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Sample records for capsaicin receptor trpv1

  1. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  2. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  3. Capsaicin receptor: TRPV1 a promiscuous TRP channel.

    PubMed

    Pingle, S C; Matta, J A; Ahern, G P

    2007-01-01

    TRPV1, the archetypal member of the vanilloid TRP family, was initially identified as the receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot chili peppers. The receptor has a diverse tissue distribution, with high expression in sensory neurons. TRPV1 is a nonselective cation channel with significant permeability to calcium, protons, and large polyvalent cations. It is the most polymodal TRP channel, being activated by numerous stimuli, including heat, voltage, vanilloids, lipids, and protons/cations. TRPV1 acts as a molecular integrator of physical and chemical stimuli in peripheral nociceptor terminals and plays a critical role in thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. In addition, TRPV1 may regulate a variety of physiological functions in different organ systems. Various second messenger systems regulate TRPV1 activity, predominantly by serine-threonine phosphorylation. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the information currently available about this channel. PMID:17217056

  4. The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 as a novel modulator of neural precursor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Garthe, Alexander; de Almeida Sassi, Felipe; Glass, Rainer; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    The capsaicin receptor (TRPV1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) was first discovered in the peripheral nervous system as a detector of noxious chemical and thermal stimuli including the irritant chili pepper. Recently, there has been increasing evidence of TRPV1 expression in the central nervous system. Here, we show that TRPV1 is expressed in neural precursor cells (NPCs) during postnatal development, but not in the adult. However, expression of TRPV1 is induced in the adult in paradigms linked to an increase in neurogenesis, such as spatial learning in the Morris water maze or voluntary exercise. Loss of TRPV1 expression in knockout mice leads to an increase in NPC proliferation. Functional TRPV1 expression has been confirmed in cultured NPCs. Our results indicate that TRPV1 expression influences both postnatal and activity-induced neurogenesis in adulthood. PMID:25092424

  5. Halogenation of a capsaicin analogue leads to novel vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Appendino, Giovanni; Harrison, Selena; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Daddario, Nives; Bianchi, Federica; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Trevisani, Marcello; Benvenuti, Francesca; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The C-5 halogenation of the vanillyl moiety of resiniferatoxin, an ultrapotent agonist of vanilloid TRPV1 receptors, results in a potent antagonist for these receptors. Here, we have synthesized a series of halogenated derivatives of ‘synthetic capsaicin' (nonanoyl vanillamide=nordihydrocapsaicin) differing for the nature (iodine, bromine–chlorine) and the regiochemistry (C-5, C-6) of the halogenation.The activity of these compounds was investigated on recombinant human TRPV1 receptors overexpressed in HEK-293 cells. None of the six compounds exerted any significant agonist activity, as assessed by measuring their effect on TRPV1-mediated calcium mobilization. Instead, all compounds antagonized, to various extents, the effect of capsaicin in this assay.All 6-halo-nordihydrocapsaicins behaved as competitive antagonists against human TRPV1 according to the corresponding Schild's plots, and were more potent than the corresponding 5-halogenated analogues. The iodo-derivatives were more potent than the bromo- and chloro-derivatives.Using human recombinant TRPV1, 6-iodo-nordihydrocapsaicin (IC50=10 nM against 100 nM capsaicin) was about four times more potent than the prototypical TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and was tested against capsaicin also on native TRPV1 in: (i) rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture; (ii) guinea-pig urinary bladder; and (iii) guinea-pig bronchi. In all cases, except for the guinea-pig bronchi, the compound was significantly more potent than capsazepine as a TRPV1 antagonist.In conclusion, 6-iodo-nordihydrocapsaicin, a stable and easily prepared compound, is a potent TRPV1 antagonist and a convenient replacement for capsazepine in most of the in vitro preparations currently used to assess the activity of putative vanilloid receptor agonists. PMID:12922928

  6. Protein kinase C phosphorylation sensitizes but does not activate the capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Gautam; Hu, Hui-Juan; Glauner, Kathi S.; Zhu, Weiguo; Wang, Haibin; Brasier, D. J.; Oxford, Gerry S.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulates the function of the capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). This modulation manifests as increased current when the channel is activated by capsaicin. In addition, studies have suggested that phosphorylation by PKC might directly gate the channel, because PKC-activating phorbol esters induce TRPV1 currents in the absence of applied ligands. To test whether PKC both modulates and gates the TRPV1 function by direct phosphorylation, we used direct sequencing to determine the major sites of PKC phosphorylation on TRPV1 intracellular domains. We then tested the ability of the PKC-activating phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to potentiate capsaicin-induced currents and to directly gate TRPV1. We found that mutation of S800 to alanine significantly reduced the PMA-induced enhancement of capsaicin-evoked currents and the direct activation of TRPV1 by PMA. Mutation of S502 to alanine reduced PMA enhancement of capsaicin-evoked currents, but had no effect on direct activation of TRPV1 by PMA. Conversely, mutation of T704 to alanine had no effect on PMA enhancement of capsaicin-evoked currents but dramatically reduced direct activation of TRPV1 by PMA. These results, combined with pharmacological studies showing that inactive phorbol esters also weakly activate TRPV1, suggest that PKC-mediated phosphorylation modulates TRPV1 but does not directly gate the channel. Rather, currents induced by phorbol esters result from the combination of a weak direct ligand-like activation of TRPV1 and the phosphorylation-induced enhancement of the TRPV1 function. Furthermore, modulation of the TRPV1 function by PKC appears to involve distinct phosphorylation sites depending on the mechanism of channel activation. PMID:14523239

  7. Nicotinic Acid Activates the Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1 A Potential Mechanism for Cutaneous Flushing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Mao, Rongrong; Cai, Anping; Jia, Yunfang; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Xu, Lin; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nicotinic acid (a.k.a. niacin or vitamin B3), widely used to treat dyslipidemias, represents an effective and safe means to reduce the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, a substantial fraction of patients discontinue treatment due to a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly termed flushing. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic acid causes flushing partially by activating the capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a polymodal cellular sensor that mediates the flushing response upon consumption of spicy food. Approach and Results We observed that the nicotinic acid-induced increase in blood flow was substantially reduced in Trpv1?/? knockout mice, indicating involvement of the channel in flushing response. Using exogenously expressed TRPV1, we confirmed that nicotinic acid at sub-millimolar to millimolar concentrations directly and potently activates TRPV1 from the intracellular side. Binding of nicotinic acid to TRPV1 lowers its activation threshold for heat, causing channel opening at physiological temperatures. Activation of TRPV1 by voltage or ligands (capsaicin and 2-APB) is also potentiated by nicotinic acid. We further demonstrated that nicotinic acid does not compete directly with capsaicin but may activate TRPV1 through the 2-APB activation pathway. Using live-cell fluorescence imaging, we observed that nicotinic acid can quickly enter the cell through a transporter-mediated pathway to activate TRPV1. Conclusions Direct activation of TRPV1 by nicotinic acid may lead to cutaneous vasodilation that contributes to flushing, suggesting a potential novel pathway to inhibit flushing and improve compliance. PMID:24675661

  8. Extracellular cations sensitize and gate capsaicin receptor TRPV1 modulating pain signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Gerard P; Brooks, Ian M; Miyares, Rosa Linda; Wang, Xiang-bin

    2005-05-25

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels detect diverse sensory stimuli, including alterations in osmolarity. However, a molecular detector of noxious hypertonic stimuli has not yet been identified. We show here that acute pain-related behavior evoked by elevated ionic strength is abolished in TRP vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-null mice and inhibited by iodoresiniferatoxin, a potent TRPV1 antagonist. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrate a novel form of ion channel modulation by which extracellular Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ ions sensitize and activate the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1. At room temperature, increasing extracellular Mg2+ (from 1 to 5 mM) or Na+ (+50 mM) increased ligand-activated currents up to fourfold, and 10 mM Mg2+ reduced the EC50 for activation by capsaicin from 890 to 450 nM. Moreover, concentrations of divalent cations >10 mM directly gate the receptor. These effects occur via electrostatic interactions with two glutamates (E600 and E648) formerly identified as proton-binding residues. Furthermore, phospholipase C-mediated signaling enhances the effects of cations, and physiological concentrations of cations contribute to the bradykinin-evoked activation of TRPV1 and the sensitization of the receptor to heat. Thus, the modulation of TRPV1 by cationic strength may contribute to inflammatory pain signaling. PMID:15917451

  9. Novel gating and sensitizing mechanism of capsaicin receptor (TRPV1): tonic inhibitory regulation of extracellular sodium through the external protonation sites on TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Toshio; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Ito, Shigeo

    2008-04-01

    Transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel expressed in nociceptors and activated by capsaicin. TRPV1 detects diverse stimuli, including acid, heat, and endogenous vanilloids, and functions as a molecular integrator of pain perception. Herein we demonstrate a novel regulatory role of extracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)](o)) on TRPV1 function. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing porcine TRPV1, low [Na(+)](o) evoked increases of [Ca(2+)](i) that were suppressed by TRPV1 antagonists and facilitated responses to capsaicin, protons, heat, and an endovanilloid. [Na(+)](o) removal simultaneously elicited a [Ca(2+)](i) increase and outward-rectified current with a reversal potential similar to those of capsaicin. Neutralization of the two acidic residues which confer the proton sensitivity to TRPV1 resulted in a reduction of low [Na(+)](o)-induced responses. In primary culture of porcine sensory neurons, the removal of [Na(+)](o) produced a [Ca(2+)](i) increase and current responses only in the cells responding to capsaicin. Low [Na(+)](o) evoked a [Ca(2+)](i) increase in sensory neurons of wild type mice, but not TRPV1-null mice, and in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing human TRPV1. The present results suggest that [Na(+)](o) negatively regulates the gating and polymodal sensitization of the TRPV1 channel. [Na(+)](o) surrounding several proton-sensitive sites on the extracellular side of the pore-forming loop of the TRPV1 channel may play an important role as a brake to suppress the excessive activity of this channel under physiological conditions. PMID:18230619

  10. ThermoTRP channels in nociceptors: taking a lead from capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2008-03-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP's. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP's to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1's role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP's (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the activator and inhibitor molecules known to interact with them and modulate their activity. PMID:19305786

  11. ThermoTRP Channels in Nociceptors: Taking a Lead from Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP’s. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP’s to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1’s role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP’s (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the activator and inhibitor molecules known to interact with them and modulate their activity. PMID:19305786

  12. A Bivalent Tarantula Toxin Activates the Capsaicin Receptor, TRPV1, by Targeting the Outer Pore Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bohlen, Christopher J.; Priel, Avi; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Siemens, Jan; Julius, David

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxins have evolved to target regions of membrane ion channels that underlie ligand binding, gating, or ion permeation, and have thus served as invaluable tools for probing channel structure and function. Here we describe a peptide toxin from the Earth Tiger tarantula that selectively and irreversibly activates the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive channel, TRPV1. This high avidity interaction derives from a unique tandem repeat structure of the toxin that endows it with an antibody-like bivalency, illustrating a new paradigm in toxin structure and evolution. The double-knot toxin traps TRPV1 in the open state by interacting with residues in the presumptive pore-forming region of the channel, highlighting the importance of conformational changes in the outer pore region of TRP channels during activation. PMID:20510930

  13. The TRPV1 receptor and nociception.

    PubMed

    Immke, David C; Gavva, Narender R

    2006-10-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is an emerging target for the treatment of pain with a unique expression profile in peripheral nociceptors and the ability to show polymodal activation, TRPV1 is an important integrator of responses to inflammatory mediators. Sensitization of TRPV1 during chronic pain is believed to contribute to the transduction of noxious signaling for normally innocuous stimuli and consequently the search for novel TRPV1 therapeutics is intense. The current understanding of the physiological role the receptor, as well as the potential therapeutic utility and emerging liabilities of TRPV1 modulators are discussed. PMID:17196854

  14. Tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane enhances capsaicin-induced intracellular Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Satoshi; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Nishimura, Hitomi; Matoba, Motohiro; Shiraishi, Seiji; Konno, Hiroki; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-02-01

    Non-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channels are activated by various insults, including exposure to heat, acidity, and the compound capsaicin, resulting in sensations of pain in the skin, visceral organs, and oral cavity. Recently, TRPV1 activation was also demonstrated in response to basic pH elicited by ammonia and intracellular alkalization. Tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane (THAM) is widely used as an alkalizing agent; however, the effects of THAM on TRPV1 channels have not been defined. In this study, we characterized the effects of THAM-induced TRPV1 channel activation in baby hamster kidney cells expressing human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) and the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent sensor GCaMP2 by real-time confocal microscopy. Notably, both capsaicin (1 μM) and pH 6.5 buffer elicited steep increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while treatment with THAM (pH 8.5) alone had no effect. However, treatment with THAM (pH 8.5) following capsaicin application elicited a profound, long-lasting increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Taken together, these results suggest that hTRPV1 pre-activation is required to provoke enhanced, THAM-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases, which could be a mechanism underlying pain induced by basic pH. PMID:26738986

  15. Antinociceptive desensitizing actions of TRPV1 receptor agonists capsaicin, resiniferatoxin and N-oleoyldopamine as measured by determination of the noxious heat and cold thresholds in the rat.

    PubMed

    Blcskei, Kata; Tkus, Valria; Dzsi, Lszl; Szolcsnyi, Jnos; Petho, Gbor

    2010-05-01

    Agonists of the TRPV1 receptor excite TRPV1-expressing polymodal nociceptors that is followed after higher doses by a state of diminished responsiveness called desensitization which ensues at two levels: (i) diminished responsiveness of the ion channel (TRPV1 receptor desensitization); (ii) diminished responsiveness of the nerve endings to all stimuli including noxious heat. The aim was to compare these desensitizing actions of TRPV1 agonists in the rat by measuring with an incremental hot/cold plate the noxious heat and cold thresholds, i.e. the lowest hot and highest cold plate temperature, respectively, that evokes nocifensive behaviour. Capsaicin (3.3-1000 nmol) or resiniferatoxin (0.016-0.5 nmol) applied intraplantarly evoked a sustained dose-dependent elevation of the noxious heat threshold lasting for 2-11 days. N-oleoyldopamine failed to elevate the heat threshold. The noxious cold threshold was decreased by capsaicin or resiniferatoxin with a recovery within 2-4 days. The diminished acute nocifensive and heat threshold-lowering effects of resiniferatoxin or N-oleoyldopamine by pretreatment with doses that failed to elevate the heat threshold and to alter the nocifensive action of the TRPA1 activator formaldehyde, were taken as indication of TRPV1 receptor desensitization. In conclusion, using measurement of threshold temperatures eliciting nocifensive reactions in rats both in the hot and cold range revealed that capsaicin and RTX impair thermosensation in both noxious ranges due to a functional desensitization of peripheral terminals of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons responsible for noxious heat and cold responsiveness. This could be differentiated from desensitization of TRPV1 receptor evoked by lower doses of resiniferatoxin or N-oleoyldopamine. PMID:19800272

  16. Inhibitory effects of capsaicin on voltage-gated potassium channels by TRPV1-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Xiong, Zhe; Liu, Changjin; Liu, Lieju

    2014-01-01

    Previously we observed that capsaicin, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor activator, inhibited transient potassium current (IA) in capsaicin-sensitive (CS) and capsaicin-insensitive (CIS) trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons from rats. It suggested that the inhibitory effects of capsaicin on IA have two different mechanisms: TRPV1-dependent and TRPV1-independent pathways. The main purpose of this study is to further investigate the TRPV1 independent effects of capsaicin on voltage-gated potassium channels (VGPCs). Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record IA and sustained potassium current (IK) in cultured TG neurons from trpv1 knockout (TRPV1?/?) mice. We found that capsaicin reversibly inhibited IA and IK in a dose-dependent manner. Capsaicin (30 M) did not alter the activation curve of IA and IK but shifted the inactivation-voltage curve to hyperpolarizing direction, thereby increasing the number of inactivated VGPCs at the resting potential. Administration of high concentrations capsaicin, no use-dependent block and delay of recovery time course were found on IK and IA. Moreover, forskolin, an adenylate cyclase agonist, selectively decreased the inhibitory effects of IK by capsaicin, whereas no influenced the inhibitions of IA. These results suggest that capsaicin inhibits the VGPCs through TRPV1-independent and PKA-dependent mechanisms, which may contribute to the capsaicin-induced nociception. PMID:24590823

  17. Glucose concentration in culture medium affects mRNA expression of TRPV1 and CB1 receptors and changes capsaicin toxicity in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Farani, Ahmad; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Sahebgharani, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    Objective (s): Hyperglycemia is widely recognized as the underlying cause for some debilitating conditions in diabetic patients. The role of cannabinoid CB1 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptors and their endogenous agonists, endovanilloids, in diabetic neuropathy is shown in many studies. Here we have used PC12 cell line to investigate the possible influence of glucose concentration in culture medium on cytoprotective or toxic effects of a CB1 [WIN55 212-2 (WIN)], or TRPV1 [Capsaicin (CAS)] agonist. Materials and Methods: Cell viability was tested using the MTT assay. We have also measured TRPV1 and CB1 transcripts by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction while cells were grown in low (5.5 mM) and high (50 mM) glucose concentrations. Results: Real time PCR results indicated that high glucose medium increased (P<0.01) TRPV1 mRNA and decreased (P <0.001) that of CB1. Cell culture tests show that hyperglycemic cells are more vulnerable (Dose Medium, F (3,63)=41.5, P<0.001) to the toxic effects of capsaicin compared to those grown in low glucose medium. Conclusion: These findings propose that hyperglycemic conditions may result in neuronal cell death because of inducing a counterbalance between cytotoxic TRPV1 and cytoprotective CB1 receptors. PMID:25691944

  18. Preferential block of inactivation-deficient Na+ currents by capsaicin reveals a non-TRPV1 receptor within the Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sho-Ya; Mitchell, Jane; Wang, Ging Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Capsaicin elicits burning pain via the activation of the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1). Intriguingly, several reports showed that capsaicin also inhibits Na+ currents but the mechanisms remain unclear. To explore this non-TRPV1 action we applied capsaicin to HEK293 cells stably expressing inactivation-deficient rat skeletal muscle Na+ mutant channels (rNav1.4-WCW). Capsaicin elicited a conspicuous time-dependent block of inactivation-deficient Na+ currents. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of capsaicin for open Na+ channels at +30 mV was measured 6.8+/-0.6 microM (n=5), a value that is 10-30 times lower than those for resting (218 microM) and inactivated (74 microM) wild-type Na+ channels. On-rate and off-rate constants for capsaicin open-channel block at +30 mV were estimated to be 6.37 microM(-1) s(-1) and 34.4 s(-1), respectively, with a calculated dissociation constant (KD) of 5.4 microM. Capsaicin at 30 microM produced approximately 70% additional use-dependent block of remaining rNav1.4-WCW Na+ currents during repetitive pulses at 1 Hz. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the local anesthetic receptor was not responsible for the capsaicin block of the inactivation-deficient Na+ channel. Interestingly, capsaicin elicited little time-dependent block of batrachotoxin-modified rNav1.4-WCW Na+ currents, indicating that batrachotoxin prevents capsaicin binding. Finally, neuronal open Na+ channels endogenously expressed in GH3 cells were as sensitive to capsaicin block as rNav1.4 counterparts. We conclude that capsaicin preferentially blocks persistent late Na+ currents, probably via a receptor that overlaps the batrachotoxin receptor but not the local anesthetic receptor. Drugs that target such a non-TRPV1 receptor could be beneficial for patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:16962240

  19. Increased capsaicin receptor TRPV1 in skin nerve fibres and related vanilloid receptors TRPV3 and TRPV4 in keratinocytes in human breast pain.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Preethi; Wan, Elaine; Holdcroft, Anita; Facer, Paul; Davis, John B; Smith, Graham D; Bountra, Chas; Anand, Praveen

    2005-03-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast pain and tenderness affects 70% of women at some time. These symptoms have been attributed to stretching of the nerves with increase in breast size, but tissue mechanisms are poorly understood. METHODS: Eighteen patients (n = 12 breast reduction and n = 6 breast reconstruction) were recruited and assessed for breast pain by clinical questionnaire. Breast skin biopsies from each patient were examined using immunohistological methods with specific antibodies to the capsaicin receptor TRPV1, related vanilloid thermoreceptors TRPV3 and TRPV4, and nerve growth factor (NGF). RESULTS: TRPV1-positive intra-epidermal nerve fibres were significantly increased in patients with breast pain and tenderness (TRPV1 fibres / mm epidermis, median [range] - no pain group, n = 8, 0.69 [0-1.27]; pain group, n = 10, 2.15 [0.77-4.38]; p = 0.0009). Nerve Growth Factor, which up-regulates TRPV1 and induces nerve sprouting, was present basal keratinocytes: some breast pain specimens also showed NGF staining in supra-basal keratinocytes. TRPV4-immunoreactive fibres were present in sub-epidermis but not significantly changed in painful breast tissue. Both TRPV3 and TRPV4 were significantly increased in keratinocytes in breast pain tissues; TRPV3, median [range] - no pain group, n = 6, 0.75 [0-2]; pain group, n = 11, 2 123, p = 0.008; TRPV4, median [range] - no pain group, n = 6, [0-1]; pain group, n = 11, 1 [0.5-2], p = 0.014). CONCLUSION: Increased TRPV1 intra-epidermal nerve fibres could represent collateral sprouts, or re-innervation following nerve stretch and damage by polymodal nociceptors. Selective TRPV1-blockers may provide new therapy in breast pain. The role of TRPV3 and TRPV4 changes in keratinocytes deserve further study. PMID:15755319

  20. Binding of Capsaicin to the TRPV1 Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Darr, Leonardo; Domene, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels constitute a notable family of cation channels involved in the ability of an organisms to detect noxious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli that give rise to the perception of pain, taste, and changes in temperature. One of the most experimentally studied agonist of TRP channels is capsaicin, which is responsible for the burning sensation produced when chili pepper is in contact with organic tissues. Thus, understanding how this molecule interacts and regulates TRP channels is essential to high impact pharmacological applications, particularly those related to pain treatment. The recent publication of a three-dimensional structure of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) in the absence and presence of capsaicin from single particle electron cryomicroscopy experiments provides the opportunity to explore these questions at the atomic level. In the present work, molecular docking and unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate a structural model of the capsaicin-channel complex. In addition, the standard free energy of binding was estimated using alchemical transformations coupled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraints on the ligand. Key binding modes consistent with previous experimental data are identified, and subtle but essential dynamical features of the binding site are characterized. These observations shed some light into how TRPV1 interacts with capsaicin, and may help to refine design parameters for new TRPV1 antagonists, and potentially guide further developments of TRP channel modulators. PMID:26502196

  1. Attenuation of natural killer cell functions by capsaicin through a direct and TRPV1-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Gye Eun; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Davies, Alexander J; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, Heuiran; Cho, Young Keol; Joo, Chul Hyun; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Yoo Kyum

    2014-07-01

    The assessment of the biological activity of capsaicin, the compound responsible for the spicy flavor of chili pepper, produced controversial results, showing either carcinogenicity or cancer prevention. The innate immune system plays a pivotal role in cancer pathology and prevention; yet, the effect of capsaicin on natural killer (NK) cells, which function in cancer surveillance, is unclear. This study found that capsaicin inhibited NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production (interferon-? and tumor necrosis factor-?). Capsaicin impaired the cytotoxicity of NK cells, thereby inhibiting lysis of standard target cells and gastric cancer cells by modulating calcium mobilization in NK cells. Capsaicin also induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, but that effect required higher concentrations and longer exposure times than those required to trigger NK cell dysfunction. Furthermore, capsaicin inhibited the cytotoxicity of isolated NK cells and of an NK cell line, suggesting a direct effect on NK cells. Antagonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), a cognate capsaicin receptor, or deficiency in TRPV1 expression failed to prevent the defects induced by capsaicin in NK cells expressing functional TRPV1. Thus, the mechanism of action of capsaicin on NK cells is largely independent of TRPV1. Taken together, capsaicin may have chemotherapeutic potential but may impair NK cell function, which plays a central role in tumor surveillance. PMID:24743513

  2. Activation of TRPV1 by Dietary Capsaicin Improves Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation and Prevents Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dachun; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Shuangtao; Wong, Wing Tak; Ma, Liqun; Zhong, Jian; He, Hongbo; Zhao, Zhigang; Cao, Tingbing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Arendshorst, William J.; Huang, Yu; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Some plant-based diets lower the cardiometabolic risks and prevalence of hypertension. New evidence implies a role for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Little is known about impact of chronic TRPV1 activation on the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure. Here we report that chronic TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increases the phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) and eNOS and thus production of nitric oxide (NO) in endothelial cells, which is calcium dependent. TRPV1 activation by capsaicin enhances endothelium-dependent relaxation in wild-type mice, an effect absent in TRPV1-deficient mice. Long-term stimulation of TRPV1 can activate PKA, which contributes to increased eNOS phosphorylation, improves vasorelaxation, and lowers blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats. We conclude that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin improves endothelial function. TRPV1-mediated increase in NO production may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention of hypertension. PMID:20674858

  3. Capsaicin Interaction with TRPV1 Channels in a Lipid Bilayer: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, SonyaM.; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, KentonJ.; Sansom, MarkS.P.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet and mechanisms of binding site access by capsaicin. PMID:25809255

  4. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet and mechanisms of binding site access by capsaicin. PMID:25809255

  5. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  6. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Patrice G; Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-I(sc)). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-I(sc) by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-I(sc). Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  7. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R.; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R.; Matthews, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-Isc). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-Isc by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-Isc. Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca2+]i induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  8. Triggering of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) by capsaicin induces Fas/CD95-mediated apoptosis of urothelial cancer cells in an ATM-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Amantini, Consuelo; Ballarini, Patrizia; Caprodossi, Sara; Nabissi, Massimo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Lucciarini, Roberta; Cardarelli, Marco Andrea; Mammana, Gabriele; Santoni, Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    Herein, we provide evidence on the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) on human urothelial cancer (UC) cells and its involvement in the apoptosis induced by the selective agonist capsaicin (CPS). We analyzed TRPV1 messenger RNA and protein expression on human UC cell lines demonstrating its progressive decrease in high-grade UC cells. Treatment of RT4 cells with CPS induced cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase and apoptosis. These events were associated with rapid co-ordinated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes including Fas/CD95, Bcl-2 and caspase families and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/CHK2/p53 DNA damage response pathway. CPS induced Fas/CD95 upregulation, but more importantly Fas/CD95 ligand independent, TRPV1-dependent death receptor clustering and triggering of both extrinsic and intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent pathways. Moreover, we observed that CPS activates ATM kinase that is involved in Ser15, Ser20 and Ser392 p53 phosphorylation as shown by the use of the specific inhibitor KU55933. Notably, ATM activation was also found to control upregulation of Fas/CD95 expression and its co-clustering with TRPV1 as well as RT4 cell growth and apoptosis. Altogether, we describe a novel connection between ATM DNA damage response pathway and Fas/CD95-mediated intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways triggered by TRPV1 stimulation on UC cells. PMID:19502594

  9. Capsaicin enhances anti-proliferation efficacy of pirarubicin via activating TRPV1 and inhibiting PCNA nuclear translocation in 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long; Chen, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhenkun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Fei; Yang, Zhao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei; Zeng, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of bladder cancer after surgery with or without chemotherapy remains a major challenge in bladder cancer treatment. Previous studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1) acts as a tumor suppressor through inducing apoptosis in bladder cancer cells. However, whether activation of TRPV1 has any synergistic effects with pirarubicin (THP), one of main drugs used in urinary bladder instillation chemotherapy to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy has remained elusive. The present study verified that TRPV1 was differentially expressed in bladder cancer cell lines. Furthermore, activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin was shown to induce growth inhibition of 5637cells in which TRPV1 was highly expressed, while the growth of T24 cells, which express TRPV1 at low levels, was not affected. In addition, the present study demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 enhanced the anti?proliferative effects of pirarubicin using an MTT assay and cell cycle analysis. Finally, immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that activation of TRPV1 prevented the translocation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen to the nucleus. This phenomenon was reversed by pre?treatment with capsazepine, a specific TRPV1 antagonist. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the anti?tumor activity of TRPV1 against bladder cancer. Activation of TRPV1 may be applied as a novel strategy to treat bladder cancer or enhance the therapeutic efficacy of traditional chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26648574

  10. New insights into mechanisms of opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shaqura, Mohammed; Khalefa, Baled I; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Zllner, Christian; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Frst, Susanna; Schfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a disease of the peripheral sensory neuron with impaired opioid responsiveness. Since ?-opioid receptor (MOR) activation can inhibit the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activity in peripherally sensory neurons, this study investigated the mechanisms of impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in painful diabetic neuropathy. Intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45mg/kg) in Wistar rats led to a degeneration of insulin producing pancreatic ?-cells, elevated blood glucose, and mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia). In these animals, local morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior as well as on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current in dorsal root ganglion cells were significantly impaired. These changes were associated with a loss in MOR but not TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons. Intrathecal delivery of nerve growth factor in diabetic animals normalized sensory neuron MOR and subsequently rescued morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity invivo and invitro. These findings identify a loss in functional MOR on sensory neurons as a contributing factor for the impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during advanced STZ-induced diabetes. Moreover, they support growing evidence of a distinct regulation of opioid responsiveness during various painful states of disease (e.g. arthritis, cancer, neuropathy) and may give novel therapeutic incentives. PMID:24863039

  11. Reciprocal effects of capsaicin and menthol on thermosensation through regulated activities of TRPV1 and TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Masayuki; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimada, Tadashi; Fujita, Fumitaka; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is activated by elevated temperature (>42 °C), and it has been reported that cold temperature decreases capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity. In contrast, transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is activated by low temperatures and menthol, and heat stimulation suppresses menthol-evoked TRPM8 currents. These findings suggest that the effects of specific agents on TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels are intricately interrelated. We examined the effects of menthol on human (h)TRPV1 and of capsaicin on hTRPM8. hTRPV1 currents activated by heat and capsaicin were inhibited by menthol, whereas hTRPM8 currents activated by cold and menthol were similarly inhibited by capsaicin. An in vivo sensory irritation test showed that menthol conferred an analgesic effect on the sensory irritation evoked by a capsaicin analogue. These results indicate that in our study the agonists of TRPV1 and TRPM8 interacted with both of these channels and suggest that the anti-nociceptive effects of menthol can be partially explained by this phenomenon. PMID:26645885

  12. Direct activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) by Diacylglycerol (DAG)

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Ho; Jung, Sung Jun; Zhu, Mei Hong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Kim, Yong Ho; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, C Justin

    2008-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor, known as transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), is activated by a wide range of noxious stimulants and putative ligands such as capsaicin, heat, pH, anandamide, and phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the identity of endogenous activators for TRPV1 under physiological condition is still debated. Here, we report that diacylglycerol (DAG) directly activates TRPV1 channel in a membrane-delimited manner in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a membrane-permeable DAG analog, elicited intracellular Ca2+ transients, cationic currents and cobalt uptake that were blocked by TRPV1-selective antagonists, but not by inhibitors of PKC and DAG lipase in rat DRG neurons or HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing TRPV1. OAG induced responses were about one fifth of capsaicin induced signals, suggesting that OAG displays partial agonism. We also found that endogenously produced DAG can activate rat TRPV1 channels. Mutagenesis of rat TRPV1 revealed that DAG-binding site is at Y511, the same site for capsaicin binding, and PtdIns(4,5)P2binding site may not be critical for the activation of rat TRPV1 by DAG in heterologous system. We propose that DAG serves as an endogenous ligand for rat TRPV1, acting as an integrator of Gq/11-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases that are linked to phospholipase C. PMID:18826653

  13. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats affects TRPV1-related noxious heat sensation and circadian body temperature rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-06-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a cation channel that serves as a polymodal detector of noxious stimuli such as capsaicin. Therefore, capsaicin treatment has been used to investigate the physiological function of TRPV1. Here, we report physiological changes induced by treating neonatal rats with capsaicin. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) (cap-treated) or vehicle (vehicle-treated) was systemically administered to newborn SD rat pups within 48 h after birth. TRPV1 expression, intake volume of capsaicin water, and noxious heat sensation were measured 6 weeks after capsaicin treatment. Circadian body temperature and locomotion were recorded by biotelemetry. Expression of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Hsf1 (clock genes) was also investigated. Neonatal capsaicin treatment not only decreased TRPV1 expression but also induced desensitization to noxious heat stimuli. Circadian body temperature of cap-treated rats increased significantly compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Additionally, the amplitude of the circadian body temperature was reversed in cap-treated rats. Expression of the hypothalamic Hsf1 and liver Per2 clock genes followed a similar trend. Therefore, we suggest that these findings will be useful in studying various physiological mechanisms related to TRPV1. PMID:24746025

  14. The pharmacological challenge to tame the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) nocisensor

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, P

    2008-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) cation channel is a receptor that is activated by heat (>42?C), acidosis (pH<6) and a variety of chemicals among which capsaicin is the best known. With these properties, TRPV1 has emerged as a polymodal nocisensor of nociceptive afferent neurones, although some non-neuronal cells and neurones in the brain also express TRPV1. The activity of TRPV1 is controlled by a multitude of regulatory mechanisms that either cause sensitization or desensitization of the channel. As many proalgesic pathways converge on TRPV1 and this nocisensor is upregulated and sensitized by inflammation and injury, TRPV1 is thought to be a central transducer of hyperalgesia and a prime target for the pharmacological control of pain. As a consequence, TRPV1 agonists causing defunctionalization of sensory neurones and a large number of TRPV1 blockers have been developed, some of which are in clinical trials. A major drawback of many TRPV1 antagonists is their potential to cause hyperthermia, and their long-term use may carry further risks because TRPV1 has important physiological functions in the peripheral and central nervous system. The challenge, therefore, is to pharmacologically differentiate between the physiological and pathological implications of TRPV1. There are several possibilities to focus therapy specifically on those TRPV1 channels that contribute to disease processes. These approaches include (i) site-specific TRPV1 antagonists, (ii) modality-specific TRPV1 antagonists, (iii) uncompetitive TRPV1 (open channel) blockers, (iv) drugs interfering with TRPV1 sensitization, (v) drugs interfering with intracellular trafficking of TRPV1 and (vi) TRPV1 agonists for local administration. PMID:18806809

  15. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate. PMID:22412190

  16. The ? opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Wyse, Bruce D; Monteith, Gregory R; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Cabot, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the ? opioid receptor (MOP) agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+) responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation. PMID:16842630

  17. TRPV1 activation and induction of nociceptive response by a non-pungent capsaicin-like compound, capsiate.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Moriyama, T; Kobata, K; Morita, A; Murayama, N; Hashizume, S; Fushiki, T; Yazawa, S; Watanabe, T; Tominaga, M

    2003-06-01

    Capsiate is a capsaicin-like ingredient of a non-pungent cultivar of red pepper, CH-19 sweet. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the non-pungency of capsiate, we investigated whether capsiate activates the cloned capsaicin receptor, TRPV1 (VR1). In patch-clamp experiments, capsiate was found to activate TRPV1 expressed transiently in HEK293 cells with a similar potency as capsaicin. Capsiate induced nociceptive responses in mice when injected subcutaneously into their hindpaws with a similar dose dependency as capsaicin. These data indicate that the non-pungent capsiate is an agonist for TRPV1 and could excite peripheral nociceptors. In contrast to this, capsiate did not induce any significant responses when applied to the skin surface, eye or oral cavity of mice, suggesting that capsiate requires direct access to nerve endings to exhibit its effects. Capsiate was proved to have high lipophilicity and to be easily broken down in normal aqueous conditions, leading to less accessibility to nociceptors. Another highly lipophilic capsaicin analogue, olvanil, was similar to capsiate in that it did not produce irritant responses when applied to the skin surface, although it could activate TRPV1. Taken together, high lipophilicity and instability might be critical determinants for pungency and so help in understanding the effects of capsaicin-related compounds. PMID:12726827

  18. TRPV1 and the gut: from a tasty receptor for a painful vanilloid to a key player in hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2004-10-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in red pepper, has been used since ancient times as a spice, despite the burning sensation associated with its intake. More than 50 years ago, Nikolaus Jancso discovered that capsaicin can selectively stimulate nociceptive primary afferent neurons. The ensuing research established that the neuropharmacological properties of capsaicin are due to its activation of the transient receptor potential ion channel of the vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). Expressed by primary afferent neurons innervating the gut and other organs, TRPV1 is gated not only by vanilloids such as capsaicin, but also by noxious heat, acidosis and intracellular lipid mediators such as anandamide and lipoxygenase products. Importantly, TRPV1 can be sensitized by acidosis and activation of various pro-algesic pathways. Upregulation of TRPV1 in inflammatory bowel disease and the beneficial effect of TRPV1 downregulation in functional dyspepsia and irritable bladder make this polymodal nociceptor an attractive target of novel therapies for chronic abdominal pain. PMID:15464036

  19. Promiscuous Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Channels by Negatively Charged Intracellular Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Rives, Jan-Michael; Sun, Xiaohui; Zakharian, Eleonora; Rohacs, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of the heat- and capsaicin-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels by phosphoinositides is controversial. Data in cellular systems support the dependence of TRPV1 activity on phosphoinositides. The purified TRPV1, however, was recently shown to be fully functional in artificial liposomes in the absence of phosphoinositides. Here, we show that several other negatively charged phospholipids, including phosphatidylglycerol, can also support TRPV1 activity in excised patches at high concentrations. When we incorporated TRPV1 into planar lipid bilayers consisting of neutral lipids, capsaicin-induced activity depended on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We also found that TRPV1 activity in excised patches ran down and that MgATP reactivated the channel. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases or enzymatic removal of phosphatidylinositol abolished this effect of MgATP, suggesting that it activated TRPV1 by generating endogenous phosphoinositides. We conclude that endogenous phosphoinositides are positive cofactors for TRPV1 activity. Our data highlight the importance of specificity in lipid regulation of ion channels and may reconcile discordant data obtained in various experimental settings. PMID:24158445

  20. ?-Arrestin-2 Desensitizes the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Por, Elaine D.; Bierbower, Sonya M.; Berg, Kelly A.; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N.; Wetsel, William C.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel activated by multiple stimuli and is implicated in a variety of pain disorders. Dynamic sensitization of TRPV1 activity by A-kinase anchoring protein 150 demonstrates a critical role for scaffolding proteins in nociception, yet few studies have investigated scaffolding proteins capable of mediating receptor desensitization. In this study, we identify ?-arrestin-2 as a scaffolding protein that regulates TRPV1 receptor activity. We report ?-arrestin-2 association with TRPV1 in multiple cell models. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ?-arrestin-2 in primary cultures resulted in a significant increase in both initial and repeated responses to capsaicin. Electrophysiological analysis further revealed significant deficits in TRPV1 desensitization in primary cultures from ?-arrestin-2 knock-out mice compared with wild type. In addition, we found that ?-arrestin-2 scaffolding of phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 to the plasma membrane was required for TRPV1 desensitization. Importantly, inhibition of PDE4D5 activity reversed ?-arrestin-2 desensitization of TRPV1. Together, these results identify a new endogenous scaffolding mechanism that regulates TRPV1 ligand binding and activation. PMID:22952227

  1. Functional characterisation of the S512Y mutant vanilloid human TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kathy G; Garrett, Elizabeth M; Rutter, A Richard; Bonnert, Timothy P; Jarolimek, Wolfgang; Seabrook, Guy R

    2005-11-01

    1 Mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels include the nonselective cation channel TRPV1, which is activated by a range of stimuli including low pH, vanilloids and heat. Previously, selective mutagenesis experiments identified an intracellular residue (S512Y) critical to discriminating between pH and vanilloid (capsaicin) gating of the rat TRPV1 receptor. 2 In this study, switching the equivalent residue in the human TRPV1 (which has some significant differences with the rat TRPV1) also rendered this channel relatively insensitive to activation by capsaicin and proved critical in determining the receptor's sensitivity to the putative endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), suggesting a similar mode of activation for these two agonists. 3 Potency of pH gating was reduced; however, voltage-dependent outward rectification properties of the pH-dependent current and gating by heat and pH sensitisation of the S512Y heat response remained unaffected. 4 Surprisingly, residual capsaicin gating was detected and could be sensitised by pH even in the presence of a competitive antagonist. Taken together, these findings indicate that effective functional interaction of capsaicin with the S512Y channel still occurred, although the vanilloid-dependent gating per se was severely compromised. 5 This observation provides additional evidence for capsaicin interacting at multiple sites, distinct from the S512 residue located close to the intracellular face of the pore. PMID:16100528

  2. Functional characterisation of the S512Y mutant vanilloid human TRPV1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kathy G; Garrett, Elizabeth M; Rutter, A Richard; Bonnert, Timothy P; Jarolimek, Wolfgang; Seabrook, Guy R

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels include the nonselective cation channel TRPV1, which is activated by a range of stimuli including low pH, vanilloids and heat. Previously, selective mutagenesis experiments identified an intracellular residue (S512Y) critical to discriminating between pH and vanilloid (capsaicin) gating of the rat TRPV1 receptor. In this study, switching the equivalent residue in the human TRPV1 (which has some significant differences with the rat TRPV1) also rendered this channel relatively insensitive to activation by capsaicin and proved critical in determining the receptor's sensitivity to the putative endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), suggesting a similar mode of activation for these two agonists. Potency of pH gating was reduced; however, voltage-dependent outward rectification properties of the pH-dependent current and gating by heat and pH sensitisation of the S512Y heat response remained unaffected. Surprisingly, residual capsaicin gating was detected and could be sensitised by pH even in the presence of a competitive antagonist. Taken together, these findings indicate that effective functional interaction of capsaicin with the S512Y channel still occurred, although the vanilloid-dependent gating per se was severely compromised. This observation provides additional evidence for capsaicin interacting at multiple sites, distinct from the S512 residue located close to the intracellular face of the pore. PMID:16100528

  3. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 Ligand, Suppresses Bone Resorption by Inhibiting the Prostaglandin E Production of Osteoblasts, and Attenuates the Inflammatory Bone Loss Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Megumi; Watanabe, Kenta; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) ligand, regulates nerve-related pain-sensitive signals, inflammation, and cancer growth. Capsaicin suppresses interleukin-1-induced osteoclast differentiation, but its roles in bone tissues and bone diseases are not known. This study examined the effects of capsaicin on inflammatory bone resorption and prostaglandin E (PGE) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro and on bone mass in LPS-treated mice in vivo. Capsaicin suppressed osteoclast formation, bone resorption, and PGE production induced by LPS in vitro. Capsaicin suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and membrane-bound PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) mRNAs and PGE production induced by LPS in osteoblasts. Capsaicin may suppress PGE production by inhibiting the expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1 in osteoblasts and LPS-induced bone resorption by TRPV1 signals because osteoblasts express TRPV1. LPS treatment markedly induced bone loss in the femur in mice, and capsaicin significantly restored the inflammatory bone loss induced by LPS in mice. TRPV1 ligands like capsaicin may therefore be potentially useful as clinical drugs targeting bone diseases associated with inflammatory bone resorption. PMID:22548186

  4. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B; Walters, Edgar T; Carlton, Susan M; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-09-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity. PMID:23925292

  5. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B.; Walters, Edgar T.; Carlton, Susan M.; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-01-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity. PMID:23925292

  6. Structural Determinants of the Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPV1) Channel Activation by Phospholipid Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lzaro, Sara L.; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernndez-Garca, Enrique; Gonzlez-Ramrez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position ?9, 10, or 11 and ?9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  7. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lzaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernndez-Garca, Enrique; Gonzlez-Ramrez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position ?9, 10, or 11 and ?9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  8. Inhibition of capsaicin-driven nasal hyper-reactivity by SB-705498, a TRPV1 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Carlijn; Drunen, Cornelis Van; Denyer, Jane; Smart, Kevin; Segboer, Christine; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Newlands, Amy; Beerahee, Misba; Fokkens, Wytske; Tsitoura, Daphne C

    2014-01-01

    AIMS To assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of intranasal SB-705498, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. METHODS Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical studies were performed: (i) an intranasal SB-705498 first time in human study to examine the safety and PK of five single escalating doses from 0.5 to 12?mg and of repeat dosing with 6?mg and 12?mg twice daily for 14 days and (ii) a PD efficacy study in subjects with non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) to evaluate the effect of 12?mg intranasal SB-705498 against nasal capsaicin challenge. RESULTS Single and repeat dosing with intranasal SB-705498 was safe and well tolerated. The overall frequency of adverse events was similar for SB-705498 and placebo and no dose-dependent increase was observed. Administration of SB-705498 resulted in less than dose proportional AUC(0,12?h) and Cmax, while repeat dosing from day 1 to day 14 led to its accumulation. SB-705498 receptor occupancy in nasal tissue was estimated to be high (>80%). Administration of 12?mg SB-705498 to patients with NAR induced a marked reduction in total symptom scores triggered by nasal capsaicin challenge. Inhibition of rhinorrhoea, nasal congestion and burning sensation was associated with 2-to 4-fold shift in capsaicin potency. CONCLUSIONS Intranasal SB-705498 has an appropriate safety and PK profile for development in humans and achieves clinically relevant attenuation of capsaicin-provoked rhinitis symptoms in patients with NAR. The potential impact intranasal SB-705498 may have in rhinitis treatment deserves further evaluation. PMID:23909699

  9. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains. PMID:26194846

  10. Effect of lipid raft disruption on TRPV1 receptor activation of trigeminal sensory neurons and transfected cell line.

