [dry weight]) at 45°C. The chimera phaCH16β and two parental PHA synthase genes were overexpressed in E. coli BLR(DE3) cells and purified. At 30°C, the specific activity of the chimera PhaCH16β (172 ± 17.8 U/mg) was 3.45-fold higher than that of the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (50 ± 5.2 U/mg). At 45°C, the half-life of the chimera PhaCH16β (11.2 h) was 127-fold longer than that of PhaCH16 (5.3 min). Furthermore, the chimera PhaCH16β accumulated 1.55-fold (59% [dry weight]) more PHA content than the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (38% [dry weight]) at 37°C. This study reveals a limited number of point mutations which enhance not only thermostability but also PhaCH16 activity. The highly thermostable and active PHA synthase will provide advantages for its promising applications to in vitro PHA synthesis and recombinant E. coli PHA fermentation. PMID:22408158

  20. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  1. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-11-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  2. Mutation of a novel virulence-related gene mltD in Vibrio anguillarum enhances lethality in zebra fish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zinan; Wang, Ying; Han, Yin; Chen, Jixiang; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum, a halophilic Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of vibriosis, which is a major problem for the aquaculture industry worldwide. Previously, a virulence-related gene fragment of V. anguillarum was obtained from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library. In this study, the complete gene sequence was obtained by long and accurate PCR (LA-PCR). After sequence analysis and homologous comparison, this new virulence-related gene was revealed to encode a putative membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase D (MltD), which consisted of 547 amino acids, and showed 34% identity to the MltD in Escherichia coli. An mltD mutant of pathogenic V. anguillarum CW-1 was constructed by homologous recombination. Production of extracellular gelatinase and protease of the mltD mutant decreased markedly compared with those of the wild-type strain, and the hemolytic activity was totally lost. Sodium chloride challenge and antibiotic sensitivity assay showed that the resistance of the mltD mutant to high concentrations of sodium chloride, and rocephin, fortun, cefobid, gentamicin, kanamycin and carbenicillin was enhanced. Most importantly, virulence of the mltD mutant was enhanced compared with that of the wild type when it was inoculated intraperitoneally into zebra fish; the LD₅₀ of the wild type and the mutant was 3.92 × 10³ CFU and 1.01 × 10² CFU fish⁻¹, respectively. The mltD was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli, and the recombinant MltD protein showed hemolytic, phospholipase, gelatinase and diastase activities. This is the first report that MltD possibly has a virulence-related function. PMID:21070855

  3. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV. PMID:26340409

  4. Inhibition of mRNA turnover in yeast by an xrn1 mutation enhances the requirement for eIF4E binding to eIF4G and for proper capping of transcripts by Ceg1p.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J T; Yang, X; Johnson, A W

    2000-01-01

    Null mutants of XRN1, encoding the major cytoplasmic exoribonuclease in yeast, are viable but accumulate decapped, deadenylated transcripts. A screen for mutations synthetic lethal with xrn1Delta identified a mutation in CDC33, encoding eIF4E. This mutation (glutamate to glycine at position 72) affected a highly conserved residue involved in interaction with eIF4G. Synthetic lethality between xrn1 and cdc33 was not relieved by high-copy expression of eIF4G or by disruption of the yeast eIF4E binding protein Caf20p. High-copy expression of a mutant eIF4G defective for eIF4E binding resulted in a dominant negative phenotype in an xrn1 mutant, indicating the importance of this interaction in an xrn1 mutant. Another allele of CDC33, cdc33-1, along with mutations in CEG1, encoding the nuclear guanylyltransferase, were also synthetic lethal with xrn1Delta, whereas mutations in PRT1, encoding a subunit of eIF3, were not. Mutations in CDC33, CEG1, PRT1, PAB1, and TIF4631, encoding eIF4G1, have been shown to lead to destabilization of mRNAs. Although such destabilization in cdc33, ceg1, and pab1 mutants can be partially suppressed by an xrn1 mutation, we observed synthetic lethality between xrn1 and either cdc33 or ceg1 and no suppression of the inviability of a pab1 null mutation by xrn1Delta. Thus, the inhibition of mRNA turnover by blocking Xrn1p function does not suppress the lethality of defects upstream in the turnover pathway but it does enhance the requirement for (7)mG caps and for proper formation of the eIF4E/eIF4G cap recognition complex. PMID:10790382

  5. Mutation of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase enhances secretion of the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael O; Sokolov, Sviatoslav S; Romanova, Nina V; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Kim, So-Young; Kalebina, Tatyana S; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2005-10-15

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted and aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast cells due to inefficient folding. A screen for Hansenula polymorpha mutants with improved uPA secretion revealed a gene encoding a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-O-mannosyltransferase Pmt1p. Expression of the H. polymorpha PMT1 gene (HpPMT1) abolished temperature sensitivity of the S. cerevisiae pmt1 pmt2 double mutant. As in S. cerevisiae, inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene affected electrophoretic mobility of the O-glycosylated protein, extracellular chitinase. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, disruption of HpPMT1 alone caused temperature sensitivity. Inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene decreased intracellular aggregation of uPA, suggesting that enhanced secretion of uPA was due to improvement of its folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Unlike most of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins, HpPmt1p possesses the C-terminal KDEL retention signal. PMID:16200504

  6. Impaired cell envelope resulting from arcA mutation largely accounts for enhanced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting; Dong, Yangyang; Ju, Lili; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major challenges that Shewanella encounter routinely because they thrive in redox-stratified environments prone to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, letting alone that ROS can be generated endogenously. As respiration is the predominant process for endogenous ROS, regulators mediating respiration have been demonstrated and/or implicated to play a role in oxidative stress response. In our efforts to unveil the involvement of global regulators for respiration in the oxidative stress response, we found that loss of the Arc system increases S. oneidensis sensitivity to H2O2 whereas neither Fnr nor Crp has a significant role. A comparison of transcriptomic profiles of the wild-type and its isogenic arcA mutant revealed that the OxyR regulon is independent of the Arc system. We then provided evidence that the enhanced H2O2 sensitivity of the arcA mutant is due to an increased H2O2 uptake rate, a result of a cell envelope defect. Although one of three proteases of the ArcA regulon when in excess is partially accountable for the envelope defect, the major contributors remain elusive. Overall, our data indicate that the Arc system influences the bacterial cell envelope biosynthesis, a physiological aspect that has not been associated with the regulator before. PMID:25975178

  7. A Combination of HA and PA Mutations Enhances Virulence in a Mouse-Adapted H6N6 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Likai; Smith, David K.; He, Shuyi; Zheng, Yun; Shao, Zhenwen; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Huachen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT H6N6 viruses are commonly isolated from domestic ducks, and avian-to-swine transmissions of H6N6 viruses have been detected in China. Whether subsequent adaptation of H6N6 viruses in mammals would increase their pathogenicity toward humans is not known. To address this, we generated a mouse-adapted (MA) swine influenza H6N6 virus (A/swine/Guangdong/K6/2010 [GDK6-MA]) which exhibited greater virulence than the wild-type virus (GDK6). Amino acid substitutions in PB2 (E627K), PA (I38M), and hemagglutinin ([HA] L111F, H156N, and S263R) occurred in GDK6-MA. HA with the H156N mutation [HA(H156N)] resulted in enlarged plaque sizes on MDCK cells and enhanced early-stage viral replication in mammalian cells. PA(I38M) raised polymerase activity in vitro but did not change virus replication in either mammalian cells or mice. These single substitutions had only limited effects on virulence; however, a combination of HA(H156N S263R) with PA(I38M) in the GDK6 backbone led to a significantly more virulent variant. This suggests that these substitutions can compensate for the lack of PB2(627K) and modulate virulence, revealing a new determinant of pathogenicity for H6N6 viruses in mice, which might also pose a threat to human health. IMPORTANCE Avian H6N6 influenza viruses are enzootic in domestic ducks and have been detected in swine in China. Infections of mammals by H6N6 viruses raise the possibility of viral adaptation and increasing pathogenicity in the new hosts. To examine the molecular mechanisms of adaptation, a mouse-adapted avian-origin swine influenza H6N6 virus (GDK6-MA), which had higher virulence than its parental virus, was generated. Specific mutations were found in PB2 (E627K), PA (I38M), and HA (L111F, H156N, and S263R) and were assessed for their virulence in mice. The combination of HA(H156N S263R) and PA(I38M) compensated for the lack of PB2(627K) and showed increased pathogenicity in mice, revealing a novel mechanism that can affect the virulence of

  8. Tryptophan mutations at azi-etomidate photo-incorporation sites on alpha1 or beta2 subunits enhance GABAA receptor gating and reduce etomidate modulation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Deirdre; Desai, Rooma; Cheng, Qi; Liu, Aiping; Forman, Stuart A

    2008-12-01

    The potent general anesthetic etomidate produces its effects by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activation. Its photolabel analog [(3)H]azi-etomidate labels residues within transmembrane domains on alpha and beta subunits: alphaMet236 and betaMet286. We hypothesized that these methionines contribute to etomidate sites formed at alpha-beta subunit interfaces and that increasing side-chain bulk and hydrophobicity at either locus would mimic etomidate binding and block etomidate effects. Channel activity was electrophysiologically quantified in alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) receptors with alpha(1)M236W or beta(2)M286W mutations, in both the absence and the presence of etomidate. Measurements included spontaneous activation, GABA EC(50), etomidate agonist potentiation, etomidate direct activation, and rapid macrocurrent kinetics. Both alpha(1)M236W and beta(2)M286W mutations induced spontaneous channel opening, lowered GABA EC(50), increased maximal GABA efficacy, and slowed current deactivation, mimicking effects of etomidate on alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L) channels. These changes were larger with alpha(1)M236W than with beta(2)M286W. Etomidate (3.2 muM) reduced GABA EC(50) much less in alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) receptors (2-fold) than in wild type (23-fold). However, etomidate was more potent and efficacious in directly activating alpha(1)M236Wbeta(2)gamma(2L) compared with wild type. In alpha(1)beta(2)M286Wgamma(2L) receptors, etomidate induced neither agonist-potentiation nor direct channel activation. These results support the hypothesis that alpha(1)Met236 and beta(2)Met286 are within etomidate sites that allosterically link to channel gating. Although alpha(1)M236W produced the larger impact on channel gating, beta(2)M286W produced more profound changes in etomidate sensitivity, suggesting a dominant role in drug binding. Furthermore, quantitative mechanistic analysis demonstrated that wild-type and mutant results are consistent with the presence of only one class of