    PubMed

    Szoke, Eva; Brzsei, Rita; Tth, Dniel Mrton; Lengl, Orsolya; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Sndor, Zoltn; Szolcsnyi, Jnos

    2010-02-25

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a noxious heat-sensitive, chemonociceptive cation channel which is expressed in primary sensory neurons of polymodal nociceptors. The present study is devoted to analyse the role of lipid raft constituents in calcium influx evoked by various TRPV1 agonists on sensory neurons and on rTRPV1-transfected CHO cell line. Depletion of cholesterol by methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MCD, 1-10mM) diminished the percent of the calcium uptake response of cultured trigeminal neurons to capsaicin (100nM) or resiniferatoxin (RTX, 3nM). In contrast, in TRPV1-transfected cells the inhibition was observed only when capsaicin or N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA, 10microM) was applied, but not when RTX, anandamide (AEA, 10microM) or pH 5.5 was used for gating. The magnitude of Ca(2+)-transients evoked by capsaicin (330nM) was also inhibited in both cell types. Treatment of rTRPV1-expressing cells with sphinomyelinase inhibited the capsaicin-evoked (45)Ca-uptake leaving the RTX-induced response unchanged. On the other hand, in trigeminal neurons the effect of both compounds was inhibited by sphingomyelinase treatment. Inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis by d-threo-1-Phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP, 10-20microM) or myriocyn (5-50nM) diminished similarly capsaicin- or RTX-evoked calcium uptake in both cultured trigeminal neurons and rTRPV1-expressing cells. The present study revealed that depletion of different constituents of lipid raft inhibited gating the TRPV1 cation channel by various vanilloid and non-vanilloid agents. Evidence for a supporting role of cholesterol, sphingomyelin and gangliosides were obtained both in native and TRPV1-transfected cells. Differential modulation of responses to capsaicin and RTX was often observed. PMID:19958765

  11. The mechanism of ?-opioid receptor (MOR)-TRPV1 crosstalk in TRPV1 activation involves morphine anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Yu, Jing; Hou, Wei; Hua, Baojin

    2015-09-01

    Initiated by the activation of various nociceptors, pain is a reaction to specific stimulus modalities. The ?-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, including morphine, remain the most potent analgesics to treat patients with moderate to severe pain. However, the utility of MOR agonists is limited by the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs, including analgesic tolerance and physical dependence. A strong connection has been suggested between the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) ion channel and the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. TRPV1 is important for thermal nociception induction, and is mainly expressed on sensory neurons. Recent reports suggest that opioid or TRPV1 receptor agonist exposure has contrasting consequences for anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence. Chronic morphine exposure modulates TRPV1 activation and induces the anti-nociception effects of morphine. The regulation of many downstream targets of TRPV1 plays a critical role in this process, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Additional factors also include capsaicin treatment blocking the anti-nociception effects of morphine in rats, as well as opioid modulation of TRPV1 responses through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway and MAPK signaling pathways. Here, we review new insights concerning the mechanism underlying MOR-TRPV1 crosstalk and signaling pathways and discuss the potential mechanisms of morphine-induced anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence associated with the TRPV1 signaling pathway and highlight how understanding these mechanisms might help find therapeutic targets for the treatment of morphine induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PMID:26176938

  12. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 receptor in human MCF-7 and canine CF.41 cells.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, C; Barbero, R; Cuniberti, B; Odore, R; Re, G

    2015-06-01

    As canine mammary tumours (CMT) and human breast cancer share clinical and prognostic features, the former have been proposed as a model to study carcinogenesis and improved therapeutic treatment in human breast cancer. In recent years, it has been shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in different neoplastic tissues and its activation has been associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of the present research was to demonstrate the presence of TRPV1 in human and canine mammary cancer cells, MCF-7 and CF.41, respectively, and to study the role of TRPV1 in regulating cell proliferation. The images obtained by Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of TRPV1 receptor. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. By contrast, in CF.41 cells capsaicin and capsazepine induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in cell proliferation, whereas resiniferatoxin (RTX) and 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) had no influence on CF.41 cell proliferation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the different effects evoked by TRPV1 activation in MCF-7 and CF.41 cells. PMID:23510405

  13. TRPV1 receptors augment basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, F; Eslamizade, M J; Mousavi, S M M; Abraki, S B; Hadjighassem, M R; Gorji, A

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy in human and animals is attributed to alterations in brain function especially hippocampus formation. Changes in synaptic activity might be causally related to the alterations during epileptogenesis. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as one of the non-selective ion channels has been shown to be involved in synaptic transmission. However, the potential role of TRPV1 receptors in synaptic function in the epileptic brain needs to be elucidated. In the present study, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal TRPV1 mRNA expression, protein content, and distribution. Moreover, the effects of pharmacologic activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors on the slope of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons, after 3months of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). SE induced an upregulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein content in the whole hippocampal extract, as well as its distribution in both CA1 and CA3 regions. Activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors (via capsaicin 1?M and capsazepine 10?M, respectively) did not influence basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 regions of control slices, however, capsaicin increased and capsazepine decreased synaptic transmission in both regions in tissues from epileptic animals. Taken together, these findings suggest that a higher expression of TRPV1 in the epileptic condition is accompanied by alterations in basal synaptic transmission. PMID:26621124

  14. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  15. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaa, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids. PMID:24726577

  16. Structural mechanism underlying capsaicin binding and activation of the TRPV1 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Xiao, Xian; Cheng, Wei; Yang, Wei; Yu, Peilin; Song, Zhenzhen; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Capsaicin bestows spiciness by activating TRPV1 channel with exquisite potency and selectivity. Although a capsaicin-bound channel structure was previously resolved by cryo-EM at 4.2- to 4.5- resolution, capsaicin was registered as a small electron density, reflecting neither its chemical structure nor specific ligand-channel interactions--important details required for mechanistic understanding. We obtained the missing atomic-level details by iterative computation and confirmed them by systematic site-specific functional tests. We observed that the bound capsaicin takes a 'tail-up, head-down' configuration. The vanillyl and amide groups form specific interactions to anchor its bound position, while the aliphatic tail may sample a range of conformations, making it invisible in cryo-EM images. Capsaicin stabilizes TRPV1's open state by 'pull-and-contact' interactions between the vanillyl group and the S4-S5 linker. Our study provides a structural mechanism for the agonistic function of capsaicin and its analogs, and demonstrates an effective approach to obtain atomic-level information from cryo-EM structures. PMID:26053297

  17. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  18. Deletion of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) in mice alters behavioral effects of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Y.A.; Harris, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated by ethanol and this may be important for some of the central and peripheral actions of ethanol. To determine if this receptor has a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors, we studied null mutant mice in which the Trpv1 gene was deleted. Mice lacking this gene showed significantly higher preference for ethanol and consumed more ethanol in a two-bottle choice test as compared with wild type littermates. Null mutant mice showed shorter duration of loss of righting reflex induced by low doses of ethanol (3.2 and 3.4 g/kg) and faster recovery from motor incoordination induced by ethanol (2 g/kg). However, there were no differences between null mutant and wild type mice in severity of ethanol-induced acute withdrawal (4 g/kg) or conditioned taste aversion to ethanol (2.5 g/kg). Two behavioral phenotypes (decreased sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and faster recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination) seen in null mutant mice were reproduced in wild type mice by injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (10 mg/kg). These two ethanol behaviors were changed in the opposite direction after injection of capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 agonist, in wild type mice. The studies provide the first evidence that TRPV1 is important for specific behavioral actions of ethanol. PMID:19705551

  19. Regulation of leptin receptor?expressing neurons in the brainstem by TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea; Jiang, Yanyan; Gao, Hong; Anwar, Imran J.; Rezai?Zadeh, Kavon; Enix, Courtney L.; Mnzberg, Heike; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The central nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of feeding behavior and whole?body metabolism via controlling the autonomic output to the visceral organs. Activity of the parasympathetic neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) determines the vagal tone and thereby modulates the function of the subdiaphragmatic organs. Leptin is highly involved in the regulation of food intake and alters neuronal excitability of brainstem neurons. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has also been shown to increase neurotransmission in the brainstem and we tested the hypothesis that TRPV1 regulates presynaptic neurotransmitter release to leptin receptor?expressing (LepRbEGFP) DMV neurons. Whole?cell patch?clamp recordings were performed to determine the effect of TRPV1 activation on excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (EPSC, IPSC) of LepRbEGFP neurons in the DMV. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in 50% of LepRbEGFP neurons without altering the frequency of miniature IPSCs in the DMV. Stomach?projecting LepRbEGFP neurons were identified in the DMV using the transsynaptic retrograde viral tracer PRV?614. Activation of TRPV1 increased the frequency of mEPSC in ~50% of stomach?related LepRbEGFP DMV neurons. These data demonstrate that TRPV1 increases excitatory neurotransmission to a subpopulation of LepRbEGFP DMV neurons via presynaptic mechanisms and suggest a potential interaction between TRPV1 and leptin signaling in the DMV. PMID:25263209

  20. TRPV1 and PLC Participate in Histamine H4 Receptor-Induced Itch.

    PubMed

    Jian, Tunyu; Yang, Niuniu; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Yuan, Xiaolin; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Tang, Min; He, Qian; Lan, Lei; Wu, Guanyi; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Histamine H4 receptor has been confirmed to play a role in evoking peripheral pruritus. However, the ionic and intracellular signaling mechanism of activation of H4 receptor on the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons is still unknown. By using cell culture and calcium imaging, we studied the underlying mechanism of activation of H4 receptor on the DRG neuron. Immepip dihydrobromide (immepip)-a histamine H4 receptor special agonist under cutaneous injection-obviously induced itch behavior of mice. Immepip-induced scratching behavior could be blocked by TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810 and PLC pathway inhibitor U73122. Application of immepip (8.3-50 μM) could also induce a dose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) of DRG neurons. We found that 77.8% of the immepip-sensitized DRG neurons respond to the TRPV1 selective agonist capsaicin. U73122 could inhibit immepip-induced Ca(2+) responses. In addition, immepip-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase could be blocked by ruthenium red, capsazepine, and AMG9810; however it could not be blocked by TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. These results indicate that TRPV1 but not TRPA1 is the important ion channel to induce the DRG neurons' responses in the downstream signaling pathway of histamine H4 receptor and suggest that TRPV1 may be involved in the mechanism of histamine-induced itch response by H4 receptor activation. PMID:26819760

  1. TRPV1 and PLC Participate in Histamine H4 Receptor-Induced Itch

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Tunyu; Yang, Niuniu; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Yuan, Xiaolin; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Tang, Min; He, Qian; Lan, Lei; Wu, Guanyi; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Histamine H4 receptor has been confirmed to play a role in evoking peripheral pruritus. However, the ionic and intracellular signaling mechanism of activation of H4 receptor on the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons is still unknown. By using cell culture and calcium imaging, we studied the underlying mechanism of activation of H4 receptor on the DRG neuron. Immepip dihydrobromide (immepip)—a histamine H4 receptor special agonist under cutaneous injection—obviously induced itch behavior of mice. Immepip-induced scratching behavior could be blocked by TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810 and PLC pathway inhibitor U73122. Application of immepip (8.3–50 μM) could also induce a dose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) of DRG neurons. We found that 77.8% of the immepip-sensitized DRG neurons respond to the TRPV1 selective agonist capsaicin. U73122 could inhibit immepip-induced Ca2+ responses. In addition, immepip-induced [Ca2+]i increase could be blocked by ruthenium red, capsazepine, and AMG9810; however it could not be blocked by TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. These results indicate that TRPV1 but not TRPA1 is the important ion channel to induce the DRG neurons' responses in the downstream signaling pathway of histamine H4 receptor and suggest that TRPV1 may be involved in the mechanism of histamine-induced itch response by H4 receptor activation. PMID:26819760

  2. Block of native and cloned vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Raisinghani, Manish; Premkumar, Louis S

    2005-01-01

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) is a Ca2+ permeable non-specific cation channel located at the peripheral nerve terminals and functions as a polymodal nociceptor. Neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic induces analgesia in various animal models. However, the mechanism of action of neomycin has not been fully understood. In this study, we have determined the effect of neomycin on native TRPV1 in cultured embryonic DRG neurons and cloned TRPV1 heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes using patch clamp, double electrode voltage clamp, and Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques. Here, we show that neomycin potently (IC50 approximately 400 nM) blocks TRPV1-mediated membrane currents in DRG neurons and the block is unrelated to capsaicin concentrations used to evoke currents, suggesting a non-competitive block. Similarly, capsaicin- and proton-induced currents are blocked in oocytes, but to a lesser extent. Increases in capsaicin-induced intracellular Ca2+ levels are also reduced by neomycin. Single-channel current analyses reveal that single-channel conductance is unaffected by neomycin and there is no indication of open channel block. The predominant effect is to lower, the open probability (Po) at both, negative and positive potentials. Kinetic analyses reveal that the number of exponential components required to fit the open time distributions remains the same or reduced, however, the longest open time constant and the area of distribution are shortened at negative and positive potentials, respectively. The area of distribution of longest closed-time constants were significantly prolonged at negative and positive potentials. We conclude that neomycin inhibits TRPV1 channel activity by allosteric binding and altering channel gating. PMID:15621372

  3. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  4. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  5. Capsaicin-responsive corneal afferents do not contain TRPV1 at their central terminals in trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Deborah M.; Hermes, Sam M.; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Aicher, Sue A.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the substrates for ocular nociception in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Capsaicin application to the ocular surface in awake rats evoked nocifensive responses and suppressed spontaneous grooming responses. Thus, peripheral capsaicin was able to activate the central pathways encoding ocular nociception. Our capsaicin stimulus evoked c-Fos expression in a select population of neurons within rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis in anesthetized rats. These activated neurons also received direct contacts from corneal afferent fibers traced with cholera toxin B from the corneal surface. However, the central terminals of the corneal afferents that contacted capsaicin-activated trigeminal neurons did not contain TRPV1. To determine if TRPV1 expression had been altered by capsaicin stimulation, we examined TRPV1 content of corneal afferents in animals that did not receive capsaicin stimulation. These studies confirmed that while TRPV1 was present in 30% of CTb-labeled corneal afferent neurons within the trigeminal ganglion, TRPV1 was only detected in 2% of the central terminals of these corneal afferents within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Other TRP channels were also present in low proportions of central corneal afferent terminals in unstimulated animals (TRPM8, 2%; TRPA1, 10%). These findings indicate that a pathway from the cornea to rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis is involved in corneal nociceptive transmission, but that central TRP channel expression is unrelated to the type of stimulus transduced by the peripheral nociceptive endings. PMID:24996127

  6. [The capsaicin receptor. "TRPing" transduction for painful stimuli].

    PubMed

    Greffrath, W

    2006-06-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, once discovered as a receptor for pungent spices, is a polymodal sensor molecule for painful chemical and thermal stimuli. However, TRPV1 plays an important role not only for the integration of acute painful stimuli but also in the genesis of inflammatory processes. The persistent functional sensitization of TRPV1 as well as an up-regulation of its expression may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain states. Thus, TRPV1 is an excellent target for a rational pharmacological treatment of pain. Several additional physiological and pathophysiological functions of TRPV1 are assumed beyond nociception and pain. Activation of TRPV1 seems to contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases concerning, e.g., the gastrointestinal tract, the bladder, and the respiratory system. Therefore, the therapeutic potential of a pharmacological manipulation of TRPV1 may not be restricted to a symptomatic therapy of pain. PMID:16151753

  7. Structural mechanism underlying capsaicin binding and activation of TRPV1 ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Yang, Wei; Yu, Peilin; Song, Zhenzhen; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin bestows spiciness by activating TRPV1 channel with exquisite potency and selectivity. Capsaicin-bound channel structure was previously resolved by cryo-EM at 4.2-to-4.5 Å resolution, however important details required for mechanistic understandings are unavailable: capsaicin was registered as a small electron density, reflecting neither its chemical structure nor specific ligand-channel interactions. We obtained the missing atomic-level details by iterative computation, which were confirmed by systematic site-specific functional tests. We observed that the bound capsaicin takes “tail-up, head-down” configurations. The vanillyl and amide groups form specific interactions to anchor its bound position, while the aliphatic tail may sample a range of conformations, making it invisible in cryo-EM images. Capsaicin stabilizes the open state by “pull-and-contact” interactions between the vanillyl group and the S4-S5 linker. Our study provided a structural mechanism for the agonistic function of capsaicin and its analogs, and demonstrated an effective approach to obtain atomic level information from cryo-EM structures. PMID:26053297

  8. Lipids as regulators of the activity of transient receptor potential type V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-08-19

    After 7 years from its cloning, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel remains the sole membrane receptor mediating the pharmacological effects of the hot chilli pepper pungent component, capsaicin, and of the Euphorbia toxin, resiniferatoxin. Yet, this ion channel represents one of the most complex examples of how the activity of a protein can be regulated. Among the several chemicophysical stimuli that can modulate TRPV1 permeability to cations, endogenous lipids appear to play a major role, either as allosteric effectors or as direct agonists, or both. Furthermore, the capability of some mediators, such as the endocannabinoid anandamide, or the eicosanoid precursors 12- and 5-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acids, to activate TRPV1 receptors provides a striking example of the "site-dependent" and "metabolic" functional plasticity, respectively, typical of bioactive lipids. In this article, the multi-faceted and most recently discovered aspects of TRPV1 regulation are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the interaction between these membrane channels and some lipid molecules. PMID:15936040

  9. TRPV1 receptors mediate particulate matter-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agopyan, N; Head, J; Yu, S; Simon, S A

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is a world-wide health problem mainly because it produces adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects that frequently result in morbidity. Despite many years of epidemiological and basic research, the mechanisms underlying PM toxicity remain largely unknown. To understand some of these mechanisms, we measured PM-induced apoptosis and necrosis in normal human airway epithelial cells and sensory neurons from both wild-type mice and mice lacking TRPV1 receptors using Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated annexin V and propidium iodide labeling, respectively. Exposure of environmental PMs containing residual oil fly ash and ash from Mount St. Helens was found to induce apoptosis, but not necrosis, as a consequence of sustained calcium influx through TRPV1 receptors. Apoptosis was completely prevented by inhibiting TRPV1 receptors with capsazepine or by removing extracellular calcium or in sensory neurons from TRPV1(-/-) mice. Binding of either one of the PMs to the cell membrane induced a capsazepine-sensitive increase in cAMP. PM-induced apoptosis was augmented upon the inhibition of PKA. PKA inhibition on its own also induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting that this pathway may be endogenously protective against apoptosis. In summary, it was found that inhibiting TRPV1 receptors prevents PM-induced apoptosis, thereby providing a potential mechanism to reduce their toxicity. PMID:14633515

  10. Biological activity of a polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents data on the activity of a new APHC2 polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptors, which was isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. It has been shown that APHC2 has an analgesic activity, does not impair normal motor activity, and does not change body temperature of experimental animals, which has a great practical value for design of potent analgesics of a new generation. Further study of the characteristics of binding of the polypeptide to the TRPV1 receptor may show approaches to the development of other antagonists of this receptor that do not influence the body temperature. PMID:26725234

  11. Activation of Mu Opioid Receptors Sensitizes Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) via ?-Arrestin-2-Mediated Cross-Talk

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Matthew P.; Bierbower, Sonya M.; Eskander, Michael A.; Szteyn, Kalina; Por, Elaine D.; Gomez, Ruben; Veldhuis, Nicholas; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential family V1 channel (TRPV1) is activated by multiple stimuli, including capsaicin, acid, endovanilloids, and heat (>42C). Post-translational modifications to TRPV1 result in dynamic changes to the sensitivity of receptor activation. We have previously demonstrated that ?-arrestin2 actively participates in a scaffolding mechanism to inhibit TRPV1 phosphorylation, thereby reducing TRPV1 sensitivity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ?-arrestin2 sequestration by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) on thermal and chemical activation of TRPV1. Here we report that activation of mu opioid receptor by either morphine or DAMGO results in ?-arrestin2 recruitment to mu opioid receptor in sensory neurons, while activation by herkinorin does not. Furthermore, treatment of sensory neurons with morphine or DAMGO stimulates ?-arrestin2 dissociation from TRPV1 and increased sensitivity of the receptor. Conversely, herkinorin treatment has no effect on TRPV1 sensitivity. Additional behavioral studies indicate that GPCR-driven ?-arrestin2 sequestration plays an important peripheral role in the development of thermal sensitivity. Taken together, the reported data identify a novel cross-talk mechanism between GPCRs and TRPV1 that may contribute to multiple clinical conditions. PMID:24695785

  12. Functional plasticity of central TRPV1 receptors in brainstem dorsal vagal complex circuits of streptozotocin-treated hyperglycemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea; Bhaskaran, Muthu D.; Gao, Hong; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Smith, Bret N.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that central neurons participate in diabetic processes by modulating autonomic output from neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). We tested the hypothesis that synaptic modulation by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors is reduced in the DMV in slices from a murine model of type 1 diabetes. The TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin robustly enhanced glutamate release onto DMV neurons by acting at preterminal receptors in slices from intact mice, but failed to do so in slices from diabetic mice. TRPV1 receptor protein expression in the vagal complex was unaltered. Brief insulin pre-application restored TRPV1-dependent modulation of glutamate release in a PKC- and PI3K-dependent manner. The restorative effect of insulin was prevented by brefeldin A, suggesting insulin induced TRPV1 receptor trafficking to the terminal membrane. Central vagal circuits critical to the autonomic regulation of metabolism undergo insulin-dependent synaptic plasticity involving TRPV1 receptor modulation in diabetic mice after several days of chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:21957263

  13. Cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis reduces ASIC channel but enhances TRPV1 receptor function in rat bladder sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Khoa; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Using patch-clamp techniques, we studied the plasticity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) and transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channel function in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons retrogradely labeled from the bladder. Saline (control) or cyclophosphamide (CYP) was given intraperitoneally on days 1, 3, and 5. On day 6, lumbosacral (LS, L6–S2) or thoracolumbar (TL, T13–L2) DRG were removed and dissociated. Bladders and bladder DRG neurons from CYP-treated rats showed signs of inflammation (greater myeloperoxidase activity; lower intramuscular wall pH) and increased size (whole cell capacitance), respectively, compared with controls. Most bladder neurons (>90%) responded to protons and capsaicin. Protons produced multiphasic currents with distinct kinetics, whereas capsaicin always triggered a sustained response. The TRPV1 receptor antagonist A-425619 abolished capsaicin-triggered currents and raised the threshold of heat-activated currents. Prolonged exposure to an acidic environment (pH range: 7.2 to 6.6) inhibited proton-evoked currents, potentiated the capsaicin-evoked current, and reduced the threshold of heat-activated currents in LS and TL bladder neurons. CYP treatment reduced density but not kinetics of all current components triggered by pH 5. In contrast, CYP-treatment was associated with an increased current density in response to capsaicin in LS and TL bladder neurons. Correspondingly, heat triggered current at a significantly lower temperature in bladder neurons from CYP-treated rats compared with controls. These results reveal that cystitis differentially affects TRPV1- and ASIC-mediated currents in both bladder sensory pathways. Acidification of the bladder wall during inflammation may contribute to changes in nociceptive transmission mediated through the TRPV1 receptor, suggesting a role for TRPV1 in hypersensitivity associated with cystitis. PMID:23636721

  14. Nonpsychotropic plant cannabinoids, cannabidivarin (CBDV) and cannabidiol (CBD), activate and desensitize transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in vitro: potential for the treatment of neuronal hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Hill, Charlotte L; Leo, Antonio; Alhusaini, Ahlam; Soubrane, Camille; Mazzarella, Enrico; Russo, Emilio; Whalley, Benjamin J; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Stephens, Gary J

    2014-11-19

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder, with over 50 million people worldwide affected. Recent evidence suggests that the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) may contribute to the onset and progression of some forms of epilepsy. Since the two nonpsychotropic cannabinoids cannabidivarin (CBDV) and cannabidiol (CBD) exert anticonvulsant activity in vivo and produce TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation in vitro, we evaluated the effects of these two compounds on TRPV1 channel activation and desensitization and in an in vitro model of epileptiform activity. Patch clamp analysis in transfected HEK293 cells demonstrated that CBD and CBDV dose-dependently activate and rapidly desensitize TRPV1, as well as TRP channels of subfamily V type 2 (TRPV2) and subfamily A type 1 (TRPA1). TRPV1 and TRPV2 transcripts were shown to be expressed in rat hippocampal tissue. When tested on epileptiform neuronal spike activity in hippocampal brain slices exposed to a Mg(2+)-free solution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs), CBDV reduced both epileptiform burst amplitude and duration. The prototypical TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, produced similar, although not identical effects. Capsaicin, but not CBDV, effects on burst amplitude were reversed by IRTX, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. These data suggest that CBDV antiepileptiform effects in the Mg(2+)-free model are not uniquely mediated via activation of TRPV1. However, TRPV1 was strongly phosphorylated (and hence likely sensitized) in Mg(2+)-free solution-treated hippocampal tissue, and both capsaicin and CBDV caused TRPV1 dephosphorylation, consistent with TRPV1 desensitization. We propose that CBDV effects on TRP channels should be studied further in different in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. PMID:25029033

  15. Anandamide elicits an acute release of nitric oxide through endothelial TRPV1 receptor activation in the rat arterial mesenteric bed

    PubMed Central

    Poblete, Ins M; Orliac, Mara Luz; Briones, Ren; Adler-Graschinsky, Edda; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2005-01-01

    In the isolated rat mesenteric bed, the 1 min perfusion with 100 nm anandamide, a concentration that did not evoke vasorelaxation, elicited an acute release of 165.1 9.2 pmol nitric oxide (NO) that was paralleled by a 2-fold increase in cGMP tissue levels. The rise in NO released was mimicked by either (R)-(+)-methanandamide or the vanilloid receptor agonists resiniferatoxin and (E)-capsaicin but not by its inactive cis-isomer (Z)-capsaicin. The NO release elicited by either anandamide or capsaicin was reduced by the TRPV1 receptor antagonists 5?-iodoresiniferatoxin, SB 366791 and capsazepine as well as by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists SR 141716A or AM251. The outflow of NO elicited by anandamide and capsaicin was also reduced by endothelium removal or NO synthase inhibition, suggesting the specific participation of endothelial TRPV1 receptors, rather than the novel endothelial TRPV4 receptors. Consistently, RT-PCR showed the expression of the mRNA coding for the rat TRPV1 receptor in the endothelial cell layer, in addition to its expression in sensory nerves. The participation of sensory nerves on the release of NO was precluded on the basis that neonatal denervation of the myenteric plexus sensory nerves did not modify the pattern of NO release induced by anandamide and capsaicin. We propose that low concentrations of anandamide, devoid of vasorelaxing effects, elicit an acute release of NO mediated predominantly by the activation of endothelial TRPV1 receptors whose physiological significance remains elusive. PMID:16081483

  16. Inhibitory effect of positively charged triazine antagonists of prokineticin receptors on the transient receptor vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Lee, Jae Yeol; Vzquez-Romero, Ana; Garrido, Maria; Messeguer, Angel; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Zamponi, Gerald W; Deplano, Alessandro; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Balboni, Gianfranco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Four positively charged compounds, previously shown to produce analgesic activity by interacting with prokineticin receptor or T-type calcium channels, were tested for their ability to inhibit capsaicin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the human recombinant TRPV1, with the goal of identifying novel TRPV1 open-pore inhibitors. KYS-05090 showed the highest potency as a TRPV1 antagonist, even higher than that of the open-pore triazine inhibitor 8aA. The latter showed quite remarkable agonist/desensitizer activity at the rat recombinant TRPM8 channel. The activity of KYS-05090 and the other compounds was selective because none of these compounds was able to modulate the rat TRPA1 channel. Open-pore inhibitors of TRPV1 may be a new class of multi-target analgesics with lesser side effects, such as loss of acute pain sensitivity and hyperthermia, than most TRPV1 antagonists developed so far. PMID:26192347

  17. Dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter CB1 and TRPV1 receptors exert opposite modulation on expression of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Uliana, D L; Hott, S C; Lisboa, S F; Resstel, L B M

    2016-04-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and Transient Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter are involved in the modulation of conditioned response. Both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are related to glutamate release and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It was previously demonstrated that both NMDA glutamate receptors and NO are involved in the conditioned emotional response. Therefore, one aim of this work was to verify whether dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors modulate the expression of contextual conditioned emotional response. Moreover, we also investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors and the NO pathway in this response. Male Wistar rats with local dlPAG guide cannula were submitted to contextual fear conditioning. Following 24 h, a polyethylene catheter was implanted in the femoral artery for cardiovascular recordings. After an additional 24 h, drugs were administered in the dlPAG and freezing behavior and autonomic responses were recorded during chamber re-exposure. Both a CB1 antagonist (AM251) and a TRPV1 agonist (Capsaicin; CPS) increased the expression of a conditioned emotional response. This response was prevented by an NMDA antagonist, a preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, an NO scavenger and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGC). Furthermore, pretreatment with a TRPV1 antagonist also prevented the increased conditioned emotional response induced by AM251. Considering that GABA can counterbalance glutamate effects, we also investigated whether GABAA receptors were involved in the effect of a higher dose of AM251. Pretreatment with a GABAA receptor antagonist caused an increased conditioned emotional response by AM251. Our results support the possibility that dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are involved in the expression of conditioned emotional response through the NMDA/NO/sGC pathway. Moreover, the opposite effects exerted by GABA and glutamate could produce different outcomes of drugs modulating eCBs. PMID:26724373

  18. The role of TRPV1 receptors in pain evoked by noxious thermal and chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Willis, William D

    2009-06-01

    Transient receptor potential receptors (TRP) on primary afferent neurons respond to noxious and/or thermal stimuli. TRPV1 receptors can be activated by noxious heat, acid, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin, leading to burning pain or itch mediated by discharges in C polymodal and Adelta mechano-heat nociceptors and in central neurons, including spinothalamic tract (STT) cells. Central nociceptive transmission involves both non-NMDA and NMDA receptors, and inhibitory interneurons as well as projection neurons contribute to the neural interactions. Behavioral consequences of intradermal injection of capsaicin include pain, as well as primary and secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. Primary hyperalgesia depends on sensitization of peripheral nociceptors, whereas, secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia result from sensitization of central nociceptive neurons, such as STT cells. Central sensitization is associated with enhanced responses to excitatory amino acids and decreased responses to inhibitory amino acids. The mechanism of the increase in responses to excitatory amino acids includes phosphorylation of NR1 subunits of NMDA receptors and GluR1 subunits of AMPA receptors. Central sensitization depends on activation of several protein kinases and other enzymes, such as nitric oxide synthase. This process is regulated by protein phosphatases. Central sensitization can be regarded as a spinal cord form of long-term potentiation. PMID:19294370

  19. Prolonged exposure to bradykinin and prostaglandin E2 increases TRPV1 mRNA but does not alter TRPV1 and TRPV1b protein expression in cultured rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Shilpa; Paule, Cleoper C; Varga, Angelika; Photiou, Andy; Jenes, Agnes; Avelino, Antonio; Buluwela, Laki; Nagy, Istvan

    2014-04-01

    Sensitisation of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) ion channel in nociceptive primary sensory neurons (PSN) underlies the development of inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Removal of the negative-dominant splice variant of the TRPV1 molecule, TRPV1b from TRPV1/TRPV1b heterotetrameric channels, which should be associated with changes in the expression of TRPV1 and TRPV1b transcripts and proteins, has been suggested to contribute to that sensitisation. Respective reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western-blotting revealed that both TRPV1 and TRPV1b mRNA, and their encoded proteins are expressed in rat cultured PSN. Sequencing of the RT-PCR products showed that TRPV1b mRNA lacks the entire exon 7. Further, growing PSN for 2 days in the presence of 10?M bradykinin (BK) and 10?M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) significantly increases TRPV1 responsiveness and TRPV1 mRNA expression, without producing any changes in TRPV1b mRNA, and TRPV1 and TRPV1b protein expression. These data challenge the hypothesis that alterations in the composition of the TRPV1 ion channel contributes to the sensitisation. PMID:24525250

  20. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Hisashi; Yamaoka, Tomoko; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Sasaoka, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2008-12-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca(2+) channel opening, Ca(2+) influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production. PMID:18996081

  1. TRPV1 antagonists: the challenges for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Khairatkar-Joshi, Neelima; Szallasi, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1) is a polymodal nociceptor whose expression is upregulated in several painful disorders. At present, potent small molecule TRPV1 antagonists are undergoing clinical trials in patients with chronic pain. Clinical development of TRPV1 antagonists is, however, facing new challenges. Many drug candidates evoke a febrile reaction that varies among patients. We speculate that TRPV1 gene polymorphism might be an underlying cause of the inter-subject variability in pain sensation and response to TRPV1 antagonists. This newly understood and yet to be fully validated aspect of pain suggests that pain management based on regulating the TRPV1 receptor might require a personalized approach for effective clinical outcome. Here, we provide our perspectives on current progress in targeting TRPV1. PMID:19097938

  2. Epithelial TRPV1 Signaling Accelerates Gingival Epithelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Yamada, H.; Tabeta, K.; Nakajima, T.; Murakami, S.; Yamazaki, K.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), a member of the calcium-permeable thermosensitive transient receptor potential superfamily, is a sensor of thermal and chemical stimuli. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat (> 43C), acidic conditions (pH < 6.6), capsaicin, and endovanilloids. This pain receptor was discovered on nociceptive fibers in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 was recently found to be expressed by non-neuronal cells, such as epithelial cells. The oral gingival epithelium is exposed to multiple noxious stimuli, including heat and acids derived from endogenous and exogenous substances; however, whether gingival epithelial cells (GECs) express TRPV1 is unknown. We show that both TRPV1 mRNA and protein are expressed by GECs. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels in the gingival epithelial cell line, epi 4. Moreover, TRPV1 activation in epi 4 cells accelerated proliferation. These responses to capsaicin were inhibited by a specific TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366791. We also observed GEC proliferation in capsaicin-treated mice in vivo. No effects were observed on GEC apoptosis by epithelial TRPV1 signaling. To examine the molecular mechanisms underlying this proliferative effect, we performed complementary (c)DNA microarray analysis of capsaicin-stimulated epi 4 cells. Compared with control conditions, 227 genes were up-regulated and 232 genes were down-regulated following capsaicin stimulation. Several proliferation-related genes were validated by independent experiments. Among them, fibroblast growth factor-17 and neuregulin 2 were significantly up-regulated in capsaicin-treated epi 4 cells. Our results suggest that functional TRPV1 is expressed by GECs and contributes to the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:25266715

  3. Pharmacology of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Istvan; Friston, Dominic; Valente, Jojo Sousa; Torres Perez, Jose Vicente; Andreou, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel (TRPV1), has been identified as a polymodal transducer molecule on a sub-set of primary sensory neurons which responds to various stimuli including noxious heat (> -42 degrees C), protons and vanilloids such as capsaicin, the hot ingredient of chilli peppers. Subsequently, TRPV1 has been found indispensable for the development of burning pain and reflex hyperactivity associated with inflammation of peripheral tissues and viscera, respectively. Therefore, TRPV1 is regarded as a major target for the development of novel agents for the control of pain and visceral hyperreflexia in inflammatory conditions. Initial efforts to introduce agents acting on TRPV1 into clinics have been hampered by unexpected side-effects due to wider than expected expression in various tissues, as well as by the complex pharmacology, of TRPV1. However, it is believed that better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TRPV1 and specific targeting of tissues may eventually lead to the development of clinically useful agents. In order to assist better understanding of TRPV1 pharmacology, here we are giving a comprehensive account on the activation and inactivation mechanisms and the structure-function relationship of TRPV1. PMID:24941664

  4. Analgesic Compound from Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa Is the First Polypeptide Inhibitor of Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1)*

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Yaroslav A.; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M.; Kozlovskaya, Emma P.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Venomous animals from distinct phyla such as spiders, scorpions, snakes, cone snails, or sea anemones produce small toxic proteins interacting with a variety of cell targets. Their bites often cause pain. One of the ways of pain generation is the activation of TRPV1 channels. Screening of 30 different venoms from spiders and sea anemones for modulation of TRPV1 activity revealed inhibitors in tropical sea anemone Heteractis crispa venom. Several separation steps resulted in isolation of an inhibiting compound. This is a 56-residue-long polypeptide named APHC1 that has a Bos taurus trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)/Kunitz-type fold, mostly represented by serine protease inhibitors and ion channel blockers. APHC1 acted as a partial antagonist of capsaicin-induced currents (32 9% inhibition) with half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) 54 4 nm. In vivo, a 0.1 mg/kg dose of APHC1 significantly prolonged tail-flick latency and reduced capsaicin-induced acute pain. Therefore, our results can make an important contribution to the research into molecular mechanisms of TRPV1 modulation and help to solve the problem of overactivity of this receptor during a number of pathological processes in the organism. PMID:18579526

  5. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1).

    PubMed

    Morales-Lzaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with its deregulation. PMID:23613529

  6. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lzaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with its deregulation. PMID:23613529

  7. Dissecting TRPV1: lessons to be learned?

    PubMed

    Grimm, Christian; Aneiros, Eduardo; de Groot, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is a polymodal nociceptor. It is primarily expressed in dorsal root ganglia and peripheral sensory nerve endings, and to a much lesser extent, in the central nervous system. It has also been implicated in the functional properties of e.g. urinary and bronchial epithelia. TRPV1 has long been under intensive investigation by the pharmaceutical industry as a candidate drug target especially for pain conditions. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular determinants of TRPV1 channel activation by heat, protons and capsaicin. Newly discovered heat and proton activation sites within the pore domain are discussed as well as potential consequences for drug discovery. Polymodal TRPV1 antagonists were found to cause hyperthermia in a species-dependent manner in-vivo, hence the discovery of euthermic compounds with an appropriate modality selectivity profile will be crucial for TRPV1's future as a drug target. PMID:21654202

  8. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  9. Integrative Binding Sites within Intracellular Termini of TRPV1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grycova, Lenka; Holendova, Blanka; Bumba, Ladislav; Bily, Jan; Jirku, Michaela; Lansky, Zdenek; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-01-01

    TRPV1 is a nonselective cation channel that integrates wide range of painful stimuli. It has been shown that its activity could be modulated by intracellular ligands PIP2 or calmodulin (CaM). The detailed localization and description of PIP2 interaction sites remain unclear. Here, we used synthesized peptides and purified fusion proteins of intracellular regions of TRPV1 expressed in E.coli in combination with fluorescence anisotropy and surface plasmon resonance measurements to characterize the PIP2 binding to TRPV1. We characterized one PIP2 binding site in TRPV1 N-terminal region, residues F189-V221, and two independent PIP2 binding sites in Cterminus: residues K688-K718 and L777-S820. Moreover we show that two regions, namely F189-V221 and L777-S820, overlap with previously localized CaM binding sites. For all the interactions the equilibrium dissociation constants were estimated. As the structural data regarding C-terminus of TRPV1 are lacking, restraint-based molecular modeling combined with ligand docking was performed providing us with structural insight to the TRPV1/PIP2 binding. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with our in silico predictions. PMID:23119017

  10. Effect of genetic deletion of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 on the expression of Substance P in sensory neurons of mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Willcockson, Helen H.; Chen, Yong; Han, Ji Eun; Valtschanoff, Juli G.

    2010-01-01

    The neuropeptide Substance P (SP), expressed by nociceptive sensory afferents in joints, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Capsaicin causes neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to release SP from their central and peripheral axons, suggesting a functional link between SP and the capsaicin receptor, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The expression of both TRPV1 and SP have been reported to increase in several models of arthritis but the specific involvement of TRPV1-expressing articular afferents that can release SP is not completely understood. We here wanted to ascertain whether the increase in the number of SP-positive primary afferents in arthritis may be affected by genetic deletion of TRPV1. For this, we used immunohistochemistry to quantify the expression of SP in primary afferent neurons in wild type mice (WT) vs. TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). We found that the expression of SP in DRG 1) increased significantly over nave level in both WT and KO mice 3 weeks after AIA, 2) was significantly higher in KO mice than in WT mice in nave mice and 2-3 weeks after AIA, 3) was significantly higheron the side of AIA than on the contralateral, vehicle-injected side at all time points in WT mice, but not in KO mice, and 4) increased predominantly in small-size neurons in KO mice and in small- and medium-size neurons in WT mice. Since the size distribution of SP-positive DRG neurons in arthritic TRPV1-KO mice was not significantly different from that in nave mice, we speculate that the increased expression of SP is unlikely to reflect recruitment of A-fiber primary afferents and that the higher expression of SP in KO mice may represent a plastic change to compensate for the missing receptor in a major sensory circuit. PMID:20303589

  11. Group II/III metabotropic glutamate receptors exert endogenous activity-dependent modulation of TRPV1 receptors on peripheral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Susan M.; Zhou, Shengtai; Govea, Rosann; Du, Junhui

    2011-01-01

    There is pharmacological evidence Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) function as activity-dependent autoreceptors, inhibiting transmission in supraspinal sites. These receptors are expressed by peripheral nociceptors. We investigated whether mGluRs function as activity-dependent autoreceptors inhibiting pain transmission to the rat CNS, particularly TRPV1-induced activity. Blocking peripheral mGluR activity by intraplantar injection of antagonists LY341495 (LY, 20, 100 ?M, Group II/III ), APICA (100 ?M, Group II) or UBP1112 (30 ?M, Group III) increased capsaicin (CAP)-induced nociceptive behaviors and nociceptor activity. In contrast, Group II agonist APDC (0.1 ?M) or Group III agonist L-AP4 (10 ?M) blocked the LY-induced increase. Ca2+ imaging in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells confirmed LY enhanced CAP-induced Ca2+ mobilization which was blocked by APDC and L-AP4. We hypothesized that excess glutamate (GLU), released by high intensity and/or prolonged stimulation endogenously activated Group II/III, dampening nociceptor activation. In support of this, intraplantar GLU+LY produced heat hyperalgesia and exogenous GLU+LY applied to nociceptors produced enhanced nociceptor activity and thermal sensitization. Intraplantar formalin known to elevate extracellular GLU, enhanced pain behaviors in the presence of LY. LY alone produced no pain behaviors, no change in nociceptor discharge rate or heat-evoked responses and no change in cytosolic Ca2+ in DRG cells, demonstrating a lack of tonic inhibitory control. Group II/III mGluRs maintain an activity-dependent autoinhibition, capable of significantly reducing TRPV1-induced activity. They are endogenously activated following high frequency and/or prolonged nociceptor stimulation, acting as built-in negative modulators of TRPV1 and nociceptor function, reducing pain transmission to the CNS. PMID:21900552

  12. Measurement of relative Ca(2+) permeability during sustained activation of TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Samways, Damien S K; Tomkiewicz, Evan; Langevin, Olivia M; Bukhari, Maurish

    2016-02-01

    Some cation permeable ligand-gated ion channels, including the capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1, have been reported to exhibit a time-dependent increase in permeability to large inorganic cations during sustained activation, a phenomenon termed "pore dilation." TRPV1 conducts substantial Ca(2+) entry, and it has been suggested that this channel undergoes a time-dependent change in Ca(2+) permeability relative to Na(+) (P Ca/P Na) that parallels pore dilation. However, our experiments employing whole cell patch clamp photometry and single channel recordings to directly measure relative Ca(2+) current in TRPV1 expressing HEK293 cells show that relative Ca(2+) influx remains constant for the duration of capsaicin-evoked channel activation. Further, we present evidence from patch clamp photometry experiments suggesting that sustained activation of Ca(2+) permeable ion channels in the voltage-clamp configuration leads to rapid saturation of the pipette Ca(2+) chelator, and that subsequent observed shifts in the current reversal potentials in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) are likely due to intracellular accumulation of this ion and a movement of the Ca(2+) equilibrium potential (E Ca) towards zero. Finally, using an adapted reversal potential-based protocol in which cells are only exposed to Ca(2+) after sustained capsaicin exposure in the absence of added extracellular Ca(2+), we demonstrate that the calculated P Ca/P Na is unaffected by duration of TRPV1 activation. In conclusion, we find no evidence in support of a time-dependent change in P Ca/P Na for TRPV1. Our data further urges caution in estimating relative Ca(2+) permeability using reversal potentials, as there is a limited time window in which the cytosolic Ca(2+) chelator included in the patch pipette can prevent localised elevations in cytosolic free Ca(2+) and thus allow for an accurate estimate of this important channel permeability parameter. PMID:26490461

  13. Carboxyl-terminal Domain of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Contains Distinct Segments Differentially Involved in Capsaicin- and Heat-induced Desensitization*

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, John; Wang, Sen; Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Ca2+-dependent processes are involved in capsaicin-induced desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), but desensitization of TRPV1 by heat occurs even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin and heat desensitize TRPV1 through distinct mechanisms involving distinct structural segments of TRPV1. In HEK293 cells that heterologously express TRPV1, we found that heat-induced desensitization was not affected by the inclusion of intracellular ATP or alanine mutation of Lys155, both of which attenuate capsaicin-induced desensitization, suggesting that heat-induced desensitization occurs through mechanisms distinct from capsaicin-induced desensitization. To determine protein domains involved in heat-induced desensitization, we generated chimeric proteins between TRPV1 and TRPV3, a heat-gated channel lacking heat-induced desensitization. We found that TRPV1 with the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of TRPV3 retained heat activation but was impaired in heat-induced desensitization. Further experiments using chimeric or deletion mutants within TRPV1 CTD indicated that the distal half of CTD regulates the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 in modality-specific manners. Within the distal CTD, we identified two segments that distinctly regulated capsaicin- and heat-induced desensitization. The results suggest that the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 by capsaicin and heat can be modulated differentially and disproportionally through different regions of TRPV1 CTD. Identifying the domains involved in thermal regulation of TRPV1 may facilitate the development of novel anti-hyperalgesic approaches aimed at attenuating activation and enhancing desensitization of TRPV1 by thermal stimuli. PMID:24174527

  14. Streptozotocin-Induced Early Thermal Hyperalgesia is independent of Glycemic State of Rats: Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) and Inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin (STZ) is used as a common tool to induce diabetes and to study diabetes-induced complications including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Previously, we have reported that STZ induces a direct effect on neurons through expression and function of the Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel in sensory neurons resulting in thermal hyperalgesia, even in non-diabetic STZ-treated mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of expression and function of TRPV1 in the central sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord in STZ-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Results We found that a proportion of STZ-treated rats were normoglycemic but still exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical data show that STZ treatment, irrespective of glycemic state of the animal, caused microglial activation and increased expression of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn. Further, there was a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-?) in spinal cord tissue, irrespective of the glycemic state. Capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was significantly higher in the spinal cord of STZ-treated animals. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent TRPV1 agonist, significantly attenuated STZ-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. RTX treatment also prevented the increase in TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in the spinal cord tissue. Conclusions From these results, it is concluded that TRPV1 is an integral component of initiating and maintaining inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia, which can be alleviated by intrathecal administration of RTX. Further, the results suggest that enhanced expression and inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 at the spinal cord may play a role in central sensitization in STZ-induced neuropathy. PMID:21794120

  15. TRPV1 Marks Synaptic Segregation of Multiple Convergent Afferents at the Rat Medial Solitary Tract Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Peters, James H.; McDougall, Stuart J.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    TRPV1 receptors are expressed on most but not all central terminals of cranial visceral afferents in the caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS). TRPV1 is associated with unmyelinated C-fiber afferents. Both TRPV1+ and TRPV1- afferents enter NTS but their precise organization remains poorly understood. In horizontal brainstem slices, we activated solitary tract (ST) afferents and recorded ST-evoked glutamatergic excitatory synaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) under whole cell voltage clamp conditions from neurons of the medial subnucleus. Electrical shocks to the ST produced fixed latency EPSCs (jitter<200 s) that identified direct ST afferent innervation. Graded increases in shock intensity often recruited more than one ST afferent and ST-EPSCs had consistent threshold intensity, latency to onset, and unique EPSC waveforms that characterized each unitary ST afferent contact. The TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (100 nM) blocked the evoked TRPV1+ ST-EPSCs and defined them as either TRPV1+ or TRPV1- inputs. No partial responses to capsaicin were observed so that in NTS neurons that received one or multiple (25) direct ST afferent inputs all were either blocked by capsaicin or were unaltered. Since TRPV1 mediates asynchronous release following TRPV1+ ST-evoked EPSCs, we likewise found that recruiting more than one ST afferent further augmented the asynchronous response and was eliminated by capsaicin. Thus, TRPV1+ and TRPV1- afferents are completely segregated to separate NTS neurons. As a result, the TRPV1 receptor augments glutamate release only within unmyelinated afferent pathways in caudal medial NTS and our work indicates a complete separation of C-type from A-type afferent information at these first central neurons. PMID:21949835

  16. Paradoxic effects of propofol on visceral pain induced by various TRPV1 agonists.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenjin; Cui, Can; Zhang, Zhiwei; Liang, Jiexian

    2013-04-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of propofol inhibits subsequent acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice. Propofol increases the sensitivity of dorsal root ganglion neurons to capsaicin through transient receptor potential ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) and protein kinase C? (PKC?)-mediated phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1). Intraperitoneal co-injection of propofol may increase visceral nociception induced by TRPV1 agonists via sensitization of TRPV1. Therefore, we investigated the effects of intraperitoneal co-injection of propofol on nociception induced by acetic acid and capsaicin. The number of writhing movements induced by acetic acid or nociception time by capsaicin with or without propofol were counted. Neonatal capsaicin-treated mice were also used to demonstrate the role of TRPV1 in the effects of propofol on nociception, induced by TRPV1 agonists. Co-injection of propofol resulted in a pronociceptive effect on the writhing response induced by acetic acid, while the same dose of propofol ameliorated the response to capsaicin. The writhing response to intraperitoneal acetic acid was sharply inhibited following neonatal treatment with capsaicin. Co-injection with propofol reduced the number of writhing movements induced by acetic acid in neonatal capsaicin-treated mice. These results suggest that propofol binds to TRPV1 at the capsaicin-binding pocket. PMID:23596498

  17. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ?60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  18. Structure Activity Relationships of 1,4-Dihydropyridines That Act as Enhancers of the Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun Joo; Keller, Jason M.; Olah, Zoltan; Iadarola, Michael J.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Vanilloid agonists such as capsaicin activate ion flux through the TRPV1 channel, a heat- and ligand-gated cation channel that transduces painful chemical or thermal stimuli applied to peripheral nerve endings in skin or deep tissues. We have probed the SAR of a variety of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives as novel "enhancers" of TRPV1 activity by examining changes in capsaicin-induced elevations in 45Ca2+-uptake in either cells ectopically expressing TRPV1 or in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The enhancers increased the maximal capsaicin effect on 45Ca2+-uptake by typically 2 3 fold without producing an action when used alone. The DHP enhancers contained 6-aryl substitution and small alkyl groups at the 1 and 4 positions, and a 3-phenylalkylthioester was tolerated. Levels of free intracellular Ca2+, as measured by calcium imaging, were also increased in DRG neurons when exposed to the combination of capsaicin and the most efficacious enhancer 23 compared to capsaicin alone. Thus, DHPs can modulate TRPV1 channels in a positive fashion. PMID:18809334

  19. CB(2) and TRPV(1) receptors oppositely modulate in vitro human osteoblast activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Tortora, Chiara; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Luongo, Livio; Conforti, Antonella; Starc, Nadia; Manzo, Iolanda; Nobili, Bruno; Locatelli, Franco; Maione, Sabatino

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we have investigated the effect of CB2 and TRPV1 receptor ligands on in vitro osteoblasts from bone marrow of human healthy donors. A pivotal role for the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism has been highlighted. We have demonstrated a functional cross-talk between CB2 and TRPV1 in human osteoclasts, suggesting these receptors as new pharmacological target for the treatment of bone resorption disease as osteoporosis. Moreover, we have shown the presence of these receptors on human mesenchimal stem cells, hMSCs. Osteoblasts are mononucleated cells originated from hMSCs by the essential transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 and involved in bone formation via the synthesis and release of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin. For the first time, we show that CB2 and TRPV1 receptors are both expressed on human osteoblasts together with enzymes synthesizing and degrading endocannabinoids/endovanilloids, and oppositely modulate human osteoblast activity in culture in a way that the CB2 receptor stimulation improves the osteogenesis whereas TRPV1 receptor stimulation inhibits it. PMID:26117426

  20. Pharmacodynamics of TRPV1 Agonists in a Bioassay Using Human PC-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimnez, Marcel; Clav, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. TRPV1 is a multimodal channel mainly expressed in sensory neurons. We aimed to explore the pharmacodynamics of the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin, natural capsaicinoids, and piperine in an in vitro bioassay using human PC-3 cells and to examine desensitization and the effect of the specific antagonist SB366791. Methods. PC-3 cells expressing TRPV1 were incubated with Fluo-4. Fluorescence emission changes following exposition to agonists with and without preincubation with antagonists were assessed and referred to maximal fluorescence following the addition of ionomycin. Concentration-response curves were fitted to the Hill equation. Results. Capsaicin and piperine had similar pharmacodynamics (Emax 204.8 184.3% piperine versus 176.6 35.83% capsaicin, P = 0.8814, Hill coefficient 0.70 0.50 piperine versus 1.59 0.86 capsaicin, P = 0.3752). In contrast, capsaicinoids had lower Emax (40.99 6.14% capsaicinoids versus 176.6 35.83% capsaicin, P < 0.001). All the TRPV1 agonists showed significant desensitization after the second exposition and their effects were strongly inhibited by SB366791. Conclusion. TRPV1 receptor is successfully stimulated by capsaicin, piperine, and natural capsaicinoids. These agonists present desensitization and their effect is significantly reduced by a TRPV1-specific antagonist. In addition, PC-3 cell bioassays proved useful in the study of TRPV1 pharmacodynamics. PMID:24688365

  1. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  2. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating.

    PubMed

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-03-16

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  3. Sumatriptan Inhibits TRPV1 Channels in Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. Steven; Cheng, Xiangying; Jeffry, Joseph A.; Disney, Kimberly E.; Premkumar, Louis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand a possible role for transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channels in sumatriptan relief of pain mediated by trigeminal nociceptors. Background TRPV1 channels are expressed in small nociceptive sensory neurons. In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), TRPV1-containing nociceptors mediate certain types of inflammatory pain. Neurogenic inflammation of cerebral dura and blood vessels in the trigeminal nociceptive system is thought to be important in migraine pain, but the ion channels important in transducing migraine pain are not known. Sumatriptan is an agent effective in treatment of migraine and cluster headache. We hypothesized that sumatriptan might modulate activity of TRPV1 channels found in the trigeminal nociceptive system. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to detect the presence of TRPV1 channel protein, whole cell recording in acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglia (TG) to detect functionality of TRPV1 channels, and whole cell recording in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) to detect effects on release of neurotransmitters from trigeminal neurons onto second order sensory neurons. Effects specifically on TG neurons that project to cerebral dura were assessed by labeling dural nociceptors with DiI. Results Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TRPV1 channels are present in cerebral dura, trigeminal ganglion, and in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, produced depolarization and repetitive action potential firing in current clamp recordings and large inward currents in voltage clamp recordings from acutely dissociated TG neurons, demonstrating that TRPV1 channels are functional in trigeminal neurons. Capsaicin increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in neurons of layer II in TNC slices, showing that these channels have a physiological effect on central synaptic transmission. Sumatriptan (10 ?M), a selective anti-migraine drug inhibited TRPV1-mediated inward currents in TG. and capsaicin-elicited sEPSCs in TNC slices. The same effects of capsaicin and sumatriptan were found in acutely dissociated DiI-labeled TG neurons innervating cerebral dura. Conclusion Our results build on previous work indicating that TRPV1 channels in trigeminal nociceptors play a role in craniofacial pain. Our findings that TRPV1 is inhibited by the specific antimigraine drug sumatriptan, and that TRPV1 channels are functional in neurons projecting to cerebral dura suggests a specific role for these channels in migraine or cluster headache. PMID:22289052

  4. Phospholipase C mediated modulation of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Rohacs, Tibor; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Lukacs, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels are involved in both thermosensation and nociception. They are activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin and modulated by a plethora of other agents. This review will focus on the consequences of phospholipase C (PLC) activation, with special emphasis on the effects of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) on these channels. Two opposing effects of PIP2 have been reported on TRPV1. PIP2 has been proposed to inhibit TRPV1, and relief from this inhibition was suggested to be involved in sensitization of these channels by pro-inflammatory agents. In excised patches, however, PIP2 was shown to activate TRPV1. Calcium flowing through TRPV1 activates PLC and the resulting depletion of PIP2 was proposed to play a role in capsaicin-induced desensitization of these channels. We will describe the data indicating involvement of PLC and PIP2 in sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1 and will also discuss other pathways potentially contributing to these two phenomena. We attempt to resolve the seemingly contradictory data by proposing that PIP2 can both activate and inhibit TRPV1 depending on the experimental conditions, more specifically on the level of stimulation of these channels. Finally, we also discuss data in the literature indicating that other TRP channels, TRPA1 and some members of the TRPC subfamily, may also be under a similar dual control by PIP2. PMID:18528787

  5. Receptome: Interactions between three pain-related receptors or the "Triumvirate" of cannabinoid, opioid and TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zdor, Ferenc; Wollemann, Maria

    2015-12-01

    A growing amount of data demonstrates the interactions between cannabinoid, opioid and the transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. These interactions can be bidirectional, inhibitory or excitatory, acute or chronic in their nature, and arise both at the molecular level (structurally and functionally) and in physiological processes, such as pain modulation or perception. The interactions of these three pain-related receptors may also reserve important and new therapeutic applications for the treatment of chronic pain or inflammation. In this review, we summarize the main findings on the interactions between the cannabinoid, opioid and the TRPV1 receptor regarding to pain modulation. PMID:26520391

  6. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jamie K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dom, Aaron M; Witte, Theodore R; Thornhill, Brent A; Crabtree, Clayton M; Perry, Haley E; Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Creel, Rebecca G; Damron, C Luke; Rollyson, William D; Stevenson, Cathryn D; Hardman, W Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A; Carpenter, A Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-08-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is a known agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The pro-apoptotic activity of capsaicin was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by threefold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  7. N-oleoyldopamine, a novel endogenous capsaicin-like lipid, protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Beihua; Wang, Donna H.

    2008-01-01

    N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA), a bioactive lipid originally found in the mammalian brain, is an endovanilloid that selectively activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel. This study tests the hypothesis that OLDA protects the heart against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury via activation of the TRPV1 in wild-type (WT) but not in gene-targeted TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1?/?) mice. Hearts of WT or TRPV1?/? mice were Langendorffly perfused with OLDA (2 10?9 M) in the presence or absence of CGRP837 (1 10?6 M), a selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist; RP-67580 (1 10?6 M), a selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist; chelerythrine (5 10?6 M), a selective protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist; or tetrabutylammonium (TBA, 5 10?4 M), a nonselective K+ channel antagonist, followed by 35 min of global ischemia and 40 min of reperfusion (I/R). Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), coronary flow (CF), and left ventricular peak positive dP/dt (+dP/dt) were evaluated after I/R. OLDA improved recovery of cardiac function after I/R in WT but not TRPV1?/? hearts by increasing LVDP, CF, and +dP/dt and by decreasing LVEDP. CGRP837, RP-67580, chelerythrine, or TBA abolished the protective effect of OLDA in WT hearts. Radioimmunoassay showed that the release of substance P (SP) and CGRP after OLDA treatment was higher in WT than in TRPV1?/? hearts, which was blocked by chelerythrine or TBA. Thus OLDA exerts a cardiac protective effect during I/R injury in WT hearts via CGRP and SP release, which is abolished by PKC or K+ channel antagonists. The protective effect of OLDA is void in TRPV1?/? hearts, supporting the notion that TRPV1 mediates OLDA-induced protection against cardiac I/R injury. PMID:18567714

  8. Capsaicin, transient receptor potential (TRP) protein subfamilies and the particular relationship between capsaicin receptors and small primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hiura, Akio

    2006-09-01

    A number of subfamilies of the capsaicin receptor, collectively called TRP, have been reported since the discovery of vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). The term 'TRP' is derived from 'transient receptor potential', which means the transient and rapid defect of reaction following long stimulation with light in the photoreceptor cells of mutant Drosophila. The common features of TRP family members are the centrally situated six transmembrane domain, in which an ion channel is located, three to four ankirin repeats at the N-terminus and a TRP domain comprising 25 amino acids at the C-terminus. The TRP family members are present in animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates, and in the cells in various tissues in individual animals. During evolution, the original TRP seems to have acquired a wide variety of functions related to sensing the inner or outer environment (e.g. to sensing light (Drosophila), osmolarity, protons, temperature, ligands and mechanical force). In mammals, the TRPV subfamily is exclusively expressed in small- to medium-sized primary sensory neurons that also co-express some chemical markers (i.e. isolectin B4 (IB4), fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase (FRAP), the P2X3 purinoceptor (a receptor provoked by ATP-induced nociception) and Ret, a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor). There is a paradox in that regardless of the marked or complete loss of noxious, small sensory neurons (polymodal nociceptors) in mice treated with capsaicin during the neonatal period, as well as in VR1 (TRPV1)-deficient knock-out mice, the responses to noxious heat are normal. Regarding the paradox in mice treated with capsaicin as neonates, our explanation is that although capsaicin probably reduces the number of a subgroup of small neurons (IB4-, VR1+), the remaining IB4+ (VR1-) neurons can sense noxious heat normally. One working hypothesis is that mice lacking TRPV1/2 can sense noxious heat under normal conditions, presumably via another still unknown pathway, and TRPV1 has been suggested to be involved in noxious heat transduction under pathological conditions, such as inflammation and tissue injury. Further studies will be required to clarify these complexities. Mice treated with capsaicin as neonates would provide a model to investigate the above paradoxes, as would TRPV1-knock-out mice, although different mechanisms may be operating in the two models. PMID:16955665

  9. A "cute" desensitization of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Touska, Filip; Marsakova, Lenka; Teisinger, Jan; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin and other vanilloids selectively excite and subsequently desensitize pain-conducting nerve fibers (nociceptors) and this process contributes to the analgesic (and thus therapeutically relevant) effects of these compounds. Such a desensitization process is triggered by the activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 receptor channels (TRPV1) that open their cationic pores, permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium (Ca(2+)) ions. Depending on the duration of capsaicin exposure and the external calcium concentration, the Ca(2+) influx via TRPV1 channels desensitizes the channels themselves, which, from the cellular point of view, represents a feedback mechanism protecting the nociceptive neuron from toxic Ca(2+) overload. The 'acute desensitization' accounts for most of the reduction in responsiveness occurring within the first few (~20) seconds after the vanilloids are administered to the cell for the first time. Another form of desensitization is 'tachyphylaxis', which is a reduction in the response to repeated applications of vanilloid. The wealth of pathways following TRPV1 activation that lead to increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and both forms of desensitization is huge and they might utilise just about every known type of signalling molecule. This review will not attempt to cover all historical aspects of research into all these processes. Instead, it will try to highlight some new challenging thoughts on the important phenomenon of TRPV1 desensitization and will focus on the putative mechanisms that are thought to account for the acute phase of this process. PMID:20932251

  10. Sensitization by pulmonary reactive oxygen species of rat vagal lung C-fibers: the roles of the TRPV1, TRPA1, and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ting; Lin, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Tien-Huan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Jow, Guey-Mei; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Sensitization of vagal lung C-fibers (VLCFs) induced by mediators contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hypersensitivity, which is characterized by exaggerated sensory and reflex responses to stimulants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mediators produced during airway inflammation. However, the role of ROS in VLCF-mediated airway hypersensitivity has remained elusive. Here, we report that inhalation of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated apneic responses to intravenous capsaicin (a TRPV1 receptor agonist), ?,?-methylene-ATP (a P2X receptor agonist), and phenylbiguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) in anesthetized rats. The apneic responses to these three stimulants were abolished by vagatomy or by perivagal capsaicin treatment, a procedure that blocks the neural conduction of VLCFs. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to these VLCF stimulants was prevented by catalase (an enzyme that degrades H2O2) and by dimethylthiourea (a hydroxyl radical scavenger). The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to capsaicin was attenuated by HC-030031 (a TRPA1 receptor antagonist) and by iso-pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',5'-disulphonate (a P2X receptor antagonist). The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to ?,?-methylene-ATP was reduced by capsazepine (a TRPV1 receptor antagonist), and by HC-030031. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to phenylbiguanide was totally abolished when all three antagonists were combined. Consistently, our electrophysiological studies revealed that airway delivery of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated the VLCF responses to intravenous capsaicin, ?,?-methylene-ATP, and phenylbiguanide. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the VLCF responses to phenylbiguanide was totally prevented when all antagonists were combined. Inhalation of 0.05% H2O2 indeed increased the level of ROS in the lungs. These results suggest that 1) increased lung ROS sensitizes VLCFs, which leads to exaggerated reflex responses in rats and 2) the TRPV1, TRPA1, and P2X receptors are all involved in the development of this airway hypersensitivity. PMID:24699274

  11. Sensitization by Pulmonary Reactive Oxygen Species of Rat Vagal Lung C-Fibers: The Roles of the TRPV1, TRPA1, and P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Ting; Lin, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Tien-Huan; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Jow, Guey-Mei; Kou, Yu Ru

    2014-01-01

    Sensitization of vagal lung C-fibers (VLCFs) induced by mediators contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hypersensitivity, which is characterized by exaggerated sensory and reflex responses to stimulants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mediators produced during airway inflammation. However, the role of ROS in VLCF-mediated airway hypersensitivity has remained elusive. Here, we report that inhalation of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated apneic responses to intravenous capsaicin (a TRPV1 receptor agonist), ?,?-methylene-ATP (a P2X receptor agonist), and phenylbiguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) in anesthetized rats. The apneic responses to these three stimulants were abolished by vagatomy or by perivagal capsaicin treatment, a procedure that blocks the neural conduction of VLCFs. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to these VLCF stimulants was prevented by catalase (an enzyme that degrades H2O2) and by dimethylthiourea (a hydroxyl radical scavenger). The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to capsaicin was attenuated by HC-030031 (a TRPA1 receptor antagonist) and by iso-pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2?,5?-disulphonate (a P2X receptor antagonist). The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to ?,?-methylene-ATP was reduced by capsazepine (a TRPV1 receptor antagonist), and by HC-030031. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the apneic responses to phenylbiguanide was totally abolished when all three antagonists were combined. Consistently, our electrophysiological studies revealed that airway delivery of aerosolized 0.05% H2O2 for 90 s potentiated the VLCF responses to intravenous capsaicin, ?,?-methylene-ATP, and phenylbiguanide. The potentiating effect of H2O2 on the VLCF responses to phenylbiguanide was totally prevented when all antagonists were combined. Inhalation of 0.05% H2O2 indeed increased the level of ROS in the lungs. These results suggest that 1) increased lung ROS sensitizes VLCFs, which leads to exaggerated reflex responses in rats and 2) the TRPV1, TRPA1, and P2X receptors are all involved in the development of this airway hypersensitivity. PMID:24699274

  12. Mechanisms of potassium- and capsaicin-induced axonal calcitonin gene-related peptide release: involvement of L- and T-type calcium channels and TRPV1 but not sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, M J S; Reeh, P W; Sauer, S K

    2008-02-01

    We have previously shown that capsaicin, noxious heat, protons and potassium ions (K(+)) induce a graded, calcium- and receptor-dependent increase of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) release from isolated rat sciatic axons. Morphological evidence for axonal vesicular exocytosis has also been presented. Here we determine the differential contribution of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels to high extracellular potassium and capsaicin-induced iCGRP secretion. Blockade of L-type calcium channels significantly decreased the K(+)-induced axonal response (nimodipine (10 microM) by 66% and methoxyverapamil, D600 (50 microM), by 77%). Interestingly, however, D600 was unable to reduce the capsaicin-induced iCGRP release. Omega-Conotoxin GVIA (1 microM), a N-type blocker, and omega-agatoxin TK (0.1 microM), a P/Q-type blocker, had no significant effect. Also the anticonvulsant gabapentin (50 microM and 100 microM), reported to impede calcium channels, was ineffective. Inhibition of low threshold T-type calcium channels by mibefradil (10 microM) significantly reduced potassium (by 47%) but not capsaicin-stimulated iCGRP release. Reduction of total sodium channel conductance by tetrodotoxin (1 microM), lidocaine (10 microM, 50 microM or 500 microM) or by replacement of extracellular sodium with choline-chloride did not result in a reduction of either potassium- or capsaicin-induced axonal iCGRP release. These results suggest that slow depolarization by high extracellular potassium activates axonal low threshold (T-type) as well as high threshold-activated (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channels to mediate iCGRP release, and that capsaicin-induced release is largely dependent on calcium influx through TRPV1. Action potential generation and propagation are not required for axonal release mechanisms. PMID:18178321

  13. TRPV1 activation impedes foam cell formation by inducing autophagy in oxLDL-treated vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, B-H; Yin, Y-W; Liu, Y; Pi, Y; Guo, L; Cao, X-J; Gao, C-Y; Zhang, L-L; Li, J-C

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are an important origin of foam cells besides macrophages. The mechanisms underlying VSMC foam cell formation are relatively little known. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and autophagy have a potential role in regulating foam cell formation. Our study demonstrated that autophagy protected against foam cell formation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-treated VSMCs; activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin rescued the autophagy impaired by oxLDL and activated autophagylysosome pathway in VSMCs; activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin impeded foam cell formation of VSMCs through autophagy induction; activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin induced autophagy through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. This study provides evidence that autophagy plays an important role in VSMC foam cell formation and highlights TRPV1 as a promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. PMID:24743737

  14. Capsaicin Induces Apoptosis in Human Small Cell Lung Cancer via the TRPV6 Receptor and the Calpain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jamie K.; Brown, Kathleen C.; Dom, Aaron M.; Witte, Theodore R.; Thornhill, Brent A.; Crabtree, Clayton M.; Perry, Haley E.; Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Creel, Rebecca G.; Damron, C. Luke; Rollyson, William D.; Stevenson, Cathryn D.; Hardman, W. Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A.; Carpenter, A. Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is an agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The proapoptotic activity of was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin induced increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by three-fold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  15. Unique Responses are Observed in Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and TRPV1) Co-Expressing Cells.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Sreekrishna, Koti T; Lin, Yakang; Schinaman, Renee; Gorka, Kate; Mantri, Yogita; Haught, John Christian; Huggins, Thomas G; Isfort, Robert J; Bascom, Charles C; Morice, Alyn H

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are implicated in modulation of cough and nociception. In vivo, TRPA1 and TRPV1 are often co-expressed in neurons and TRPA1V1 hetero-tetramer formation is noted in cells co-transfected with the respective expression plasmids. In order to understand the impact of TRP receptor interaction on activity, we created stable cell lines expressing the TRPA1, TRPV1 and co-expressing the TRPA1 and TRPV1 (TRPA1V1) receptors. Among the 600 compounds screened against these receptors, we observed a number of compounds that activated the TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPA1V1 receptors; compounds that activated TRPA1 and TRPA1V1; compounds that activated TRPV1 and TRPA1V1; compounds in which TRPA1V1 response was modulated by either TRPA1 or TRPV1; and compounds that activated only TRPV1 or TRPA1 or TRPA1V1; and one compound that activated TRPA1 and TRPV1, but not TRPA1V1. These results suggest that co-expression of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptors imparts unique activation profiles different from that of cells expressing only TRPA1 or TRPV1. PMID:24921186

  16. Estrogen-dependent up-regulation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor proteins in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Pohczky, Krisztina; Kun, Jzsef; Szalontai, Blint; Sz?ke, va; Sghy, va; Payrits, Maja; Kajtr, Bla; Kovcs, Krisztina; Krnyei, Jzsef Lszl; Garai, Jnos; Garami, Andrs; Perkecz, Anik; Czegldi, Levente; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed predominantly in sensory nerves are activated by inflammatory stimuli and mediate inflammation and pain. Although they have been shown in the human endometrium, their regulation and function are unknown. Therefore, we investigated their estrogen- and progesterone-dependent alterations in the rat endometrium in comparison with the estrogen-regulated inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Four-week-old (sexually immature) and four-month-old (sexually mature) female rats were treated with the non-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonist diethylstilboestrol (DES), progesterone and their combination, or ovariectomized. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine mRNA and protein expression levels respectively. Channel function was investigated with ratiometric [Ca(2+)]i measurement in cultured primary rat endometrial cells. Both TRP receptors and MIF were detected in the endometrium at mRNA and protein levels, and their localizations were similar. Immunostaining was observed in the immature epithelium, while stromal, glandular and epithelial positivity were observed in adults. Functionally active TRP receptor proteins were shown in endometrial cells by activation-induced calcium influx. In adults, Trpa1 and Trpv1 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated after DES treatment. TRPA1 increased after every treatment, but TRPV1 remained unchanged following the combined treatment and ovariectomy. In immature rats, DES treatment resulted in increased mRNA expression of both channels and elevated TRPV1 immunopositivity. MIF expression changed in parallel with TRPA1/TRPV1 in most cases. DES up-regulated Trpa1, Trpv1 and Mif mRNA levels in endometrial cell cultures, but 17?-oestradiol having ER?-selective potency increased only the expression of Trpv1. We provide the first evidence for TRPA1/TRPV1 expression and their estrogen-induced up-regulation in the rat endometrium in correlation with the MIF. PMID:26643912

  17. "Hotheaded": the role OF TRPV1 in brain functions.

    PubMed

    Martins, D; Tavares, I; Morgado, C

    2014-10-01

    The TRPV1 (vanilloid 1) channel is best known for its role in sensory transmission in the nociceptive neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Although first studied in the dorsal root ganglia as the receptor for capsaicin, TRPV1 has been recently recognized to have a broader distribution in the central nervous system, where it is likely to constitute an atypical neurotransmission system involved in several functions through modulation of both neuronal and glial activities. The endovanilloid-activated brain TRPV1 channels seem to be involved in somatosensory, motor and visceral functions. Recent studies suggested that TRPV1 channels also account for more complex functions, as addiction, anxiety, mood and cognition/learning. However, more studies are needed before the relevance of TRPV1 in brain activity can be clearly stated. This review highlights the increasing importance of TRPV1 as a regulator of brain function and discusses possible bases for the future development of new therapeutic approaches that by targeting brain TRPV1 receptors might be used for the treatment of several neurological disorders. PMID:24887171

  18. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception.

    PubMed

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E; Nordmann, Grégory C; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Wetzel, Christian H

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca(2+)-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity. PMID:26902776

  19. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception

    PubMed Central

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E.; Nordmann, Grégory C.; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Wetzel, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca2+-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity. PMID:26902776

  20. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, Hisashi; Yamaoka, Tomoko; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Sasaoka, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2008-12-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel opening, Ca{sup 2+} influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production.

  1. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  2. Interactions between CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels mediated by 12-HPETE are cytotoxic to mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S R; Bok, E; Chung, Y C; Chung, E S; Jin, B K

    2008-01-01

    Background and purposes: We recently proposed the existence of neurotoxic interactions between the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in rat mesencephalic cultures. This study seeks evidence for the mediator(s) and mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic interactions between CB1 receptors and TRPV1 in vitro and in vivo. Experimental approach: The mediator(s) and mechanism(s) for the interactions between CB1 receptors and TRPV1 were evaluated by cell viability assays, immunocytochemistry, Fura-2 calcium imaging, mitochondrial morphology assay, ELISA and Western blot assay in vitro in neuron-enriched mesencephalic cultures. Injections into the substantia nigra and subsequent cell counts were also used to confirm these interactions in vivo. Key results: The neurotoxic interactions were mediated by 12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HPETE), an endogenous TRPV1 agonist. CB1 receptor agonists (HU210 and WIN55,212-2) increased the level of 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HETE), a downstream metabolite of 12(S)-HPETE, which stimulates TRPV1-mediated death of mesencephalic neurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The neurotoxicity was mediated by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) through TRPV1, consequently leading to mitochondrial damage and was attenuated by baicalein, a 12-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Conclusion and implications: Activation of CB1 receptors in rat mesencephalic neurons was associated with biosynthesis of 12(S)-HPETE, which in turn stimulated TRPV1 activity, leading to increased [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial damage and neuronal death. PMID:18552868

  3. POTENTIATION OF PULMONARY REFLEX RESPONSE TO CAPSAICIN 24 HOURS FOLLOWING WHOLE-BODY ACROLEIN EXPOSURE IS MEDIATED BY TRPV1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary C-fibers are stimulated by irritant air pollutants producing apnea, bronchospasm, and decrease in HR. C-fiber chemoreflex activation is mediated by TRPV1 and release of substance P. While acrolein has been shown to stimulate C-fibers, the persistence of acrolein effect...

  4. The chimeric approach reveals that differences in the TRPV1 pore domain determine species-specific sensitivity to block of heat activation.