  9. CBL Linker Region and RING Finger Mutations Lead to Enhanced Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Signaling via Elevated Levels of JAK2 and LYN*

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D.; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways. PMID:23696637

  10. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  11. Induction of a tumor-associated activating mutation in protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn11 (Shp2) enhances mitochondrial metabolism, leading to oxidative stress and senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Li, Shanhu; Hsu, Peter; Qu, Cheng-Kui

    2013-09-01

    Activating mutations in Ptpn11 (Shp2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in diverse cell signaling pathways, are associated with pediatric leukemias and solid tumors. However, the pathogenic effects of these mutations have not been fully characterized. Here, we report that induction of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation, the most common and active Ptpn11 mutation found in leukemias and solid tumors, in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in proliferative arrest and premature senescence. As a result, apoptosis was markedly increased. These cellular responses were accompanied and mediated by up-regulation of p53 and p21. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), byproducts of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, were elevated in Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells. Since Shp2 is also distributed to the mitochondria (in addition to the cytosol), the impact of the Ptpn11(E76K/+) mutation on mitochondrial function was analyzed. These analyses revealed that oxygen consumption of Ptpn11(E76K/+) cells and the respiratory function of Ptpn11(E76K/+) mitochondria were significantly increased. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of mitochondrial Stat3, one of the substrates of Shp2 phosphatase, was greatly decreased in the mutant cells with the activating mutation Ptpn11(E76K/+). This study provides novel insights into the initial effects of tumor-associated Ptpn11 mutations. PMID:23884424

  12. Mutations in E.coli 16s rRNA that enhance and decrease the activity of a suppressor tRNA.

    PubMed

    Prescott, C D; Kornau, H C

    1992-04-11

    The in vivo expression of mutations constructed within helix 34 of 16S rRNA has been examined together with a nonsense tRNA suppressor for their action at stop codons. The data revealed two novel results: in contrast to previous findings, some of the rRNA mutations affected suppression at UAA and UAG nonsense codons. Secondly, both an increase and a decrease in the efficiency of the suppressor tRNA were induced by the mutations. This is the first report that rRNA mutations decreased the efficiency of a suppressor tRNA. The data are interpreted as there being competition between the two release factors (RF-1 and RF-2) for an overlapping domain and that helix 34 influences this interaction. PMID:1374555

  13. Mutations in E.coli 16s rRNA that enhance and decrease the activity of a suppressor tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, C D; Kornau, H C

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo expression of mutations constructed within helix 34 of 16S rRNA has been examined together with a nonsense tRNA suppressor for their action at stop codons. The data revealed two novel results: in contrast to previous findings, some of the rRNA mutations affected suppression at UAA and UAG nonsense codons. Secondly, both an increase and a decrease in the efficiency of the suppressor tRNA were induced by the mutations. This is the first report that rRNA mutations decreased the efficiency of a suppressor tRNA. The data are interpreted as there being competition between the two release factors (RF-1 and RF-2) for an overlapping domain and that helix 34 influences this interaction. PMID:1374555

  14. GENERAL ENHANCEMENT OF MUTAGENIC POTENCY OF VARIOUS MUTAGENS DUE TO DELETED GENES IN THE ΔuvrB STRAINS TA 98 AND TA 100 OF SALMONELLA COMPARED WITH STRAINS CONTAINING ONLY A POINT MUTATION IN uvrB

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common strains used in Ames mutagenicity assays, TA98 and TA 100, contain a �uvrB mutation designed to enhance the mutagenicity of compounds, presumably due to the loss of the nucleotide excision repair system. We showed previously that the �uvrB mutations in these s...

  15. Spontaneous mutations in the CsrRS two-component regulatory system of Streptococcus pyogenes result in enhanced virulence in a murine model of skin and soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Engleberg, N C; Heath, A; Miller, A; Rivera, C; DiRita, V J

    2001-04-01

    CsrS/CsrR is a 2-component system in Streptococcus pyogenes that negatively regulates hyaluronic capsule and several exotoxins. To detect spontaneous mutations in csrRS, mucoid and large colony variants of M1 strain MGAS166 were isolated from experimental murine skin infections. By use of complementation with a csrRS(+) plasmid, relevant mutations were also detected in 7 of 12 human clinical isolates. The presence of spontaneous mutants in mouse infection was associated with larger, more necrotic lesions. Most spontaneous changes in CsrR resulted from single amino acid substitutions, whereas most csrS mutations were frameshift or nonsense mutations. In 2 instances, IS1548 insertions were found in csrS. Experimental inoculation of mixtures of wild-type (wt) and csrRS(-) bacteria yielded larger, more necrotic lesions than did either strain at twice the inoculum, which suggests that these variants may exhibit pathogenic synergy. Spontaneous emergence of csrRS(-) mutants in vivo enhances the virulence of wt bacteria and increases severity of murine skin infection. PMID:11237829

  16. A Kv7.2 mutation associated with early onset epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst enhances Kv7/M channel activity.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Jérôme; Abidi, Affef; Roubertie, Agathe; Molinari, Florence; Becq, Hélène; Lacoste, Caroline; Villard, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the KCNQ2 gene encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv7.2 cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). Most mutations have been shown to induce a loss of function or to affect the subcellular distribution of Kv7 channels in neurons. Herein, we investigated functional consequences and subcellular distribution of the p.V175L mutation of Kv7.2 (Kv7.2(V175L) ) found in a patient presenting EOEE. We observed that the mutation produced a 25-40 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the conductance-voltage relationship of both the homomeric Kv7.2(V175L) and heteromeric Kv7.2(V175L) /Kv7.3 channels compared to wild-type channels and a 10 mV hyperpolarizing shift of Kv7.2(V175L) /Kv7.2/Kv7.3 channels in a 1:1:2 ratio mimicking the patient situation. Mutant channels also displayed faster activation kinetics and an increased current density that was prevented by 1 μm linopirdine. The p.V175L mutation did not affect the protein expression of Kv7 channels and its localization at the axon initial segment. We conclude that p.V175L is a gain of function mutation. This confirms previous observations showing that mutations having opposite consequences on M channels can produce EOEE. These findings alert us that drugs aiming to increase Kv7 channel activity might have adverse effects in EOEE in the case of gain-of-function variants. PMID:27030113

  17. Mutation of the Highly Conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 Gag Protein to Phe Causes the Formation of a Hydrophobic Patch, Enhances Membrane Association, and Polyubiquitination of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Åge; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag. PMID:25279819

  18. MicroRNA-223 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of U87MG Cells In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liping; Zhu, Ji; Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Deng, Yun; Wu, Xingzhong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Fangqi; Cai, Guoxiang; Gu, Weilie; Shen, Lijun; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is important in the DNA damage response because it repairs radiation-induced damage in cancers. We examined the effect of microRNA-223 (miR-223), a regulator of ATM expression, on radiation sensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Human embryonic kidney 293 T (293T) cells were infected with pLL3.7-miR-223 plasmid to generate the pLL3.7-miR-223 and -empty virus (EV) lentivirus (miR-223 and EV). A dual luciferase assay in which the reporter contained wild-type 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of ATM was performed. U87MG cells were infected with miR-223 or EV to establish the overexpressed stable cell lines (U87-223 or U87-EV, respectively). Cells were irradiated in vitro, and dose enhancement ratios at 2 Gy (DER{sub 2}) were calculated. Hind legs of BALB/c athymic mice were injected with U87-223 or U87-EV cells; after 2 weeks, half of the tumors were irradiated. Tumor volumes were tracked for a total of 5 weeks. Results: The dual luciferase reporter assay showed a significant reduction in luciferase activity of 293T cells cotransfected with miR-223 and the ATM 3′UTR compared to that in EV control. Overexpression of miR-223 in U87MG cells showed that ATM expression was significantly downregulated in the U87-223 cells compared to that in U87-EV (ATM/β-actin mRNA 1.0 vs 1.5, P<.05). U87-223 cells were hypersensitive to radiation compared to U87-EV cells in vitro (DER{sub 2} = 1.32, P<.01). Mice injected with miR-223-expressing tumors had almost the same tumors after 3 weeks (1.5 cm{sup 3} vs 1.7 cm{sup 3}). However, irradiation significantly decreased tumor size in miR-223-expressing tumors compared to those in controls (0.033 cm{sup 3} vs 0.829 cm{sup 3}). Conclusions: miR-223 overexpression downregulates ATM expression and sensitizes U87 cells to radiation in vitro and in vivo. MicroRNA-223 may be a novel cancer-targeting therapy, although its cancer- and patient-specific roles are

  19. Arginine/serine-rich protein interaction domain-dependent modulation of a tau exon 10 splicing enhancer: altered interactions and mechanisms for functionally antagonistic FTDP-17 mutations Delta280K AND N279K.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Ian; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2006-02-01

    Tau exon 10 splicing is altered by autosomal dominant mutations that cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism chromosome 17-type and by unknown mechanisms in other related neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying cis- and trans-regulators of tau exon 10 splicing is therefore crucial for understanding disease mechanisms. We previously identified several splicing enhancers and silencers within exon 10 and intron 10. Here, we show that splicing factors SF2/ASF, Tra2beta, and a 50-kDa nuclear protein bind in vitro to the polypurine enhancer at the 5' end of exon 10. Disease splicing mutations N279K and Delta280K disrupt the enhancer and alter associations with these factors. N279K targets robustly bind Tra2beta compared with the normal enhancer, which may explain why N279K enhances exon 10 splicing in vivo. In contrast, factor associations with Delta280K targets are nearly undetectable, explaining why Delta280K almost abolishes exon 10 splicing in vivo. Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of endogenous SF2/ASF and Tra2beta significantly reduces exon 10 splicing. Exogenous SF2/ASF dramatically enhances normal exon 10 splicing and efficiently rescues the Delta280K splicing defect. Domain deletion analyses show that the C-terminal RS domains of SF2/ASF and Tra2beta are required for normal exon 10 splicing in vivo. In contrast to Tra2beta, the SF2/ASF RS domain remains essential in the presence of a strengthened enhancer or when either weak splice site is strengthened. The data suggest that SF2/ASF has both essential and regulatory roles, whereas Tra2beta has a supporting role in exon 10 splicing. PMID:16308321

  20. The novel Parkinson's disease linked mutation G51D attenuates in vitro aggregation and membrane binding of α-synuclein, and enhances its secretion and nuclear localization in cells.