    PubMed

    Papakosta, Marianthi; Dalle, Carine; Haythornthwaite, Alison; Cao, Lishuang; Stevens, Edward B; Burgess, Gillian; Russell, Rachel; Cox, Peter J; Phillips, Stephen C; Grimm, Christian

    2011-11-11

    The capsaicin-, heat-, and proton-activated ion channel TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential cation channel family is a polymodal nociceptor. For almost a decade, TRPV1 has been explored by the pharmaceutical industry as a potential target for example for pain conditions. Antagonists which block TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, heat, and protons were developed by a number of pharmaceutical companies. The unexpected finding of hyperthermia as an on-target side effect in clinical studies using polymodal TRPV1 antagonists has prompted companies to search for ways to circumvent hyperthermia, for example by the development of modality-selective antagonists. The significant lack of consistency of the pharmacology of many TRPV1 antagonists across different species has been a further obstacle. JYL-1421 for example was shown to block capsaicin and heat responses in human and monkey TRPV1 while it was largely ineffective in blocking heat responses in rat TRPV1. These findings suggested structural dissimilarities between different TRPV1 species relevant for small compound antagonism for example of heat activation. Using a chimeric approach (human and rat TRPV1) in combination with a novel FLIPR-based heat activation assay and patch-clamp electrophysiology we have identified the pore region as being strongly linked to the observed species differences. We demonstrate that by exchanging the pore domains JYL-1421, which is modality-selective in rat can be made modality-selective in human TRPV1 and vice-versa. PMID:21911503

  5. The Chimeric Approach Reveals That Differences in the TRPV1 Pore Domain Determine Species-specific Sensitivity to Block of Heat Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Papakosta, Marianthi; Dalle, Carine; Haythornthwaite, Alison; Cao, Lishuang; Stevens, Edward B.; Burgess, Gillian; Russell, Rachel; Cox, Peter J.; Phillips, Stephen C.; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin-, heat-, and proton-activated ion channel TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential cation channel family is a polymodal nociceptor. For almost a decade, TRPV1 has been explored by the pharmaceutical industry as a potential target for example for pain conditions. Antagonists which block TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, heat, and protons were developed by a number of pharmaceutical companies. The unexpected finding of hyperthermia as an on-target side effect in clinical studies using polymodal TRPV1 antagonists has prompted companies to search for ways to circumvent hyperthermia, for example by the development of modality-selective antagonists. The significant lack of consistency of the pharmacology of many TRPV1 antagonists across different species has been a further obstacle. JYL-1421 for example was shown to block capsaicin and heat responses in human and monkey TRPV1 while it was largely ineffective in blocking heat responses in rat TRPV1. These findings suggested structural dissimilarities between different TRPV1 species relevant for small compound antagonism for example of heat activation. Using a chimeric approach (human and rat TRPV1) in combination with a novel FLIPR-based heat activation assay and patch-clamp electrophysiology we have identified the pore region as being strongly linked to the observed species differences. We demonstrate that by exchanging the pore domains JYL-1421, which is modality-selective in rat can be made modality-selective in human TRPV1 and vice-versa. PMID:21911503

  6. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a mediator of lung toxicity for coal fly ash particulate material.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Johansen, Mark E; Roberts, Jessica K; Thomas, Karen C; Romero, Erin G; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2012-03-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4? (C4?), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Is a Mediator of Lung Toxicity for Coal Fly Ash Particulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Johansen, Mark E.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Thomas, Karen C.; Romero, Erin G.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.; Veranth, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  8. Involvement of TRPV1-dependent and -independent components in the regulation of vagally induced contractions in the mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    Boudaka, Ammar; Wrl, Jrgen; Shiina, Takahiko; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Kobayashi, Haruo; Shimizu, Yasutake; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2007-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel of the vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1)-dependent pathway, consisting of capsaicin-sensitive tachykininergic primary afferent and myenteric nitrergic neurons, has been suggested to mediate the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on vagally mediated striated muscle contractions in the rat esophagus. In a recent study, similar but also different effects of capsaicin and piperine on TRPV1 were demonstrated. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the effects of these two drugs on vagally induced contractions in the mouse esophagus. Capsaicin and piperine inhibited vagally induced contractions of a thoracic esophageal segment in a concentration-dependent manner. Ruthenium red (10 microM; a non-selective blocker of transient receptor potential cation channels) and SB-366791 (10 microM; a novel selective antagonist of TRPV1) blocked the inhibitory effect of capsaicin but not that of piperine. Piperine inhibited the vagally mediated contractions in esophagi of adult mice neonatally injected with capsaicin, while capsaicin failed to do so. Desensitization of TRPV1 in the mouse esophagus by in vitro pretreatment with capsaicin failed to affect the inhibitory effect of piperine, whereas the piperine effect was cross-desensitized by capsaicin pretreatment in rat and hamster esophagi. Additionally, a tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonist, L-732,138 (1 microM), as well as a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 200 microM), blocked the inhibitory effect of capsaicin but not that of piperine. Taken together, the results suggest that piperine inhibits the vagally mediated striated muscle contraction in the mouse esophagus through its action on a TRPV1-dependent pathway as well as a TRPV1-independent site. PMID:17156774

  9. Additive antiemetic efficacy of low-doses of the cannabinoid CB(1/2) receptor agonist ?(9)-THC with ultralow-doses of the vanilloid TRPV1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Darmani, Nissar A; Chebolu, Seetha; Zhong, Weixia; Trinh, Chung; McClanahan, Bryan; Brar, Rajivinder S

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1/2 and vanilloid TRPV1 agonists (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?(9)-THC) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), respectively) can attenuate the emetic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. In this study we used the least shrew to demonstrate whether combinations of varying doses of ?(9)-THC with resiniferatoxin can produce additive antiemetic efficacy against cisplatin-induced vomiting. RTX by itself caused vomiting in a bell-shaped dose-dependent manner with maximal vomiting at 18 ?g/kg when administered subcutaneously (s.c.) but not intraperitoneally (i.p.). ?(9)-THC up to 10 mg/kg provides only 80% protection of least shrews from cisplatin-induced emesis with an ID50 of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg. Combinations of 1 or 5 ?g/kg RTX with varying doses of ?(9)-THC completely suppressed both the frequency and the percentage of shrews vomiting with ID50 dose values 5-50 times lower than ?(9)-THC doses tested alone against cisplatin. A less potent TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, by itself did not cause emesis (i.p. or s.c.), but it did significantly reduce vomiting induced by cisplatin given after 30 min but not at 2 h. The TRPV1-receptor antagonist, ruthenium red, attenuated cisplatin-induced emesis at 5mg/kg; however, another TRPV1-receptor antagonist, capsazepine, did not. In summary, we present evidence that combination of CB1/2 and TRPV1 agonists have the capacity to completely abolish cisplatin-induced emesis at doses that are ineffective when used individually. PMID:24157976

  10. Pain-enhancing mechanism through interaction between TRPV1 and anoctamin 1 in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Yasunori; Uta, Daisuke; Furue, Hidemasa; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is activated by various noxious stimuli, and the stimuli are converted into electrical signals in primary sensory neurons. It is believed that cation influx through TRPV1 causes depolarization, leading to the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, followed by the generation of action potential. Here we report that the capsaicin-evoked action potential could be induced by two components: a cation influx-mediated depolarization caused by TRPV1 activation and a subsequent anion efflux-mediated depolarization via activation of anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a calcium-activated chloride channel, resulting from the entry of calcium through TRPV1. The interaction between TRPV1 and ANO1 is based on their physical binding. Capsaicin activated the chloride currents in an extracellular calcium-dependent manner in HEK293T cells expressing TRPV1 and ANO1. Similarly, in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, capsaicin-activated inward currents were inhibited significantly by a specific ANO1 antagonist, T16Ainh-A01 (A01), in the presence of a high concentration of EGTA but not in the presence of BAPTA [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N?,N?-tetraacetic acid]. The generation of a capsaicin-evoked action potential also was inhibited by A01. Furthermore, pain-related behaviors in mice treated with capsaicin, but not with ??-methylene ATP, were reduced significantly by the concomitant administration of A01. These results indicate that TRPV1ANO1 interaction is a significant pain-enhancing mechanism in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25848051

  11. Protein kinase C inhibitor BIM suspended TRPV1 effect on mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wollemann, Mária; Tóth, Fanni; Benyhe, Sándor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the role of protein kinase A and C in the mechanism of capsaicin inhibition on mu-opiate receptors. H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor and BIM (bisindolylmaleimide), a protein kinase C inhibitor were used for this purpose. BIM suspended the inhibition of capsaicin in endomorphin-1 competition binding. The addition of BIM alone had no effect itself on this reaction. H89 however, exerted a strong inhibitory effect on the endomorphin-1 binding. We can conclude that protein kinase C certainly plays a role in the inhibition of capsaicin. The role of protein kinase A in this reaction could not be established, owing to the blocking effect of H89 on the mu-opioid receptors. PMID:23128053

  12. TRPV1 Channel: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy has 2-3% incidence worldwide. However, present antiepileptic drugs provide only partial control of seizures. Calcium ion accumulation in hippocampal neurons has long been known as a major contributor to the etiology of epilepsy. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel and mediator of epilepsy in the hippocampus. TRPV1 is expressed in epileptic brain areas such as CA1 area and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Here the author reviews the patent literature on novel molecules targeting TRPV1 that are currently being investigated in the laboratory and are candidates for future clinical evaluation in the management of epilepsy. A limited number of recent reports have implicated TRPV1 in the induction or treatment of epilepsy suggesting that this may be new area for potential drugs targeting this debilitating disease. Thus activation of TRPV1 by oxidative stress, resiniferatoxin, cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activators (i.e. anandamide) or capsaicin induced epileptic effects, and these effects could be reduced by appropriate inhibitors, including capsazepine (CPZ), 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), resolvins, and CB1 antagonists. It has been also reported that CPZ and IRTX reduced spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission through modulation of glutaminergic systems and desensitization of TRPV1 channels in the hippocampus of rats. Immunocytochemical studies indicated that TRPV1 channel expression increased in the hippocampus of mice and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy Taken together, findings in the current literature support a role for calcium ion accumulation through TRPV1 channels in the etiology of epileptic seizures, indicating that inhibition of TRPV1 in the hippocampus may possibly be a novel target for prevention of epileptic seizures. PMID:26411767

  13. TRPV1-Mediated Neuropeptide Secretion and Depressor Effects: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Ca2+ Release Receptors in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Galligan, James J.; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-induced neuropeptide secretion and depressor response are mediated by, at least in part, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Ca2+ release receptors, leading to increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods/Results Bolus injection of capsaicin (CAP, 10 or 50 ?g/kg), a selective TRPV1 agonist, into anesthetized male Wistar rats caused dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP, P<0.05). CAP (50 ?g/kg)-induced depressor effects and increases in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels (-292 mmHg, 82.25.0 pg/ml, respectively) were abolished by a selective TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (3 mg/kg CAPZ, -41 mmHg, 41.84.4 pg/ml, P<0.01), and attenuated by a selective ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist, dantrolene (5 mg/kg, -121 mmHg, 57.22.6 pg/ml, P<0.01), but unaffected by an inhibitor of ER Ca2+-ATPase, thapsigargin (50 ?g/kg TG, -301 mmHg, 73.82.3 pg/ml, P>0.05), or an antagonist of the inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (3 mg/kg 2-APB, -345 mmHg, 69.03.7 pg/ml, P>0.05). CGRP8-37 (1 mg/kg), a selective CGRP receptor antagonist, also blocked CAP-induced depressor effects. In contrast, dantrolene had no effect on CGRP (1 ?g/kg)-induced depressor effects. In vitro, CAP (0.3 ?M) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and CGRP release from freshly isolated sensory neurons in DRG (P<0.01), which were blocked by CAPZ (10 ?M) and attenuated by dantrolene but not TG or 2-APB. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers RyR- but not IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release from ER in DRG neurons leading to increased CGRP release and consequent depressor effects. PMID:18806620

  14. AKAP150 mediates TRPV1 sensitivity to phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Por, Elaine D.; Belugin, Sergei; Chaudhury, Sraboni; Berg, Kelly A.; Akopian, Armen N.; Henry, Michael A.; Gomez, Ruben

    2011-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) is a scaffolding protein that controls protein kinase A- and C-mediated phosphorylation of the transient receptor potential family V type 1 (TRPV1), dictating receptor response to nociceptive stimuli. The phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) anchors AKAP150 to the plasma membrane in nave conditions, and also affects TRPV1 activity. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the effects of PIP2 on TRPV1 are mediated through AKAP150. In trigeminal neurons and CHO cells, the manipulation of cellular PIP2 led to significant changes in the association of AKAP150 and TRPV1. Following PIP2 degradation, increased TRPV1:AKAP150 co-immunoprecipitation was observed, resulting in increased receptor response to capsaicin treatment. Phospholipase C activation in neurons isolated from AKAP150?/? animals indicated that PIP2 -mediated inhibition of TRPV1 in the whole cell environment requires expression of the scaffolding protein. Furthermore, the addition of PIP2 to neurons isolated from AKAP150 wild-type mice reduced PKA-sensitization of TRPV1 compared to isolated neurons from AKAP150?/? mice. These findings suggest that PIP2 degradation increases AKAP150 association with TRPV1 in the whole cell environment, leading to sensitization of the receptor to nociceptive stimuli. PMID:21653872

  15. The role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Rodger A

    2007-08-01

    Premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreas which leads to autodigestion of the gland is an early step in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Pancreatic injury is followed by other manifestations of inflammation including plasma extravasation, edema, and neutrophil infiltration which constitute the features of pancreatitis. Recent studies indicate that neural innervation of the pancreas may play an important role in the initiation and maintenance of the inflammatory response to injury. The pancreas is innervated by vagal, sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons, as well as sensory neurons. Activation of pancreatic primary sensory neurons causes the release of inflammatory neuropeptides both in the spinal cord to signal pain and in the pancreas itself where they produce plasma extravasation and neutrophil infiltration. Recent studies indicate that primary sensory neurons of the pancreas express transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels whose activation induces pancreatic inflammation. Moreover, blockade of these TRP channels significantly ameliorates experimental pancreatitis. This review describes our current understanding of the role of TRPV1 channels in pancreatitis and illustrates how this mechanism might be used to direct future treatments of pancreatic diseases. PMID:17428642

  16. Receptor Activity and Conformational Analysis of 5’-Halogenated Resiniferatoxin Analogues as TRPV1 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kwang Su; Kang, Dong Wook; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Myeong Seop; Park, Seul-Gi; Choi, Sun; Pearce, Larry V.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Lee, Jeewoo

    2012-01-01

    A series of 5’-halogenated resiniferatoxin analogues have been investigated in order to examine the effect of halogenation in the A-region on their binding and the functional pattern of agonism/antagonism for rat TRPV1 heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Halogenation at the 5-position in the A-region of RTX and of 4-amino RTX shifted the agonism of parent compounds toward antagonism. The extent of antagonism was greater as the size of the halogen increased (I > Br > Cl > F) while the binding affinities were similar, as previously observed for our potent agonists. In this series, 5-bromo-4-amino RTX (39) showed very potent antagonism with Ki(ant) = 2.81 nM, which was thus 4.5-fold more potent than 5’-iodo RTX, previously reported as a potent TRPV1 antagonist. Molecular modeling analyses with selected agonists and the corresponding halogenated antagonists revealed a striking conformational difference. The 3-methoxy of the A-region in the agonists remained free to interact with the receptor whereas in the case of the antagonists, the compounds assumed a bent conformation, permitting the 3-methoxy to instead form an internal hydrogen bond with the C4-hydroxyl of the diterpene. PMID:21111618

  17. TRPV1 in Salivary Gland Epithelial Cells Is Not Involved in Salivary Secretion via Transcellular Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seulki; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Namkoong, Eun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Cong, Xin; Yu, Guangyan

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) was originally found in sensory neurons. Recently, it has been reported that TRPV1 is expressed in salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC). However, the physiological role of TRPV1 in salivary secretion remains to be elucidated. We found that TRPV1 is expressed in mouse and human submandibular glands (SMG) and HSG cells, originated from human submandibular gland ducts at both mRNA and protein levels. However, capsaicin (CAP), TRPV1 agonist, had little effect on intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in these cells, although carbachol consistently increased [Ca2+]i. Exposure of cells to high temperature (>43?) or acidic bath solution (pH5.4) did not increase [Ca2+]i, either. We further examined the role of TRPV1 in salivary secretion using TRPV1 knock-out mice. There was no significant difference in the pilocarpine (PILO)-induced salivary flow rate between wild-type and TRPV1 knock-out mice. Saliva flow rate also showed insignificant change in the mice treated with PILO plus CAP compared with that in mice treated with PILO alone. Taken together, our results suggest that although TRPV1 is expressed in SGEC, it appears not to play any direct roles in saliva secretion via transcellular pathway. PMID:25598668

  18. 6,6-Fused heterocyclic ureas as highly potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Kim, Hyo-Shin; Lee, Sunho; Jung, Aeran; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ann, Jihyae; Yoon, Suyoung; Choi, Sun; Lee, Jin Hee; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank-Foltyn, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Schiene, Klaus; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Christoph, Thomas; Frormann, Sven; Lee, Jeewoo

    2015-02-15

    A series of N-[{2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)-pyridin-3-yl}methyl] N'-(6,6-fused heterocyclic) ureas have been investigated as hTRPV1 antagonists. Among them, compound 15 showed highly potent TRPV1 antagonism to capsaicin, with Ki(ant)=0.2nM, as well as antagonism to other activators, and it was efficacious in a pain model. A docking study of 15 with our hTRPV1 homology model indicates that there is crucial hydrogen bonding between the ring nitrogen and the receptor, contributing to its potency. PMID:25597011

  19. The general anesthetic propofol excites nociceptors by activating TRPV1 and TRPA1 rather than GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J M; Leffler, Andreas; Niedermirtl, Florian; Kistner, Katrin; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Reeh, Peter W; Nau, Carla

    2010-11-01

    Anesthetic agents can induce a paradox activation and sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons and, thus, potentially facilitate pain processing. Here we identify distinct molecular mechanisms that mediate an activation of sensory neurons by 2,6-diisopropylphenol (propofol), a commonly used intravenous anesthetic known to elicit intense pain upon injection. Clinically relevant concentrations of propofol activated the recombinant transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors TRPA1 and TRPV1 heterologously expressed in HEK293t cells. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, propofol-induced activation correlated better to expression of TRPA1 than of TRPV1. However, pretreatment with the protein kinase C activator 4?-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a significantly sensitized propofol-induced activation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons as well as in HEK293t cells. Pharmacological and genetic silencing of both TRPA1 and TRPV1 only partially abrogated propofol-induced responses in DRG neurons. The remaining propofol-induced activation was abolished by the selective ?-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. Propofol but not GABA evokes a release of calcitonin gene-related peptide, a key component of neurogenic inflammation, from isolated peripheral nerves of wild-type but not TRPV1 and TRPA1-deficient mice. Moreover, propofol but not GABA induced an intense pain upon intracutaneous injection. As both the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and injection pain by propofol seem to be independent of GABA(A) receptors, our data identify TRPV1 and TRPA1 as key molecules for propofol-induced excitation of sensory neurons. This study warrants further investigations into the role of anesthetics to induce nociceptor sensitization and to foster postoperative pain. PMID:20826794

  20. The General Anesthetic Propofol Excites Nociceptors by Activating TRPV1 and TRPA1 Rather than GABAA Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J. M.; Leffler, Andreas; Niedermirtl, Florian; Kistner, Katrin; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Reeh, Peter W.; Nau, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Anesthetic agents can induce a paradox activation and sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons and, thus, potentially facilitate pain processing. Here we identify distinct molecular mechanisms that mediate an activation of sensory neurons by 2,6-diisopropylphenol (propofol), a commonly used intravenous anesthetic known to elicit intense pain upon injection. Clinically relevant concentrations of propofol activated the recombinant transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors TRPA1 and TRPV1 heterologously expressed in HEK293t cells. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, propofol-induced activation correlated better to expression of TRPA1 than of TRPV1. However, pretreatment with the protein kinase C activator 4?-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a significantly sensitized propofol-induced activation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons as well as in HEK293t cells. Pharmacological and genetic silencing of both TRPA1 and TRPV1 only partially abrogated propofol-induced responses in DRG neurons. The remaining propofol-induced activation was abolished by the selective ?-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABAA) receptor antagonist picrotoxin. Propofol but not GABA evokes a release of calcitonin gene-related peptide, a key component of neurogenic inflammation, from isolated peripheral nerves of wild-type but not TRPV1 and TRPA1-deficient mice. Moreover, propofol but not GABA induced an intense pain upon intracutaneous injection. As both the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and injection pain by propofol seem to be independent of GABAA receptors, our data identify TRPV1 and TRPA1 as key molecules for propofol-induced excitation of sensory neurons. This study warrants further investigations into the role of anesthetics to induce nociceptor sensitization and to foster postoperative pain. PMID:20826794

  1. Distinctive changes in plasma membrane phosphoinositides underlie differential regulation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Viktor; Yudin, Yevgen; Hammond, Gerald R; Sharma, Esseim; Fukami, Kiyoko; Rohacs, Tibor

    2013-07-10

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a polymodal, Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel crucial to regulation of nociceptor responsiveness. Sensitization of TRPV1 by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists to its endogenous activators, such as low pH and noxious heat, is a key factor in hyperalgesia during tissue injury as well as pathological pain syndromes. Conversely, chronic pharmacological activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin leads to calcium influx-induced adaptation of the channel. Paradoxically, both conditions entail activation of phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes, which hydrolyze phosphoinositides. We found that in sensory neurons PLC? activation by bradykinin led to a moderate decrease in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), but no sustained change in the levels of its precursor PI(4)P. Preventing this selective decrease in PI(4,5)P2 inhibited TRPV1 sensitization, while selectively decreasing PI(4,5)P2 independently of PLC potentiated the sensitizing effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the channel, thereby inducing increased TRPV1 responsiveness. Maximal pharmacological TRPV1 stimulation led to a robust decrease of both PI(4,5)P2 and its precursor PI(4)P in sensory neurons. Attenuating the decrease of either lipid significantly reduced desensitization, and simultaneous reduction of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P independently of PLC inhibited TRPV1. We found that, on the mRNA level, the dominant highly Ca(2+)-sensitive PLC isoform in dorsal root ganglia is PLC?4. Capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 currents was significantly reduced, whereas capsaicin-induced nerve impulses in the skin-nerve preparation increased in mice lacking this isoform. We propose a comprehensive model in which differential changes in phosphoinositide levels mediated by distinct PLC isoforms result in opposing changes in TRPV1 activity. PMID:23843517

  2. Distinctive Changes in Plasma Membrane Phosphoinositides Underlie Differential Regulation of TRPV1 in Nociceptive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Yudin, Yevgen; Hammond, Gerald R.; Sharma, Esseim; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2013-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a polymodal, Ca2+-permeable cation channel crucial to regulation of nociceptor responsiveness. Sensitization of TRPV1 by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists to its endogenous activators, such as low pH and noxious heat, is a key factor in hyperalgesia during tissue injury as well as pathological pain syndromes. Conversely, chronic pharmacological activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin leads to calcium influx-induced adaptation of the channel. Paradoxically, both conditions entail activation of phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes, which hydrolyze phosphoinositides. We found that in sensory neurons PLC? activation by bradykinin led to a moderate decrease in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), but no sustained change in the levels of its precursor PI(4)P. Preventing this selective decrease in PI(4,5)P2 inhibited TRPV1 sensitization, while selectively decreasing PI(4,5)P2 independently of PLC potentiated the sensitizing effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the channel, thereby inducing increased TRPV1 responsiveness. Maximal pharmacological TRPV1 stimulation led to a robust decrease of both PI(4,5)P2 and its precursor PI(4)P in sensory neurons. Attenuating the decrease of either lipid significantly reduced desensitization, and simultaneous reduction of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P independently of PLC inhibited TRPV1. We found that, on the mRNA level, the dominant highly Ca2+-sensitive PLC isoform in dorsal root ganglia is PLC?4. Capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 currents was significantly reduced, whereas capsaicin-induced nerve impulses in the skinnerve preparation increased in mice lacking this isoform. We propose a comprehensive model in which differential changes in phosphoinositide levels mediated by distinct PLC isoforms result in opposing changes in TRPV1 activity. PMID:23843517

  3. Evodiamine suppresses capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia through activation and subsequent desensitization of the transient receptor potential V1 channels.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Emiko; Wang, Shenglan; Matsuyoshi, Nobuyuki; Kogure, Yoko; Aoki, Shunji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Noguchi, Koichi; Dai, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evodiae fructus (EF), a fruit of Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham, has long been used as an analgesic drug in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of its pharmacological action is unclear. Here, using calcium imaging, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and behavioral analysis, we investigated the pharmacological action of EF and its principal compound, evodiamine, on the transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 channels. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and TRPV1- or TRPA1-transfected human embryonic kidney-derived (HEK) 293 cells were used for calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Twenty male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia behavioral analyses. We found that evodiamine induced significant increases in intracellular calcium and robust inward currents in a subpopulation of isolated rat DRG neurons, most of which were also sensitive to capsaicin. The effect of evodiamine was completely blocked by capsazepine, a competitive antagonist of TRPV1. Evodiamine induced significant inward currents in TRPV1-, but not TRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. Pretreatment with evodiamine reduced capsaicin-induced currents significantly. Furthermore, the in vivo pre-treatment of evodiamine suppressed thermal hyperalgesia induced by intraplantar injection of capsaicin in rats. These results identify that the analgesic effect of EF and evodiamine may be due to the activation and subsequent desensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons. PMID:26188960

  4. Distinct properties of Ca2+calmodulin binding to N- and C-terminal regulatory regions of the TRPV1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Sze-Yi; Procko, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a molecular pain receptor belonging to the TRP superfamily of nonselective cation channels. As a polymodal receptor, TRPV1 responds to heat and a wide range of chemical stimuli. The influx of calcium after channel activation serves as a negative feedback mechanism leading to TRPV1 desensitization. The cellular calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) likely participates in the desensitization of TRPV1. Two CaM-binding sites are identified in TRPV1: the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and a short distal C-terminal (CT) segment. Here, we present the crystal structure of calcium-bound CaM (Ca2+CaM) in complex with the TRPV1-CT segment, determined to 1.95- resolution. The two lobes of Ca2+CaM wrap around a helical TRPV1-CT segment in an antiparallel orientation, and two hydrophobic anchors, W787 and L796, contact the C-lobe and N-lobe of Ca2+CaM, respectively. This structure is similar to canonical Ca2+CaM-peptide complexes, although TRPV1 contains no classical CaM recognition sequence motif. Using structural and mutational studies, we established the TRPV1 C terminus as a high affinity Ca2+CaM-binding site in both the isolated TRPV1 C terminus and in full-length TRPV1. Although a ternary complex of CaM, TRPV1-ARD, and TRPV1-CT had previously been postulated, we found no biochemical evidence of such a complex. In electrophysiology studies, mutation of the Ca2+CaM-binding site on TRPV1-ARD abolished desensitization in response to repeated application of capsaicin, whereas mutation of the Ca2+CaM-binding site in TRPV1-CT led to a more subtle phenotype of slowed and reduced TRPV1 desensitization. In summary, our results show that the TRPV1-ARD is an important mediator of TRPV1 desensitization, whereas TRPV1-CT has higher affinity for CaM and is likely involved in separate regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23109716

  5. Antinociceptive activity of transient receptor potential channel TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 antagonists in neurogenic and neuropathic pain models in mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sa?at, Kinga; Filipek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the antinociceptive activity of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 antagonists in neurogenic, tonic, and neuropathic pain models in mice. For this purpose, TRP channel antagonists were administered into the dorsal surface of a hind paw 15 min before capsaicin, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), or formalin. Their antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic efficacies after intraperitoneal administration were also assessed in a paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain model. Motor coordination of paclitaxel-treated mice that received these TRP channel antagonists was investigated using the rotarod test. TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine and SB-366791, attenuated capsaicin-induced nociceptive reaction in a concentration-dependent manner. At 8 ?g/20 ?l, this effect was 51% (P<0.001) for capsazepine and 37% (P<0.05) for SB-366791. A TRPA1 antagonist, A-967079, reduced pain reaction by 48% (P<0.05) in the AITC test and by 54% (P<0.001) in the early phase of the formalin test. The test compounds had no influence on the late phase of the formalin test. In paclitaxel-treated mice, they did not attenuate heat hyperalgesia but N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-{[(3-methylphenyl)methyl]oxy}-N-(2-thienylmethyl) benzamide hydrochloride salt (AMTB), a TRPM8 antagonist, reduced cold hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia by 31% (P<0.05) and 51% (P<0.01), respectively. HC-030031, a TRPA1 channel antagonist, attenuated tactile allodynia in the von Frey test (62%; P<0.001). In conclusion, distinct members of TRP channel family are involved in different pain models in mice. Antagonists of TRP channels attenuate nocifensive responses of neurogenic, tonic, and neuropathic pain, but their efficacies strongly depend on the pain model used. PMID:25743118

  6. Role for the TRPV1 channel in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Morales-Lzaro, Sara L; Snchez-Soto, Carmen; Velasco, Myrian; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Hiriart, Marcia

    2014-06-01

    Transient receptor potential channels have been put forward as regulators of insulin secretion. A role for the TRPV1 ion channel in insulin secretion has been suggested in pancreatic beta cell lines. We explored whether TRPV1 is functionally expressed in RINm5F and primary beta cells from neonate and adult rats. We examined if capsaicin could activate cationic non-selective currents. Our results show that TRPV1 channels are not functional in insulin-secreting cells, since capsaicin did not produce current activation, not even under culture conditions known to induce the expression of other ion channels in these cells. Although TRPV1 channels seem to be irrelevant for the physiology of isolated beta cells, they may play a role in glucose homeostasis acting through the nerve fibers that regulate islet function. At the physiological level, we observed that Trpv1 (-/-) mice presented lower fasting insulin levels than their wild-type littermates, however, we did not find differences between these experimental groups nor in the glucose tolerance test or in the insulin secretion. However, we did find that the Trpv1 (-/-) mice exhibited a higher insulin sensitivity compared to their wild-type counterparts. Our results demonstrate that TRPV1 does not contribute to glucose-induced insulin secretion in beta cells as was previously thought, but it is possible that it may control insulin sensitivity. PMID:24676478

  7. Cannabidiol reduced the striatal atrophy caused 3-nitropropionic acid in vivo by mechanisms independent of the activation of cannabinoid, vanilloid TRPV1 and adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagredo, Onintza; Ramos, Jos A; Decio, Alessandra; Mechoulam, Raphael; Fernndez-Ruiz, Javier

    2007-08-01

    The neuroprotective potential of cannabinoids has been examined in rats with striatal lesions caused by 3-nitropropionic acic (3NP), an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex II. We used the CB1 agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA), the CB2 agonist HU-308, and cannabidiol (CBD), an antioxidant phytocannabinoid with negligible affinity for cannabinoid receptors. The administration of 3NP reduced GABA contents and also mRNA levels for several markers of striatal GABAergic projection neurons, including proenkephalin (PENK), substance P (SP) and neuronal-specific enolase (NSE). We also found reductions in mRNA levels for superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) and -2 (SOD-2), which indicated that 3NP reduced the endogenous antioxidant defences. The administration of CBD, but not ACEA or HU-308, completely reversed 3NP-induced reductions in GABA contents and mRNA levels for SP, NSE and SOD-2, and partially attenuated those found in SOD-1 and PENK. This indicates that CBD is neuroprotective but acted preferentially on striatal neurons that project to the substantia nigra. The effects of CBD were not reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. The same happened with the TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine, in concordance with the observation that capsaicin, a TRPV1 receptor agonist, failed to reproduce the CBD effects. The effects of CBD were also independent of adenosine signalling as they were not attenuated by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3. In summary, this study demonstrates that CBD provides neuroprotection against 3NP-induced striatal damage, which may be relevant for Huntington's disease, a disorder characterized by the preferential loss of striatal projection neurons. This capability seems to be based exclusively on the antioxidant properties of CBD. PMID:17672854

  8. Comparison of the effects of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin on human vanilloid receptors.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Thomas; Roufogalis, Basil; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2013-07-01

    Pelargonic acid vanillylamide is like capsaicin a natural capsaicinoid from chili peppers and commonly used in food additives to create a hot sensation, even in self-defense pepper sprays and as an alternative to capsaicin in medical products for topical treatment of pain. Although the chemical structures of both compounds are similar, preclinical data suggest that capsaicin is the more potent compound. We therefore performed voltage-clamp recordings using cells transfected with the human vanilloid receptor TRPV1 in order to assess the responses of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin at the receptor level. We provide evidence that at the molecular target TRPV1, the concentration-response curves, kinetics of current activation, as well as inhibition by the competitive antagonist capsazepine were not significantly different between the two capsaicinoids. We suggest that the different effects of the two capsaicinoids observed in previous studies may rather be due to different physicochemical or pharmacokinetic properties than to different pharmacological profiles at the receptor level. PMID:22961689

  9. Interference of TRPV1 function altered the susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yun-Fang; Li, Ying-Chao; Tang, Yan-Ping; Cao, Jun; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Xu, Lin; Mao, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) including hippocampus, and regulates the balance of excitation and inhibition in CNS, which imply its important role in epilepsy. We used both pharmacological manipulations and transgenic mice to disturb the function of TRPV1 and then studied the effects of these alterations on the susceptibility of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. Our results showed that systemic administration of TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (CAP, 40 mg/kg) directly induced tonic-clonic seizures (TCS) without PTZ induction. The severity of seizure was increased in lower doses of CAP groups (5 and 10 mg/kg), although the latency to TCS was delayed. On the other hand, systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg) and TRPV1 knockout mice exhibited delayed latency to TCS and reduced mortality. Furthermore, hippocampal administration of CPZ (10 and 33 nmol/?L/side) was firstly reported to increase the latency to TCS, decrease the maximal grade of seizure and mortality. It is worth noting that decreased susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures was observed in hippocampal TRPV1 overexpression mice and hippocampal CAP administration (33 nmol/?L/side), which is opposite from results of systemic agonist CAP. Our findings suggest that the systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist may be a novel therapeutic target for epilepsy, and alteration of hippocampal TRPV1 function exerts a critical role in seizure susceptibility. PMID:25713512

  10. Anionic linear aliphatic surfactants activate TRPV1: a possible endpoint for estimation of detergent induced eye nociception?

    PubMed

    Lindegren, H; Mogren, H; El Andaloussi-Lilja, J; Lundqvist, J; Forsby, A

    2009-12-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported as one of the key components in the pain pathway. Activation of the receptor causes a Ca(2+) influx in sensory C-fibres with secondary effects leading to neurogenic inflammation in the surrounding tissue. We have earlier reported specific activation of TRPV1 by surfactant-containing hygiene products. We have continued this project by investigating activation of the TRPV1 by shampoo and soap ingredients in low concentrations measured as intracellular Ca(2+) influxes in stably TRPV1-expressing neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. As a TRPV1 specific control, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine was used. The response was quantified as the product induced Ca(2+) influx during 2 min in relation to the maximum response induced by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. The results show that anionic alkyl linear surfactant ingredients such as sodium lauryl sulphate, sodium laureth sulphate, ammonium lauryl sulphate, sodium C12-15 pareth sulphate and N-lauroylsarcosine concentration-dependently induced Ca(2+) influx that could be addressed to TRPV1. The cationic surfactants benzalkonium chloride and cetylpyridinium chloride induced a Ca(2+) influx that was not TRPV1 mediated as well as the zwitterionic surfactant cocamidopropyl betaine, the non-linear anionic surfactant sodium deoxycholate and the non-ionic surfactant Triton-X. These results reveal a new mechanistic pathway for surfactant-induced nociception. PMID:19540328

  11. Conservation of Tubulin-Binding Sequences in TRPV1 throughout Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Puspendu; Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Background Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub type 1 (TRPV1), commonly known as capsaicin receptor can detect multiple stimuli ranging from noxious compounds, low pH, temperature as well as electromagnetic wave at different ranges. In addition, this receptor is involved in multiple physiological and sensory processes. Therefore, functions of TRPV1 have direct influences on adaptation and further evolution also. Availability of various eukaryotic genomic sequences in public domain facilitates us in studying the molecular evolution of TRPV1 protein and the respective conservation of certain domains, motifs and interacting regions that are functionally important. Methodology and Principal Findings Using statistical and bioinformatics tools, our analysis reveals that TRPV1 has evolved about ?420 million years ago (MYA). Our analysis reveals that specific regions, domains and motifs of TRPV1 has gone through different selection pressure and thus have different levels of conservation. We found that among all, TRP box is the most conserved and thus have functional significance. Our results also indicate that the tubulin binding sequences (TBS) have evolutionary significance as these stretch sequences are more conserved than many other essential regions of TRPV1. The overall distribution of positively charged residues within the TBS motifs is conserved throughout evolution. In silico analysis reveals that the TBS-1 and TBS-2 of TRPV1 can form helical structures and may play important role in TRPV1 function. Conclusions and Significance Our analysis identifies the regions of TRPV1, which are important for structure function relationship. This analysis indicates that tubulin binding sequence-1 (TBS-1) near the TRP-box forms a potential helix and the tubulin interactions with TRPV1 via TBS-1 have evolutionary significance. This interaction may be required for the proper channel function and regulation and may also have significance in the context of Taxol-induced neuropathy. PMID:22496727

  12. Persistent Nociception Triggered by Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Is Mediated by TRPV1 and Oxidative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Michael A.; Ruparel, Shivani; Green, Dustin P.; Chen, Paul B.; Por, Elaine D.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Gao, Xiaoli; Flores, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in certain chronic pain conditions and is a sufficient stimulus to cause lasting pain in humans, but the actual mechanisms underlying the persistent effects of NGF remain incompletely understood. We developed a rat model of NGF-induced persistent thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia to determine the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and oxidative mechanisms in the persistent effects of NGF. Persistent thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia require de novo protein translation and are mediated by TRPV1 and oxidative mechanisms. By comparing effects after systemic (subcutaneous), spinal (intrathecal) or hindpaw (intraplantar) injections of test compounds, we determined that TRPV1 and oxidation mediate persistent thermal hypersensitivity via peripheral and spinal sites of action and mechanical allodynia via only a spinal site of action. Therefore, NGF-evoked thermal and mechanical allodynia are mediated by spatially distinct mechanisms. NGF treatment evoked sustained increases in peripheral and central TRPV1 activity, as demonstrated by increased capsaicin-evoked nocifensive responses, increased calcitonin gene-related peptide release from hindpaw skin biopsies, and increased capsaicin-evoked inward current and membrane expression of TRPV1 protein in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Finally, we showed that NGF treatment increased concentrations of linoleic and arachidonic-acid-derived oxidized TRPV1 agonists in spinal cord and skin biopsies. Furthermore, increases in oxidized TRPV1-active lipids were reduced by peripheral and spinal injections of compounds that completely blocked persistent nociception. Collectively, these data indicate that NGF evokes a persistent nociceptive state mediated by increased TRPV1 activity and oxidative mechanisms, including increased production of oxidized lipid TRPV1 agonists. PMID:26041925

  13. Microsomal omega-hydroxylated metabolites of N-arachidonoyl dopamine are active at recombinant human TRPV1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rimmerman, N; Bradshaw, H.B; Basnet, A; Tan, B; Widlanski, Theodore S; Walker, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) is an endogenous lipid that modulates signal transduction in neuronal and immune pathways. NADA activates the non-selective cation channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and cannabinoid receptor 1. That NADA is comprised of an arachidonic acid (AA) backbone suggests that it may be metabolized through many of the enzymes that act upon AA such as the other AA-derived signaling lipids, the endogenous cannabinoids. To investigate the metabolism of NADA through the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) metabolic pathway, we studied the in-vitro rat liver microsomal production of hydroxylated metabolites and their activity at recombinant human TRPV1 receptors. We showed that following microsomal activation in the presence of NADA, omega and (omega -1) hydroxylated metabolites (19-, and 20-HETE-DA) were formed. These metabolites were active at recombinant human TRPV1 receptors, inducing a dose-dependent calcium influx. Both metabolites exhibited lower potency compared to NADA. We conclude that CYP450 enzymes are capable of metabolizing this signaling lipid forming a larger family of potential neuromodulators. PMID:18812233

  14. PP2B/calcineurin-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 does not require AKAP150

    PubMed Central

    Por, Elaine D.; Samelson, Bret K.; Belugin, Sergei; Akopian, Armen N.; Scott, John D.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of protein kinases and phosphatases at the plasma membrane often initiates agonist-dependent signalling events. In sensory neurons, AKAP150 (A-kinase-anchoring protein 150) orientates PKA (protein kinase A), PKC (protein kinase C) and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent PP2B (protein phosphatase 2B, also known as calcineurin) towards membrane-associated substrates. Recent evidence indicates that AKAP150-anchored PKA and PKC phosphorylate and sensitize the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential subfamily V type 1 channel, also known as the capsaicin receptor). In the present study, we explore the hypothesis that an AKAP150-associated pool of PP2B catalyses the dephosphorylation and desensitization of TRPV1. Biochemical, electrophysiological and cell-based experiments indicate that PP2B associates with AKAP150 and TRPV1 in cultured TG (trigeminal ganglia) neurons. Gene silencing of AKAP150 reduces basal phosphorylation of TRPV1. However, functional studies in neurons isolated from AKAP150?/? mice indicate that the anchoring protein is not required for pharmacological desensitization of TRPV1. Behavioural analysis of AKAP150?/? mice further support this notion, demonstrating that agonist-stimulated desensitization of TRPV1 is sensitive to PP2B inhibition and does not rely on AKAP150. These findings allow us to conclude that pharmacological desensitization of TRPV1 by PP2B may involve additional regulatory components. PMID:20883208

  15. Distinct properties of Ca2+-calmodulin binding to N- and C-terminal regulatory regions of the TRPV1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Sze-Yi; Procko, Erik; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2012-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a molecular pain receptor belonging to the TRP superfamily of nonselective cation channels. As a polymodal receptor, TRPV1 responds to heat and a wide range of chemical stimuli. The influx of calcium after channel activation serves as a negative feedback mechanism leading to TRPV1 desensitization. The cellular calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) likely participates in the desensitization of TRPV1. Two CaM-binding sites are identified in TRPV1: the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and a short distal C-terminal (CT) segment. Here, we present the crystal structure of calcium-bound CaM (Ca2+–CaM) in complex with the TRPV1-CT segment, determined to 1.95-Å resolution. The two lobes of Ca2+–CaM wrap around a helical TRPV1-CT segment in an antiparallel orientation, and two hydrophobic anchors, W787 and L796, contact the C-lobe and N-lobe of Ca2+–CaM, respectively. This structure is similar to canonical Ca2+–CaM-peptide complexes, although TRPV1 contains no classical CaM recognition sequence motif. Using structural and mutational studies, we established the TRPV1 C terminus as a high affinity Ca2+–CaM-binding site in both the isolated TRPV1 C terminus and in full-length TRPV1. Although a ternary complex of CaM, TRPV1-ARD, and TRPV1-CT had previously been postulated, we found no biochemical evidence of such a complex. In electrophysiology studies, mutation of the Ca2+–CaM-binding site on TRPV1-ARD abolished desensitization in response to repeated application of capsaicin, whereas mutation of the Ca2+–CaM-binding site in TRPV1-CT led to a more subtle phenotype of slowed and reduced TRPV1 desensitization. In summary, our results show that the TRPV1-ARD is an important mediator of TRPV1 desensitization, whereas TRPV1-CT has higher affinity for CaM and is likely involved in separate regulatory mechanisms.