    PubMed

    Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Ait-Bouziad, Nadine; Dikiy, Igor; Mbefo, Martial K; Jovičić, Ana; Kiely, Aoife; Holton, Janice L; Lee, Seung-Jae; Gitler, Aaron D; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2014-09-01

    A novel mutation in the α-Synuclein (α-Syn) gene "G51D" was recently identified in two familial cases exhibiting features of Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). In this study, we explored the impact of this novel mutation on the aggregation, cellular and biophysical properties of α-Syn, in an attempt to unravel how this mutant contributes to PD/MSA. Our results show that the G51D mutation significantly attenuates α-Syn aggregation in vitro. Moreover, it disrupts local helix formation in the presence of SDS, decreases binding to lipid vesicles C-terminal to the site of mutation and severely inhibits helical folding in the presence of acidic vesicles. When expressed in yeast, α-Syn(G51D) behaves similarly to α-Syn(A30P), as both exhibit impaired membrane association, form few inclusions and are non-toxic. In contrast, enhanced secreted and nuclear levels of the G51D mutant were observed in mammalian cells, as well as in primary neurons, where α-Syn(G51D) was enriched in the nuclear compartment, was hyper-phosphorylated at S129 and exacerbated α-Syn-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Finally, post-mortem human brain tissues of α-Syn(G51D) cases were examined, and revealed only partial colocalization with nuclear membrane markers, probably due to post-mortem tissue delay and fixation. These findings suggest that the PD-linked mutations may cause neurodegeneration via different mechanisms, some of which may be independent of α-Syn aggregation. PMID:24728187

  1. Enhancement of lipid peroxidation and its amelioration by vitamin E in a subject with mutations in the SBP2 gene[S

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hamajima, Takashi; Ishida, Noriko; Mita, Yuichiro; Nakao, Shohei; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Niki, Etsuo; Noguchi, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) insertion sequence-binding protein 2 (SBP2) is essential for the biosynthesis of Sec-containing proteins, termed selenoproteins. Subjects with mutations in the SBP2 gene have decreased levels of several selenoproteins, resulting in a complex phenotype. Selenoproteins play a significant role in antioxidative defense, and deficiencies in these proteins can lead to increased oxidative stress. However, lipid peroxidation and the effects of antioxidants in subjects with SBP2 gene mutations have not been studied. In the present study, we evaluated the lipid peroxidation products in the blood of a subject (the proband) with mutations in the SBP2 gene. We found that the proband had higher levels of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation products, such as 7β-hydroxycholesterol, than the control subjects. Treatment of the proband with vitamin E (α-tocopherol acetate, 100 mg/day), a lipid-soluble antioxidant, for 2 years reduced lipid peroxidation product levels to those of control subjects. Withdrawal of vitamin E treatment for 7 months resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation products. Collectively, these results clearly indicate that free radical-mediated oxidative stress is increased in the subject with SBP2 gene mutations and that vitamin E treatment effectively inhibits the generation of lipid peroxidation products. PMID:26411970

  2. Point Mutations in FimH Adhesin of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Enhance Intestinal Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Dreux, Nicolas; Denizot, Jérémy; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Mellmann, Alexander; Billig, Maria; Kisiela, Dagmara; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Neut, Christel; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Barnich, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are abnormally predominant on Crohn's disease (CD) ileal mucosa. AIEC reference strain LF82 adheres to ileal enterocytes via the common type 1 pili adhesin FimH and recognizes CEACAM6 receptors abnormally expressed on CD ileal epithelial cells. The fimH genes of 45 AIEC and 47 non-AIEC strains were sequenced. The phylogenetic tree based on fimH DNA sequences indicated that AIEC strains predominantly express FimH with amino acid mutations of a recent evolutionary origin - a typical signature of pathoadaptive changes of bacterial pathogens. Point mutations in FimH, some of a unique AIEC-associated nature, confer AIEC bacteria a significantly higher ability to adhere to CEACAM-expressing T84 intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, in the LF82 strain, the replacement of fimHLF82 (expressing FimH with an AIEC-associated mutation) with fimHK12 (expressing FimH of commensal E. coli K12) decreased the ability of bacteria to persist and to induce severe colitis and gut inflammation in infected CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM receptors. Our results highlight a mechanism of AIEC virulence evolution that involves selection of amino acid mutations in the common bacterial traits, such as FimH protein, and leads to the development of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a genetically susceptible host. The analysis of fimH SNPs may be a useful method to predict the potential virulence of E. coli isolated from IBD patients for diagnostic or epidemiological studies and to identify new strategies for therapeutic intervention to block the interaction between AIEC and gut mucosa in the early stages of IBD. PMID:23358328

  3. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the −94C > G or −61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20–40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations. PMID:27341548

  4. Enhanced response of granulosa and theca cells from sheep carriers of the FecB mutation in vitro to gonadotropins and bone morphogenic protein-2, -4, and -6.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B K; Souza, C J H; Skinner, A J; Webb, R; Baird, D T

    2006-04-01

    The FecB (Booroola) mutation, which leads to increased ovulation rates and multiple births in sheep, is now known to occur in the signaling domain of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-1B receptor. We examined the effect of the mutation on the responsiveness of granulosa (GC) and theca cells (TC) to BMPs and other local regulators using tissue from animals with (Fec(B/B)) and without (Fec(+/+)) the FecB mutation. Experiments examined the effect of BMP-2, -4, and -6 (0.005-50 ng/ml), and their interaction with IGF-I (0.1-10 ng/ml LR3 analog) and gonadotropins, on the proliferation and differentiation of GCs and TCs isolated from small (<2 mm) antral follicles and maintained in serum-free culture for up to 8 d. Dose-finding studies using ovaries from wild-type sheep obtained from the abbattoir showed no difference among the different BMPs in stimulating (P < 0.001) estradiol (E2) production by GCs cultured with FSH (10 ng/ml), but there was a clear interaction (P < 0.001) with IGF-I. BMPs had no effect on GC proliferation or the sensitivity of GCs to FSH. In contrast, higher doses of BMPs (5-50 ng/ml) inhibited LH-stimulated androstenedione production by TCs, whereas lower doses (0.005-0.05 ng/ml) stimulated TC proliferation (P < 0.01). Regardless of dose of IGF-I, at the end of culture (96-192 h) hormone production by GCs (E2, inhibin A) and TCs (androstenedione) was 4- to 5-fold greater (P < 0.001) by cells from Fec(B/B), compared with Fec(+/+) ewes exposed to the same dose of gonadotropin. In the presence of low concentrations of IGF-I (0.1 ng/ml), the maximum increase in the production of E2 and inhibin A by GCs from FF ewes in response to BMPs was observed at doses that were 3- to 10-fold lower (3-10 ng/ml) than ++ (30 ng/ml; P < 0.001). Low doses of BMPs stimulated proliferation of TCs from ++ (P < 0.01) but not FF ewes. Immunohistochemistry confirmed BMP-6 protein expression in the oocyte, granulosa, and thecal layers of antral follicles from both genotypes

  5. Extensive scanning of the calpain-3 gene broadens the spectrum of LGMD2A phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Politano, L; Aurino, S; Fanin, M; Ricci, E; Ventriglia, V; Belsito, A; Totaro, A; Saccone, V; Topaloglu, H; Nascimbeni, A; Fulizio, L; Broccolini, A; Canki-Klain, N; Comi, L; Nigro, G; Angelini, C; Nigro, V

    2005-01-01

    Background: The limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of Mendelian disorders highlighted by weakness of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. Seventeen autosomal loci have been so far identified and genetic tests are mandatory to distinguish among the forms. Mutations at the calpain 3 locus (CAPN3) cause LGMD type 2A. Objective: To obtain unbiased information on the consequences of CAPN3 mutations. Patients: 530 subjects with different grades of symptoms and 300 controls. Methods: High throughput denaturing HPLC analysis of DNA pools. Results: 141 LGMD2A cases were identified, carrying 82 different CAPN3 mutations (45 novel), along with 18 novel polymorphisms/variants. Females had a more favourable course than males. In 94% of the more severely affected patient group, the defect was also discovered in the second allele. This proves the sensitivity of the approach. CAPN3 mutations were found in 35.1% of classical LGMD phenotypes. Mutations were also found in 18.4% of atypical patients and in 12.6% of subjects with high serum creatine kinase levels. Conclusions: A non-invasive and cost–effective strategy, based on the high throughput denaturing HPLC analysis of DNA pools, was used to obtain unbiased information on the consequences of CAPN3 mutations in the largest genetic study ever undertaken. This broadens the spectrum of LGMD2A phenotypes and sets the carrier frequency at 1:103. PMID:16141003

  6. Disruption of RB/E2F-1 interaction by single point mutations in E2F-1 enhances S-phase entry and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Durfee, T; Lee, W H

    1996-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been proposed to function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation by complexing with cellular proteins such as the transcription factor E2F. To study the biological consequences of the RB/E2F-1 interaction, point mutants of E2F-1 which fail to bind to RB were isolated by using the yeast two-hybrid system. Sequence analysis revealed that within the minimal 18-amino acid peptide of E2F-1 required for RB binding, five residues, Tyr (position 411), Glu (419), and Asp-Leu-Phe (423-425), are critical. These amino acids are conserved among the known E2F family members. While mutation of any of these five amino acids abolished binding to RB, all mutants retained their full transactivation potential. Expression of mutated E2F-1, when compared with that of wild-type, significantly accelerated entry into S phase and subsequent apoptosis. These results provide direct genetic evidence for the biological significance of the RB/E2F interaction and strongly suggest that the interplay between RB and E2F is critical for proper cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8570615

  7. The Photosystem II D1-K238E mutation enhances electrical current production using cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes in a bio-photoelectrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Larom, Shirley; Kallmann, Dan; Saper, Gadiel; Pinhassi, Roy; Rothschild, Avner; Dotan, Hen; Ankonina, Guy; Schuster, Gadi; Adir, Noam

    2015-10-01

    The conversion of solar energy (SEC) to storable chemical energy by photosynthesis has been performed by photosynthetic organisms, including oxygenic cyanobacteria for over 3 billion years. We have previously shown that crude thylakoid membranes from the cyanobacterium Synechocytis sp. PCC 6803 can reduce the electron transfer (ET) protein cytochrome c even in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU. Mutation of lysine 238 of the Photosystem II D1 protein to glutamic acid increased the cytochrome reduction rates, indicating the possible position of this unknown ET pathway. In this contribution, we show that D1-K238E is rather unique, as other mutations to K238, or to other residues in the same vicinity, are not as successful in cytochrome c reduction. This observation indicates the sensitivity of ET reactions to minor changes. As the next step in obtaining useful SEC from biological material, we describe the use of crude Synechocystis membranes in a bio-photovoltaic cell containing an N-acetyl cysteine-modified gold electrode. We show the production of significant current for prolonged time durations, in the presence of DCMU. Surprisingly, the presence of cytochrome c was not found to be necessary for ET to the bio-voltaic cell. PMID:25588957

  8. A Single Mutation in the Glycophorin A Binding Site of Hepatitis A Virus Enhances Virus Clearance from the Blood and Results in a Lower Fitness Variant

    PubMed Central

    Costafreda, M. Isabel; Ribes, Enric; Franch, Àngels; Bosch, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has previously been reported to bind to human red blood cells through interaction with glycophorin A. Residue K221 of VP1 and the surrounding VP3 residues are involved in such an interaction. This capsid region is specifically recognized by the monoclonal antibody H7C27. A monoclonal antibody-resistant mutant with the mutation G1217D has been isolated. In the present study, the G1217D mutant was characterized physically and biologically in comparison with the parental HM175 43c strain. The G1217D mutant is more sensitive to acid pH and binds more efficiently to human and rat erythrocytes than the parental 43c strain. In a rat model, it is eliminated from serum more rapidly and consequently reaches the liver with a certain delay compared to the parental 43c strain. In competition experiments performed in vivo in the rat model, the G1217D mutant was efficiently outcompeted by the parental 43c strain. Only in the presence of antibodies reacting specifically with the parental 43c strain could the G1217D mutant outcompete the parental 43c strain in serum, although the latter still showed a remarkable ability to reach the liver. Altogether, these results indicate that the G1217D mutation induces a low fitness phenotype which could explain the lack of natural antigenic variants of the glycophorin A binding site. PMID:22593170

  9. Etomidate blocks LTP and impairs learning but does not enhance tonic inhibition in mice carrying the N265M point mutation in the beta3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Zarnowska, E D; Rodgers, F C; Oh, I; Rau, V; Lor, C; Laha, K T; Jurd, R; Rudolph, U; Eger, E I; Pearce, R A

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been proposed as the mechanism by which a variety of anesthetics, including the general anesthetic etomidate, impair learning and memory. Since α5 subunits preferentially partner with β3 subunits, we tested the hypothesis that etomidate acts through β3-subunit containing GABAARs to enhance tonic inhibition, block LTP, and impair memory. We measured the effects of etomidate in wild type mice and in mice carrying a point mutation in the GABAAR β3-subunit (β3-N265M) that renders these receptors insensitive to etomidate. Etomidate enhanced tonic inhibition in CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in wild type but not in mutant mice, demonstrating that tonic inhibition is mediated by β3-subunit containing GABAARs. However, despite its inability to enhance tonic inhibition, etomidate did block LTP in brain slices from mutant mice as well as in those from wild type mice. Etomidate also impaired fear conditioning to context, with no differences between genotypes. In studies of recombinant receptors expressed in HEK293 cells, α5β1γ2L GABAARs were insensitive to amnestic concentrations of etomidate (1 μM and below), whereas α5β2γ2L and α5β3γ2L GABAARs were enhanced. We conclude that etomidate enhances tonic inhibition in pyramidal cells through its action on α5β3-containing GABAA receptors, but blocks LTP and impairs learning by other means - most likely by modulating α5β2-containing GABAA receptors. The critical anesthetic targets underlying amnesia might include other forms of inhibition imposed on pyramidal neurons (e.g. slow phasic inhibition), or inhibitory processes on non-pyramidal cells (e.g. interneurons). PMID:25680234

  10. Estimating mutation rate: how to count mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun-Xin; Huai, Haying

    2003-01-01

    Mutation rate is an essential parameter in genetic research. Counting the number of mutant individuals provides information for a direct estimate of mutation rate. However, mutant individuals in the same family can share the same mutations due to premeiotic mutation events, so that the number of mutant individuals can be significantly larger than the number of mutation events observed. Since mutation rate is more closely related to the number of mutation events, whether one should count only independent mutation events or the number of mutants remains controversial. We show in this article that counting mutant individuals is a correct approach for estimating mutation rate, while counting only mutation events will result in underestimation. We also derived the variance of the mutation-rate estimate, which allows us to examine a number of important issues about the design of such experiments. The general strategy of such an experiment should be to sample as many families as possible and not to sample much more offspring per family than the reciprocal of the pairwise correlation coefficient within each family. To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of mutation rate, the number of sampled families needs to be in the same or higher order of magnitude as the reciprocal of the mutation rate. PMID:12807798

  11. Mutations, mutation rates, and evolution at the hypervariable VNTR loci of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Amy J; Keys, Christine E; Allender, Christopher; Bailey, Ira; Girard, Jessica; Pearson, Talima; Smith, Kimothy L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul

    2007-03-01

    VNTRs are able to discriminate among closely related isolates of recently emerged clonal pathogens, including Yersinia pestis the etiologic agent of plague, because of their great diversity. Diversity is driven largely by mutation but little is known about VNTR mutation rates, factors affecting mutation rates, or the mutational mechanisms. The molecular epidemiological utility of VNTRs will be greatly enhanced when this foundational knowledge is available. Here, we measure mutation rates for 43 VNTR loci in Y. pestis using an in vitro generated population encompassing approximately 96,000 generations. We estimate the combined 43-locus rate and individual rates for 14 loci. A comparison of Y. pestis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 VNTR mutation rates and products revealed a similar relationship between diversity and mutation rate in these two species. Likewise, the relationship between repeat copy number and mutation rate is nearly identical between these species, suggesting a generalized relationship that may be applicable to other species. The single- versus multiple-repeat mutation ratios and the insertion versus deletion mutation ratios were also similar, providing support for a general model for the mutations associated with VNTRs. Finally, we use two small sets of Y. pestis isolates to show how this general model and our estimated mutation rates can be used to compare alternate phylogenies, and to evaluate the significance of genotype matches, near-matches, and mismatches found in empirical comparisons with a reference database. PMID:17161849

  12. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Plenary lectures; Brook mutational mechanisms; Adduction and DNA damage; Recombination and gene conversion; Repair: Prokoyote mechanisms and induction; Repair: Lower eukaryote and plant mechanisms; Repair: Higher eukaryote mechanisms and selectivity; Repair: Human genes and mechanisms; Mutation: Spectra and mechanisms; Mutation: Shuttle vectors; Mutation: Transgenic animals; New methods: Polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Enhanced troponin I binding explains the functional changes produced by the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation A8V of cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    Zot, Henry G; Hasbun, Javier E; Michell, Clara A; Landim-Vieira, Maicon; Pinto, Jose R

    2016-07-01

    Higher affinity for TnI explains how troponin C (TnC) carrying a causative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation, TnC(A8V), sensitizes muscle cells to Ca(2+). Muscle fibers reconstituted with TnC(A8V) require ∼2.3-fold less [Ca(2+)] to achieve 50% maximum-tension compared to fibers reconstituted with wild-type TnC (TnC(WT)). Binding measurements rule out a significant change in N-terminus Ca(2+)-affinity of isolated TnC(A8V), and TnC(A8V) binds the switch-peptide of troponin-I (TnI(sp)) ∼1.6-fold more strongly than TnC(WT); thus we model the TnC-TnI(sp) interaction as competing with the TnI-actin interaction. Tension data are well-fit by a model constrained to conditions in which the affinity of TnC(A8V) for TnI(sp) is 1.5-1.7-fold higher than that of TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)]. Mean ATPase rates of reconstituted cardiac myofibrils is greater for TnC(A8V) than TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)], with statistically significant differences in the means at higher [Ca(2+)]. To probe TnC-TnI interaction in low Ca(2+), displacement of bis-ANS from TnI was monitored as a function of TnC. Whereas Ca(2+)-TnC(WT) displaces significantly more bis-ANS than Mg(2+)-TnC(WT), Ca(2+)-TnC(A8V) displaces probe equivalently to Mg(2+)-TnC(A8V) and Ca(2+)-TnC(WT), consistent with stronger Ca(2+)-independent TnC(A8V)-TnI(sp). A Matlab program for computing theoretical activation is reported. Our work suggests that contractility is constantly above normal in hearts made hypertrophic by TnC(A8V). PMID:26976709

  14. Enhancement of α5-Containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid TypeAReceptors by the Nonimmobilizer 1,2-Dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) is Abolished by the β3(N265M) Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Burkat, Paul M.; Lor, Chong; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) by general anesthetics may contribute to their ability to produce amnesia. Receptors containing α5 subunits, which mediate tonic and slow synaptic inhibition, are co-localized with β3 and γ2 subunits in dendritic layers of the hippocampus and are sensitive to low (amnestic) concentrations of anesthetics. Since α5 and β3 subunits influence performance in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks in the presence and absence of general anesthetics, and the experimental inhaled drug 1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) impairs hippocampus-dependent learning, we hypothesized that F6 would modulate receptors that incorporate α5 and β3 subunits. We hypothesized further that the β3(N265M) mutation, which controls receptor modulation by general anesthetics, would similarly influence modulation by F6. Methods Using whole-cell electrophysiological recording techniques, we tested the effects of F6 at concentrations ranging from 4 μM to 16 μM on receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney293 cells. We measured drug modulation of wild type α5β3 and α5β3γ2L GABAARs, and receptors harboring the β3(N265M) mutation. We also tested the effects of F6 on α1β2γ2L receptors, which were reported previously to be insensitive to this drug when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Results F6 enhanced the responses of wild type α5β3γ2L but not α1β2γ2L receptors to low concentrations of GABA in a concentration-dependent manner. Receptors that incorporated the mutant β3(N265M) subunit were insensitive to F6. When applied together with a high concentration of GABA, F6 blocked currents through α5β3 but not α5β3γ2L receptors. F6 did not alter deactivation of α5β3γ2L receptors after brief, high concentration pulses of GABA. Conclusions The nonimmobilizer F6 modulates GABAARs in a manner that depends on subunit composition and on mode of receptor activation by GABA, supporting a possible role for α5