  16. Effect of chirality and lipophilicity in the functional activity of evodiamine and its analogues at TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Fontana, Gabriele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Passarella, Daniele; Appendino, Giovanni; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evodiamine, a racemic quinazolinocarboline alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Evodiae fructus, has been reported to act as an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) cation channel both in vitro and in vivo. Evodiamine is structurally different from all known TRPV1 activators, and has significant clinical potential as a thermogenic agent. Nevertheless, the molecular bases for its actions are still poorly understood. Experimental Approach To investigate the structure-activity relationships of evodiamine, the natural racemate was resolved, and a series of 23 synthetic analogues was prepared, using as the end point the intracellular Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing either the human or the rat recombinant TRPV1. Key Results S-(+) evodiamine was more efficacious and potent than R-(?) evodiamine, and a new potent lead (Evo30) was identified, more potent than the reference TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin. In general, potency and efficacy correlated with the lipophilicity of the analogues. Like other TRPV1 agonists, several synthetic analogues could efficiently desensitize TRPV1 to activation by capsaicin. Conclusions and Implications Evodiamine qualifies as structurally unique lead structure to develop new potent TRPV1 agonists/desensitizers. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:23902373

  17. TRPV1 and Endocannabinoids: Emerging Molecular Signals that Modulate Mammalian Vision.

    PubMed

    Ryskamp, Daniel A; Redmon, Sarah; Jo, Andrew O; Kriaj, David

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) subunits form a polymodal cation channel responsive to capsaicin, heat, acidity and endogenous metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids. While originally reported to serve as a pain and heat detector in the peripheral nervous system, TRPV1 has been implicated in the modulation of blood flow and osmoregulation but also neurotransmission, postsynaptic neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity within the central nervous system. In addition to its central role in nociception, evidence is accumulating that TRPV1 contributes to stimulus transduction and/or processing in other sensory modalities, including thermosensation, mechanotransduction and vision. For example, TRPV1, in conjunction with intrinsic cannabinoid signaling, might contribute to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axonal transport and excitability, cytokine release from microglial cells and regulation of retinal vasculature. While excessive TRPV1 activity was proposed to induce RGC excitotoxicity, physiological TRPV1 activity might serve a neuroprotective function within the complex context of retinal endocannabinoid signaling. In this review we evaluate the current evidence for localization and function of TRPV1 channels within the mammalian retina and explore the potential interaction of this intriguing nociceptor with endogenous agonists and modulators. PMID:25222270

  18. TRPV1 and Endocannabinoids: Emerging Molecular Signals that Modulate Mammalian Vision

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Redmon, Sarah; Jo, Andrew O.; Kriaj, David

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) subunits form a polymodal cation channel responsive to capsaicin, heat, acidity and endogenous metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids. While originally reported to serve as a pain and heat detector in the peripheral nervous system, TRPV1 has been implicated in the modulation of blood flow and osmoregulation but also neurotransmission, postsynaptic neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity within the central nervous system. In addition to its central role in nociception, evidence is accumulating that TRPV1 contributes to stimulus transduction and/or processing in other sensory modalities, including thermosensation, mechanotransduction and vision. For example, TRPV1, in conjunction with intrinsic cannabinoid signaling, might contribute to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axonal transport and excitability, cytokine release from microglial cells and regulation of retinal vasculature. While excessive TRPV1 activity was proposed to induce RGC excitotoxicity, physiological TRPV1 activity might serve a neuroprotective function within the complex context of retinal endocannabinoid signaling. In this review we evaluate the current evidence for localization and function of TRPV1 channels within the mammalian retina and explore the potential interaction of this intriguing nociceptor with endogenous agonists and modulators. PMID:25222270

  19. Vanilloids selectively sensitize thermal glutamate release from TRPV1 expressing solitary tract afferents.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Vanilloids, high temperature, and low pH activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In spinal dorsal root ganglia, co-activation of one of these gating sites on TRPV1 sensitized receptor gating by other modes. Here in rat brainstem slices, we examined glutamate synaptic transmission in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) neurons where most cranial primary afferents express TRPV1, but TRPV1 sensitization is unknown. Electrical shocks to the solitary tract (ST) evoked EPSCs (ST-EPSCs). Activation of TRPV1 with capsaicin (100 nM) increased spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) but inhibited ST-EPSCs. High concentrations of the ultra-potent vanilloid resiniferatoxin (RTX, 1 nM) similarly increased sEPSC rates but blocked ST-EPSCs. Lowering the RTX concentration to 150 pM modestly increased the frequency of the sEPSCs without causing failures in the evoked ST-EPSCs. The sEPSC rate increased with raising bath temperature to 36 °C. Such thermal responses were larger in 150 pM RTX, while the ST-EPSCs remained unaffected. Vanilloid sensitization of thermal responses persisted in TTX but was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Our results demonstrate that multimodal activation of TRPV1 facilitates sEPSC responses in more than the arithmetic sum of the two activators, i.e. co-activation sensitizes TRPV1 control of spontaneous glutamate release. Since action potential evoked glutamate release is unaltered, the work provides evidence for cooperativity in gating TRPV1 plus a remarkable separation of calcium mechanisms governing the independent vesicle pools responsible for spontaneous and evoked release at primary afferents in the NTS. PMID:26471418

  20. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  1. Resolving TRPV1- and TNF-?-mediated spinal cord synaptic plasticity and inflammatory pain with neuroprotectin D1.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kyu; L, Ning; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Serhan, Charles N; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-10-19

    Mechanisms of inflammatory pain are not fully understood. We investigated the role of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential subtype V1) and TNF-?, two critical mediators for inflammatory pain, in regulating spinal cord synaptic transmission. We found in mice lacking Trpv1 the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons of spinal cord slices is reduced. Further, C-fiber-induced spinal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo is abolished in Trpv1 knock-out mice. TNF-? also increases sEPSC frequency but not amplitude in spinal outer lamina II (lamina IIo) neurons, and this increase is abolished in Trpv1 knock-out mice. Single-cell PCR analysis revealed that TNF-?-responding neurons in lamina IIo are exclusively excitatory (vGluT2(+)) neurons. Notably, neuroprotectin-1 (NPD1), an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator derived from ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid), blocks TNF-?- and capsaicin-evoked sEPSC frequency increases but has no effect on basal synaptic transmission. Strikingly, NPD1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current (IC(50) = 0.4 nm) in dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this IC(50) is ? 500 times lower than that of AMG9810, a commonly used TRPV1 antagonist. NPD1 inhibition of TRPV1 is mediated by GPCRs, since the effects were blocked by pertussis toxin. In contrast, NPD1 had no effect on mustard oil-induced TRPA1 currents. Spinal injection of NPD1, at very low doses (0.1-10 ng), blocks spinal LTP and reduces TRPV1-dependent inflammatory pain, without affecting baseline pain. NPD1 also reduces TRPV1-independent but TNF-?-dependent pain hypersensitivity. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of NPD1 in regulating TRPV1/TNF-?-mediated spinal synaptic plasticity and identify NPD1 as a novel analgesic for treating inflammatory pain. PMID:22016541

  2. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Ptervri, Erika; Balask, Mrta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Szkely, Mikls; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22C, a moderate dose of LPS (25100 ?g kg?1i.v.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ?100 min postinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 ?g kg?1i.p.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine (40 mg kg?1i.p.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg?1i.p.). However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6 mg kg?1i.p.) or SLV319 (15 mg kg?1i.p.) blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered i.c.v. at a dose (4.6 ?g) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by i.c.v. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-?. In contrast to rimonabant, the i.c.v. administration of AEA (50 ?g) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, i.c.v. AEA did not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermoeffector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis. PMID:21486787

  3. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Ptervri, Erika; Balask, Mrta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Szkely, Mikls; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-05-01

    Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide(AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22?C, a moderate dose of LPS (25 - 100 ?g kg?1 I.V.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ?100 minpostinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 ?g kg - 1 I.P.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine(40mg kg?1 I.P.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg?1 I.P.).However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6mg kg?1 I.P.) or SLV319 (15mg kg?1 I.P.)blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered I.C.V. at a dose (4.6 ?g) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by I.C.V. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-?. In contrast to rimonabant,the I.C.V. administration of AEA (50 ?g) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, I.C.V. AEAdid not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermo effector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis. PMID:21486787

  4. Novel therapeutics in the field of capsaicin and pain.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a pharmacologically active agent found in chili peppers, causes burning and itching sensation due to binding at the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV-1) receptor, a polymodal receptor critical to the sensing of a variety of stimuli (e.g., noxious heat, bidirectional pH), and subsequent activation of polymodal C and A-? nociceptive fibers. Acutely, TRPV-1 activation with peripheral capsaicin produces pronociceptive effects, which extends to the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia. However, capsaicin has been reported to display antinociceptive properties as well, largely through TRPV-1-dependent mechanisms. Local application of high concentration of capsaicin is used for neuropathic pain and repeated stimulation of TRPV-1 induced an improvement of epigastric pain in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia patients by desensitization of nociceptive pathways. New TRPV-1 agonists are currently under preclinical study and TRPV-1 antagonists are in early clinical development as analgesics. The TRPV-1 pathway might be a novel target for therapeutics in pain sensitivity. PMID:25959004

  5. Biphasic modulation by mGlu5 receptors of TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation in sensory neurons contributes to heat sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, T; Nakamura, T; Kudo, M; Yoshida, J; Takaoka, Y; Kato, N; Ishibashi, T; Imaizumi, N; Nishio, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevation of glutamate, an excitatory amino acid, during inflammation and injury plays a crucial role in the reception and transmission of sensory information via ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the biphasic effects of metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptor activation on responses to noxious heat. Experimental Approach We assessed the effects of intraplantar quisqualate, a non-selective glutamate receptor agonist, on heat and mechanical pain behaviours in mice. In addition, the effects of quisqualate on the intracellular calcium response and on membrane currents mediated by TRPV1 channels, were examined in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons from mice. Key Results Activation of mGlu5 receptors in hind paw transiently increased, then decreased, the response to noxious heat. In sensory neurons, activation of mGlu5 receptors potentiated TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation, while terminating activation of mGlu5 receptors depressed it. TRPV1-induced currents were potentiated by activation of mGlu5 receptors under voltage clamp conditions and these disappeared after washout. However, voltage-gated calcium currents were inhibited by the mGlu5 receptor agonist, even after washout. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that, in sensory neurons, mGlu5 receptors biphasically modulate TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium response via transient potentiation of TRPV1 channel-induced currents and persistent inhibition of voltage-gated calcium currents, contributing to heat hyper- and hypoalgesia. PMID:25297838

  6. Permeation and block of TRPV1 channels by the cationic lidocaine derivative QX-314

    PubMed Central

    Puopolo, Michelino; Binshtok, Alexander M.; Yao, Gui-Lan; Oh, Seog Bae; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    QX-314 (N-ethyl-lidocaine) is a cationic lidocaine derivative that blocks voltage-dependent sodium channels when applied internally to axons or neuronal cell bodies. Coapplication of external QX-314 with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 protein (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin produces long-lasting sodium channel inhibition in TRPV1-expressing neurons, suggestive of QX-314 entry into the neurons. We asked whether QX-314 entry occurs directly through TRPV1 channels or through a different pathway (e.g., pannexin channels) activated downstream of TRPV1 and whether QX-314 entry requires the phenomenon of “pore dilation” previously reported for TRPV1. With external solutions containing 10 or 20 mM QX-314 as the only cation, inward currents were activated by stimulation of both heterologously expressed and native TRPV1 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. QX-314-mediated inward current did not require pore dilation, as it activated within several seconds and in parallel with Cs-mediated outward current, with a reversal potential consistent with PQX-314/PCs = 0.12. QX-314-mediated current was no different when TRPV1 channels were expressed in C6 glioma cells, which lack expression of pannexin channels. Rapid addition of QX-314 to physiological external solutions produced instant partial inhibition of inward currents carried by sodium ions, suggesting that QX-314 is a permeant blocker. Maintained coapplication of QX-314 with capsaicin produced slowly developing reduction of outward currents carried by internal Cs, consistent with intracellular accumulation of QX-314 to concentrations of 50–100 μM. We conclude that QX-314 is directly permeant in the “standard” pore formed by TRPV1 channels and does not require either pore dilation or activation of additional downstream channels for entry. PMID:23303863

  7. ZO-1 and -2 Are Required for TRPV1-Modulated Paracellular Permeability.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Cong, X; Zhang, Y; Xiang, R L; Mei, M; Yang, N Y; Su, Y C; Choi, S; Park, K; Zhang, L W; Wu, L L; Yu, G Y

    2015-12-01

    The tight junction-based paracellular pathway plays an important role in saliva secretion. Zonula occludens (ZO) proteins are submembranous proteins of tight junction complex; however, their function in salivary epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we found that activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) by capsaicin increased rat saliva secretion both in vivo and ex vivo. Meanwhile, TRPV1 activation enlarged the width of tight junctions between neighboring acinar cells, increased the paracellular flux of 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran in submandibular gland (SMG) tissues, and decreased transepithelial electric resistance (TER) in SMG-C6 cells. ZO-1, -2, and -3 were distributed principally to the apical lateral region of acinar cells in SMG tissues and continuously encircled the peripheries of SMG-C6 cells in the untreated condition. TRPV1 activation obviously diminished ZO-1 and -2 staining, but not ZO-3 or β-catenin, at the cell-cell contacts ex vivo and in vitro. Moreover, in untreated SMG-C6 cells, ZO-1 and -2 single or double knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the paracellular flux of 4-kDa FITC-dextran. In capsaicin-treated cells, ZO-1 and -2 single or double knockdown abolished, whereas their re-expression restored, the capsaicin-induced increase in paracellular permeability. Furthermore, TRPV1 activation increased RhoA activity, and inhibition of either RhoA or Rho kinase (ROCK) abolished the capsaicin-induced TER decrease as well as ZO-1 and -2 redistribution. These results indicate that ZO-1 and -2 play crucial roles in both basal salivary epithelial barrier function and TRPV1-modulated paracellular transport. RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway is responsible for TRPV1-modulated paracellular permeability as well as ZO-1 and -2 redistribution. PMID:26464396

  8. TRPV1: a stress response protein in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen W; Ward, Nicholas J; Calkins, David J

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) family comprises a diverse group of cation channels that regulate a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. The TRPV1 (vanilloid 1) channel is best known for its role in nociception and sensory transmission. First studied in the dorsal root ganglia as the receptor for capsaicin, TRPV1 is now recognized to have a broader distribution and function within the central nervous system (CNS). Because it can be activated by a range of potentially noxious stimuli, TRPV1's polymodal nature and ability to interact with other receptor pathways make it a candidate for a stress response protein. As a result, TRPV1 is emerging as a key mediator of CNS function through modulation of both glial and neuronal activity. Growing evidence has suggested that TRPV1 can mediate a variety of pathways from glial reactivity and cytokine release to synaptic transmission and plasticity. This review highlights the increasing importance of TRPV1 as a regulator of CNS function in response to stress. PMID:22737633

  9. Propofol Restores Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Receptor Subtype-1 Sensitivity via Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Receptor Subtype-1 in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wickley, Peter J.; Sinha, Sayantani; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between peripheral nociceptors belonging to the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) family has recently been demonstrated. Moreover, the intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to directly activate TRPA1 receptors, and indirectly restore sensitivity of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 activation is involved in mediating the propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity. Methods Mouse DRG neurons were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and grown for 24 h. F-11 cells were transfected with complementary DNA for both TRPV1 and TRPA1 or TRPV1 only. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. Following TRPV1 de-sensitization with capsaicin (100 nM), cells were treated with propofol (1, 5 and 10 ?M) alone, propofol in the presence of the TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031 (0.5 ?M) or the TRPA1 agonist, Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 100 ?M) and capsaicin was then reapplied. Results In DRG neurons that contain both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in DRG neurons containing only TRPV1 receptors, exposure to propofol or AITC following de-sensitization did not restore capsaicin-induced TRPV1 sensitivity. Similarly, in F-11 cells transfected with both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in F-11 cells transfected with TRPV1 only, neither propofol nor AITC were capable of restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity in primary DRG neurons and in cultured F-11 cells transfected with both the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors via a TRPA1-dependent process. Propofols effects on sensory neurons may be clinically important and contribute to peripheral sensitization to nociceptive stimuli in traumatized tissue. PMID:21364461

  10. Developing piperine towards TRPV1 and GABAA receptor ligands--synthesis of piperine analogs via Heck-coupling of conjugated dienes.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Laurin; Schnbauer, David; Pakfeifer, Peter; Schffmann, Angela; Khom, Sophia; Hering, Steffen; Mihovilovic, Marko D

    2015-01-28

    Piperine, the pungent alkaloid of black pepper, and several of its derivatives are modulators of ?-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. Concomitantly, this natural product has also been reported to activate transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. We have developed a Heck cross-coupling reaction of conjugated dienamides enabling the rapid assembly of piperine derivatives containing a modified aromatic core. Upon assessment of a focussed compound library, key aromatic substituents were identified selectively affecting either the GABAA or the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:25438036

  11. Spicing up the sensation of stretch: TRPV1 controls mechanosensitive Piezo channels.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2015-02-10

    Piezo proteins--a family of mammalian cation-selective ion channels that respond to mechanical stretch--are molecular mediators of biological processes, including vascular tone, hearing, touch, and pain. In this issue of Science Signaling, Rohacs and colleagues demonstrate that activation of the heat-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), another cation channel, inhibits Piezo channels through a calcium-induced depletion of phosphoinositides. This regulation could contribute to the cellular mechanisms by which the TRPV1 activator capsaicin mitigates mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:25670201

  12. Osmoregulatory thirst in mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and/or type 4 (TRPV4) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kinsman, Brian; Cowles, James; Lay, Jennifer; Simmonds, Sarah S.; Browning, Kirsteen N.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the ability of the central nervous system to detect changes in osmolality is mediated by products of the genes encoding the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) channel. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether deletion of TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels altered thirst responses to cellular dehydration in mice. Injection of 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl produced dose-dependent increases in cumulative water intakes of wild-type (WT), TRPV1−/−, TRPV4−/−, and TRPV1−/−V4−/− mice. However, there were no differences in cumulative water intakes between WT versus any other strain despite similar increases in plasma electrolytes and osmolality. Similar results were observed after injection of hypertonic mannitol. This was a consistent finding regardless of the injection route (intraperitoneal vs. subcutaneous) or timed access to water (delayed vs. immediate). There were also no differences in cumulative intakes across strains after injection of 0.15 M NaCl or during a time-controlled period (no injection). Chronic hypernatremia produced by sole access to 2% NaCl for 48 h also produced similar increases in water intake across strains. In a final set of experiments, subcutaneous injection of 0.5 M NaCl produced similar increases in the number of Fos-positive nuclei within the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median preoptic nucleus across strains but significantly smaller number in the subfornical organ of WT versus TRPV1−/−V4−/− mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels are not the primary mechanism by which the central nervous system responds to cellular dehydration during hypernatremia or hyperosmolality to increase thirst. PMID:25100078

  13. Osmoregulatory thirst in mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and/or type 4 (TRPV4) receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsman, Brian; Cowles, James; Lay, Jennifer; Simmonds, Sarah S; Browning, Kirsteen N; Stocker, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies suggest the ability of the central nervous system to detect changes in osmolality is mediated by products of the genes encoding the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) channel. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether deletion of TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels altered thirst responses to cellular dehydration in mice. Injection of 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl produced dose-dependent increases in cumulative water intakes of wild-type (WT), TRPV1-/-, TRPV4-/-, and TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. However, there were no differences in cumulative water intakes between WT versus any other strain despite similar increases in plasma electrolytes and osmolality. Similar results were observed after injection of hypertonic mannitol. This was a consistent finding regardless of the injection route (intraperitoneal vs. subcutaneous) or timed access to water (delayed vs. immediate). There were also no differences in cumulative intakes across strains after injection of 0.15 M NaCl or during a time-controlled period (no injection). Chronic hypernatremia produced by sole access to 2% NaCl for 48 h also produced similar increases in water intake across strains. In a final set of experiments, subcutaneous injection of 0.5 M NaCl produced similar increases in the number of Fos-positive nuclei within the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median preoptic nucleus across strains but significantly smaller number in the subfornical organ of WT versus TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels are not the primary mechanism by which the central nervous system responds to cellular dehydration during hypernatremia or hyperosmolality to increase thirst. PMID:25100078

  14. Consequences of activating the calcium-permeable ion channel TRPV1 in breast cancer cells with regulated TRPV1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tina T L; Peters, Amelia A; Tan, Ping T; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2014-08-01

    Increased expression of specific calcium channels in some cancers and the role of calcium signaling in proliferation and invasion have led to studies assessing calcium channel inhibitors as potential therapies for some cancers. The use of channel activators to promote death of cancer cells has been suggested, but the risk of activators promoting cancer cell proliferation and the importance of the degree of channel over-expression is unclear. We developed an MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with inducible TRPV1 overexpression and assessed the role of TRPV1 levels on cell death mediated by the TRPV1 activator capsaicin and the potential for submaximal activation to promote proliferation. The TRPV1 level was a determinant of cell death induced by capsaicin. A concentration response curve with varying TRPV1 expression levels identified the minimum level of TRPV1 required for capsaicin induced cell death. At no level of TRPV1 over-expression or capsaicin concentration did TRPV1 activation enhance proliferation. Cell death induced by capsaicin was necrotic and associated with up-regulation of c-Fos and RIP3. These studies suggest that activators of specific calcium channels may be an effective way to induce necrosis and that this approach may not always be associated with enhancement of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:24889371

  15. Functionally important amino acid residues in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel an overview of the current mutational data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to create an overview of the currently available results of site-directed mutagenesis studies on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Systematization of the vast number of data on the functionally important amino acid mutations of TRPV1 may provide a clearer picture of this field, and may promote a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of TRPV1. The review summarizes information on 112 unique mutated sites along the TRPV1, exchanged to multiple different residues in many cases. These mutations influence the effect or binding of different agonists, antagonists, and channel blockers, alter the responsiveness to heat, acid, and voltage dependence, affect the channel pore characteristics, and influence the regulation of the receptor function by phosphorylation, glycosylation, calmodulin, PIP2, ATP, and lipid binding. The main goal of this paper is to publish the above mentioned data in a form that facilitates in silico molecular modelling of the receptor by promoting easier establishment of boundary conditions. The better understanding of the structure-function relationship of TRPV1 may promote discovery of new, promising, more effective and safe drugs for treatment of neurogenic inflammation and pain-related diseases and may offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23800232

  16. A painful link between the TRPV1 channel and lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lzaro, Sara L; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2015-03-15

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is expressed mainly by sensory neurons that detect noxious stimuli from the environment such as high temperatures and pungent compounds (such as allicin and capsaicin) and has been extensively linked to painful and inflammatory processes. This extraordinary protein also responds to endogenous stimuli among which we find molecules of a lipidic nature. We recently described that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid linked to the generation and maintenance of pain, can directly activate TRPV1 and produce pain by binding to the channels' C-terminal region, specifically to residue K710. In an effort to further understand how activation of TRPV1 is achieved by this negatively-charged lipid, we used several synthetic and naturally-occurring lipids to determine the structural requirements that need to be met by these charged lipids in order to produce the activation of TRPV1. In this review, we detail the findings obtained by other research groups and our own on the field of TRPV1-regulation by negatively-charged lipids and discuss the possible therapeutic relevance of these findings on the basis of the role of TRPV1 in pathophysiological processes. PMID:25445434

  17. Transient activation of specific neurons in mice by selective expression of the capsaicin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gler, Ali D.; Rainwater, Aundrea; Parker, Jones G.; Jones, Graham L.; Argilli, Emanuela; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Ehlers, Michael D.; Bonci, Antonello; Zweifel, Larry s.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control the electrical activity of a neuronal subtype is a valuable tool in deciphering the role of discreet cell populations in complex neural circuits. Recent techniques that allow remote control of neurons are either labor intensive and invasive or indirectly coupled to neural electrical potential with low temporal resolution. Here we show the rapid, reversible and direct activation of genetically identified neuronal subpopulations by generating two inducible transgenic mouse models. Confined expression of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, allows cell-specific activation after peripheral or oral delivery of ligand in freely moving mice. Capsaicin-induced activation of dopaminergic or serotonergic neurons reversibly alters both physiological and behavioural responses within minutes, and lasts ~10 min. These models showcase a robust and remotely controllable genetic tool that modulates a distinct cell population without the need for invasive and labour-intensive approaches. PMID:22434189

  18. Increase of TRPV1-Immunoreactivity in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons Innervating the Femur in a Rat Model of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Kensuke; Suzuki, Miyako; Kawarai, Yuya; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Nakamura, Junichi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated nonselective cation channel, which can be activated by capsaicin and other noxious stimuli. Recently, an association between bone pain and TRPV1 has been reported. However, the influence of osteoporosis on TRPV1 in the sensory system innervating the femur has not been reported. Materials and Methods TRPV1-immunoreactive (ir) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons labeled with neurotracer [Fluoro-Gold (FG)] innervating the femurs of Sprague Dawley rats were examined in control, sham, and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We evaluated osteoporosis in the femurs and compared the proportion of TRPV1-ir DRG neurons innervating femur between the 3 groups of rats. Results OVX rats showed osteoporotic cancellous bone in the femur. FG labeled neurons were distributed from L1 to L6 DRG, but there was no significant difference in the proportion of labeled neurons between the 3 groups (p>0.05). The proportions of FG labeled TRPV1-ir DRG neurons were 1.7%, 1.7%, and 2.8% of DRG neurons innervating the femur, in control, sham-operated, and OVX rats, respectively. The proportion of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRG innervating the femur in OVX rats was significantly higher than that in control and sham-operated rats (p<0.05). Conclusion Under physiological conditions, DRG neurons innervating femurs in rats contain TRPV1. Osteoporosis increases the numbers of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRG innervating osteoporotic femurs in rats. These findings suggest that TRPV1 may have a role in sensory perception of osteoporotic femurs. PMID:25323897

  19. TRPV1 Activation Exacerbates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Apoptosis in H9C2 Cells via Calcium Overload and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zewei; Han, Jie; Zhao, Wenting; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shuai; Ye, Lifang; Liu, Tingting; Zheng, Liangrong

    2014-01-01

    Transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, which are expressed on sensory neurons, elicit cardioprotective effects during ischemia reperfusion injury by stimulating the release of neuropeptides, namely calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Recent studies show that TRPV1 channels are also expressed on cardiomyocytes and can exacerbate air pollutant-induced apoptosis. However, whether these channels present on cardiomyocytes directly modulate cell death and survival pathways during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in H/R induced apoptosis of H9C2 cardiomyocytes. We demonstrated that TRPV1 was indeed expressed in H9C2 cells, and activated by H/R injury. Although neuropeptide release caused by TRPV1 activation on sensory neurons elicits a cardioprotective effect, we found that capsaicin (CAP; a TRPV1 agonist) treatment of H9C2 cells paradoxically enhanced the level of apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium and mitochondrial superoxide levels, attenuating mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibiting mitochondrial biogenesis (measured by the expression of ATP synthase β). In contrast, treatment of cells with capsazepine (CPZ; a TRPV1 antagonist) or TRPV1 siRNA attenuated H/R induced-apoptosis. Furthermore, CAP and CPZ treatment revealed a similar effect on cell viability and mitochondrial superoxide production in primary cardiomyocytes. Finally, using both CGRP8–37 (a CGRP receptor antagonist) and RP67580 (a SP receptor antagonist) to exclude the confounding effects of neuropeptides, we confirmed aforementioned detrimental effects as TRPV1−/− mouse hearts exhibited improved cardiac function during ischemia/reperfusion. In summary, direct activation of TRPV1 in myocytes exacerbates H/R-induced apoptosis, likely through calcium overload and associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Our study provides a novel understanding of the role of myocyte TRPV1 channels in ischemia/reperfusion injury that sharply contrasts with its known extracardiac neuronal effects. PMID:25314299

  20. Mechanisms of Prolonged Presynaptic Ca2+ Signaling and Glutamate Release Induced by TRPV1 Activation in Rat Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Medvedeva, Yuliya V.; Kim, Man-Su; Usachev, Yuriy M.

    2009-01-01

    TRPV1-mediated release of neuroactive peptides and neurotransmitters from the peripheral and central terminals of primary sensory neurons can critically contribute to nociceptive processing at the periphery and in the CNS. However, the mechanisms that link TRPV1 activation with Ca2+ signaling at the release sites and neurosecretion are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a brief stimulation of the receptor using either capsaicin or the endogenous TRPV1 agonist N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) induces a prolonged elevation of presynaptic [Ca2+]i and a concomitant enhancement of glutamate release at sensory synapses. Initiation of this response required Ca2+ entry, primarily via TRPV1. The sustained phase of the response was independent of extracellular Ca2+ and was prevented by inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release mechanisms. Measurements using a mitochondria-targeted Ca2+ indicator, mtPericam, revealed that TRPV1 activation elicits a long-lasting Ca2+ elevation in presynaptic mitochondria. The concentration of TRPV1 agonist determined the duration of mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+ signals in presynaptic boutons and, consequently, the period of enhanced glutamate release and action potential firing by postsynaptic neurons. These data suggest that mitochondria control vanilloid-induced neurotransmission by translating the strength of presynaptic TRPV1 stimulation into duration of the postsynaptic response. PMID:18480286

  1. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Cassidy, Ryan M; Harrison, Daniel S; Cata, Juan P; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2015-09-30

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1(+) neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1(+) neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. Significance statement: In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1-coexpressing HEK293 cells, and in both rat and mouse spinal cord slices. Moreover, this is the first study to show that this interaction plays an important role in the generation of behavioral hypersensitivity in paclitaxel-related neuropathy. The key translational implications are that TLR4 and TRPV1 antagonists may be useful in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in humans. PMID:26424893

  2. Capsaicin receptor expression in rat laryngeal innervation.

    PubMed

    Uno, Toshiyuki; Koike, Shinobu; Bamba, Hitoshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Hisa, Yasuo

    2004-05-01

    Capsaicin elicits a sensation of burning pain by selectively activating sensory neurons that convey information about noxious stimuli to the central nervous system. Vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VRI) and the vanilloid receptor-like protein 1 (VRL-1) are activated, not only by capsaicin, but also by noxious heat and protons, and it has been suggested that they are polymodal nociceptors. We investigated the expression of VR1 and VRL-1 in the rat larynx and nodose ganglion using VR1 and VRL-1 immunohistochemical analysis with visualization by diaminobenzidine reaction. Fibers positive for VRL-1 were detected in the laryngeal epithelium and lamina propria. Cells positive for VRL-1 were distributed in the intralaryngeal ganglia. Half of the neurons in the nodose ganglion had VR-1 immunoreactivity, and almost 10% of the nodose ganglion neurons were positive for VRL-1. These findings suggest that these capsaicin receptors play an important role in the nociception of the laryngeal innervation. PMID:15174761

  3. Involvement of an increased spinal TRPV1 sensitization through its up-regulation in mechanical allodynia of CCI rats.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshihito; Nakazato, Etsuko; Fujiuchi, Akiyoshi; Hara, Tomokazu; Imai, Aki

    2005-12-01

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) antagonists are known to attenuate the neuropathic pain symptoms in peripheral nerve injury models, but the mechanism(s) of their effect remains unclear. At the same time, the role of spinal TRPV1 in pain transduction system has not been fully understood. In this study, the role of spinal TRPV1 in mechanical allodynia in rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model was investigated. Intrathecal administration of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, N-(4-tertiarybutylphenyl)-4-(3-cholorphyridin-2-yl)tetrahydropryazine-1(2H)-carbox-amide (BCTC) significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia in CCI rats at 100 and 300 nmol. In vitro, BCTC inhibited capsaicin (300 nM)-induced releases of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity (CGRP-LI) and substance P-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI) from the rat spinal cord slice preparations with IC(50)s of 37.0 and 36.0 nM, respectively, confirming that BCTC potently inhibits TRPV1 function in the rat spinal cord. TRPV1 expression levels in the spinal cord following CCI were quantified in by Western blot analysis. TRPV1 protein levels were significantly increased in the ipsilateral side of the lumbar spinal cord at 7 and 14 days following CCI surgery, but not in the contralateral side. Furthermore, capsaicin (300 nM)-evoked release of CGRP-LI was significantly higher in the ipsilateral spinal cord of CCI rats (14 days after surgery) than that of sham-operated rats. These findings suggest that an increased sensitization of the spinal TRPV1 through its up-regulation is involved in the development and/or maintenance of mechanical allodynia in rat CCI model. PMID:15998524

  4. Breathtaking TRP Channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in Airway Chemosensation and Reflex Control

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-01-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  5. Monoacylglycerols Activate TRPV1 A Link between Phospholipase C and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Peter M.; Ermund, Anna; Movahed, Pouya; Andersson, David A.; Simonsen, Charlotte; Jnsson, Bo A. G.; Blomgren, Anders; Birnir, Bryndis; Bevan, Stuart; Eschalier, Alain; Mallet, Christophe; Gomis, Ana; Hgesttt, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate generates diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and protons, all of which can regulate TRPV1 activity via different mechanisms. Here we explored the possibility that the diacylglycerol metabolites 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 1-arachidonoylglycerol, and not metabolites of these monoacylglycerols, activate TRPV1 and contribute to this signaling cascade. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and 1-arachidonoylglycerol activated native TRPV1 on vascular sensory nerve fibers and heterologously expressed TRPV1 in whole cells and inside-out membrane patches. The monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors methylarachidonoyl-fluorophosphonate and JZL184 prevented the metabolism of deuterium-labeled 2-arachidonoylglycerol and deuterium-labeled 1-arachidonoylglycerol in arterial homogenates, and enhanced TRPV1-mediated vasodilator responses to both monoacylglycerols. In mesenteric arteries from TRPV1 knock-out mice, vasodilator responses to 2-arachidonoylglycerol were minor. Bradykinin and adenosine triphosphate, ligands of phospholipase C-coupled membrane receptors, increased the content of 2-arachidonoylglycerol in dorsal root ganglia. In HEK293 cells expressing the phospholipase C-coupled histamine H1 receptor, exposure to histamine stimulated the formation of 2-AG, and this effect was augmented in the presence of JZL184. These effects were prevented by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin. Histamine induced large whole cell currents in HEK293 cells co-expressing TRPV1 and the histamine H1 receptor, and the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine abolished these currents. JZL184 increased the histamine-induced currents and tetrahydrolipstatin prevented this effect. The calcineurin inhibitor ciclosporin and the endogenous entourage compound palmitoylethanolamide potentiated the vasodilator response to 2-arachidonoylglycerol, disclosing TRPV1 activation of this monoacylglycerol at nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of JZL184 produced TRPV1-dependent antinociception in the mouse formalin test. Our results show that intact 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 1-arachidonoylglycerol are endogenous TRPV1 activators, contributing to phospholipase C-dependent TRPV1 channel activation and TRPV1-mediated antinociceptive signaling in the brain. PMID:24312564

  6. Anti-dyskinetic effects of cannabinoids in a rat model of Parkinson's disease: role of CB1 and TRPV1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Morgese, Maria Grazia; Cassano, Tommaso; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Levodopa is the most commonly prescribed drug for Parkinson's disease (PD). Although levodopa improves PD symptoms in the initial stages of the disease, its long-term use is limited by development of side effects, including abnormal involuntary movements (dyskinesias) and psychiatric complications. The endocannabinoid system is emerging as an important modulator of basal ganglia functions and its pharmacologic manipulation represents a promising therapy to alleviate levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions that are chronically treated with levodopa develop increasingly severe axial, limb, locomotor and oro-facial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). Administration of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212?2 attenuated levodopa-induced axial, limb and oral AIMs dose-dependently via a CB1mediated mechanism, whereas it had no effect on locomotive AIMs. By contrast, systemic administration of URB597, a potent FAAH inhibitor, did not affect AIMs scoring despite its ability to increase anandamide concentration throughout the basal ganglia. Unlike WIN, anandamide can also bind and activate transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptors, which have been implicated in the modulation of dopamine transmission in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, URB597 significantly decreased all AIMs subtypes only if co-administered with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Our data indicate that pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 receptors unmasks the anti-dyskinetic effects of FAAH inhibitors and that CB1 and TRPV1 receptors play opposite roles in levodopa-induced dyskinesias. PMID:17900568

  7. Dissecting the role of TRPV1 in detecting multiple trigeminal irritants in three behavioral assays for sensory irritation

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, CJ

    2013-01-01

    Polymodal neurons of the trigeminal nerve innervate the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral cavity and cornea. Trigeminal nociceptive fibers express a diverse collection of receptors and are stimulated by a wide variety of chemicals. However, the mechanism of stimulation is known only for relatively few of these compounds. Capsaicin, for example, activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. In the present study, wildtype (C57Bl/6J) and TRPV1 knockout mice were tested in three behavioral assays for irritation to determine if TRPV1 is necessary to detect trigeminal irritants in addition to capsaicin. In one assay mice were presented with a chemical via a cotton swab and their response scored on a 5 level scale. In another assay, a modified two bottle preference test, which avoids the confound of mixing irritants with the animal’s drinking water, was used to assess aversion. In the final assay, an air dilution olfactometer was used to administer volatile compounds to mice restrained in a double-chambered plethysmograph where respiratory reflexes were monitored. TRPV1 knockouts showed deficiencies in the detection of benzaldehyde, cyclohexanone and eugenol in at least one assay. However, cyclohexanone was the only substance tested that appears to act solely through TRPV1. PMID:24358880

  8. LASSBio-881: an N-acylhydrazone transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily type 1 antagonist orally effective against the hypernociception induced by capsaicin or partial sciatic ligation

    PubMed Central

    Tributino, JLM; Santos, MLH; Mesquita, CM; Lima, CKF; Silva, LL; Maia, RC; Duarte, CD; Barreiro, EJ; Fraga, CAM; Castro, NG; Miranda, ALP; Guimaraes, MZP

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Compound LASSBio-881 is an orally effective antinociceptive that binds to cannabinoid receptors and is active mainly on the neurogenic component of pain models. We investigated whether transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily type 1 (TRPV1) channels are involved in the effects of LASSBio-881. Experimental approach: Modulation of capsaicin (CAP)- and low pH-induced currents was evaluated in TRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. In vivo effects were evaluated in CAP-induced acute and inflammatory changes in nociception, as well as in partial sciatic ligation-induced thermal hypernociception. Key results: LASSBio-881 inhibited TRPV1 currents elicited by CAP with an IC50 of 14 M, and inhibited proton-gated currents by 70% at 20 M. Functional interaction with CAP was surmountable. Locally applied LASSBio-881 decreased time spent in CAP-elicited nocifensive behaviour by 30%, and given orally it reduced measures of CAP- or carrageenan-evoked thermal hypernociception by 60 and 40% respectively. In addition, LASSBio-881 decreased the paw withdrawal responses to thermal stimuli of animals with sciatic neuropathy 711 days after nerve ligation, at a dose of 300 molkg?1day?1 p.o. At this dose, hyperthermia was not observed within 4 h following oral administration. Conclusions and implications: LASSBio-881 is a TRPV1 antagonist that apparently competes with CAP. Accordingly, LASSBio-881 inhibited nociception in models of acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain presumed to involve TRPV1 signalling. These in vivo actions were not hindered by hyperthermia, a common side effect of other TRPV1 antagonists. We propose that the antinociceptive properties of LASSBio-881 are due to TRPV1 antagonism, although other molecular interactions may contribute to the effects of this multi-target drug candidate. PMID:20401963

  9. Activation of the TRPV1 channel attenuates N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced neuronal injury in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Kuroki, Taiyo; Okuno, Yui; Sekiya, Haruna; Watanabe, Akihiro; Sagawa, Tomonori; Ito, Hiroko; Mizuta, Aya; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2014-06-15

    Capsaicin, a transient receptor potential vanilloid type1 (TRPV1) agonist, has been reported to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs, including the brain, heart, and kidney, whereas activation of TRPV1 was also reported to contribute to neurodegeneration, including pressure-induced retinal ganglion cell death in vitro. We histologically investigated the effects of capsaicin and SA13353, TRPV1 agonists, on retinal injury induced by intravitreal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA; 200 nmol/eye) in rats in vivo. Under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to intravitreal NMDA injection. Capsaicin (5.0 nmol/eye) was intravitreally admianeously with NMDA injection. SA13353 (10mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered 15 min before NMDA injection. Morphometric evaluation at 7 days after NMDA injection showed that intravitreal NMDA injection resulted in ganglion cell loss. Capsaicin and SA13353 almost completely prevented this damage. Treatment with capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist, 0.5 nmol/eye), CGRP (8-37) (calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, 0.5 pmol/eye), or RP67580 (tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, 0.5 nmol/eye) almost completely negated the protective effect of capsaicin in the NMDA-injected rats. Seven days after intravitreal NMDA injection, the cell number of retinal ganglion cell was significantly smaller than in the eye that had received capsaicin in B6.Cg-TgN(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J transgenic mice that express the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein in retinal ganglion cells in the retina. These results suggested that activation of TRPV1 protects retinal neurons from the injury induced by intravitreal NMDA in rats in vivo. Activation of CGRP and tachykinin NK1 receptors is possibly involved in underlying protective mechanisms. PMID:24704373