  15. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  16. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  17. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, George Saad; Abu-Tahon, Medhat Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens) and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen) to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v), temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0–11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g), CMCase (1,783 U/g), and β-glucosidase (342 U/g), which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover. PMID:26691490

  18. Interactions with M-band Titin and Calpain 3 Link Myospryn (CMYA5) to Tibial and Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophies*

    PubMed Central

    Sarparanta, Jaakko; Blandin, Gaëlle; Charton, Karine; Vihola, Anna; Marchand, Sylvie; Milic, Astrid; Hackman, Peter; Ehler, Elisabeth; Richard, Isabelle; Udd, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the C terminus of titin, situated at the M-band of the striated muscle sarcomere, cause tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2J. Mutations in the protease calpain 3 (CAPN3), in turn, lead to LGMD2A, and secondary CAPN3 deficiency in LGMD2J suggests that the pathomechanisms of the diseases are linked. Yeast two-hybrid screens carried out to elucidate the molecular pathways of TMD/LGMD2J and LGMD2A resulted in the identification of myospryn (CMYA5, cardiomyopathy-associated 5) as a binding partner for both M-band titin and CAPN3. Additional yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed both interactions. The interaction of myospryn and M-band titin was supported by localization of endogenous and transfected myospryn at the M-band level. Coexpression studies showed that myospryn is a proteolytic substrate for CAPN3 and suggested that myospryn may protect CAPN3 from autolysis. Myospryn is a muscle-specific protein of the tripartite motif superfamily, reported to function in vesicular trafficking and protein kinase A signaling and implicated in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The novel interactions indicate a role for myospryn in the sarcomeric M-band and may be relevant for the molecular pathomechanisms of TMD/LGMD2J and LGMD2A. PMID:20634290

  19. Calpain-3-mediated regulation of the Na⁺-Ca²⁺ exchanger isoform 3.

    PubMed

    Michel, Lauriane Y M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2016-02-01

    Ca(2+) disturbances are observed when Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteases malfunction, causing muscle weakness and wasting. For example, loss of calpain-3 (CAPN3) activity leads to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A). In neuronal excitotoxicity, the cleavage of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger isoform 3 (NCX3) has been associated with an increase in activity and elevation of the Ca(2+) content in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since NCX3 is expressed in skeletal muscle, we evaluated the cleavage of different NCX3 splice variants by CAPN1 and CAPN3. Using Fura-2-based cellular Ca(2+) imaging, we showed for the first time that CAPN3 increases NCX3 activity and that only NCX3-AC, the variant predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle, is sensitive to calpain. The silencing of the endogenous CAPN1 and the expression of the inactive form of CAPN3 (C129S CAPN3) confirmed the specificity for CAPN1 and CAPN3. Functional studies revealed that cellular Ca(2+) uptake through the reverse mode of NCX3 was significantly increased independently of the mode of activation of the exchanger by either a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) or Na(+) ([Na(+)]i). Subsequently, the sensitivity to CAPN1 and CAPN3 could be abrogated by removal of the six residues coded in exon C of NCX3-AC. Additionally, mutation of the Leu-600 and Leu-601 suggested the presence of a cleavage site at Leu-602. The increased Ca(2+) uptake of NCX3 might participate in the Ca(2+) refilling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) after the excitation-contraction uncoupling following exercise and therefore be implicated in the impaired reticular Ca(2+) storage observed in LGMD2A. PMID:26503425

  20. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. PMID:27246850

  1. A New Subtype of Multiple Synostoses Syndrome Is Caused by a Mutation in GDF6 That Decreases Its Sensitivity to Noggin and Enhances Its Potency as a BMP Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yu, Tingting; Wang, Zhigang; Ohte, Satoshi; Yao, Ru-En; Zheng, Zhaojing; Geng, Juan; Cai, Haiqing; Ge, Yihua; Li, Yuchan; Xu, Yunlan; Zhang, Qinghua; Gusella, James F; Fu, Qihua; Pregizer, Steven; Rosen, Vicki; Shen, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    Growth and differentiation factors (GDFs) are secreted signaling molecules within the BMP family that have critical roles in joint morphogenesis during skeletal development in mice and humans. Using genetic data obtained from a six-generation Chinese family, we identified a missense variant in GDF6 (NP_001001557.1; p.Y444N) that fully segregates with a novel autosomal dominant synostoses (SYNS) phenotype, which we designate as SYNS4. Affected individuals display bilateral wrist and ankle deformities at birth and progressive conductive deafness after age 40 years. We find that the Y444N variant affects a highly conserved residue of GDF6 in a region critical for binding of GDF6 to its receptor(s) and to the BMP antagonist NOG, and show that this mutant GDF6 is a more potent stimulator of the canonical BMP signaling pathway compared with wild-type GDF6. Further, we determine that the enhanced BMP activity exhibited by mutant GDF6 is attributable to resistance to NOG-mediated antagonism. Collectively, our findings indicate that increased BMP signaling owing to a GDF6 gain-of-function mutation is responsible for loss of joint formation and profound functional impairment in patients with SYNS4. More broadly, our study highlights the delicate balance of BMP signaling required for proper joint morphogenesis and reinforces the critical role of BMP signaling in skeletal development. PMID:26643732

  2. Pro32Pro33 mutations in the integrin β3 PSI domain result in αIIbβ3 priming and enhanced adhesion: reversal of the hypercoagulability phenotype by the Src inhibitor SKI-606.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kendra H; Jessen, Tammy; Crawford, Emily L; Chung, Chang Y; Sutcliffe, James S; Carneiro, Ana M

    2014-06-01

    The plasma-membrane integrin αIIbβ3 (CD41/CD61, GPIIbIIIa) is a major functional receptor in platelets during clotting. A common isoform of integrin β3, Leu33Pro is associated with enhanced platelet function and increased risk for coronary thrombosis and stroke, although these findings remain controversial. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which this sequence variation modifies platelet function, we produced transgenic knockin mice expressing a Pro32Pro33 integrin β3. Consistent with reports utilizing human platelets, we found significantly reduced bleeding and clotting times, as well as increased in vivo thrombosis, in Pro32Pro33 homozygous mice. These alterations paralleled increases in platelet attachment and spreading onto fibrinogen resulting from enhanced integrin αIIbβ3 function. Activation with protease-activated receptor 4- activating peptide, the main thrombin signaling receptor in mice, showed no significant difference in activation of Pro32Pro33 mice as compared with controls, suggesting that inside-out signaling remains intact. However, under unstimulated conditions, the Pro32Pro33 mutation led to elevated Src phosphorylation, facilitated by increased talin interactions with the β3 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the αIIbβ3 intracellular domains are primed for activation while the ligand-binding domain remains unchanged. Acute dosing of animals with a Src inhibitor was sufficient to rescue the clotting phenotype in knockin mice to wild-type levels. Together, our data establish that the Pro32Pro33 structural alteration modifies the function of integrin αIIbβ3, priming the integrin for outside-in signaling, ultimately leading to hypercoagulability. Furthermore, our data may support a novel approach to antiplatelet therapy by Src inhibition where hemostasis is maintained while reducing risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24695082

  3. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; CF Molecular Genetic Testing Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Panel Related tests: Sweat Test ; Trypsinogen ; ...

  4. Colorectal cancer prognosis: is it all mutation, mutation, mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A B; Paraskeva, C

    2005-01-01

    For the 500 000 new cases of colorectal cancer in the world each year, identification of patients with a worse prognosis and those who are more likely to respond to treatment is a challenge. There is an increasing body of evidence correlating genetic mutations with outcome in tumours derived from human colorectal cancer cohorts. K-ras, but not p53 or APC, mutations appear to be associated with poorer overall survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16099785

  5. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  6. Enhancer Malfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Hu, Deqing; Shilatifard, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Why certain point mutations in a general transcription factor are associated with specific forms of cancer has been a major question in cancer biology. Enhancers are DNA regulatory elements that are major regulators of tissue-specific gene expression. Recent studies suggest that enhancer malfunction through point mutations in either regulatory elements or factors modulating enhancer-promoter communication could be the cause of tissue-specific cancer development. In this Perspective, we will discuss recent findings in the identification of cancer-related enhancer mutations and the role of Drosophila Trr and its human homologs, the MLL3 and MLL4/COMPASS-like complexes, as enhancer histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferases functioning in enhancer-promoter communication. Recent genome-wide studies in the cataloging of somatic mutations in cancer have identified mutations in intergenic sequences encoding regulatory elements, and in MLL3 and MLL4 in both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. We propose that cancer-associated mutations in MLL3 and MLL4 exert their properties through the malfunction of Trr/MLL3/MLL4-dependent enhancers. PMID:24656127

  7. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  8. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and genetic factors play an important role in its genesis. Although mutations in tumor suppressors and oncogenes encoded by the nuclear genome are known to play a critical role in breast tumorigenesis, the contribution of the mitochondrial genome to this process is unclear. Like the nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome also encodes proteins critical for mitochondria functions such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which is known to be defective in cancer including breast cancer. Due to limited repair mechanisms compared to that for nuclear DNA (nDNA), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is more susceptible to mutations. Thus changes in mitochondrial genes could also contribute to the development of breast cancer. In this review we discuss mtDNA mutations that affect OXPHOS. Continuous acquisition of mtDNA mutations and selection of advantageous mutations ultimately leads to generation of cells that propagate uncontrollably to form tumors. Since irreversible damage to OXPHOS leads to a shift in energy metabolism towards enhanced aerobic glycolysis in most cancers, mutations in mtDNA represent an early event during breast tumorigenesis, and thus may serve as potential biomarkers for early detection and prognosis of breast cancer. Because mtDNA mutations lead to defective OXPHOS, development of agents that target OXPHOS will provide specificity for preventative and therapeutic agents against breast cancer with minimal toxicity. PMID:24140413

  10. Stationary mutation models.

    PubMed

    Simonsson, Ivar; Mostad, Petter

    2016-07-01

    Probability calculations for relationship inference based on DNA tests are often performed with computer packages such as Familias. When mutations are assumed to be a possibility, one may notice a curious and problematic effect of including untested parents: results tend to change slightly. In this paper, we trace this effect back to fundamental model-formulating issues which can only be resolved by using stationary mutation models. We present several methods for obtaining such stationary mutation matrices from original mutation matrices, and evaluate essential properties of these methods. Our conclusion is that typically, stationary mutation models can be obtained, but for many types of markers, it may be impossible to combine specific biologically reasonable requirements for a mutation matrix with the requirement of stationarity. PMID:27231805