  10. ?-Substituted 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonamidophenyl)acetamides as potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong-Thao; Kim, Ho Shin; Ann, Jihyae; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Changhoon; Hong, Mannkyu; Hoang, Van-Hai; Ngo, Van T H; Hong, Sunhye; Cui, Minghua; Choi, Sun; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank-Foltyn, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Christoph, Thomas; Lee, Jeewoo

    2015-06-01

    A series of ?-substituted acetamide derivatives of previously reported 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonamidophenyl)propanamide leads (1, 2) were investigated for antagonism of hTRPV1 activation by capsaicin. Compound 34, which possesses an ?-m-tolyl substituent, showed highly potent and selective antagonism of capsaicin with Ki(CAP)=0.1 nM. It thus reflected a 3-fold improvement in potency over parent 1. Docking analysis using our homology model indicated that the high potency of 34 might be attributed to a specific hydrophobic interaction of the m-tolyl group with the receptor. PMID:25937016

  11. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (?42 C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 ?M. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  12. Palmitoylethanolamide normalizes intestinal motility in a model of post-inflammatory accelerated transit: involvement of CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Raffaele; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pagano, Ester; Aveta, Teresa; Buono, Lorena; Borrelli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a naturally occurring acylethanolamide chemically related to the endocannabinoid anandamide, interacts with targets that have been identified in peripheral nerves controlling gastrointestinal motility, such as cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, TRPV1 channels and PPARα. Here, we investigated the effect of PEA in a mouse model of functional accelerated transit which persists after the resolution of colonic inflammation (post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome). Experimental Approach Intestinal inflammation was induced by intracolonic administration of oil of mustard (OM). Mice were tested for motility and biochemical and molecular biology changes 4 weeks later. PEA, oleoylethanolamide and endocannabinoid levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and receptor and enzyme mRNA expression by qRT-PCR. Key Results OM induced transient colitis and a functional post-inflammatory increase in upper gastrointestinal transit, associated with increased intestinal anandamide (but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol, PEA or oleoylethanolamide) levels and down-regulation of mRNA for TRPV1 channels. Exogenous PEA inhibited the OM-induced increase in transit and tended to increase anandamide levels. Palmitic acid had a weaker effect on transit. Inhibition of transit by PEA was blocked by rimonabant (CB1 receptor antagonist), further increased by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (TRPV1 antagonist) and not significantly modified by the PPARα antagonist GW6471. Conclusions and Implications Intestinal endocannabinoids and TRPV1 channel were dysregulated in a functional model of accelerated transit exhibiting aspects of post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome. PEA counteracted the accelerated transit, the effect being mediated by CB1 receptors (possibly via increased anandamide levels) and modulated by TRPV1 channels. PMID:24818658

  13. Small Molecule Positive Allosteric Modulation of TRPV1 Activation by Vanilloids and Acidic pHS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kaszas, Krisztian; Keller, Jason M.; Coddou, Claudio; Mishra, Santosh K.; Hoon, Mark A.; Stojilkovic, Stanko; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) is a high-conductance, nonselective cation channel strongly expressed in nociceptive primary afferent neurons of the peripheral nervous system and functions as a multimodal nociceptor gated by temperatures greater than 43°C, protons, and small-molecule vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin. The ability to respond to heat, low pH, vanilloids, and endovanilloids and altered sensitivity and expression in experimental inflammatory and neuropathic pain models made TRPV1 a major target for the development of novel, nonopioid analgesics and resulted in the discovery of potent antagonists. In human clinical trials, observations of hyperthermia and the potential for thermal damage by suppressing the ability to sense noxious heat suggested that full-scale blockade of TRPV1 function can be counterproductive and subtler pharmacological approaches are necessary. Here we show that the dihydropyridine derivative 4,5-diethyl-3-(2-methoxyethylthio)-2-methyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(±)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate (MRS1477) behaves as a positive allosteric modulator of both proton and vanilloid activation of TRPV1. Under inflammatory-mimetic conditions of low pH (6.0) and protein kinase C phosphorylation, addition of MRS1477 further increased sensitivity of already sensitized TPRV1 toward capsaicin. MRS1477 does not affect inhibition by capsazepine or ruthenium red and remains effective in potentiating activation by pH in the presence of an orthosteric vanilloid antagonist. These results indicate a distinct site on TRPV1 for positive allosteric modulation that may bind endogenous compounds or novel pharmacological agents. Positive modulation of TRPV1 sensitivity suggests that it may be possible to produce a selective analgesia through calcium overload restricted to highly active nociceptive nerve endings at sites of tissue damage and inflammation. PMID:22005042

  14. Opposite effect of capsaicin and capsazepine on behavioral thermoregulation in insects.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Justyna; T?gowska, Eugenia

    2011-10-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are implicated in thermosensation both in mammals and insects. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of mammalian vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) agonist (capsaicin) and antagonist (capsazepine) on insect behavioral thermoregulation. We tested behavioral thermoregulation of mealworms larvae intoxicated with capsaicin and capsazepine in two concentrations (10(-7) and 10(-4)M) in a thermal gradient system for 3days. Our results revealed that in low concentration, capsaicin induces seeking lower temperatures than the ones selected by the insects that were not intoxicated. After application of capsazepine in the same concentration, the mealworms prefer higher temperatures than the control group. The observed opposite effect of TRPV1 agonist and antagonist on insect behavioral thermoregulation, which is similar to the effect of these substances on thermoregulation in mammals, indicates indirectly that capsaicin may act on receptors in insects that are functionally similar to TRPV1. PMID:21667066

  15. The unsilent majority–TRPV1 drives “spontaneous” transmission of unmyelinated primary afferents within cardiorespiratory NTS

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E.; Fawley, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Cranial primary afferent sensory neurons figure importantly in homeostatic control of visceral organ systems. Of the two broad classes of visceral afferents, the role of unmyelinated or C-type class remains poorly understood. This review contrasts key aspects of peripheral discharge properties of C-fiber afferents and their glutamate transmission mechanisms within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). During normal prevailing conditions, most information arrives at the NTS through myelinated A-type nerves. However, most of visceral afferent axons (75–90%) in NTS are unmyelinated, C-type axons. Centrally, C-type solitary tract (ST) afferent terminals have presynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. Capsaicin activation of TRPV1 blocks phasic or synchronous release of glutamate but facilitates release of glutamate from a separate pool of vesicles. This TRPV1-operated pool of vesicles is active at normal temperatures and is responsible for actively driving a 10-fold higher release of glutamate at TRPV1 compared with TRPV1− terminals even in the absence of afferent action potentials. This novel TRPV1 mechanism is responsible for an additional asynchronous release of glutamate that is not present in myelinated terminals. The NTS is rich with presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors, and the implications of TRPV1-operated glutamate offer unique targets for signaling in C-type sensory afferent terminals from neuropeptides, inflammatory mediators, lipid metabolites, cytokines, and cannabinoids. From a homeostatic view, this combination could have broad implications for integration in chronic pathological disturbances in which the numeric dominance of C-type endings and TRPV1 would broadly disturb multisystem control mechanisms. PMID:23076872

  16. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Kewei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  17. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx–TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  18. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  19. 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides as potent transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists: structure-activity relationships of 2-amino derivatives in the N-(6-trifluoromethylpyridin-3-ylmethyl) C-region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Seop; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Cho, Seong-Hee; Seo, Sejin; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kwak, Eun Joo; Kim, Yong Soo; Bhondwe, Rahul S; Kim, Ho Shin; Park, Seul-gi; Son, Karam; Choi, Sun; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Pearce, Larry V; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Kgel, Babette Y; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas; Lee, Jeewoo

    2012-10-11

    A series of N-(2-amino-6-trifluoromethylpyridin-3-ylmethyl)-2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides were designed combining previously identified pharmacophoric elements and evaluated as hTRPV1 antagonists. The SAR analysis indicated that specific hydrophobic interactions of the 2-amino substituents in the C-region of the ligand were critical for high hTRPV1 binding potency. In particular, compound 49S was an excellent TRPV1 antagonist (K(i(CAP)) = 0.2 nM; IC(50(pH)) = 6.3 nM) and was thus approximately 100- and 20-fold more potent, respectively, than the parent compounds 2 and 3 for capsaicin antagonism. Furthermore, it demonstrated strong analgesic activity in the rat neuropathic model superior to 2 with almost no side effects. Compound 49S antagonized capsaicin induced hypothermia in mice but showed TRPV1-related hyperthermia. The basis for the high potency of 49S compared to 2 is suggested by docking analysis with our hTRPV1 homology model in which the 4-methylpiperidinyl group in the C-region of 49S made additional hydrophobic interactions with the hydrophobic region. PMID:22957803

  20. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  1. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain.

    PubMed

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Pea, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  2. Photoswitchable fatty acids enable optical control of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, James Allen; Moroni, Mirko; Moshourab, Rabih; Sumser, Martin; Lewin, Gary R.; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are not only essential components of cellular energy storage and structure, but play crucial roles in signalling. Here we present a toolkit of photoswitchable FA analogues (FAAzos) that incorporate an azobenzene photoswitch along the FA chain. By modifying the FAAzos to resemble capsaicin, we prepare a series of photolipids targeting the Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel known for its role in nociception. Several azo-capsaicin derivatives (AzCAs) emerge as photoswitchable agonists of TRPV1 that are relatively inactive in the dark and become active on irradiation with ultraviolet-A light. This effect can be rapidly reversed by irradiation with blue light and permits the robust optical control of dorsal root ganglion neurons and C-fibre nociceptors with precision timing and kinetics not available with any other technique. More generally, we expect that photolipids will find many applications in controlling biological pathways that rely on protein–lipid interactions. PMID:25997690

  3. Mechanisms and clinical uses of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Vij, Amarjit Singh; Sharma, Mohit

    2013-11-15

    Capsaicin is the active ingredient of chili peppers and gives them the characteristic pungent flavor. Understanding the actions of capsaicin led to the discovery of its receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). This receptor is found on key sensory afferents, and so the use of capsaicin to selectively activate pain afferents has been studied in animal and human models for various indications. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. This process known as defunctionalisation has been exploited for therapeutic use of capsaicin in various painful conditions. We reviewed different studies on mechanisms of action of capsaicin and its utility in different clinical conditions. A beneficial role of capsaicin has been reported in obesity, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal conditions, various cancers, neurogenic bladder, and dermatologic conditions. Various theories have been put forth to explain these effects. Interestingly many of these pharmacological actions are TRPV1 independent. This review is aimed at providing an overview of these mechanisms and to also present literature which contradicts the proposed beneficial effects of capsaicin. Most of the literature comes from animal studies and since many of these mechanisms are poorly understood, more investigation is required in human subjects. PMID:24211679

  4. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection. PMID:25371244

  5. Capsaicin and sensory neurones: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Szolcsnyi, Jnos

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of red pepper has become not only a "hot" topic in neuroscience but its new target-related unique actions have opened the door for the drug industry to introduce a new chapter of analgesics. After several lines of translational efforts with over 1,000 patents and clinical trials, the 8% capsaicin dermal patch reached the market and its long-lasting local analgesic effect in some severe neuropathic pain states is now well established. This introductory chapter outlines on one hand the historical background based on the author's 50 years of experience in this field and on the other hand emphasizes new scopes, fascinating perspectives in pharmaco-physiology, and molecular pharmacology of nociceptive sensory neurons. Evidence for the effect of capsaicin on C-polymodal nociceptors (CMH), C-mechanoinsensitive (CHMi), and silent C-nociceptors are listed and the features of the capsaicin-induced blocking effects of nociceptors are demonstrated. Common and different characteristics of nociceptor-blocking actions after systemic, perineural, local, intrathecal, and in vitro treatments are summarized. Evidence for the misleading conclusions drawn from neonatal capsaicin pretreatment is presented. Perspectives opened from cloning the capsaicin receptor "Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1" (TRPV1) are outlined and potential molecular mechanisms behind the long-lasting functional, ultrastructural, and nerve terminal-damaging effects of capsaicin and other TRPV1 agonists are summarized. Neurogenic inflammation and the long-list of "capsaicin-sensitive" tissue responses are mediated by an unorthodox dual sensory-efferent function of peptidergic TRPV1-expressing nerve terminals which differ from the classical efferent and sensory nerve endings that have a unidirectional role in neuroregulation. Thermoregulatory effects of capsaicin are discussed in detail. It is suggested that since hyperthermia and burn risk due to enhanced noxious heat threshold are the major obstacles of some TRPV1 antagonists, they could be overcome. The special "multisteric" gating function of the TRPV1 cation channel provides the structural ground for blocking chemical activation of TRPV1 without affecting its responsiveness to physical stimuli. A new chapter of potential analgesics targeting nociceptors is now already supported for pain relief in persistent pathological pain states. PMID:24941663

  6. Molecular Determinants of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) Binding to Transient Receptor Potential V1 (TRPV1) Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V.; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  7. Molecular determinants of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding to transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-23

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  8. Capsaicin may have important potential for promoting vascular and metabolic health.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the phytochemical responsible for the spiciness of peppers, has the potential to modulate metabolism via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, which are found not only on nociceptive sensory neurons, but also in a range of other tissues. TRPV1 activation induces calcium influx, and in certain tissues this is associated with increased activation or expression of key proteins such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), KLF2, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and LXR?. The calcium influx triggered by TRPV1 activation in endothelial cells mimics the impact of shear stress in this regard, activating and increasing the expression of eNOS-but also increasing expression of cox-2, thrombomodulin, and nrf2-responsive antioxidant enzymes, while decreasing expression of proinflammatory proteins. Hence, dietary capsaicin has favourably impacted endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rodents. TRPV1-mediated induction of LXR? in foam cells promotes cholesterol export, antagonising plaque formation. Capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the gastrointestinal tract promotes sympathetically mediated stimulation of brown fat, raising metabolic rate. The increased expression of UCP2 induced by TRPV1 activation exerts a protective antioxidant effect on the liver in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and on vascular endothelium in the context of hyperglycaemia. In rodent studies, capsaicin-rich diets have shown favourable effects on atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and stroke risk. Clinically, ingestion of capsaicin-or its less stable non-pungent analogue capsiate-has been shown to boost metabolic rate modestly. Topical application of capsaicin via patch was found to increase exercise time to ischaemic threshold in patients with angina. Further clinical studies with capsaicin administered in food, capsules, or via patch, are needed to establish protocols that are tolerable for most patients, and to evaluate the potential of capsaicin for promoting vascular and metabolic health. PMID:26113985

  9. Cinnamaldehyde up-regulates the mRNA expression level of TRPV1 receptor potential ion channel protein and its function in primary rat DRG neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sui, Feng; Lin, Na; Guo, Jian-You; Zhang, Chang-Bin; Du, Xin-Liang; Zhao, Bao-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Bin; Yang, Na; Li, Lan-Fang; Guo, Shu-Ying; Huo, Hai-Ru; Jiang, Ting-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (1) is a pharmacologically active ingredient isolated from cassia twig (Ramulus Cinnamomi), which is commonly used in herbal remedies to treat fever-related diseases. Both TRPV1 and TRPM8 ion channel proteins are abundantly expressed in sensory neurons, and are assumed to act as a thermosensor, with the former mediating the feeling of warmth and the latter the feeling of cold in the body. Both of them have recently been reported to be involved in thermoregulation. The purpose of this paper is to further uncover the antipyretic mechanisms of 1 by investigating its effects on the mRNA expression levels and functions of both TRPV1 and TRPM8. The results showed that 1 could up-regulate the mRNA expression levels of TRPV1 at both 37 and 39 degrees C, and its calcium-mediating function was significantly increased at 39 degrees C, all of which could not be blocked by pretreatment of the neuronal cells with ruthenium red, a general transient receptor potential (TRP) blocker, indicating that the action of 1 was achieved through a non-TRPA1 channel pathway. In conclusion, the findings in our in vitro studies might account for part of the peripheral molecular mechanisms for the antipyretic action of 1. PMID:20390747

  10. Differential regulation of proton-sensitive ion channels by phospholipids: a comparative study between ASICs and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Yu, Soo-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Protons are released in pain-generating pathological conditions such as inflammation, ischemic stroke, infection, and cancer. During normal synaptic activities, protons are thought to play a role in neurotransmission processes. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are typical proton sensors in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In addition to ASICs, capsaicin- and heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels can also mediate proton-mediated pain signaling. In spite of their importance in perception of pH fluctuations, the regulatory mechanisms of these proton-sensitive ion channels still need to be further investigated. Here, we compared regulation of ASICs and TRPV1 by membrane phosphoinositides, which are general cofactors of many receptors and ion channels. We observed that ASICs do not require membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) for their function. However, TRPV1 currents were inhibited by simultaneous breakdown of PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. By using a novel chimeric protein, CF-PTEN, that can specifically dephosphorylate at the D3 position of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3), we also observed that neither ASICs nor TRPV1 activities were altered by depletion of PI(3,4,5)P3 in intact cells. Finally, we compared the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on two proton-sensitive ion channels. We observed that AA potentiates the currents of both ASICs and TRPV1, but that they have different recovery aspects. In conclusion, ASICs and TRPV1 have different sensitivities toward membrane phospholipids, such as PI(4)P, PI(4,5)P2, and AA, although they have common roles as proton sensors. Further investigation about the complementary roles and respective contributions of ASICs and TRPV1 in proton-mediated signaling is necessary. PMID:25781982

  11. Increased GFR and Renal Excretory Function by Activation of TRPV1 in the Isolated Perfused Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianping; Wang, Donna H.

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels leads to natriuresis and diuresis via an increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), recirculating Krebs-Henseleit buffer added with inulin was perfused in the isolated perfused kidney of male Wistar rat at a constant flow, and perfusion pressures (PP) were pre-adjusted to three different levels (~100, ~150, and ~190 mmHg) with phenylephrine. Capsaicin (Cap), a selective TRPV1 agonist, was perfused in the presence or absence of capsazepine (Capz), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, CGRP837, a selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, or spantide II (Spa), a selective substance P (SP) receptor antagonist. At the higher (150 and 190 mmHg) but not baseline (100 mmHg) PP levels, Cap at 10M significantly decreased PP and increased GFR, urine flow rate (UFR) and Na+ excretion (UNaV). At the highest (190 mmHg) PP level, Cap (2, 10, 30 M) dose-dependently decreased PP and increased GFR, UFR, UNaV, and the release of CGRP and SP. Capz or CGRP837 combined with Spa fully blocked the effect of Cap on PP, GFR, UFR, UNaV, and the release of CGRP and SP. In conclusion, activation of TRPV1 in the isolated kidney decreases renal PP and increases GFR and water/sodium excretion possibly via simultaneous activation of CGRP and SP receptors upon their enhanced release, suggesting that TRPV1 plays a key role in modulating renal hemodynamics and excretory function. PMID:18329285

  12. Activation of the TRPV1 Cation Channel Contributes to Stress-Induced Astrocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Karen W.; Lambert, Wendi S.; Calkins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes provide metabolic, structural and synaptic support to neurons in normal physiology and also contribute widely to pathogenic processes in response to stress or injury. Reactive astrocytes can undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and increase migration through changes in intracellular Ca2+ mediated by a variety of potential modulators. Here we tested whether migration of isolated retinal astrocytes following mechanical injury (scratch wound) involves the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channel (TRPV1), which contributes to Ca2+-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and migration in other systems. Application of the TRPV1-specific antagonists, capsazepine (CPZ) or 5’-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), slowed migration by as much as 44%, depending on concentration. In contrast, treatment with the TRPV1-specific agonists, capsaicin (CAP) or resiniferatoxin (RTX) produced only a slight acceleration over a range of concentrations. Chelation of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA (1 mM) slowed astrocyte migration by 35%. Ratiometric imaging indicated that scratch wound induced a sharp 20% rise in astrocyte Ca2+ that dissipated with distance from the wound. Treatment with IRTX both slowed and dramatically reduced the scratch-induced Ca2+ increase. Both CPZ and IRTX influenced astrocyte cytoskeletal organization, especially near the wound edge. Taken together, our results indicate that astrocyte mobilization in response to mechanical stress involves influx of extracellular Ca2+ and cytoskeletal changes in part mediated by TRPV1 activation. PMID:24838827

  13. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein Mediates TRPV1 Thermal Hyperalgesia through PKA Phosphorylation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B.; Fehrenbacher, Jill C.; Henry, Michael; Akopian, Armen N.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    Certain phosphorylation events are tightly controlled by scaffolding proteins such as A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP). On nociceptive terminals, phosphorylation of transient receptor potential channel type 1 (TRPV1) results in the sensitization to many different stimuli, contributing to the development of hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the functional involvement of AKAP150 in mediating sensitization of TRPV1, and found that AKAP150 is co-expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons from rat and associates with TRPV1. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knock-down of AKAP150 expression led to a significant reduction in PKA phosphorylation of TRPV1 in cultured TG neurons. In CHO cells, the PKA RII binding site on AKAP was necessary for PKA enhancement of TRPV1-mediated Ca+2-accumulation. In addition, AKAP150 knock-down in cultured TG neurons attenuated PKA sensitization of TRPV1 activity and in vivo administration of an AKAP antagonist significantly reduced prostaglandin E2 sensitization to thermal stimuli. These data suggest that AKAP150 functionally regulates PKA-mediated phosphorylation/ sensitization of the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:18381233

  14. Capsaicin may have important potential for promoting vascular and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the phytochemical responsible for the spiciness of peppers, has the potential to modulate metabolism via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, which are found not only on nociceptive sensory neurons, but also in a range of other tissues. TRPV1 activation induces calcium influx, and in certain tissues this is associated with increased activation or expression of key proteins such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), KLF2, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and LXRα. The calcium influx triggered by TRPV1 activation in endothelial cells mimics the impact of shear stress in this regard, activating and increasing the expression of eNOS—but also increasing expression of cox-2, thrombomodulin, and nrf2-responsive antioxidant enzymes, while decreasing expression of proinflammatory proteins. Hence, dietary capsaicin has favourably impacted endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rodents. TRPV1-mediated induction of LXRα in foam cells promotes cholesterol export, antagonising plaque formation. Capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the gastrointestinal tract promotes sympathetically mediated stimulation of brown fat, raising metabolic rate. The increased expression of UCP2 induced by TRPV1 activation exerts a protective antioxidant effect on the liver in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and on vascular endothelium in the context of hyperglycaemia. In rodent studies, capsaicin-rich diets have shown favourable effects on atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and stroke risk. Clinically, ingestion of capsaicin—or its less stable non-pungent analogue capsiate—has been shown to boost metabolic rate modestly. Topical application of capsaicin via patch was found to increase exercise time to ischaemic threshold in patients with angina. Further clinical studies with capsaicin administered in food, capsules, or via patch, are needed to establish protocols that are tolerable for most patients, and to evaluate the potential of capsaicin for promoting vascular and metabolic health. PMID:26113985

  15. Abundant expression and functional participation of TRPV1 at Zusanli acupoint (ST36) in mice: mechanosensitive TRPV1 as an acupuncture-responding channel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a therapy that involves applying mechanical stimulation to acupoints using needles. Although acupuncture is believed to trigger neural regulation by opioids or adenosine, still little is known about how physical stimulation is turned into neurological signaling. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptors 1 and 4 (TRPV1 and TRPV4) and the acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) are regarded as mechanosensitive channels. This study aimed to clarify their role at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) and propose possible sensing pathways linking channel activation to neurological signaling. Methods First, tissues from different anatomical layers of ST36 and the sham point were sampled, and channel expressions between the two points were compared using western blotting. Second, immunofluorescence was performed at ST36 to reveal distribution pattern of the channels. Third, agonist of the channels were injected into ST36 and tested in a mouse inflammatory pain model to seek if agonist injection could replicate acupuncture-like analgesic effect. Last, the components of proposed downstream sensing pathway were tested with western blotting to determine if they were expressed in tissues with positive mechanosensitive channel expression. Results The results from western blotting demonstrated an abundance of TRPV1, TRPV4, and ASIC3 in anatomical layers of ST36. Furthermore, immunofluorescence showed these channels were expressed in both neural and non-neural cells at ST36. However, only capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, replicated the analgesic effect of acupuncture when injected into ST36. Components of calcium wave propagation (CWP, the proposed downstream sensing pathway) were also expressed in tissues with abundant TRPV1 expression, the muscle and epimysium layers. Conclusions The results demonstrated mechanosensitive channel TRPV1 is highly expressed at ST36 and possibly participated in acupuncture related analgesia. Since CWP was reported by other to occur during acupuncture and its components were shown here to express in tissues with positive TRPV1 expression. These findings suggest TRPV1 might act as acupuncture-responding channel by sensing physical stimulation from acupuncture and conducting the signaling via CWP to nerve terminals. This study provided a better understanding between physical stimulation from acupuncture to neurological signaling. PMID:24612851

  16. Genetic control of neuronal activity in mice conditionally expressing TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Klein, Marguerita E; Davison, Ian G; Katz, Lawrence C; Ehlers, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a knock-in mouse model for Cre-loxPbased conditional expression of TRPV1 in central nervous system neurons. Expression of Cre recombinase using biolistics, lentivirus or genetic intercrosses triggered heterologous expression of TRPV1 in a cell-specific manner. Application of the TRPV1 ligand capsaicin induced strong inward currents, triggered action potentials and activated stereotyped behaviors, allowing cell typespecific chemical genetic control of neuronal activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18327266

  17. Mechanisms underlying capsaicin effects in canine coronary artery: implications for coronary spasm

    PubMed Central

    Hiett, S. Christopher; Owen, Meredith K.; Li, Wennan; Chen, Xingjuan; Riley, Ashley; Noblet, Jillian; Flores, Sarah; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.; Obukhov, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The TRPV1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, agonist capsaicin is considered to be beneficial for cardiovascular health because it dilates coronary arteries through an endothelial-dependent mechanism and may slow atheroma progression. However, recent reports indicate that high doses of capsaicin may constrict coronary arterioles and even provoke myocardial infarction. Thus far, the mechanisms by which TRPV1 activation modulates coronary vascular tone remain poorly understood. This investigation examined whether there is a synergistic interplay between locally acting vasoconstrictive pro-inflammatory hormones (autacoids) and capsaicin effects in the coronary circulation. Methods and results Experiments were performed in canine conduit coronary artery rings and isolated smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Isometric tension measurements revealed that 110 ?M capsaicin alone did not affect resting tension of coronary artery rings. In contrast, in endothelium-intact rings pre-contracted with a Gq/11-coupled FP/TP (prostaglandin F/thromboxane) receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2? (PGF2?; 10 ?M), capsaicin first induced transient dilation that was followed by sustained contraction. In endothelium-denuded rings pre-contracted with PGF2? or thromboxane analogue U46619 (1 ?M, a TP receptor agonist), capsaicin induced only sustained contraction. Blockers of the TP receptor or TRPV1 significantly inhibited capsaicin effects, but these were still observed in the presence of 50 ?M nifedipine and 70 mM KCl. Capsaicin also potentiated 20 mM KCl-induced contractions. Fluorescence imaging experiments in CASMCs revealed that the Gq/11-phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+-PLC-PKC pathways are likely involved in sensitizing CASMC TRPV1 channels. Conclusion Capsaicin alone does not cause contractions in conduit canine coronary artery; however, pre-treatment with pro-inflammatory prostaglandinthromboxane agonists may unmask capsaicin's vasoconstrictive potential. PMID:24935430

  18. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor PI(4)P from the plasma membrane through Ca2+-induced phospholipase C? (PLC?) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLC? indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 or PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25670203

  19. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase C? (PLC?) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLC? indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25670203

  20. Identification of a binding motif in the S5 helix that confers cholesterol sensitivity to the TRPV1 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Jurez, Giovanni; Romero-Surez, Silvina; Nieto-Posadas, Andrs; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrs; Briggs, Margaret; McIntosh, Thomas J; Simon, Sidney A; Ladrn-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Islas, Len D; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-07-15

    The TRPV1 ion channel serves as an integrator of noxious stimuli with its activation linked to pain and neurogenic inflammation. Cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, modifies the function of several types of ion channels. Here, using measurements of capsaicin-activated currents in excised patches from TRPV1-expressing HEK cells, we show that enrichment with cholesterol, but not its diastereoisomer epicholesterol, markedly decreased wild-type rat TRPV1 currents. Substitutions in the S5 helix, rTRPV1-R579D, and rTRPV1-F582Q, decreased this cholesterol response and rTRPV1-L585I was insensitive to cholesterol addition. Two human TRPV1 variants, with different amino acids at position 585, had different responses to cholesterol with hTRPV1-Ile(585) being insensitive to this molecule. However, hTRPV1-I585L was inhibited by cholesterol addition similar to rTRPV1 with the same S5 sequence. In the absence of capsaicin, cholesterol enrichment also inhibited TRPV1 currents induced by elevated temperature and voltage. These data suggest that there is a cholesterol-binding site in TRPV1 and that the functions of TRPV1 depend on the genetic variant and membrane cholesterol content. PMID:21555515

  1. Identification of a Binding Motif in the S5 Helix That Confers Cholesterol Sensitivity to the TRPV1 Ion Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Picazo-Jurez, Giovanni; Romero-Surez, Silvina; Nieto-Posadas, Andrs; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrs; Briggs, Margaret; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Simon, Sidney A.; Ladrn-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Islas, Len D.; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The TRPV1 ion channel serves as an integrator of noxious stimuli with its activation linked to pain and neurogenic inflammation. Cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, modifies the function of several types of ion channels. Here, using measurements of capsaicin-activated currents in excised patches from TRPV1-expressing HEK cells, we show that enrichment with cholesterol, but not its diastereoisomer epicholesterol, markedly decreased wild-type rat TRPV1 currents. Substitutions in the S5 helix, rTRPV1-R579D, and rTRPV1-F582Q, decreased this cholesterol response and rTRPV1-L585I was insensitive to cholesterol addition. Two human TRPV1 variants, with different amino acids at position 585, had different responses to cholesterol with hTRPV1-Ile585 being insensitive to this molecule. However, hTRPV1-I585L was inhibited by cholesterol addition similar to rTRPV1 with the same S5 sequence. In the absence of capsaicin, cholesterol enrichment also inhibited TRPV1 currents induced by elevated temperature and voltage. These data suggest that there is a cholesterol-binding site in TRPV1 and that the functions of TRPV1 depend on the genetic variant and membrane cholesterol content. PMID:21555515

  2. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches. PMID:26812350

  3. TRPV1 expression level in isolectin B?-positive neurons contributes to mouse strain difference in cutaneous thermal nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kentaro; Ye, Yi; Viet, Chi T; Dang, Dongmin; Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-05-01

    Differential thermal nociception across inbred mouse strains has genetic determinants. Thermal nociception is largely attributed to the heat/capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1); however, the contribution of this channel to the genetics of thermal nociception has not been revealed. In this study we compared TRPV1 expression levels and electrophysiological properties in primary sensory neurons and thermal nociceptive behaviors between two (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) inbred mouse strains. Using immunofluorescence and patch-clamp physiology methods, we demonstrated that TRPV1 expression was significantly higher in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive trigeminal sensory neurons of C57BL/6 relative to BALB/c; the expression in IB4-negative neurons was similar between the strains. Furthermore, using electrophysiological cell classification (current signature method), we showed differences between the two strains in capsaicin sensitivity in IB4-positive neuronal cell types 2 and 13, which were previously reported as skin nociceptors. Otherwise electrophysiological membrane properties of the classified cell types were similar in the two mouse strains. In publicly available nocifensive behavior data and our own behavior data from the using the two mouse strains, C57BL/6 exhibited higher sensitivity to heat stimulation than BALB/c, independent of sex and anatomical location of thermal testing (the tail, hind paw, and whisker pad). The TRPV1-selective antagonist JNJ-17203212 inhibited thermal nociception in both strains; however, removing IB4-positive trigeminal sensory neurons with IB4-conjugated saporin inhibited thermal nociception on the whisker pad in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c. These results suggest that TRPV1 expression levels in IB4-positive type 2 and 13 neurons contributed to differential thermal nociception in skin of C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c. PMID:25787958

  4. Spinal 12-lipoxygenase-derived hepoxilin A3 contributes to inflammatory hyperalgesia via activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gregus, Ann M.; Doolen, Suzanne; Dumlao, Darren S.; Buczynski, Matthew W.; Takasusuki, Toshifumi; Fitzsimmons, Bethany L.; Hua, Xiao-Ying; Taylor, Bradley K.; Dennis, Edward A.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation initiates changes in spinal nociceptive processing leading to hyperalgesia. Previously, we demonstrated that among 102 lipid species detected by LC-MS/MS analysis in rat spinal cord, the most notable increases that occur after intraplantar carrageenan are metabolites of 12-lipoxygenases (12-LOX), particularly hepoxilins (HXA3 and HXB3). Thus, we examined involvement of spinal LOX enzymes in inflammatory hyperalgesia. In the current work, we found that intrathecal (IT) delivery of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevented the carrageenan-evoked increase in spinal HXB3 at doses that attenuated the associated hyperalgesia. Furthermore, IT delivery of inhibitors targeting 12-LOX (CDC, Baicalein), but not 5-LOX (Zileuton) dose-dependently attenuated tactile allodynia. Similarly, IT delivery of 12-LOX metabolites of arachidonic acid 12(S)-HpETE, 12(S)-HETE, HXA3, or HXB3 evoked profound, persistent tactile allodynia, but 12(S)-HpETE and HXA3 produced relatively modest, transient heat hyperalgesia. The pronociceptive effect of HXA3 correlated with enhanced release of Substance P from primary sensory afferents. Importantly, HXA3 triggered sustained mobilization of calcium in cells stably overexpressing TRPV1 or TRPA1 receptors and in acutely dissociated rodent sensory neurons. Constitutive deletion or antagonists of TRPV1 (AMG9810) or TRPA1 (HC030031) attenuated this action. Furthermore, pretreatment with antihyperalgesic doses of AMG9810 or HC030031 reduced spinal HXA3-evoked allodynia. These data indicate that spinal HXA3 is increased by peripheral inflammation and promotes initiation of facilitated nociceptive processing through direct activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 at central terminals. PMID:22493235

  5. Comparison of TRPA1- versus TRPV1- mediated Cough in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Brozmanova, Mariana; Mazurova, Lenka; Ru, Fei; Tatar, Milos; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-01-01

    TRPA1 receptor is activated by endogenous inflammatory mediators and exogenous pollutant molecules relevant to respiratory diseases. Previous studies have implicated TRPA1 as a drug target for antitussive therapy. Here we evaluated the relative efficacy of TRPA1 activation to evoke cough. In conscious guinea pigs the TRPA1 agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) evoked cough with a maximally effective concentration of 10mM that was abolished by the selective TRPA1 antagonist AP-18. AITC (10mM) was approximately 3-times less effective in inducing cough than capsaicin (50 ?M). Ex vivo single fiber extracellular recordings revealed that, similarly to capsaicin, AITC evoked activation in airway jugular C-fibers, but not in airway nodose A?-fibers. Consistent with the cough studies, AITC was approximately 3-times less effective than capsaicin in evoking sustained activation of the jugular C-fibers. Another TRPA1 agonist, cinnamaldehyde, was approximately twofold more effective than AITC in inducing cough. However, the cinnamaldehyde (10mM)-induced cough was only partially inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist AP-18, and was abolished by combination of AP-18 and the TRPV1 antagonist I-RTX. We conclude that in nave guinea pigs, TRPA1 activation initiates cough that is relatively modest compared to the cough initiated by TRPV1, likely due to lower efficacy of TRPA1 stimulation to induce sustained activation of airway C-fibers. PMID:22683866

  6. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. Methods In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Results Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47?=?4.438; p?=?0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2?=?3.3; p?=?0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Conclusions Although mild modulatory effects of low-flow intranasal CO2 could be seen in this human model of TRPV-1 mediated activation of nociceptive trigeminal neurons, utility is limited as observed changes in pain ratings are clinically non-significant. PMID:23574808

  7. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the nave rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  8. The differential contractile responses to capsaicin and anandamide in muscle strips isolated from the rat urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Chikashi; Kitada, Chika; Uchida, Wataru; Chancellor, Michael B.; de Groat, William C.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The contractile responses to capsaicin and anandamide, exogenous and endogenous agonists for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), respectively, were investigated in muscle strips isolated from the rat urinary bladder. Capsaicin and anandamide produced concentration-dependent contractions of the muscle strips. The contractile response induced by capsaicin disappeared within approximately 20 min. In contrast, anandamide produced contractile responses lasting at least for 30 min. Capsaicin produced additive contractile responses in anandamide-treated muscle strips. The contractile response to anandamide was attenuated, but not abolished in strips desensitized by capsaicin. The response to capsaicin was abolished in the presence of a TRPV1 antagonist, N-(4-Tertiarybutylphenyl)-4-(3-chlorphyridin-2-yl)tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carbox-amid e (BCTC), but not altered in the presence of either tetrodotoxin, atropine or indomethacin. In the presence of SR140333, a tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist or SR48968, an NK2 receptor antagonist, the response to capsaicin was attenuated. The response to anandamide was partially attenuated in the presence of ONO8130, a prostanoid EP1 receptor antagonist, URB597, a fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, BCTC, SR140333 or SR48968, and almost completely abolished by indomethacin. Neither tetrodotoxin, atropine, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, nor a cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630, had any effect on the response to anandamide. These results indicate that capsaicin produces muscle contractions by stimulating the TRPV1 receptor, followed by release of neuropeptides that can activate tachykinin NK1 and/or NK2 receptors in the bladder and that the contractile response to anandamide is mediated at least in part by activation of prostanoid EP1 receptors due to production of prostaglandins in addition to TRPV1 receptor activation. PMID:17586490

  9. Excess Nitric Oxide Activates TRPV1-Ca2+-Calpain Signaling and Promotes PEST-dependent Degradation of Liver X Receptor ?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin-Feng; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excess nitric oxide (NO) deregulates cholesterol metabolism in macrophage foam cells, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. To investigate the mechanism, we found that in macrophages, treatment with NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) or diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide induced LXR? degradation and reduced the expression of the downstream target of LXR?, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and cholesterol efflux. In addition, SNAP induced calcium (Ca2+) influx into cells, increased calpain activity and promoted the formation of calpain-LXR? complex. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain activity reversed the SNAP-induced degradation of LXR?, down-regulation of ABCA1 and impairment of cholesterol efflux in macrophages. SNAP increased the formation of calpain-LXR? complex in a Pro-Glu-Ser-Thr (PEST) motif-dependent manner. Truncation of the PEST motif in LXR? abolished the calpain-dependent proteolysis. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ by EGTA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 channel activity diminished SNAP-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+, calpain activation, LXR? degradation, ABCA1 down-regulation and impaired cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, excess NO may activate calpain via TRPV1-Ca2+ signaling and promote the recognition of calpain in the PEST motif of LXR?, thereby leading to degradation of LXR? and, ultimately, downregulated ABCA1 expression and impaired ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in macrophages. PMID:26722214

  10. Excess Nitric Oxide Activates TRPV1-Ca(2+)-Calpain Signaling and Promotes PEST-dependent Degradation of Liver X Receptor ?.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Feng; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excess nitric oxide (NO) deregulates cholesterol metabolism in macrophage foam cells, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. To investigate the mechanism, we found that in macrophages, treatment with NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) or diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide induced LXR? degradation and reduced the expression of the downstream target of LXR?, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), and cholesterol efflux. In addition, SNAP induced calcium (Ca(2+)) influx into cells, increased calpain activity and promoted the formation of calpain-LXR? complex. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain activity reversed the SNAP-induced degradation of LXR?, down-regulation of ABCA1 and impairment of cholesterol efflux in macrophages. SNAP increased the formation of calpain-LXR? complex in a Pro-Glu-Ser-Thr (PEST) motif-dependent manner. Truncation of the PEST motif in LXR? abolished the calpain-dependent proteolysis. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) by EGTA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 channel activity diminished SNAP-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+), calpain activation, LXR? degradation, ABCA1 down-regulation and impaired cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, excess NO may activate calpain via TRPV1-Ca(2+) signaling and promote the recognition of calpain in the PEST motif of LXR?, thereby leading to degradation of LXR? and, ultimately, downregulated ABCA1 expression and impaired ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in macrophages. PMID:26722214

  11. Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Amelioration of Experimental Autoimmune Hepatitis Following Activation of TRPV1 Receptors by Cannabidiol

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    Background Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are getting increased attention as one of the main regulatory cells of the immune system. They are induced at sites of inflammation and can potently suppress T cell functions. In the current study, we demonstrate how activation of TRPV1 vanilloid receptors can trigger MDSCs, which in turn, can inhibit inflammation and hepatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Polyclonal activation of T cells, following injection of concanavalin A (ConA), in C57BL/6 mice caused acute hepatitis, characterized by significant increase in aspartate transaminase (AST), induction of inflammatory cytokines, and infiltration of mononuclear cells in the liver, leading to severe liver injury. Administration of cannabidiol (CBD), a natural non-psychoactive cannabinoid, after ConA challenge, inhibited hepatitis in a dose-dependent manner, along with all of the associated inflammation markers. Phenotypic analysis of liver infiltrating cells showed that CBD-mediated suppression of hepatitis was associated with increased induction of arginase-expressing CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs. Purified CBD-induced MDSCs could effectively suppress T cell proliferation in vitro in arginase-dependent manner. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of purified MDSCs into naïve mice conferred significant protection from ConA-induced hepatitis. CBD failed to induce MDSCs and suppress hepatitis in the livers of vanilloid receptor-deficient mice (TRPV1−/−) thereby suggesting that CBD primarily acted via this receptor to induce MDSCs and suppress hepatitis. While MDSCs induced by CBD in liver consisted of granulocytic and monocytic subsets at a ratio of ∼2∶1, the monocytic MDSCs were more immunosuppressive compared to granulocytic MDSCs. The ability of CBD to induce MDSCs and suppress hepatitis was also demonstrable in Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced liver injury. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates for the first time that MDSCs play a critical role in attenuating acute inflammation in the liver, and that agents such as CBD, which trigger MDSCs through activation of TRPV1 vanilloid receptors may constitute a novel therapeutic modality to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:21483776

  12. Proton block of proton-activated TRPV1 current.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Hyun; Zheng, Jie

    2015-08-01

    The TRPV1 cation channel is a polymodal nociceptor that is activated by heat and ligands such as capsaicin and is highly sensitive to changes in extracellular pH. In the body core, where temperature is usually stable and capsaicin is normally absent, H(+) released in response to ischemia, tissue injury, or inflammation is the best-known endogenous TRPV1 agonist, activating the channel to mediate pain and vasodilation. Paradoxically, removal of H(+) elicits a transient increase in TRPV1 current that is much larger than the initial H(+)-activated current. We found that this prominent OFF response is caused by rapid recovery from H(+) inhibition of the excitatory current carried by H(+)-activated TRPV1 channels. H(+) inhibited current by interfering with ion permeation. The degree of inhibition is voltage and permeant ion dependent, and it can be affected but not eliminated by mutations to acidic residues within or near the ion selectivity filter. The opposing H(+)-mediated gating and permeation effects produce complex current responses under different cellular conditions that are expected to greatly affect the response of nociceptive neurons and other TRPV1-expressing cells. PMID:26170176

  13. Proton block of proton-activated TRPV1 current

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The TRPV1 cation channel is a polymodal nociceptor that is activated by heat and ligands such as capsaicin and is highly sensitive to changes in extracellular pH. In the body core, where temperature is usually stable and capsaicin is normally absent, H+ released in response to ischemia, tissue injury, or inflammation is the best-known endogenous TRPV1 agonist, activating the channel to mediate pain and vasodilation. Paradoxically, removal of H+ elicits a transient increase in TRPV1 current that is much larger than the initial H+-activated current. We found that this prominent OFF response is caused by rapid recovery from H+ inhibition of the excitatory current carried by H+-activated TRPV1 channels. H+ inhibited current by interfering with ion permeation. The degree of inhibition is voltage and permeant ion dependent, and it can be affected but not eliminated by mutations to acidic residues within or near the ion selectivity filter. The opposing H+-mediated gating and permeation effects produce complex current responses under different cellular conditions that are expected to greatly affect the response of nociceptive neurons and other TRPV1-expressing cells. PMID:26170176

  14. Different types of toxins targeting TRPV1 in pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2013-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1) channels are members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily. Members of this family are expressed in primary sensory neurons and are best known for their role in nociception and sensory transmission. Multiple painful stimuli can activate these channels. In this review, we discussed the mechanisms of different types of venoms that target TRPV1, such as scorpion venom, botulinum neurotoxin, spider toxin, ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Some of these toxins activate TRPV1; however, some do not. Regardless of TRPV1 inhibition or activation, they occur through different pathways. For example, BoNT/A decreases TRPV1 expression levels by blocking TRPV1 trafficking to the plasma membrane, although the exact mechanism is still under debate. Vanillotoxins from tarantula (Psalmopoeus cambridgei) are proposed to activate TRPV1 via interaction with a region of TRPV1 that is homologous to voltage-dependent ion channels. Here, we offer a description of the present state of knowledge for this complex subject. PMID:23732125

  15. Differential regulation of TRPV1 channels by H2O2: implications for diabetic microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    DelloStritto, Daniel J; Connell, Patrick J; Dick, Gregory M; Fancher, Ibra S; Klarich, Brittany; Fahmy, Joseph N; Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Damron, Derek S; Thodeti, Charles K; Bratz, Ian N

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated previously that TRPV1-dependent coupling of coronary blood flow (CBF) to metabolism is disrupted in diabetes. A critical amount of H2O2 contributes to CBF regulation; however, excessive H2O2 impairs responses. We sought to determine the extent to which differential regulation of TRPV1 by H2O2 modulates CBF and vascular reactivity in diabetes. We used contrast echocardiography to study TRPV1 knockout (V1KO), db/db diabetic, and wild type C57BKS/J (WT) mice. H2O2 dose-dependently increased CBF in WT mice, a response blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. H2O2-induced vasodilation was significantly inhibited in db/db and V1KO mice. H2O2 caused robust SB366791-sensitive dilation in WT coronary microvessels; however, this response was attenuated in vessels from db/db and V1KO mice, suggesting H2O2-induced vasodilation occurs, in part, via TRPV1. Acute H2O2 exposure potentiated capsaicin-induced CBF responses and capsaicin-mediated vasodilation in WT mice, whereas prolonged luminal H2O2 exposure blunted capsaicin-induced vasodilation. Electrophysiology studies re-confirms acute H2O2 exposure activated TRPV1 in HEK293A and bovine aortic endothelial cells while establishing that H2O2 potentiate capsaicin-activated TRPV1 currents, whereas prolonged H2O2 exposure attenuated TRPV1 currents. Verification of H2O2-mediated activation of intrinsic TRPV1 specific currents were found in isolated mouse coronary endothelial cells from WT mice and decreased in endothelial cells from V1KO mice. These data suggest prolonged H2O2 exposure impairs TRPV1-dependent coronary vascular signaling. This may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue perfusion deficits characteristic of diabetes. PMID:26907473

  16. Camphor activates and strongly desensitizes the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channel in a vanilloid-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haoxing; Blair, Nathaniel T; Clapham, David E

    2005-09-28

    Camphor is a naturally occurring compound that is used as a major active ingredient of balms and liniments supplied as topical analgesics. Despite its long history of common medical use, the underlying molecular mechanism of camphor action is not understood. Capsaicin and menthol, two other topically applied agents widely used for similar purposes, are known to excite and desensitize sensory nerves by acting on two members of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily: heat-sensitive TRP vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) and cold-sensitive TRP channel M8, respectively. Camphor has recently been shown to activate TRPV3, and here we show that camphor also activates heterologously expressed TRPV1, requiring higher concentrations than capsaicin. Activation was enhanced by phospholipase C-coupled receptor stimulation mimicking inflamed conditions. Similar camphor-activated TRPV1-like currents were observed in isolated rat DRG neurons and were strongly potentiated after activation of protein kinase C with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Camphor activation of rat TRPV1 was mediated by distinct channel regions from capsaicin, as indicated by camphor activation in the presence of the competitive inhibitor capsazepine and in a capsaicin-insensitive point mutant. Camphor did not activate the capsaicin-insensitive chicken TRPV1. TRPV1 desensitization is believed to contribute to the analgesic actions of capsaicin. We found that, although camphor activates TRPV1 less effectively, camphor application desensitized TRPV1 more rapidly and completely than capsaicin. Conversely, TRPV3 current sensitized after repeated camphor applications, which is inconsistent with the analgesic role of camphor. We also found that camphor inhibited several other related TRP channels, including ankyrin-repeat TRP 1 (TRPA1). The camphor-induced desensitization of TRPV1 and block of TRPA1 may underlie the analgesic effects of camphor. PMID:16192383

  17. ?Amyloid exacerbates inflammation in astrocytes lacking fatty acid amide hydrolase through a mechanism involving PPAR-?, PPAR-? and TRPV1, but not CB1 or CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Cristina; Toln, Rosa Mara; Castillo, Ana Isabel; Ruiz-Valdepeas, Lourdes; Martnez-Orgado, Jos Antonio; Fernndez-Snchez, Francisco Javier; Vzquez, Carmen; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Romero, Julin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The endocannabinoid system may regulate glial cell functions and their responses to pathological stimuli, specifically, Alzheimer's disease. One experimental approach is the enhancement of endocannabinoid tone by blocking the activity of degradative enzymes, such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We examined the role of FAAH in the response of astrocytes to the pathologic form of ?-amyloid (A?). Astrocytes from wild-type mice (WT) and from mice lacking FAAH (FAAH-KO) were incubated with A? for 8, 24 and 48 h, and their inflammatory responses were quantified by elisa, western-blotting and real-time quantitative-PCR. KEY RESULTS FAAH-KO astrocytes were significantly more responsive to A? than WT astrocytes, as shown by the higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Expression of COX-2, inducible NOS and TNF-? was also increased in A?-exposed KO astrocytes compared with that in WTs. These effects were accompanied by a differential pattern of activation of signalling cascades involved in mediating inflammatory responses, such as ERK1/2, p38MAPK and NF? B. PPAR-? and PPAR-? as well as transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), but not cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors, mediate some of the differential changes observed in A?-exposed FAAH-KO astrocytes. The pharmacological blockade of FAAH did not render astrocytes more sensitive to A?. In contrast, exogenous addition of several acylethanolamides (anandamide, palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide) induced an antiinflammatory response. CONCLUSIONS The genetic deletion of FAAH in astrocytes exacerbated their inflammatory phenotype against A? in a process involving PPAR-?, PPAR-? and TRPV1 receptors. PMID:22321194

  18. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx

    PubMed Central

    Kichko, Tatjana I.; Kobal, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1−/− and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 μM), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1−/− and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research. PMID:26472811

  19. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2015-10-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1(-/-) and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 ?M), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1(-/-) and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research. PMID:26472811

  20. Oncostatin M induces heat hypersensitivity by gp130-dependent sensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family and regulates eg. gene activation, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. OSM binds to a receptor complex consisting of the ubiquitously expressed signal transducer gp130 and the ligand binding OSM receptor subunit, which is expressed on a specific subset of primary afferent neurons. In the present study, the effect of OSM on heat nociception was investigated in nociceptor-specific gp130 knock-out (SNS-gp130-/-) and gp130 floxed (gp130fl/fl) mice. Subcutaneous injection of pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of OSM into the hind-paw of C57BL6J wild type mice significantly reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat stimulation. In contrast to gp130fl/fl mice, OSM did not induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo in SNS-gp130-/- mice. OSM applied at the receptive fields of sensory neurons in in vitro skin-nerve preparations showed that OSM significantly increased the discharge rate during a standard ramp-shaped heat stimulus. The capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, expressed on a subpopulation of nociceptive neurons, has been shown to play an important role in inflammation-induced heat hypersensitivity. Stimulation of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons with OSM resulted in potentiation of capsaicin induced ionic currents. In line with these recordings, mice with a null mutation of the TRPV1 gene did not show any signs of OSM-induced heat hypersensitivity in vivo. The present data suggest that OSM induces thermal hypersensitivity by directly sensitizing nociceptors via OSMR-gp130 receptor mediated potentiation of TRPV1. PMID:22196363

  1. Role of thermo TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in heat, cold, and mechanical nociception of rats.

    PubMed

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnazi; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive response of the nervous system to changes in temperature is of predominant importance for homeotherms to maintain a stable body temperature. A number of temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have been studied as nociceptors that respond to extreme temperatures and harmful chemicals. Recent findings in the field of pain have established a family of six thermo-TRP channels (TRPA1, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4) that exhibit sensitivity to increases or decreases in temperature, as well as to chemical substances eliciting the respective hot or cold sensations. In this study, we used behavioral methods to investigate whether mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) and capsaicin affect the sensitivity to heat, innocuous and noxious cold, and mechanical stimuli in male rats. The results obtained indicate that TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are clearly involved in pain reactions, and the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate enhances the heat pain sensitivity, possibly by indirectly modulating TRPV1 channels coexpressed in nociceptors with TRPA1. Overall, our data support the role of thermosensitive TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in pain modulation and show that these two thermoreceptor channels are in a synergistic and/or conditional relationship with noxious heat and cold cutaneous stimulation. PMID:26274042

  2. TGF-β1 sensitizes TRPV1 through Cdk5 signaling in odontoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Odontoblasts are specialized cells that form dentin and they are believed to be sensors for tooth pain. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed early in odontoblasts, plays an important role in the immune response during tooth inflammation and infection. TGF-β1 is also known to participate in pain signaling by regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in nociceptive neurons of the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. However, the precise role of TGF-β1 in tooth pain signaling is not well characterized. The aim of our present study was to determine whether or not in odontoblasts Cdk5 is functionally active, if it is regulated by TGF-β1, and if it affects the downstream pain receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). Results We first determined that Cdk5 and p35 are indeed expressed in an odontoblast-enriched primary preparation from murine teeth. For the subsequent analysis, we used an odontoblast-like cell line (MDPC-23) and found that Cdk5 is functionally active in these cells and its kinase activity is upregulated during cell differentiation. We found that TGF-β1 treatment potentiated Cdk5 kinase activity in undifferentiated MDPC-23 cells. SB431542, a specific inhibitor of TGF-β1 receptor 1 (Tgfbr1), when co-administered with TGF-β1, blocked the induction of Cdk5 activity. TGF-β1 treatment also activated the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, causing an increase in early growth response-1 (Egr-1), a transcription factor that induces p35 expression. In MDPC-23 cells transfected with TRPV1, Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 was significantly increased after TGF-β1 treatment. In contrast, SB431542 co-treatment blocked TRPV1 phosphorylation. Moreover, TGF-β1 treatment enhanced both proton- and capsaicin-induced Ca2+ influx in TRPV1-expressing MDPC-23 cells, while co-treatment with either SB431542 or roscovitine blocked this effect. Conclusions Cdk5 and p35 are expressed in a murine odontoblast-enriched primary preparation of cells from teeth. Cdk5 is also functionally active in odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. TGF-β1 sensitizes TRPV1 through Cdk5 signaling in MDPC-23 cells, suggesting the direct involvement of odontoblasts and Cdk5 in dental nociceptive pain transduction. PMID:23668392

  3. Functional expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in rat vestibular ganglia.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Takefumi; Ishida, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yukiko; Yamada, Takahiro; Kitahara, Tadashi; Takimoto, Yasumitsu; Horii, Arata; Uno, Atsuhiko; Imai, Takao; Okazaki, Suzuyo; Inohara, Hidenori; Shimada, Shoichi

    2013-09-27

    Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are non-selective cation channels. They are co-expressed, and interact in sensory neurons such as dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG), and are involved in nociception, being activated by nociceptive stimuli. Immunohistological localization of TRPV1 in vestibular ganglion (VG) neurons has been reported. Although TRPA1 is co-expressed with TRPV1 in DRG and TG neurons, it is unclear whether TRPA1 channels are expressed in VG neurons. Moreover, it is unknown whether TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels are functional in VG neurons. We investigated the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in rat VG neurons by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and Ca(2+) imaging experiments. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 RT-PCR products were amplified from the mRNA of rat VG neurons. In situ hybridization experiments showed TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression in the majority of VG neurons. Immunohistochemistry experiments confirmed TRPV1 protein expression. In Ca(2+) imaging experiments, capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, induced a significant increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in rat primary cultured VG neurons, which was almost completely blocked by capsazepine, a TRPV1-specific antagonist. Cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, also caused an increase in [Ca(2+)]i, which was completely inhibited by HC030031, a TRPA1-specific antagonist. Moreover, in some VG neurons, a [Ca(2+)]i increase was evoked by both capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde in the same neuron. In summary, our histological and physiological studies reveal that TRPV1 and TRPA1 are expressed in VG neurons. It is suggested that TRPV1 and TRPA1 in VG neurons might participate in vestibular function and/or dysfunction such as vertigo. PMID:23916509

  4. CT-guided injection of a TRPV1 agonist around dorsal root ganglia decreases pain transmission in swine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jacob D; Saeed, Maythem; Do, Loi; Braz, Joao; Basbaum, Allan I; Iadarola, Michael J; Wilson, David M; Dillon, William P

    2015-09-16

    One approach to analgesia is to block pain at the site of origin or along the peripheral pathway by selectively ablating pain-transmitting neurons or nerve terminals directly. The heat/capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) expressed by nociceptive neurons is a compelling target for selective interventional analgesia because it leaves somatosensory and proprioceptive neurons intact. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), like capsaicin, is a TRPV1 agonist but has greater potency. We combine RTX-mediated inactivation with the precision of computed tomography (CT)-guided delivery to ablate peripheral pain fibers in swine. Under CT guidance, RTX was delivered unilaterally around the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and vehicle only was administered to the contralateral side. During a 4-week observation period, animals demonstrated delayed or absent withdrawal responses to infrared laser heat stimuli delivered to sensory dermatomes corresponding to DRG receiving RTX treatment. Motor function was unimpaired as assessed by disability scoring and gait analysis. In treated DRG, TRPV1 mRNA expression was reduced, as were nociceptive neuronal perikarya in ganglia and their nerve terminals in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. CT guidance to precisely deliver RTX to sites of peripheral pain transmission in swine may be an approach that could be tailored to block an array of clinical pain conditions in patients. PMID:26378245

  5. Nicotinic acid is a common regulator of heat-sensing TRPV1-4 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA, a.k.a. vitamin B3 or niacin) can reduce blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins whereas increase high-density lipoproteins. However, when NA is used to treat dyslipidemias, it causes a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly called flushing. A recent study showed that NA may cause flushing by lowering activation threshold temperature of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel, leading to its activation at body temperature. The finding calls into question whether NA might also interact with the homologous heat-sensitive TRPV2-4 channels, particularly given that TRPV3 and TRPV4 are abundantly expressed in keratinocytes of the skin where much of the flushing response occurs. We found that NA indeed potentiated TRPV3 while inhibited TRPV2 and TRPV4. Consistent with these gating effects, NA lowered the heat-activation threshold of TRPV3 but elevated that of TRPV4. We further found that activity of TRPV1 was substantially prolonged by extracellular NA, which may further enhance the direct activation effect. Consistent with the broad gating effect on TRPV1-4 channels, evidence from the present study hints that NA may share the same activation pathway as 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common agonist for these TRPV channels. These findings shed new light on the molecular mechanism underlying NA regulation of TRPV channels. PMID:25752528

  6. Unravelling the Mystery of Capsaicin: A Tool to Understand and Treat Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Christina; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Nilsson, Matias; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of pharmacological studies have used capsaicin as a tool to activate many physiological systems, with an emphasis on pain research but also including functions such as the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, and the urinary tract. Understanding the actions of capsaicin led to the discovery its receptor, transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), part of the superfamily of TRP receptors, sensing external events. This receptor is found on key fine sensory afferents, and so the use of capsaicin to selectively activate pain afferents has been exploited in animal studies, human psychophysics, and imaging studies. Its effects depend on the dose and route of administration and may include sensitization, desensitization, withdrawal of afferent nerve terminals, or even overt death of afferent fibers. The ability of capsaicin to generate central hypersensitivity has been valuable in understanding the consequences and mechanisms behind enhanced central processing of pain. In addition, capsaicin has been used as a therapeutic agent when applied topically, and antagonists of the TRPV1 receptor have been developed. Overall, the numerous uses for capsaicin are clear; hence, the rationale of this review is to bring together and discuss the different types of studies that exploit these actions to shed light upon capsaicin working both as a tool to understand pain but also as a treatment for chronic pain. This review will discuss the various actions of capsaicin and how it lends itself to these different purposes. PMID:23023032

  7. Novel endogenous N-acyl amides activate TRPV1-4 receptors, BV-2 microglia, and are regulated in brain in an acute model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raboune, Siham; Stuart, Jordyn M.; Leishman, Emma; Takacs, Sara M.; Rhodes, Brandon; Basnet, Arjun; Jameyfield, Evan; McHugh, Douglas; Widlanski, Theodore; Bradshaw, Heather B.

    2014-01-01

    A family of endogenous lipids, structurally analogous to the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (Anandamide), and called N-acyl amides have emerged as a family of biologically active compounds at TRP receptors. N-acyl amides are constructed from an acyl group and an amine via an amide bond. This same structure can be modified by changing either the fatty acid or the amide to form potentially hundreds of lipids. More than 70 N-acyl amides have been identified in nature. We have ongoing studies aimed at isolating and characterizing additional members of the family of N-acyl amides in both central and peripheral tissues in mammalian systems. Here, using a unique in-house library of over 70 N-acyl amides we tested the following three hypotheses: (1) Additional N-acyl amides will have activity at TRPV1-4, (2) Acute peripheral injury will drive changes in CNS levels of N-acyl amides, and (3) N-acyl amides will regulate calcium in CNS-derived microglia. Through these studies, we have identified 20 novel N-acyl amides that collectively activate (stimulating or inhibiting) TRPV1-4. Using lipid extraction and HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry we showed that levels of at least 10 of these N-acyl amides that activate TRPVs are regulated in brain after intraplantar carrageenan injection. We then screened the BV2 microglial cell line for activity with this N-acyl amide library and found overlap with TRPV receptor activity as well as additional activators of calcium mobilization from these lipids. Together these data provide new insight into the family of N-acyl amides and their roles as signaling molecules at ion channels, in microglia, and in the brain in the context of inflammation. PMID:25136293

  8. Role of TRPV1 in the Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhichao; Wong, Chun-Kit; So, Chun; Lo, Iek-Chi; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Tsang, Suk-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is an important signal that regulates cardiomyocyte differentiation during cardiogenesis. TRPV1 is a Ca2+-permeable channel that is expressed in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, we utilized mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs) as a model to investigate the functional role of TRPV1 in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Induction of embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes was achieved using embryoid body (EB)-based differentiation method. Quantitative PCRs showed an increased TRPV1 expression during the differentiation process. In [Ca2+]i measurement study, application of TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and camphor, elicited a [Ca2+]i rise in mESC-CMs, the effect of which was abolished by TRPV1-shRNA. In functional study, treatment of EBs with TRPV1 antagonists (capsazepine and SB366791) and TRPV1-shRNA reduced the size of the EBs and decreased the percentage of spontaneously beating EBs. TRPV1 antagonists and TRPV1-shRNA also suppressed the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes, including cardiac actin, c-TnT, c-TnI, and ?-MHC. Taken together, this study demonstrated an important functional role of TRPV1 channels in the differentiation of mESCs into cardiomyocytes. PMID:26208267

  9. Ethanol contributes to neurogenic pancreatitis by activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.; Shahid, Rafiq A.; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major cause of pancreatitis in people, but the mechanism is unknown. It has been recently demonstrated that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activation causes neurogenic inflammation and plays an important role in acute pancreatitis. Moreover, TRPV1 is activated by ethanol. We examined the direct effects of ethanol on acute pancreatitis. Acute inflammation of the pancreas was produced by injection of ethanol and palmitoleic acid (POA), a nonoxidative metabolite of ethanol, in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and Trpv1-knockout C57BL/6J mice. Inflammatory indexes were analyzed 24 h later. Injection of ethanol + POA produced acute pancreatitis indicated by significant increases in histopathological damage, serum amylase levels, and pancreatic MPO concentrations (P<0.050.001). All parameters of pancreatitis were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist drug AMG9810. In addition, ethanol + POA administration to Trpv1knockout mice did not produce pancreatic inflammation. Treatment with vehicle, ethanol alone, or POA alone had no inflammatory effects. TRPV1 partially mediates inflammation induced by ethanol + POA in the mouse pancreas, consistent with the ability of ethanol to activate TRPV1. We propose that ethanol may contribute to alcohol-induced pancreatitis by a neurogenic mechanism.Vigna, S. R., Shahid, R. A., and Liddle, R. A. Ethanol contributes to neurogenic pancreatitis by activation of TRPV1. PMID:24221085

  10. Interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1: Synergy on pulmonary sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Khosravi, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors are co-expressed in vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Because both these ligand-gated non-selective cation channels are sensitive to a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators, it is highly probable that they can be activated simultaneously during airway inflammation. Studies were carried out to investigate whether there is an interaction between these two polymodal transducers upon simultaneous activation, and how it modulates the activity of vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Our studies showed a distinct potentiating effect induced abruptly by simultaneous activations of TRPA1 and TRPV1 by their respective selective agonists, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and capsaicin (Cap), at near-threshold concentrations. This synergistic effect was demonstrated in the studies of single-unit recording of vagal bronchopulmonary C-fiber afferents and the reflex responses elicited by activation of these afferents in intact animals, as well as in the isolated nodose and jugular bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. This potentiating effect was absent when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, the synergism was dependent upon the extracellular Ca(2+), and the rapid onset of the action further suggests that the interaction probably occurred locally at the sites of these channels. These findings suggest that the TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play an important role in regulating the function and excitability of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammation, but the mechanism underlying this positive interaction is not yet fully understood. PMID:26283426

  11. TRPV1, TRPA1, and CB1 in the isolated vagus nerve--axonal chemosensitivity and control of neuropeptide release.

    PubMed

    Weller, K; Reeh, P W; Sauer, S K

    2011-12-01

    Vagal sensory afferents innervating airways and abdominal tissues express TRPV1 and TRPA1, two depolarizing calcium permeable ion channels playing a major role in sensing environmental irritants and endogenous metabolites which cause neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation. Here we have studied axonal chemosensitivity and control of neuropeptide release from the isolated rat and mouse vagus nerve by using prototypical agonists of these transduction channels - capsaicin, mustard oil and the specific endogenous activators, anandamide (methyl arachidonyl ethanolamide, mAEA), and acrolein, respectively. Capsaicin evoked iCGRP release from the rat vagus nerve with an EC?? of 0.12 ?M. Co-application of mAEA had a dual effect: nanomolar concentrations of mAEA (0.01 ?M) significantly reduced capsaicin-evoked iCGRP release while concentrations ? 1 ?M mAEA had sensitizing effects. Only 100 ?M mAEA directly augmented iCGRP release by itself. In the mouse, 310 ?M mAEA increased release in wildtype and TRPA1-/- mice which could be inhibited by capsazepine (10 ?M) and was completely absent in TRPV1-/- mice. CB1-/- and CB1/CB2 double -/- mice equally displayed increased sensitivity to mAEA (100 ?M) and a sensitizing effect to capsaicin, in contrast to wildtypes. Acrolein and mustard oil (MO)--at ?M concentrations--induced a TRPA1-dependent iCGRP release; however, millimolar concentrations of mustard oil (>1mM) evoked iCGRP release by activating TRPV1, confirming recent evidence for TRPV1 agonism of high mustard oil concentrations. Taken together, we present evidence for functional expression of excitatory TRPV1, TRPA1, and inhibitory CB1 receptors along the sensory fibers of the vagus nerve which lend pathophysiological relevance to the axonal membrane and the control of neuropeptide release that may become important in cases of inflammation or neuropathy. Sensitization and possible ectopic discharge may contribute to the development of autonomic dysregulation in visceral tissues that are innervated by the vagus nerve. PMID:21868092

  12. Capsaicin Induces Brite Phenotype in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baboota, Ritesh K.; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Sarma, Siddhartha M.; Kaur, Jaspreet; Sandhir, Rajat; Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi K.; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Targeting the energy storing white adipose tissue (WAT) by pharmacological and dietary means in order to promote its conversion to energy expending brite cell type holds promise as an anti-obesity approach. Present study was designed to investigate/revisit the effect of capsaicin on adipogenic differentiation with special reference to induction of brite phenotype during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods Multiple techniques such as Ca2+ influx assay, Oil Red-O staining, nutrigenomic analysis in preadipocytes and matured adipocytes have been employed to understand the effect of capsaicin at different doses. In addition to in-vitro experiments, in-vivo studies were carried out in high-fat diet (HFD) fed rats treated with resiniferatoxin (RTX) (a TRPV1 agonist) and in mice administered capsaicin. Results TRPV1 channels are expressed in preadipocytes but not in adipocytes. In preadipocytes, both capsaicin and RTX stimulate Ca2+ influx in dose-dependent manner. This stimulation may be prevented by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist. At lower doses, capsaicin inhibits lipid accumulation and stimulates TRPV1 gene expression, while at higher doses it enhances accumulation of lipids and suppresses expression of its receptor. In doses of 0.1100 M, capsaicin promotes expression of major pro-adipogenic factor PPAR? and some of its downstream targets. In concentrations of 1 M, capsaicin up-regulates anti-adipogenic genes. Low-dose capsaicin treatment of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiating into adipocytes results in increased expression of brown fat cell marker genes. In white adipose of mice, capsaicin administration leads to increase in browning-specific genes. Global TRPV1 ablation (i.p. by RTX administration) leads to increase in locomotor activity with no change in body weight. Conclusion Our findings suggest the dual modulatory role of capsaicin in adipogenesis. Capsaicin inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 via TRPV1 activation and induces brown-like phenotype whereas higher doses. PMID:25072597

  13. Role of calcium ions in the positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    Both transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are abundantly expressed in bronchopulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves and can be activated by a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators. A recent study has reported a synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations in vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents in anesthetized rats, but its underlying mechanism was not known. This study aimed to characterize a possible interaction between these two TRP channels and to investigate the potential role of Ca(2+) as a mediator of this interaction in isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Using the perforated patch-clamp recording technique, our study demonstrated a distinct positive interaction occurring abruptly between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously by their respective agonists, capsaicin (Cap) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), at near-threshold concentrations in these neurons. AITC at this low concentration evoked only minimal or undetectable responses, but it markedly amplified the Cap-evoked current in the same neurons. This potentiating effect was eliminated when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) was removed from the extracellular solution, the synergistic effect of Cap and AITC on pulmonary sensory neurons was completely abrogated, clearly indicating a critical role of Ca(2+) in mediating the action. These results suggest that this TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play a part in regulating the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammatory reaction. PMID:25858491

  14. Neuroprotection induced by N-acetylcysteine against cytosolic glutathione depletion-induced Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice: role of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Ciğ, B; Ozgül, C

    2013-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are thiol-containing antioxidants, and also act through a direct reaction with free radicals. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is the principal transduction channel serving as a polymodal detector. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in pain sensitivity, its role in TRPV1 modulation is poorly understood. NAC may also have a regulator role on TRPV1 channel activity in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. Therefore, we tested the effects of GSH and NAC on TRPV1 channel current, Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and caspase activity in the DRG of mice. DRG neurons were freshly isolated from mice and the neurons were incubated for 6 and 24h with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Pretreatment of cultured DRG neurons with NAC, results in a protection against oxidative damages. This neuroprotection is associated with the attenuation of a Ca(2+) influx triggered by oxidative agents such as H2O2, 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and GSH depletion via BSO. Here, we demonstrate the contribution of cytosolic factors (related to thiol group depletion) on the activation of TRPV1 channels in this mechanism. TRPV1 channels are activated by various agents including capsaicin (CAP), the pungent component of hot chili peppers, and are blocked by capsazepine. An oxidative environment also increased CAP-evoked TRPV1 currents in the neurons. When NAC and GSH were included in the patch pipette as well as extracellularly in the chamber, TRPV1 channels were not activated by CAP and H2O2. TRPV1 inhibitors, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid strongly reduced BSO-induced oxidative toxicity and Ca(2+) influx, in a manner similar to pretreatment with NAC and GSH. Caspase-3 and -9 activities of all groups were not changed by the agonists or antagonists. In conclusion, in our experimental model, TRPV1 channels are involved in the oxidative stress-induced neuronal death, and negative modulation of this channel activity by GSH and NAC pretreatment may account for their neuroprotective activity against oxidative stress. PMID:23545271

  15. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  16. Phenotyping the function of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons by targeted axonal silencing.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirs, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W; Bean, Bruce P; Woolf, Clifford J

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1(+) afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1(+) sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1(+) axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  17. Role of TRPV1 in renal hemodynamics and function in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianping; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that dysfunction of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels occurs and contributes to the decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and sodium/water excretion in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats. Recirculating Krebs-Henseleit buffer added with inulin was perfused at a constant flow in the isolated kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) or Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats fed a high salt (HS) or low salt (LS) diet for three weeks. Perfusion pressures (PP) were pre-adjusted to three levels (~100, ~150, ~190 mmHg) with or without phenylephrine. Capsaicin (Cap), a selective TRPV1 agonist, in the presence or absence of capsazepine (Capz), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, was perfused. Basal GFR, urine flow rate (UFR) and Na+ excretion (UNaV) were significantly lower in DS-HS than in DR-HS, DS-LS and DR-LS rats. Cap caused pressure-dependent decreases in PP and increases in GFR, UFR and UNaV in all groups, with less magnitude of decreases in PP and increases in GFR, UFR and UNaV in DS-HS than in DR-HS, DS-LS and DR-LS rats. Capz fully blocked the effect of Cap on PP, GFR, UFR and UNaV in all groups. Thus, these results show that TRPV1 function is impaired in the kidney of DS rats fed a high salt diet, which may contribute to the decrease in GFR and renal excretory function in DS rats in face of salt challenge. PMID:18403445

  18. Capsaicin-sensitive cough receptors in lower airway are responsible for cough hypersensitivity in patients with upper airway cough syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Xu, Xianghuai; Wang, Lan; Yang, Zhongmin; L, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Background Cough hypersensitivity may be related to the pathogenesis of upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive cough receptors on the laryngopharynx and lower airway in the cough hypersensitivity of patients with UACS. Material/Methods 59 patients with UACS, 33 patients with rhinitis/sinusitis without cough, and 39 healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. Cough threshold C5, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin required for the induction of ?5 coughs upon esposure to capsaicin, were determined at baseline and after laryngopharngeal anesthesia with lidocaine in all the subjects. After induced sputum cytology, the concentrations of histamine, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGPR) in the induced sputum were measured by ELISA. In 15 patients with UACS, sputum cytology and measurement of the above mediators were repeated after successful therapy. Results C5 response to capsaicin was significantly lower in the UACS group than in the rhinitis/sinusitis group and healthy control groups [3.9 (0.98, 7.8) ?mol/L vs. 7.8 (3.9, 93.75) ?mol/L vs. 31.2 (15.6, 62.5) ?mol/L, H=40.12, P=0.000]. Laryngopharngeal anesthesia with lidocaine dramatically increased C5 to capsaicin in the subjects of all 3 groups by a similar degree, but the increase in the UACS group was still the lowest, with an increased level of histamine, PGE2, and CGRP in the induced sputum. When cough resolved with the treatment of cetirizine alone or in combination with erythromycin, the levels of CGRP and histamine in the induced sputum decreased significantly in 15 patients with UACS, with no obvious change in cell differential or concentration of PGE2 in the induced sputum. Conclusions Laryngeal TRPV1 plays an important role in cough sensitivity, but sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive cough receptors in the lower airway may be more responsible for the cough hypersensitivity in patients with UACS. PMID:24296694

  19. Allyl isothiocyanate sensitizes TRPV1 to heat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Gees, Maarten; Sanchez, Alicia; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2014-03-01

    The powerful plant-derived irritant allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, aka mustard oil) induces hyperalgesia to heat in rodents and humans through mechanisms that are not yet fully understood. It is generally believed that AITC activates the broadly tuned chemosensory cation channel transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A member 1 (TRPA1), triggering an inflammatory response that sensitizes the heat sensor transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In the view of recent data demonstrating that AITC can directly activate TRPV1, we here explored the possibility that this compound sensitizes TRPV1 to heat stimulation in a TRPA1-independent manner. Patch-clamp recordings and intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments in HEK293T cells over-expressing mouse TRPV1 revealed that the increase in channel activation induced by heating is larger in the presence of AITC than in control conditions. The analysis of the effects of AITC and heat on the current-voltage relationship of TRPV1 indicates that the mechanism of sensitization is based on additive shifts of the voltage dependence of activation towards negative voltages. Finally, intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments in mouse sensory neurons isolated from Trpa1 KO mice yielded that AITC enhances the response to heat, specifically in the subpopulation expressing TRPV1. Furthermore, this effect was strongly reduced by the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine and virtually absent in neurons isolated from double Trpa1/Trpv1 KO mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that TRPV1 is a locus for cross sensitization between AITC and heat in sensory neurons and may help explaining, at least in part, the role of this channel in AITC-induced hyperalgesia to heat. PMID:23955021

  20. TRPV1 expression in acupuncture points: response to electroacupuncture stimulation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Therese S; Chen, Ming-Liang; Ma, Sheng-Xing

    2011-04-01

    The present study was to examine the distribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor immunoreactivity in the acupuncture points (acupoint), and determine the influences of electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation on TRPV1 expression. EA stimulation of BL 40 was conducted in two sessions of 20 min separated by an 80 min interval in anesthetized rats. Sections of skin containing BL 40, and its non-meridian control were examined by immunolabeling with antibodies directed against TRPV1. Without EA, the number of subepidermal nerve fibers expressing TRPV1 was higher in the acupoint than in non-acupoint control skin (p<0.01). The subepidermal nerve fibers showed the co-localization of TRPV1 with peripherine, a marker for the C-fibers and A-? fibers. The expression of TRPV1 in nerve fibers is significantly increased by EA stimulation in acupoints (p<0.01). However the upregulation in the non acupoint meridian and the non-meridian control skin was short of statistical significance. Double immunostaining of TRPV1 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) revealed their co-localization in both the subepidermal nerve fibers and in the dermal connective tissue cells. These results show that a high expression of TRPV1 endowed with nNOS in subepidermal nerve fibers exists in the acupoints and the expression is increased by EA. We conclude that the higher expression of TRPV1 in the subepidermal nerve fibers and its upregulation after EA stimulation may play a key role in mediating the transduction of EA signals to the CNS, and its expression in the subepidermal connective tissue cells may play a role in conducting the local effect of the EA. PMID:21256210

  1. A re-evaluation of 9-HODE activity at TRPV1 channels in comparison with anandamide: enantioselectivity and effects at other TRP channels and in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Imperatore, Roberta; Cristino, Luigia; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Two oxidation products of linoleic acid, 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (HODEs), have recently been suggested to act as endovanilloids, that is, endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels, thereby contributing to inflammatory hyperalgesia in rats. However, HODE activity at rat TRPV1 in comparison with the best established endovanilloid, anandamide, and its enantioselectivity and selectivity towards other TRP channels that are also abundant in sensory neurons have never been investigated. Experimental Approach We studied the effect of 9(R)-HODE, 9(S)-HODE, (+/)13-HODE, 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide and anandamide on [Ca2+]i in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the rat or human recombinant TRPV1, or rat recombinant TRPV2, TRPA1 or TRPM8, and also the effect of 9(S)-HODE in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by calcium imaging. Key Results Anandamide and 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide were the most potent endovanilloids at human TRPV1, whereas 9(S)-HODE was approximately threefold less efficacious and 75- and 3-fold less potent, respectively, and did not perform much better at rat TRPV1. The 9(R)-HODE and (+/)13-HODE were almost inactive at TRPV1. Unlike anandamide and 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide, all HODEs were very weak at desensitizing TRPV1 to the action of capsaicin, but activated rat TRPV2 [only (+/)13-HODE] and rat TRPA1, and antagonized rat TRPM8, at concentrations higher than those required to activate TRPV1. Finally, 9(S)-HODE elevated [Ca2+]i in DRG neurons almost exclusively in capsaicin-sensitive cells but only at concentrations between 25 and 100 ?M. Conclusions and Implications The present data suggest that HODEs are less important endovanilloids than anandamide. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.167.issue-8 PMID:22861649

  2. Modality-specific mechanisms of protein kinase C-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1: S800 is a polymodal sensitization site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Joseph, John; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2015-05-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive ion channel activated by polymodal stimuli such as capsaicin, proton, and noxious heat. Multiple inflammatory mediators activate protein kinases, especially protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates TRPV1. Emerging evidence suggests that phosphorylation of TRPV1 constitutes specific signals underpinning pathological nociception. Although the mechanisms of hypersensitivity of TRPV1 to capsaicin are well studied, the phosphorylation residues that contribute to hypersensitivity to heat or acid have not been identified. In this study, we investigated modality-specific mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity using mutagenic ablation of PKC-associated phosphorylation sites in TRPV1. In heterologous systems, TRPV1 S502 and S800, but not T704, are known to be involved in hypersensitivity to capsaicin after the application of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC agonist. Unlike capsaicin, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to heat was attenuated in TRPV1 mutants T704A and S800A, but not in S502A. In contrast, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to acid was attenuated only in S800A. To examine the roles of these phosphorylation sites in more physiologically relevant conditions, TRPV1 and mutants were tested in sensory neurons from TRPV1-null mice. In sensory neurons expressing mutated TRPV1, we found that alanine mutation of S800 commonly attenuates PMA-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin, heat, and acid. Moreover, bradykinin-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin was largely attenuated by the S800A mutation. These results suggest that mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1 are modality specific and that S800 is a polymodal sensitization site integrating multiple inflammatory signals in nociceptors. Our data provide a rationale for a novel approach targeting TRPV1 S800 for antihyperalgesia. PMID:25734989

  3. The TRPV1/2/3 activator 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate sensitizes native nociceptive neurons to heat in wildtype but not TRPV1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, K; Leffler, A; Fischer, M M J; Messlinger, K; Nau, C; Reeh, P W

    2005-01-01

    TRPV1 gene disruption results in a loss of capsaicin and proton responsiveness, but has minimal effects on heat-induced nocifensive behavior, suggesting that sensory transduction of heat is independent of TRPV1. TRPV3, another heat-activated ion channel but insensitive to capsaicin, was shown to be expressed in keratinocytes as well as in sensory neurons projecting to the skin. Recently, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate was introduced as a TRPV3 agonist, but its selectivity was questioned by showing that it activated recombinant TRPV1 and TRPV2 as well. We used the isolated mouse skin-saphenous nerve preparation and whole-cell patch-clamping of cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons from TRPV1-/- and wildtype mice. We found no phenotypic differences between the heat responses of polymodal C-fibers, whereas cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons of TRPV1-/- hardly showed any heat-activated currents. Only C-fibers of wildtype but not TRPV1-/- mice were clearly sensitized to heat by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate 10 and 100 microM; heat-activated current in wildtype neurons was only facilitated at 100 microM. Noxious heat-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide release showed clear deficits (<50%) in TRPV1 deficient skin, but the stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release from the isolated skull dura was unaffected. In both models, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate was able to potentiate the heat response (46 degrees C, 5 min) in a concentration-dependent manner, again, only in wildtype but not TRPV1-/- mice, suggesting that TRPV2/3 are not involved in this sensitization to heat. The results further suggest that TRPV1 is not responsible for the normal heat response of native nociceptors but plays the essential role in thermal sensitization and a prominent one in controlling dermal calcitonin gene-related peptide release, i.e. neurogenic inflammation. PMID:16165301

  4. N-acetyl cysteine reduces oxidative toxicity, apoptosis, and calcium entry through TRPV1 channels in the neutrophils of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kse, S A; Naz?ro?lu, M

    2015-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common inflammatory and oxidant disease with an uncertain pathogenesis. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) decreases oxidative stress, intracellular free calcium ion [Ca(2+)]i, and apoptosis levels in human neutrophil. We aimed to investigate the effects of NAC on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels in neutrophils from patients with PCOS. Neutrophils isolated from PCOS group were investigated in three settings: (1) after incubation with TRPV1 channel blocker capsazepine or TRPM2 channel blocker 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB), (2) after supplementation with NAC (for 6 weeks), and (3) with combination (capsazepine + 2-APB + NAC) exposure. The neutrophils in TRPM2 and TRPV1 experiments were stimulated by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP; 1 ?M) and capsaicin (10 ?M) as concentration agonists, respectively. Neutrophil lipid peroxidation and capsaicin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were reduced by capsazepine and NAC treatments. However, the [Ca(2+)]i concentration did not change by fMLP stimulation. Neutrophil lipid peroxidation, apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, cytosolic reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values were decreased by NAC treatment although neutrophil glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione levels were increased by the NAC treatment. Serum lipid peroxidation, luteinizing hormone, testosterone, insulin, interleukin-1 beta, and homocysteine levels were decreased by NAC treatment although serum vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, and total antioxidant status were increased by the NAC treatment. In conclusion, NAC reduced oxidative stress, apoptosis, cytokine levels, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPV1 channel, which provide supportive evidence that oxidative stress and TRPV1 channel plays a key role in etiology of PCOS. PMID:25666878

  5. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundstrm, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickal; Munro, Alexander; Nylf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain. PMID:22939234

  6. Tetrahydro-naphthols as orally available TRPV1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Urbahns, Klaus; Yura, Takeshi; Gupta, Jang B; Tajimi, Masaomi; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Masuda, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ikegami, Yuka; Marumo, Makiko; Yasoshima, Kayo; Yoshida, Nagahiro; Moriwaki, Toshiya; Madge, David; Chan, Fiona; Mogi, Muneto

    2012-05-15

    Starting from a naphthol-based lead series with low oral bioavailability, we have identified potent TRPV1 antagonists with oral bioavailability in rats. These compounds emerged from SAR studies aimed at replacing the lead's phenol structure whilst maintaining potency. Compound rac-6a is an orally available TRPV1 antagonist with single-digit nanomolar activity. The enantiomers show a low eudismic ratio at the receptor level. PMID:22525313

  7. Chronic alteration in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate levels regulates capsaicin and mustard oil responses

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Belugin, Sergei; Akopian, Armen N.