  11. A T67A mutation in the proximal pocket of the high-spin heme of MauG stabilizes formation of a mixed-valent FeII/FeIII state and enhances charge resonance stabilization of the bis-FeIV state.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooim; Feng, Manliang; Li, Chao; Williamson, Heather R; Choi, Moonsung; Wilmot, Carrie M; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-08-01

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation required for posttranslational modification of a precursor of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete the biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. One heme is low-spin with ligands provided by His205 and Tyr294, and the other is high-spin with a ligand provided by His35. The side chain methyl groups of Thr67 and Leu70 are positioned at a distance of 3.4Å on either side of His35, maintaining a hydrophobic environment in the proximal pocket of the high-spin heme and restricting the movement of this ligand. Mutation of Thr67 to Ala in the proximal pocket of the high-spin heme prevented reduction of the low-spin heme by dithionite, yielding a mixed-valent state. The mutation also enhanced the stabilization of the charge-resonance-transition of the high-valent bis-FeIV state that is generated by addition of H2O2. The rates of electron transfer from TTQ biosynthetic intermediates to the high-valent form of T67A MauG were similar to that of wild-type MauG. These results are compared to those previously reported for mutation of residues in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme that also affected the redox properties and charge resonance transition stabilization of the high-valent state of the hemes. However, given the position of residue 67, the structure of the variant protein and the physical nature of the T67A mutation, the basis for the effects of the T67A mutation must be different from those of the mutations of the residues in the distal heme pocket. PMID:25896561

  12. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  13. NRAS mutation is the sole recurrent somatic mutation in large congenital melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Charbel, Christelle; Fontaine, Romain H; Malouf, Gabriel G; Picard, Arnaud; Kadlub, Natacha; El-Murr, Nizar; How-Kit, Alexandre; Su, Xiaoping; Coulomb-L'Hermine, Aurore; Tost, Jorg; Mourah, Samia; Aractingi, Selim; Guégan, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    Congenital melanocytic nevus (CMN) is a particular melanocytic in utero proliferation characterized by an increased risk of melanoma transformation during infancy or adulthood. NRAS and BRAF mutations have consistently been reported in CMN samples, but until recently results have been contradictory. We therefore studied a series of large and giant CMNs and compared them with small and medium CMNs using Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, high-resolution melting analysis, and mutation enrichment by an enhanced version of ice-COLD-PCR. Large-giant CMNs displayed NRAS mutations in 94.7% of cases (18/19). At that point, the role of additional mutations in CMN pathogenesis had to be investigated. We therefore performed exome sequencing on five specimens of large-giant nevi. The results showed that NRAS mutation was the sole recurrent somatic event found in such melanocytic proliferations. The genetic profile of small-medium CMNs was significantly different, with 70% of cases bearing NRAS mutations and 30% showing BRAF mutations. These findings strongly suggest that NRAS mutations are sufficient to drive melanocytic benign proliferations in utero. PMID:24129063

  14. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  15. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  16. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  17. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  18. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  19. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations can make profound impact on the evolution and improvement of a self-pollinated crop such as lettuce. Since it is nontransgenic, mutation breeding is more acceptable to consumers. Combined with genomic advances in new technologies like TILLING, mutagenesis is becoming an even more powerfu...

  20. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  1. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  2. The effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 on oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs-enhanced sensitivity to X-rays in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study reported here was to further investigate the potential effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 (Chk2) on radiosensitivity enhanced by oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN7909) in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Methods In vitro A549 cells were randomly separated into control, CpG, X-ray, CpG+ X-ray, ATM kinase-small interfering RNA (siRNA)+CpG+X-ray (ATM-siRNA), and Chk2-siRNA+CpG+X-ray (Chk2-siRNA) groups. siRNAs were adopted to silence the ATM and Chk2 genes. Expression and phosphorylation of ATM kinase and Chk2 were detected by Western blot assay. Cell colonies were observed under inverted phase-contrast microscopy. Cellular survival curves were fitted using a multi-target single-hitting model. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was similar among the control, CpG, X-ray, and CpG+X-ray groups. Phosphorylated ATM kinase and Chk2 were significantly increased in the CpG+X-ray group compared with in the X-ray group (t=6.00, P<0.01 and t=3.13, P<0.05, respectively), though these were hardly detected in the control and CpG groups. However, expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was clearly downregulated in the ATM-siRNA and Chk2-siRNA groups, respectively. Similarly, their phosphorylation levels were also significantly decreased in the ATM-siRNA group (t=14.35, P<0.01 and t=8.46, P<0.01, respectively) and a significant decrease in phosphorylated Chk2 was observed in the Chk2-siRNA group (t=7.28, P<0.01) when compared with the CpG+X-ray group. Further, the number of A549 cells at Gap 2/mitotic phase and the apoptosis rate were clearly increased in the CpG+X-ray group compared with in the other groups (all P<0.05). The multi-target single-hitting model showed that the sensitization enhancement ratio calculated by mean death dose was 1.39 in CpG+X-ray group (vs 1.04 and 1.03 in the ATM

  3. [Correlation of adult AML Npm1 mutations with prognosis and its relationship with gene mutation of FLT3 and CEBPA].

    PubMed

    Bao, Li-Yan; Wang, Ji-Shi

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of 12th exon mutations in the npm1 gene with prognosis of adult AML patients and to explore the relationship of 12th exon mutation with other gene mutations. The specimen of bone marrow and peripheral blood from AML patients, the informations of medical history, symptoms, related image examinations, blood routine examination, NAP, oxygen saturation level in artery blood and EPO level in serum were collected; the bcr/abl fusion gene was detected by routine examination of bone marrow + biopsy + chromosome mapping + FISH. The patients were typed according to WHO classification. The DNA in cells was extracted, the npm1 gene mutation was detected by allele specific PCR combined were the sequencing. The results indicated that the npm1 heterozygote gene mutation was found in 72 out of 150 AML patients with normal cytogenetics (48%, 72/150). 48% patients showed a frameshift mutation in the C-terminal region of the NPM1 protein. The AML patients with npm1 gene mutation had specific clinical, phenotypic and genetic characteristics. The statistical analysis demonstrated the relationship between npm1 and flt3 ITDs. The patients with npm1 mutation showed a better response to induction therapy, furthermore, the overall survival (OS) rate of patients without flt3 ITD mutation was enhanced. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the npm1 gene mutation and cebpa mutation positively correlated to the OS rate, and the correlation of flt3 mutation to OS rate showed negative. It is concluded that npm1 mutation is a favorable independent prognostic factor for adult AML patients with normal cytogenetics under conditions without FIT3 gene mutation. PMID:20137111

  4. Splice-shifting oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) created by the prevalent c.903+469T>C MTRR mutation corrects splicing and restores enzyme activity in patient cells

    PubMed Central

    Palhais, Bruno; Præstegaard, Veronica S.; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Lutz, Seraina; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Baumgartner, Matthias; Fowler, Brian; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Kožich, Viktor; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent c.903+469T>C mutation in MTRR causes the cblE type of homocystinuria by strengthening an SRSF1 binding site in an ESE leading to activation of a pseudoexon. We hypothesized that other splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are also critical for MTRR pseudoexon inclusion. We demonstrate that the MTRR pseudoexon is on the verge of being recognized and is therefore vulnerable to several point mutations that disrupt a fine-tuned balance between the different SREs. Normally, pseudoexon inclusion is suppressed by a hnRNP A1 binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS). When the c.903+469T>C mutation is present two ESEs abrogate the activity of the ESS and promote pseudoexon inclusion. Blocking the 3′splice site or the ESEs by SSOs is effective in restoring normal splicing of minigenes and endogenous MTRR transcripts in patient cells. By employing an SSO complementary to both ESEs, we were able to rescue MTRR enzymatic activity in patient cells to approximately 50% of that in controls. We show that several point mutations, individually, can activate a pseudoexon, illustrating that this mechanism can occur more frequently than previously expected. Moreover, we demonstrate that SSO blocking of critical ESEs is a promising strategy to treat the increasing number of activated pseudoexons. PMID:25878036

  5. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  6. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Davis, Sean; Killian, J. Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R.; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S.; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor’s natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  7. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Rebecca; Teper, Yaroslav; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J; Davis, Sean; Killian, J Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  8. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  9. Epigenetic synthetic lethality in ovarian clear cell carcinoma: EZH2 and ARID1A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bitler, Benjamin G; Aird, Katherine M; Zhang, Rugang

    2016-01-01

    The components of the Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) complex are mutated in approximately 20% of human cancers. The A/T-rich interacting domain 1A (ARID1A) subunit has one of the highest mutation rates. Most notably, ARID1A is mutated in over 50% of ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs). We reported that inhibition of enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is synthetically lethal in ARID1A-mutated OCCC. PMID:27308548

  10. Epigenetic synthetic lethality in ovarian clear cell carcinoma: EZH2 and ARID1A mutations.

    PubMed

    Bitler, Benjamin G; Aird, Katherine M; Zhang, Rugang

    2016-01-01

    The components of the Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) complex are mutated in approximately 20% of human cancers. The A/T-rich interacting domain 1A (ARID1A) subunit has one of the highest mutation rates. Most notably, ARID1A is mutated in over 50% of ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs). We reported that inhibition of enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is synthetically lethal in ARID1A-mutated OCCC. PMID:27308548

  11. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  12. Mutations in lettuce improvement.

    PubMed

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  13. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. ); Cohen, M.P. ); Sexauer, C.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  14. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  15. Induction of delayed mutations by benzene and ethylene dibromide in drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, P.; Kale, R.

    1995-08-01

    Two carcinogens, ethylene dibromide and benzene, were used to induce delayed (germinal mosaic) sex-linked recessive lethal mutations in spermatozoa and spermatids of adult Drosophila males. Significant numbers of delayed mutations (in F{sub 3}) were scored in absence of conventional (in F{sub 2}) mutations. A large proportion of nonlethal F{sub 2} cultures carried delayed mutations, so much so that, in some cultures, all F{sub 2} females were carriers of mutations. The mechanism through which single strand damage to treated X chromosomes can result in such delayed lethals is discussed. These observations indicate that the delayed mutation test should be used for testing the mutagenicity of environmental compounds, especially carcinogens, which tested negative in the conventional sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test. The data will support the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and, also will further enhance the sensitivity of the Drosophila mutation assay. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene (SLC26A2): 22 novel mutations, mutation review, associated skeletal phenotypes, and diagnostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Superti-Furga, A

    2001-03-01

    replaced by mutation analysis, but may still be useful in cases where mutation analysis is not informative. Although supplementation of patients' cultured cells with thiols may bypass the transporter defect and enhance sulfation of proteoglycans, therapeutic approaches are not yet available. Mouse models for this and other disorders of sulfate metabolism are being developed to help in developing therapeutic treatments. PMID:11241838

  17. Frameshift mutations at two hotspots in vasopressin transcripts in post-mitotic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A; van der Kleij, A A; Sonnemans, M A; Burbach, J P; van Leeuwen, F W

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in DNA underlie carcinogenesis, inherited pathology, and aging and are generally thought to be introduced during meiosis and mitosis. Here we report that in post-mitotic neurons specific frameshift mutations occur at high frequency. These mutations were identified in vasopressin transcripts in magnocellular neurons of the homozygous Brattleboro rat and predominantly consist of a GA deletion in GAGAG motifs. Immunocytochemistry provides evidence for similar events in wild-type rats. However, the diseased state of the Brattleboro rat, resulting in a permanent activation of vasopressin neurons, enhanced the mutational rate. These data reveal hitherto unrecognized somatic mutations in nondividing neurons. Images PMID:8016115

  18. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Erstad, Derek J.; Cusack, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge. PMID:25329450

  19. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  20. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  1. Mutation detection by chemical cleavage.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R G

    1999-02-01

    Detection and amplification of mutations in genes in a cheap, 100% effective manner is a major objective in modern molecular genetics. This ideal is some way away and many methods are used each of which have their own particular advantages and disadvantages. Sequencing is often thought of as the 'gold standard' for mutation detection. This perception is distorted due to the fact that this is the ONLY method of mutation identification but this does not mean it is the best for mutation detection. The fact that many scanning methods detect 5-10% of mutant molecules in a wild type environment immediately indicates these methods are advantageous over sequencing. One such method, the Chemical Cleavage method, is able to cut the costs of detecting a mutation on order of magnitude and guarantees mutation detection as evidenced by track record and the fact that each mutation has two chances of being detected. PMID:10084109

  2. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  3. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  4. The incidence of PAX6 mutation in patients with simple aniridia: an evaluation of mutation detection in 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Axton, R; Hanson, I; Danes, S; Sellar, G; van Heyningen, V; Prosser, J

    1997-01-01

    Twelve aniridia patients, five with a family history and seven presumed to be sporadic, were exhaustively screened in order to test what proportion of people with aniridia, uncomplicated by associated anomalies, carry mutations in the human PAX6 gene. Mutations were detected in 90% of the cases. Three mutation detection techniques were used to determine if one method was superior for this gene. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used on RT-PCR products, SSCP on genomic PCR amplifications, and chemical cleavage of mismatch on both RT-PCR and genomic amplifications. For RT-PCR products, only the translated portion of the gene was screened. On genomic products exons 1 to 13 (including 740 bp of the 3' untranslated sequence and all intron/exon boundaries) were screened, as was a neuroretina specific enhancer in intron 4. Ten of the possible 12 mutations in the five familial cases and five of the sporadic patients were found, all of which conformed to a functional outcome of haploinsufficiency. Five were splice site mutations (one in the donor site of intron 4, two in the donor site of intron 6, one in each of the acceptor sites of introns 8 and 9) and five were nonsense mutations in exons 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. SSCP analysis of individually amplified exons, with which nine of the 10 mutations were seen, was the most useful detection method for PAX6. Images PMID:9138149

  5. Two new Gaucher disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; Gelbart, T

    1994-02-01

    Recently, a mutation at nucleotide 1193 of the glucocerebrosidase gene was described in a patient with type 1 Gaucher disease. This mutation destroys a TaqI site in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragment. We used digestion with this enzyme to screen DNA samples from Gaucher disease patients representing 23 previously unidentified alleles and discovered that this site had been destroyed in three samples. However, the mutation that caused this change proved to be a CT substitution at cDNA nucleotide 1192 (Genomic 5408; 359Arg-->End). Fortuitously, another TaqI site was destroyed by a different mutation, a GA mutation at nt 1312 (Genomic 5927; 399AspAsn). Both of these mutations were functionally severe in that they were associated with type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. PMID:8112750

  6. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers. PMID:26053201

  7. Kinase Impaired BRAF Mutations Confer Lung Cancer Sensitivity to Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Banibrata; Peng, Shaohua; Tang, Ximing; Erickson, Heidi S.; Galindo, Hector; Mazumdar, Tuhina; Stewart, David J.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Johnson, Faye M.

    2013-01-01

    During a clinical trial of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib for advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) one patient responded dramatically and remains cancer-free 4 years later. A comprehensive analysis of his tumor revealed a previously undescribed, kinase inactivating BRAF mutation (Y472CBRAF); no inactivating BRAF mutations were found in the non-responding tumors taken from other patients. Cells transfected with Y472CBRAF exhibited CRAF, MEK, and ERK activation – characteristics identical to signaling changes that occur with previously known kinase inactivating BRAF mutants. Dasatinib selectively induced senescence in NSCLC cells with inactivating BRAF mutations. Transfection of other NSCLC cells with these BRAF mutations also increased these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity, whereas transfection with an activating BRAF mutation led to their increased dasatinib resistance. The sensitivity induced by Y472CBRAF was reversed by the introduction of a BRAF mutation that impairs RAF dimerization. Dasatinib inhibited CRAF modestly, but concurrently induced RAF dimerization resulting in ERK activation in NSCLC cells with kinase inactivating BRAF mutations. The sensitivity of NSCLC with kinase impaired BRAF to dasatinib suggested synthetic lethality of BRAF and a dasatinib target. Inhibiting BRAF in NSCLC cells expressing wild-type BRAF likewise enhanced these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity. Thus, the patient’s BRAF mutation was likely responsible for his tumor’s marked response to dasatinib, suggesting that tumors bearing kinase impaired BRAF mutations may be exquisitely sensitive to dasatinib. Moreover, the potential synthetic lethality of combination therapy including dasatinib and BRAF inhibitors may lead to additional therapeutic options against cancers with wild-type BRAF. PMID:22649091

  8. Single cell genotyping of exome sequencing-identified mutations to characterize the clonal composition and evolution of inv(16) AML in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Niemöller, Christoph; Renz, Nathalie; Bleul, Sabine; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Greil, Christine; Yoshida, Kenichi; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Follo, Marie; Duyster, Justus; Claus, Rainer; Ogawa, Seishi; Lübbert, Michael; Becker, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    We recently described the development of an inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a CBL mutated clonal hematopoiesis. Here, we further characterized the clonal composition and evolution of the AML based on the genetic information from the bulk specimen and analyses of individual bone marrow cells for mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. To control for allele dropout, heterozygous polymorphisms located close to the respective mutation loci were assessed in parallel. The clonal composition concluded from exome sequencing suggested a proliferation advantage associated with the acquisition of mutations in CAND1, PTPRT, and DOCK6. Out of 102 single cell sequencing reactions on these mutations and the respective polymorphisms, analyses yielded conclusive results for at least 2 mutation sites in 12 cells. The single cell genotyping not only confirmed the co-occurrence of the PTPRT, CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations in the same AML clone but also revealed a clonal hierarchy, as the PTPRT mutation was likely acquired after the CAND1 and DOCK6 mutations. This insight had not been possible based solely on the exome sequencing data and suggests that the mutation in PTPRT, which encodes a STAT3-inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase, contributed to the AML development at a later stage by enhancing proliferation. PMID:27244256

  9. REEP1 Mutation Spectrum and Genotype/Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beetz, Christian; Schule, Rebecca; Deconinck, Tine; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Zhu, Hui; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Byrne, Paula; Otto, Susanne; Nygren, Anders O. H.; Baets, Jonathan; Smets, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten; Dan, Bernard; Nagan, Narasimhan; Kassubek, Jan; Klimpe, Sven; Klopstock, Thomas; Stolze, Henning; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Hutchinson, Michael; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Braastad, Corey; Deufel, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Schols, Ludger; de Jonghe, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) have recently been reported to cause autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) type SPG31. In a large collaborative effort, we screened a sample of 535 unrelated HSP patients for "REEP1" mutations and copy number variations. We identified 13 novel and 2 known "REEP1"…

  10. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  11. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  12. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  13. Driver Mutations in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Decatur, Christina L.; Ong, Erin; Garg, Nisha; Anbunathan, Hima; Bowcock, Anne M.; Field, Matthew G.; Harbour, J. William

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Frequent mutations have been described in the following 5 genes in uveal melanoma (UM): BAP1, EIF1AX, GNA11, GNAQ, and SF3B1. Understanding the prognostic significance of these mutations could facilitate their use in precision medicine. OBJECTIVE To determine the associations between driver mutations, gene expression profile (GEP) classification, clinicopathologic features, and patient outcomes in UM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective study of patients with UM treated by enucleation by a single ocular oncologist between November 1, 1998, and July 31, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicopathologic features, patient outcomes, GEP classification (class 1 or class 2), and mutation status were recorded. RESULTS The study cohort comprised 81 participants. Their mean age was 61.5 years, and 37% (30 of 81) were female. The GEP classification was class 1 in 35 of 81 (43%), class 2 in 42 of 81 (52%), and unknown in 4 of 81 (5%). BAP1 mutations were identified in 29 of 64 (45%), GNAQ mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), GNA11 mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), SF3B1 mutations in 19 of 81 (24%), and EIF1AX mutations in 14 of 81 (17%). Sixteen of the mutations in BAP1 and 6 of the mutations in EIF1AX were previously unreported in UM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations were mutually exclusive. BAP1, SF3B1, and EIF1AX mutations were almost mutually exclusive with each other. Using multiple regression analysis, BAP1 mutations were associated with class 2 GEP and older patient. EIF1AX mutations were associated with class 1 GEP and the absence of ciliary body involvement. SF3B1 mutations were associated with younger patient age. GNAQ mutations were associated with the absence of ciliary body involvement and greater largest basal diameter. GNA11 mutations were not associated with any of the analyzed features. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, class 2 GEP was the prognostic factor most strongly associated with metastasis (relative risk, 9.4; 95% CI, 3.1–28.5) and

  14. Glucocorticoid Steroid and Alendronate Treatment Alleviates Dystrophic Phenotype with Enhanced Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy with FKRPP448L Mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Richardson, Stephanie M; Bollinger, Lauren E; Blaeser, Anthony; Madden, Kyle L; Sun, Yubo; Luckie, Taylor M; Cox, Michael D; Sparks, Susan; Harper, Amy D; Lu, Qi Long

    2016-06-01

    Fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy is characterized by defects in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan with variable clinical phenotypes, most commonly as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. There is no effective therapy available. Glucocorticoid steroids have become the standard treatment for Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies with serious adverse effects, including excessive weight gain, immune suppression, and bone loss. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy for prevention of osteoporosis. Herein, we evaluated prednisolone and alendronate for their therapeutic potential in the FKRPP448L-mutant mouse representing moderate limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. Mice were treated with prednisolone, alendronate, and both in combination for up to 6 months. Prednisolone improved muscle pathology with significant reduction in muscle degeneration, but had no effect on serum creatine kinase levels and muscle strength. Alendronate treatment did not ameliorate muscle degeneration, but demonstrated a limited enhancement on muscle function test. Combined treatment of prednisolone and alendronate provided best improvement in muscle pathology with normalized fiber size distribution and significantly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, but had limited effect on muscle force generation. The use of alendronate significantly mitigated the bone loss. Prednisolone alone and in combination with alendronate enhance functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of this alliance treatment of the two drugs for fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy. PMID:27109613

  15. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models

    PubMed Central

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a “gain-of-target” for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  16. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    PubMed

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-11-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  17. Calpain 3 deficiency affects SERCA expression and function in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toral-Ojeda, Ivan; Aldanondo, Garazi; Lasa-Elgarresta, Jaione; Lasa-Fernández, Haizpea; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; López de Munain, Adolfo; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara

    2016-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3). Several studies have implicated Ca2+ dysregulation as an underlying event in several muscular dystrophies, including LGMD2A. In this study we used mouse and human myotube cultures, and muscle biopsies in order to determine whether dysfunction of sarco/endoplasmatic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) is involved in the pathology of this disease. In CAPN3-deficient myotubes, we found decreased levels of SERCA 1 and 2 proteins, while mRNA levels remained comparable with control myotubes. Also, we found a significant reduction in SERCA function that resulted in impairment of Ca2+ homeostasis, and elevated basal intracellular [Ca2+] in human myotubes. Furthermore, small Ankyrin 1 (sAnk1), a SERCA1-binding protein that is involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum integrity, was also diminished in CAPN3-deficient fibres. Interestingly, SERCA2 protein was patently reduced in muscles from LGMD2A patients, while it was normally expressed in other forms of muscular dystrophy. Thus, analysis of SERCA2 expression may prove useful for diagnostic purposes as a potential indicator of CAPN3 deficiency in muscle biopsies. Altogether, our results indicate that CAPN3 deficiency leads to degradation of SERCA proteins and Ca2+ dysregulation in the skeletal muscle. While further studies are needed in order to elucidate the specific contribution of SERCA towards muscle degeneration in LGMD2A, this study constitutes a reasonable foundation for the development of therapeutic approaches targeting SERCA1, SERCA2 or sAnk1. PMID:27055500

  18. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  19. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  20. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  1. Identification of spontaneous mutations within the long-range limb-specific Sonic Hedgehog enhancer (ZRS) that alter Sonic Hedgehog expression in the chicken limb mutants oligozeugodactly and Silkie Breed

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Sarah A.; Suzuki, Takayuki; Fallon, John F.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved, non-coding ~800 base-pair zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) controls Shh expression in the posterior limb. We report that the chicken mutant oligozeugodactly (ozd), which lacks limb Shh expression, has a large deletion within the ZRS. Furthermore, the preaxial polydactylous, Silkie Breed chicken, which develops ectopic anterior limb Shh expression, has a single base-pair change within the ZRS. Using an in vivo reporter assay to examine enhancer function in the chick limb, we demonstrate that the wild-type ZRS drives β-galactosidase reporter expression in the ZPA of both wild-type and ozd limbs. The Silkie ZRS drives β-galactosidase in both posterior and anterior Shh domains in wild-type limb buds. These results support the hypothesis that the ZRS integrates positive and negative prepatterned regulatory inputs in the chicken model system and demonstrate the utility of the chicken limb as an efficient genetic system for gene regulatory studies. PMID:21509895

  2. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  3. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  4. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  5. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, E.; Demina, A.; Gelbart, T.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thirty-six mutations that cause Gaucher disease, the most common glycolipid storage disorder, are known. Although both alleles of most patients with the disease contain one of these mutations, in a few patients one or both disease-producing alleles have remained unidentified. Identification of mutations in these patients is useful for genetic counseling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The DNA from 23 Gaucher disease patients in whom at least one glucocerebrosidase allele did not contain any of the 36 previously described mutations has been examined by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, followed by sequencing of regions in which abnormalities were detected. RESULTS: Eight previously undescribed mutations were detected. In exon 3, a deletion of a cytosine at cDNA nt 203 was found. In exon 6, three missense mutations were identified: a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 644 (Ala176-->Asp), a C-->A transversion at cDNA nt 661 that resulted in a (Pro182-->Thr), and a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 721 (Gly202-->Arg). Two missense mutations were found in exon 7: a G-->A transition at cDNA nt 887 (Arg257-->Gln) and a C-->T at cDNA nt 970 (Arg285-->Cys). Two missense mutations were found in exon 9: a T-->G at cDNA nt 1249 (Trp378-->Gly) and a G-->A at cDNA nt 1255 (Asp380-->Asn). In addition to these disease-producing mutations, a silent C-->G transversion at cDNA nt 1431, occurring in a gene that already contained the 1226G mutation, was found in one family. CONCLUSIONS: The mutations described here and previously known can be classified as mild, severe, or lethal, on the basis of their effect on enzyme production and on clinical phenotype, and as polymorphic or sporadic, on the basis of the haplotype in which they are found. Rare mutations such as the new ones described here are sporadic in nature. PMID:8790604

  6. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration

    PubMed Central

    Zabransky, Daniel J.; Yankaskas, Christopher L.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D. Marc; Dalton, W. Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A.; Manto, Kristen M.; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as “negative” by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them. PMID:26508629

  7. Clinical expression and new SPINK5 splicing defects in Netherton syndrome: unmasking a frequent founder synonymous mutation and unconventional intronic mutations.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Lacaze-Buzy, Laetitia; Furio, Laetitia; Tron, Elodie; Valari, Manthoula; Van der Wier, Gerda; Bodemer, Christine; Bygum, Anette; Bursztejn, Anne-Claire; Gaitanis, George; Paradisi, Mauro; Stratigos, Alexander; Weibel, Lisa; Deraison, Céline; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-03-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe skin disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5) encoding the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Here, we disclose new SPINK5 defects in 12 patients, who presented a clinical triad suggestive of NS with variations in inter- and intra-familial disease expression. We identified a new and frequent synonymous mutation c.891C>T (p.Cys297Cys) in exon 11 of the 12 NS patients. This mutation disrupts an exonic splicing enhancer sequence and causes out-of-frame skipping of exon 11. Haplotype analysis indicates that this mutation is a founder mutation in Greece. Two other new deep intronic mutations, c.283-12T>A in intron 4 and c.1820+53G>A in intron 19, induced partial intronic sequence retention. A new nonsense c.2557C>T (p.Arg853X) mutation was also identified. All mutations led to a premature termination codon resulting in no detectable LEKTI on skin sections. Two patients with deep intronic mutations showed residual LEKTI fragments in cultured keratinocytes. These fragments retained some functional activity, and could therefore, together with other determinants, contribute to modulate the disease phenotype. This new founder mutation, the most frequent mutation described in European populations so far, and these unusual intronic mutations, widen the clinical and molecular spectrum of NS and offer new diagnostic perspectives for NS patients. PMID:22089833

  8. Cysteine mutations cause defective tyrosine phosphorylation in MEGF10 myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Alexander, Matthew S; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kang, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Recessive mutations in MEGF10 are known to cause a congenital myopathy in humans. Two mutations in the extracellular EGF-like domains of MEGF10, C326R and C774R, were associated with decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of MEGF10 in vitro. Y1030 was identified to be the major tyrosine phosphorylation site in MEGF10 and is phosphorylated at least in part by c-Src. Overexpression of wild-type MEGF10 enhanced C2C12 myoblast proliferation, while overexpression of Y1030F mutated MEGF10 did not. We conclude that MEGF10-mediated signaling via tyrosine phosphorylation helps to regulate myoblast proliferation. Defects in this signaling pathway may contribute to the disease mechanism of MEGF10 myopathy. PMID:23954233

  9. Limited dispersal, deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents a mathematical model that allows for some offspring to be dispersed at random, while others stay close to their mothers. A single genetic locus is assumed to control fertility, and this locus is subject to the occurrence of deletions mutations. It is shown that, at equilibrium, the frequency of deleterious mutations in the population is inversely related to the rate of dispersal. The results also show that sexual reproduction can lead to a decrease in the equilibrium frequency of deleterious mutations. The reason for this relationship is that sex involves the dispersal of genetic material, and thus, like the dispersal of offspring, sex enhances competition among adults. The model is described using the example of a hermaphroditic plant population. However, the results should apply to animal populations as well. 36 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Spatial evolution of tumors with successive driver mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antal, Tibor; Krapivsky, P. L.; Nowak, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    We study the influence of driver mutations on the spatial evolutionary dynamics of solid tumors. We start with a cancer clone that expands uniformly in three dimensions giving rise to a spherical shape. We assume that cell division occurs on the surface of the growing tumor. Each cell division has a chance to give rise to a mutation that activates an additional driver gene. The resulting clone has an enhanced growth rate, which generates a local ensemble of faster growing cells, thereby distorting the spherical shape of the tumor. We derive formulas for the abundance and diversity of additional driver mutations as function of time. Our model is semi-deterministic: the spatial growth of cancer clones is deterministic, while mutants arise stochastically.