    2011-01-01

    There is an agreement that acute (in minutes) hydrolysis and accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulate TRPV1 and TRPA1 activities. Since inflammation results in PIP2 depletion, persisting for long periods (hours-to-days) in pain models and in clinic, we examined whether chronic depletion and accumulation of PIP2 affects capsaicin and mustard oil responses. In addition we also wanted to evaluate whether the effects of PIP2 depend on TRPV1 and TRPA1 co-expression, and whether the PIP2 actions vary in expression cells versus sensory neurons. Chronic PIP2 production was stimulated by over-expression of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase, while PIP2-specific phospholipid 5?-phosphatase was selected to reduce plasma membrane levels of PIP2. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin (100 nM; CAP) responses and receptor tachyphylaxis are not significantly influenced by chronic changes in PIP2 levels in wild-type (WT) or TRPA1 null-mutant sensory neurons, as well as CHO cells expressing TRPV1 alone or with TRPA1. However, low concentrations of CAP (20 nM) produced a higher response after PIP2 depletion in cells containing TRPV1 alone, but not TRPV1 together with TRPA1. Mustard oil (25 ?M; MO) responses were also not affected by PIP2 in WT sensory neurons and cells co-expressing TRPA1 and TRPV1. In contrast, PIP2 reduction leads to pronounced tachyphylaxis to MO in cells with both channels. Chronic effect of PIP2 on TRPA1 activity depends on presence of the TRPV1 channel and cell type (CHO vs. sensory neurons). In summary, chronic alterations in PIP2 levels regulate magnitude of CAP and MO responses, as well as MO-tachyphylaxis. This regulation depends on co-expression profile of TRPA1 and TRPV1 and cell type. PMID:21337373

  8. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  9. Jellyfish and other cnidarian envenomations cause pain by affecting TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Eva; Yanagihara, Angel; Karlsson, Evert; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarian envenomations cause a burning-pain sensation of which the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Activation of TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel expressed in nociceptive neurons, leads to cell depolarisation and pain. Here, we show in vitro and in vivo evidence for desensitization-dependent TRPV1 activation in cnidarian envenomations. Cnidarian venom induced a nociceptive reactivity, comparable to capsaicin, in laboratory rats, which could be reduced by the selective TRPV1 antagonist, BCTC. These findings are the first to explain at least part of the symptomology of cnidarian envenomations and provide insights into the design of more effective treatments for this global public health problem. PMID:17010344

  10. Synthesis of novel 13?-18-norandrostane-ferrocene conjugates via homogeneous catalytic methods and their investigation on TRPV1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Sznti-Pintr, Eszter; Wouters, Johan; Gmry, gnes; Sghy, va; Sz?ke, va; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Kollr, Lszl; Skoda-Fldes, Rita

    2015-12-01

    13?-Steroid-ferrocene derivatives were synthesized via two reaction pathways starting from an unnatural 16-keto-18-nor-13?-steroid. The unnatural steroid was converted to ferrocene derivatives via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition or palladium-catalyzed aminocarbonylation. 16-Azido- and 16-N-(prop-2-ynyl)-carboxamido-steroids were synthesized as starting materials for azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the appropriate ferrocene derivatives. Based on our earlier work, aminocarbonylation of 16-iodo-16-ene and 16-iodo-15-ene derivatives was studied with ferrocenylmethylamine. The new products were obtained in moderate to good yields and were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR and MS. The solid state structure of the starting material 13?-18-norandrostan-16-one and two carboxamide products were determined by X-ray crystallography. Evidences were provided that the N-propargyl-carboxamide compound as well as its ferrocenylmethyltriazole derivative are able to decrease the activation of TRPV1 receptor on TRG neurons. PMID:26519768

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  12. Calcium transient evoked by TRPV1 activators is enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-? in rat pulmonary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youmin; Gu, Qihai; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Kryscio, Richard

    2010-01-01

    TNF?, a proinflammatory cytokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, has been shown to induce hyperalgesia in somatic tissue via a sensitizing effect on dorsal root ganglion neurons expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor (TRPV1). Because TRPV1-expressing pulmonary sensory neurons play an important role in regulating airway function, this study was carried out to determine whether TNF? alters the sensitivity of these neurons to chemical activators. Responses of isolated nodose and jugular ganglion neurons innervating the rat lungs were determined by measuring the transient increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Our results showed the following. 1) A pretreatment with TNF? (50 ng/ml) for ?24 h increased significantly the peak ?[Ca2+]i evoked by capsaicin (Cap) in these neurons. A pretreatment with the same concentration of TNF? for a longer duration (?48 h) did not further increase the response, but pretreatment for a shorter duration (1 h) or with a lower concentration (25 ng/ml, 24 h) failed to enhance the Cap sensitivity. 2) The same TNF? pretreatment also induced similar but less pronounced and less uniform increases in the responses to acid (pH 6.55.5), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common activator of TRPV1, V2, and V3 channels, and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a selective activator of TRPA1 channel. 3) In sharp contrast, the responses to ATP, ACh, and KCl were not affected by TNF?. 4) The TNF?-induced hypersensitivity to Cap was not prevented by pretreatment with indomethacin (30 ?M). 5) The immunoreactivity to both TNF receptor types 1 and 2 were detected in rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. In conclusion, prolonged treatment with TNF? induces a pronounced potentiating effect on the responses of isolated pulmonary sensory neurons to TRPV1 activators. This action of TNF? may contribute in part to the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by this cytokine. PMID:20639352

  13. Thermoregulatory Phenotype of the Trpv1 Knockout Mouse: Thermoeffector Dysbalance with Hyperkinesis

    PubMed Central

    Garami, Andras; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L.; Steiner, Alexandre A.; Wanner, Samuel P.; Almeida, M. Camila; Lesnikov, Vladimir A.; Gavva, Narender R.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the thermoregulatory phenotype of mice lacking transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels. We used Trpv1 knockout (KO) mice and their genetically unaltered littermates to study diurnal variations in deep body temperature (Tb) and thermoeffector activities under basal conditions, as well as thermoregulatory responses to severe heat and cold. Only subtle alterations were found in the basal Tb of Trpv1 KO mice or in their Tb responses to thermal challenges. The main thermoregulatory abnormality of Trpv1 KO mice was a different pattern of thermoeffectors used to regulate Tb. On the autonomic side, Trpv1 KO mice were hypometabolic (had a lower oxygen consumption) and hypervasoconstricted (had a lower tail skin temperature). In agreement with the enhanced skin vasoconstriction, Trpv1 KO mice had a higher thermoneutral zone. On the behavioral side, Trpv1 KO mice preferred a lower ambient temperature and expressed a higher locomotor activity. Experiments with pharmacological TRPV1 agonists (resiniferatoxin and anandamide) and a TRPV1 antagonist (AMG0347) confirmed that TRPV1 channels located outside the brain tonically inhibit locomotor activity. With age (observed for up to 14 months), the body mass of Trpv1 KO mice exceeded that of controls, sometimes approaching 60 g. In summary, Trpv1 KO mice possess a distinct thermoregulatory phenotype, which is coupled with a predisposition to age-associated overweight and includes hypometabolism, enhanced skin vasoconstriction, decreased thermopreferendum, and hyperkinesis. The latter may be one of the primary deficiencies in Trpv1 KO mice. We propose that TRPV1-mediated signals from the periphery tonically suppress the general locomotor activity. PMID:21289181

  14. ARA 290 relieves pathophysiological pain by targeting TRPV1 channel: Integration between immune system and nociception.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjia; Yu, Guanling; Zhang, Mengyuan

    2016-02-01

    ARA 290 is an erythropoietin-derived polypeptide that possesses analgesic and tissue protective effect in many diseases such as diabetes and cancer. The analgesic effect of ARA 290 is mediated by its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions, or more specifically, by targeting the innate repair receptor (IRR) to down-regulate inflammation to alleviate neuropathic pain. However, whether other mechanisms or pathways are involved in ARA 290-mediated analgesic effect remains elusive. In this study, we are particularly interested in whether ARA 290 could directly target peripheral nociceptors by blocking or influencing receptors in pain sensation. Using calcium imaging, cell culture and behavioral tests, we demonstrated that ARA 290 was able to specifically inhibit TRPV1 channel activity, and relieve the mechanical hypersensitivity induced by capsaicin. Our study suggested that ARA 290 could potentially function as a novel antagonist for TRPV1 channel. This finding would not only contribute to the development of new pain treatment using ARA 290, but also help to improve our understanding of the integration between the immune system and the peripheral nervous system. PMID:26774587

  15. Prolactin regulates TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 in sensory neurons in a sex-dependent manner: Contribution of prolactin receptor to inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Ruparel, Shivani B.; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a hormone produced in the anterior pituitary but also synthesized extrapituitary where it can influence diverse cellular processes, including inflammatory responses. Females experience greater pain in certain inflammatory conditions, but the contribution of the PRL system to sex-dependent inflammatory pain is unknown. We found that PRL regulates transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in a sex-dependent manner in sensory neurons. At >20 ng/ml, PRL sensitizes TRPV1 in female, but not male, neurons. This effect is mediated by PRL receptor (PRL-R). Likewise, TRPA1 and TRPM8 were sensitized by 100 ng/ml PRL only in female neurons. We showed that complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) upregulated PRL levels in the inflamed paw of both male and female rats, but levels were higher in females. In contrast, CFA did not change mRNA levels of long and short PRL-R in the dorsal root ganglion or spinal cord. Analysis of PRL and PRL-R knockout (KO) mice demonstrated that basal responses to cold stimuli were only altered in females, and with no significant effects on heat and mechanical responses in both sexes. CFA-induced heat and cold hyperalgesia were not changed in PRL and PRL-R KO compared with wild-type (WT) males, whereas significant reduction of heat and cold post-CFA hyperalgesia was detected in PRL and PRL-R KO females. Attenuation of CFA-induced mechanical allodynia was observed in both PRL and PRL-R KO females and males. Thermal hyperalgesia in PRL KO females was restored by administration of PRL into hindpaws. Overall, we demonstrate a sex-dependent regulation of peripheral inflammatory hyperalgesia by the PRL system. PMID:24022869

  16. Wu-Tou Decoction Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice: Participation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Chunfang; Wan, Hongye; Sun, Danni; Xu, Tengfei; Yang, Yue; Qu, Yakun; Xu, Ying; Jing, Xianghong; Liu, Junling; Chen, Shuping; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) is a classic traditional Chinese medicine formula and has been used effectively to treat joint diseases clinically. Previous reports indicated that WTD possesses anti-inflammatory activity; however, its actions on pain have not been clarified. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive activity of WTD in CFA-induced mice, and its possible mechanism of the action associated with transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels was also explored. Our results showed that 1.58, 3.15, and 6.30?g/kg WTD significantly attenuated mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. Moreover, WTD effectively inhibited spontaneous nociceptive responses to intraplantar injections of capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde, respectively. WTD also effectively suppressed jumping and wet-dog-shake behaviors to intraperitoneal injection of icilin. Additionally, WTD significantly reduced protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglia and skins of injured paw. Collectively, our data demonstrate firstly that WTD exerts antinociceptive activity in inflammatory conditions by attenuating mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. This antinociceptive effect may result in part from inhibiting the activities of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8, and the suppression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 protein by WTD was also highly effective. These findings suggest that WTD might be an attractive and suitable therapeutic agent for the management of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25839032

  17. Asymmetric synthesis and receptor activity of chiral simplified resiniferatoxin (sRTX) analogues as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Seop; Ki, Yooran; Ahn, Song Yeon; Yoon, Suyoung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Park, Hyeung-Geun; Sun, Wei; Son, Karam; Cui, Minghua; Choi, Sun; Pearce, Larry V; Esch, Timothy E; Deandrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Blumberg, Peter M; Lee, Jeewoo

    2014-01-01

    The chiral isomers of the two potent simplified RTX-based vanilloids, compounds 2 and 3, were synthesized employing highly enantioselective PTC alkylation and evaluated as hTRPV1 ligands. The analysis indicated that the R-isomer was the eutomer in binding affinity and functional activity. The agonism of compound 2R was comparable to that of RTX. Docking analysis of the chiral isomers of 3 suggested the basis for its stereospecific activity and the binding mode of 3R. PMID:24321344

  18. TRPV1 Channels and Gastric Vagal Afferent Signalling in Lean and High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kentish, Stephen J.; Frisby, Claudine L.; Kritas, Stamatiki; Li, Hui; Hatzinikolas, George; O’Donnell, Tracey A.; Wittert, Gary A.; Page, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Within the gastrointestinal tract vagal afferents play a role in control of food intake and satiety signalling. Activation of mechanosensitive gastric vagal afferents induces satiety. However, gastric vagal afferent responses to mechanical stretch are reduced in high fat diet mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels (TRPV1) are expressed in vagal afferents and knockout of TRPV1 reduces gastro-oesophageal vagal afferent responses to stretch. We aimed to determine the role of TRPV1 on gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity and food intake in lean and HFD-induced obese mice. Methods TRPV1+/+ and -/- mice were fed either a standard laboratory diet or high fat diet for 20wks. Gastric emptying of a solid meal and gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity was determined. Results Gastric emptying was delayed in high fat diet mice but there was no difference between TRPV1+/+ and -/- mice on either diet. TRPV1 mRNA expression in whole nodose ganglia of TRPV1+/+ mice was similar in both dietary groups. The TRPV1 agonist N-oleoyldopamine potentiated the response of tension receptors in standard laboratory diet but not high fat diet mice. Food intake was greater in the standard laboratory diet TRPV1-/- compared to TRPV1+/+ mice. This was associated with reduced response of tension receptors to stretch in standard laboratory diet TRPV1-/- mice. Tension receptor responses to stretch were decreased in high fat diet compared to standard laboratory diet TRPV1+/+ mice; an effect not observed in TRPV1-/- mice. Disruption of TRPV1 had no effect on the response of mucosal receptors to mucosal stroking in mice on either diet. Conclusion TRPV1 channels selectively modulate gastric vagal afferent tension receptor mechanosensitivity and may mediate the reduction in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity in high fat diet-induced obesity. PMID:26285043

  19. Capsaicin protects mouse neuromuscular junctions from the neuroparalytic effects of botulinum neurotoxin a.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Krivitskaya, Natalia; Potian, Joseph G; Hognason, Kormakur; Garcia, Carmen C; McArdle, Joseph J

    2009-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), the most toxic, naturally occurring protein, cleaves synapse-associated protein of 25 kDa and inhibits acetylcholine release from motor nerve endings (MNEs). This leads to paralysis of skeletal muscles. Our study demonstrates that capsaicin protects mouse neuromuscular junctions from the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A. Bilateral injection of BoNT/A near the innervation of the Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of adult Swiss-Webster mice inhibited the toe spread reflex (TSR). However, when capsaicin was coinjected bilaterally, or injected 4 or 8 h before injecting BoNT/A, the TSR remained normal. In animals that were pretreated with capsazepine, capsaicin failed to protect against the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A. In vivo analyses demonstrated that capsaicin protected muscle functions and electromygraphic activity from the incapacitating effects of BoNT/A. The twitch response to nerve stimulation was greater for EDL preparations isolated from mice injected with capsaicin before BoNT/A. Capsaicin pretreatment also prevented the inhibitory effects of BoNT/A on end-plate currents. Furthermore, pretreatment of Neuro 2a cells with capsaicin significantly preserved labeling of synaptic vesicles by FM 1-43. This protective effect of capsaicin was observed only in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by capsazepine. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that MNEs express transient receptor potential protein of the vanilloid subfamily, TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor. Capsaicin pretreatment, in vitro, reduced nerve stimulation or KCl-induced uptake of BoNT/A into motor nerve endings and cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. These data demonstrate that capsaicin interacts with TRPV1 receptors on MNEs to reduce BoNT/A uptake via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. PMID:19654265

  20. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) ? coactivator-1? (Pgc-1?) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Ppar?2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Ppar?2 and Pgc-1?. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis. PMID:26781688

  1. Coarse architecture of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    De-la-Rosa, Vctor; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Ladrn-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, Len D

    2013-10-11

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel is responsible for the perception of high temperatures and low extracellular pH, and it is also involved in the response to some pungent compounds. Importantly, it is also associated with the perception of pain and noxious stimuli. Here, we attempt to discern the molecular organization and location of the N and C termini of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel by measuring FRET between genetically attached enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent protein to the N or C terminus of the channel protein, expressed in transfected HEK 293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The static measurements of the domain organization were mapped into an available cryo-electron microscopy density of the channel with good agreement. These measurements also provide novel insights into the organization of terminal domains and their proximity to the plasma membrane. PMID:23965996

  2. The search for novel TRPV1-antagonists: from carboxamides to benzimidazoles and indazolones.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephen Robert; McIver, Edward; Lewis, Stephen; Burkamp, Frank; Leech, Clare; Mason, Glenn; Boyce, Susan; Morrison, Denise; Richards, Gillian; Sutton, Kathy; Jones, Anthony Brian

    2006-06-01

    Based on a series of diaryl amides the corresponding inverse amides have been found to be potent TRPV1 receptor antagonists. Benzimidazole and indazolone derivatives prepared retained good potency in vitro and indazolone 4a was identified as a novel TRPV1 receptor antagonist suitable for evaluating orally in animal models of analgesia. PMID:16563760

  3. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L45 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5?-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 ?g) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 ?g). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  4. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in ?-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with ?-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with ?-thalassemia major preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes is exciting. PMID:25216685

  5. Forty years in capsaicin research for sensory pharmacology and physiology.

    PubMed

    Szolcsnyi, Jnos

    2004-12-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chilli peppers has become a "hot" topic in neuroscience with yearly publications over half thousand papers. It is outlined in this survey how this exciting Hungarian research field emerged from almost complete ignorance. From the initial observation of the phenomenon of "capsaicin desensitization", a long-lasting chemoanalgesia and impairment in thermoregulation against heat, the chain of new discoveries which led to the formulation of the existence of a "capsaicin receptor" on C-polymodal nociceptors is briefly summarized. Neurogenic inflammation is mediated by these C-afferents which are supplied by the putative capsaicin receptor and were termed as "capsaicin sensitive" chemoceptive afferents. They opened new avenues in local peptidergic regulation in peripheral tissues. It has been suggested that in contrast to the classical axon reflex theory, the capsaicin-sensitive sensory system subserves a "dual sensory-efferent" function whereby initiation of afferent signals and neuropeptide release are coupled at the same nerve endings. Furthermore, in the skin at threshold stimuli which do not evoke sensation elicit already maximum efferent response as enhanced microcirculation. In isolated organ preparations large scale of new type of peptidergic capsaicin-sensitive neurogenic smooth muscle responses were revealed after the first one was described by ourselves on the guinea-pig ileum in 1978. Recently the "capsaicin receptor" has been cloned and it is now named as the "transient receptor potential vanilloid 1" (TRPV1). Hence, capsaicin research led to the discovery of the first temperature-gated ion channel gated by noxious heat, protons, vanilloids and endogenous ligands as anandamide, N-oleoyldopamine and lipoxygenase products. Another recent achievement is the discovery of a novel "unorthodox" neurohumoral regulatory mechanism mediated by somatostatin. Somatostatin released from the TRPV1-expressing nerve endings reaches the circulation and elicits systemic antiinflammatory and analgesic "sensocrine" functions with counter-regulatory influence e.g. in Freund's adjuvant-induced chronic arthritis. Nociceptors supplied by TRPV1 and sst4 somatostatin receptors has become nowadays promising targets for drug development. PMID:15567473

  6. Involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 in analgesic action of methylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Toshio; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Ito, Shigeo

    2009-02-01

    Methylsalicylate (MS) is a naturally occurring compound that is used as a major active ingredient of balms and liniments supplied as topical analgesics. Despite the common use of MS as a pain reliever, the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here we characterize the action of MS on transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing human TRPV1 (hTRPV1), MS evoked increases of [Ca(2+)](i), which declined regardless of its continuous presence, indicative of marked desensitization. TRPV1 antagonists dose-dependently suppressed the MS-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase. MS simultaneously elicited an inward current and increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in the voltage-clamped cells, suggesting that MS promoted Ca(2+) influx through the activation of TRPV1 channels. MS reversibly inhibited hTRPV1 activation by polymodal stimuli such as capsaicin, protons, heat, anandamide, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Because both the stimulatory and inhibitory actions of MS were exhibited in capsaicin- and allicin-insensitive mutant channels, MS-induced hTRPV1 activation was mediated by distinct channel regions from capsaicin and allicin. In cultured rat sensory neurons, MS elicited a [Ca(2+)](i) increase in cells responding to capsaicin. MS significantly suppressed nocifensive behavior induced by intraplantar capsaicin in rats. The present data indicate that MS has both stimulatory and inhibitory actions on TRPV1 channels and suggest that the latter action may partly underlie the analgesic effects of MS independent of inhibition of cyclooxygenases in vivo. PMID:18987162

  7. Chronic alteration in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate levels regulates capsaicin and mustard oil responses.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mayur J; Belugin, Sergei; Akopian, Armen N

    2011-06-01

    There is an agreement that acute (in minutes) hydrolysis and accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2) ) modulate TRPV1 and TRPA1 activities. Because inflammation results in PIP(2) depletion, persisting for long periods (hours to days) in pain models and in the clinic, we examined whether chronic depletion and accumulation of PIP(2) affect capsaicin (CAP) and mustard oil (MO) responses. In addition, we wanted to evaluate whether the effects of PIP(2) depend on TRPV1 and TRPA1 coexpression and whether the PIP(2) actions vary in expression cells vs. sensory neurons. Chronic PIP(2) production was stimulated by overexpression of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase, and PIP(2) -specific phospholipid 5'-phosphatase was selected to reduce plasma membrane levels of PIP(2) . Our results demonstrate that CAP (100 nM) responses and receptor tachyphylaxis are not significantly influenced by chronic changes in PIP(2) levels in wild-type (WT) or TRPA1 null-mutant sensory neurons as well as CHO cells expressing TRPV1 alone or with TRPA1. However, low concentrations of CAP (20 nM) produced a higher response after PIP(2) depletion in cells containing TRPV1 alone but not TRPV1 together with TRPA1. MO (25 ?M) responses were also not affected by PIP(2) in WT sensory neurons and cells coexpressing TRPA1 and TRPV1. In contrast, PIP(2) reduction leads to pronounced tachyphylaxis to MO in cells with both channels. Chronic effect of PIP(2) on TRPA1 activity depends on presence of the TRPV1 channel and cell type (CHO vs. sensory neurons). In summary, chronic alterations in PIP(2) levels regulate magnitude of CAP and MO responses as well as MO tachyphylaxis. This regulation depends on coexpression profile of TRPA1 and TRPV1 and cell type. PMID:21337373

  8. ΔN-TRPV1: A Molecular Co-detector of Body Temperature and Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Zaelzer, Cristian; Hua, Pierce; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Ciura, Sorana; Voisin, Daniel L; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion occur during hyperthermia or hypertonicity to preserve body hydration. These vital responses are triggered when hypothalamic osmoregulatory neurons become depolarized by ion channels encoded by an unknown product of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 gene (Trpv1). Here, we show that rodent osmoregulatory neurons express a transcript of Trpv1 that mediates the selective translation of a TRPV1 variant that lacks a significant portion of the channel's amino terminus (ΔN-TRPV1). The mRNA transcript encoding this variant (Trpv1dn) is widely expressed in the brains of osmoregulating vertebrates, including the human hypothalamus. Transfection of Trpv1dn into heterologous cells induced the expression of ion channels that could be activated by either hypertonicity or by heating in the physiological range. Moreover, expression of Trpv1dn rescued the osmosensory and thermosensory responses of single hypothalamic neurons obtained from Trpv1 knockout mice. ΔN-TRPV1 is therefore a co-detector of core body temperature and fluid tonicity. PMID:26387947

  9. AKAP150-mediated TRPV1 sensitization is disrupted by calcium/calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The transient receptor potential vanilloid type1 (TRPV1) is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and is sensitive to phosphorylation. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150) mediates phosphorylation of TRPV1 by Protein Kinases A and C, modulating channel activity. However, few studies have focused on the regulatory mechanisms that control AKAP150 association with TRPV1. In the present study, we identify a role for calcium/calmodulin in controlling AKAP150 association with, and sensitization of, TRPV1. Results In trigeminal neurons, intracellular accumulation of calcium reduced AKAP150 association with TRPV1 in a manner sensitive to calmodulin antagonism. This was also observed in transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, providing a model for conducting molecular analysis of the association. In CHO cells, the deletion of the C-terminal calmodulin-binding site of TRPV1 resulted in greater association with AKAP150, and increased channel activity. Furthermore, the co-expression of wild-type calmodulin in CHOs significantly reduced TRPV1 association with AKAP150, as evidenced by total internal reflective fluorescence-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TIRF-FRET) analysis and electrophysiology. Finally, dominant-negative calmodulin co-expression increased TRPV1 association with AKAP150 and increased basal and PKA-sensitized channel activity. Conclusions the results from these studies indicate that calcium/calmodulin interferes with the association of AKAP150 with TRPV1, potentially extending resensitization of the channel. PMID:21569553

  10. The Basal Thermal Sensitivity of the TRPV1 Ion Channel Is Determined by PKC?II

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Hasan, Raquibul

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nociceptors are excited by the activation of membrane receptors and ion channels. The heat-sensitive TRPV1 ion channel responds to various noxious chemical and thermal stimuli, causing pain and itch. Here, we show that TRPV1 is coexpressed with PKC?II in a subset of mouse sensory neurons and that, in these neurons, TRPV1 binds directly to PKC?II, leading to the activation and translocation of PKC?II. Activated PKC?II, in turn, significantly increases the responsiveness of TRPV1 by phosphorylating Thr705. The heat sensitivity of TRPV1 is almost eliminated by either knocking down PKC?II or mutating Thr705; however, neither of these manipulations affects the potentiation of TRPV1 caused by the activation of PKC?. PKC?II thus acts as an auxiliary subunit of TRPV1 by forming a population-dependent TRPV1 ion channel complex controlling the sensitivity of TRPV1 and setting the threshold for pain and itch. PMID:24920628

  11. Optical stimulation in mice lacking the TRPV1 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eul; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Otting, Margarete; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    Lasers can be used to stimulate neural tissue, including the sciatic nerve or auditory neurons. Wells and coworkers suggested that neural tissue is likely stimulated by heat.[1,2] Ion channels that can be activated by heat are the TRPV channels, a subfamily of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels. TRPV channels are nonselective cation channels found in sensory neurons involved in nociception. In addition to various chemicals, TRPV channels can also be thermally stimulated. The activation temperature for the different TRPV channels varies and is 43°C for TRPV1 and 39°C for TRPV3. By performing an immunohistochemical staining procedure on frozen 20 μm cochlear slices using a primary TRPV1 antibody, we observed specific immunostaining of the spiral ganglion cells. Here we show that in mice that lack the gene for the TRPV1 channel optical radiation cannot evoke action potentials on the auditory nerve.

  12. Resolving TRPV1 and TNF-? Mediated Spinal Cord Synaptic Plasticity and Inflammatory Pain with Neuroprotectin D1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu; L, Ning; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Serhan, Charles N.; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms of inflammatory pain are not fully understood. We investigated the role of TRPV1 and TNF-?, two critical mediators for inflammatory pain, in regulating spinal cord synaptic transmission. We found in mice lacking Trpv1 the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons of spinal cord slices is reduced. Further, C-fiber-induced spinal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo is abolished in Trpv1 knockout mice. TNF-? also increases sEPSC frequency but not amplitude in spinal lamina IIo neurons, and this increase is abolished in Trpv1 knockout mice. Single-cell PCR analysis revealed that TNF-?-responding neurons in lamina IIo are exclusively excitatory (vGluT2+) neurons. Notably, neuroprotectin-1 (NPD1), an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid) blocks TNF-?- and capsaicin-evoked sEPSC frequency increases but has no effect on basal synaptic transmission. Strikingly, NPD1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current (IC50=0.4 nM) in dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this IC50 is ? 500 times lower than that of AMG9810, a commonly used TRPV1 antagonist. NPD1 inhibition of TRPV1 is mediated by GPCRs, since the effects were blocked by pertussis toxin. In contrast, NPD1 had not effect on mustard oil-induced TRPA1 currents. Spinal injection of NPD1, at very low doses (0.110 ng), blocks spinal LTP and reduces TRPV1-dependent inflammatory pain, without affecting baseline pain. NPD1 also reduces TRPV1-independent but TNF-?-dependent pain hypersensitivity. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of NPD1 in regulating TRPV1/TNF-?-mediated spinal synaptic plasticity and identify NPD1 as a novel analgesic for treating inflammatory pain. PMID:22016541

  13. 2-Aryl substituted pyridine C-region analogues of 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides as highly potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ryu, HyungChul; Seo, Sejin; Kim, Myeong Seop; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Ho Shin; Ann, Jihyae; Tran, Phuong-Thao; Hoang, Van-Hai; Byun, Jieun; Cui, Minghua; Son, Karam; Sharma, Pankaz Kumar; Choi, Sun; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank-Foltyn, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Koegel, Babette-Yvonne; Christoph, Thomas; Frormann, Sven; Lee, Jeewoo

    2014-08-15

    A series of 2-aryl pyridine C-region derivatives of 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides were investigated as hTRPV1 antagonists. Multiple compounds showed highly potent TRPV1 antagonism toward capsaicin comparable to previous lead 7. Among them, compound 9 demonstrated anti-allodynia in a mouse neuropathic pain model and blocked capsaicin-induced hypothermia in a dose-dependent manner. Docking analysis of 9 with our hTRPV1 homology model provided insight into its specific binding mode. PMID:25011915

  14. Suppression of In Vivo Neovascularization by the Loss of TRPV1 in Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Tomoyose, Katsuo; Okada, Yuka; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Miyajima, Masayasu; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Shirai, Kumi; Morii, Tomoya; Reinach, Peter S.; Yamanaka, Osamu; Saika, Shizuya

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of loss of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) on the development of neovascularization in corneal stroma in mice. Blocking TRPV1 receptor did not affect VEGF-dependent neovascularization in cell culture. Lacking TRPV1 inhibited neovascularization in corneal stroma following cauterization. Immunohistochemistry showed that immunoreactivity for active form of TGF?1 and VEGF was detected in subepithelial stroma at the site of cauterization in both genotypes of mice, but the immunoreactivity seemed less marked in mice lacking TRPV1. mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF?1 in a mouse cornea was suppressed by the loss of TRPV1. TRPV1 gene ablation did not affect invasion of neutrophils and macrophage in a cauterized mouse cornea. Blocking TRPV1 signal does not affect angiogenic effects by HUVECs in vitro. TRPV1 signal is, however, involved in expression of angiogenic growth factors in a cauterized mouse cornea and is required for neovascularization in the corneal stroma in vivo. PMID:26491553

  15. Structural insight into tetrameric hTRPV1 from homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, virtual screening, and bioassay validations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V; Xu, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xiaole; Yang, Peng; Blumberg, Peter M; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-03-23

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-activated cation channel protein, which contributes to inflammation, acute and persistent pain. Antagonists of human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of pain. Developing various antagonists of hTRPV1, however, has been hindered by the unavailability of a 3D structure of hTRPV1. Recently, the 3D structures of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) in the presence and absence of ligand have been reported as determined by cryo-EM. rTRPV1 shares 85.7% sequence identity with hTRPV1. In the present work, we constructed and reported the 3D homology tetramer model of hTRPV1 based on the cryo-EM structures of rTRPV1. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, energy minimizations, and prescreen were applied to select and validate the best model of hTRPV1. The predicted binding pocket of hTRPV1 consists of two adjacent monomers subunits, which were congruent with the experimental rTRPV1 data and the cyro-EM structures of rTRPV1. The detailed interactions between hTRPV1 and its antagonists or agonists were characterized by molecular docking, which helped us to identify the important residues. Conformational changes of hTRPV1 upon antagonist/agonist binding were also explored by MD simulation. The different movements of compounds led to the different conformational changes of monomers in hTRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 works in a concerted way, resembling some other channel proteins such as aquaporins. We observed that the selective filter was open when hTRPV1 bound with an agonist during MD simulation. For the lower gate of hTRPV1, we observed large similarities between hTRPV1 bound with antagonist and with agonist. A five-point pharmacophore model based on several antagonists was established, and the structural model was used to screen in silico for new antagonists for hTRPV1. By using the 3D TRPV1 structural model above, the pilot in silico screening has begun to yield promising hits with activity as hTRPV1 antagonists, several of which showed substantial potency. PMID:25642729

  16. A synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations on vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Ruan, Ting; Khosravi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors are coexpressed in vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. Because both these receptors are sensitive to a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators, it is conceivable that they can be activated simultaneously during airway inflammation. This study aimed to determine whether there is an interaction between these two polymodal transducers upon simultaneous activation, and how it modulates the activity of vagal pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. In anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats, the reflex-mediated apneic response to intravenous injection of a combined dose of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 activator) and capsaicin (Cap, a TRPV1 activator) was ?202% greater than the mathematical sum of the responses to AITC and Cap when they were administered individually. Similar results were also observed in anesthetized mice. In addition, the synergistic effect was clearly demonstrated when the afferent activity of single vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents were recorded in anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats; C-fiber responses to AITC, Cap and AITC + Cap (in combination) were 0.6 0.1, 0.8 0.1, and 4.8 0.6 impulses/s (n = 24), respectively. This synergism was absent when either AITC or Cap was replaced by other chemical activators of pulmonary C-fiber afferents. The pronounced potentiating effect was further demonstrated in isolated vagal pulmonary sensory neurons using the Ca2+ imaging technique. In summary, this study showed a distinct positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously in pulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves. PMID:25414245

  17. Ion channel TRPV1-dependent activation of PTP1B suppresses EGFR-associated intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Takahashi, Naoki; Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jihyung; Bertin, Samuel; Jeffries, James; Jung, Michael; Duong, Jen; Triano, Amy I.; Lee, Jongdae; Niv, Yaron; Herdman, David S.; Taniguchi, Koji; Kim, Chang-Whan; Dong, Hui; Eckmann, Lars; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio; Corr, Maripat; Raz, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of turnover, and dysregulation of pathways that regulate regeneration can lead to tumor development; however, the negative regulators of oncogenic events in the intestinal epithelium are not fully understood. Here we identified a feedback loop between the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of proliferation, and the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that TRPV1 was expressed by IECs and was intrinsically activated upon EGFR stimulation. Subsequently, TRPV1 activation inhibited EGFR-induced epithelial cell proliferation via activation of Ca2+/calpain and resulting activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). In a murine model of multiple intestinal neoplasia (ApcMin/+ mice), TRPV1 deficiency increased adenoma formation, and treatment of these animals with an EGFR kinase inhibitor reversed protumorigenic phenotypes, supporting a functional association between TRPV1 and EGFR signaling in IECs. Administration of a TRPV1 agonist suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, similar to as well as in conjunction with a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, which suggests that targeting both TRPV1 and COX-2 has potential as a therapeutic approach for tumor prevention. Our findings implicate TRPV1 as a regulator of growth factor signaling in the intestinal epithelium through activation of PTP1B and subsequent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25083990

  18. Modulation by 17?-estradiol of anandamide vasorelaxation in normotensive and hypertensive rats: a role for TRPV1 but not fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S V

    2013-02-15

    Recent studies suggest that endocannabinoid signaling is modulated by 17?-estradiol (17E?) however it is unclear if this applies to the cardiovascular actions of anandamide, a major endocannabinoid. This study examined the in vitro effects of 17E? on vasorelaxation to anandamide in myograph-mounted small mesenteric arteries obtained from Wistar rats and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRs) of both sexes. Treatment with 1?M 17E? but not its enantiomer 17E? significantly enhanced relaxation to anandamide in male Wistar rats. This effect was independent of a functional endothelium but was blocked by the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist SB366791 (2?M) or prolonged treatment with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (10?M). A TRPV1-dependent potentiation by 17E? was also observed in male SHRs, but not in female Wistar rats or female SHRs. Whilst inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis by 1?M URB597 (an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase; FAAH) similarly augmented anandamide relaxation in male, but not female, Wistar rats and SHRs, URB597 did not affect the 17E?-induced potentiation. Female SHRs displayed a larger maximal relaxation to anandamide; however sex difference was not found in Wistar rats. We conclude that pharmacological levels of 17E? potentiate mesenteric relaxation to anandamide through mechanisms dependent on TRPV1 receptors but not FAAH-mediated hydrolysis in male Wistar rats and male SHRs. Sexual dimorphism was observed in the modulatory effects of 17E? and URB597, which does not necessarily lead to a greater anandamide response in female rats. PMID:23340220

  19. TRPV1: ON THE ROAD TO PAIN RELIEF

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrs; Simon, Sidney A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, drug research targeted to pain treatment has focused on trying to prevent the propagation of action potentials in the periphery from reaching the brain rather than pinpointing the molecular basis underlying the initial detection of the nociceptive stimulus: the receptor itself. This has now changed, given that many receptors of nociceptive stimuli have been identified and/or cloned. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels have been implicated in several physiological processes such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli detection. Ten years after the cloning of TRPV1, compelling data has been gathered on the role of this channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. TRPV1 activation in nociceptive neurons, where it is normally expressed, triggers the release of neuropeptides and transmitters resulting in the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation also will evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal or chemical stimuli. For these reasons as well as because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 has become a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. This review will provide a general picture of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the TRPV1 channel and of its structural, pharmacological and biophysical properties. Finally, it will provide the reader with an overall view of the status of the discovery of potential therapeutic agents for the management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:20021438

  20. Pyridine C-region analogs of 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides as potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ryu, HyungChul; Seo, Sejin; Lee, Jee-Young; Ha, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Sunho; Jung, Aeran; Ann, Jihyae; Kim, Sung-Eun; Yoon, Suyoung; Hong, Mannkyu; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank-Foltyn, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Schiene, Klaus; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Christoph, Thomas; Frormann, Sven; Lee, Jeewoo

    2015-03-26

    A series of pyridine derivatives in the C-region of N-((6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-3-yl)methyl) 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides were investigated as hTRPV1 antagonists. The SAR analysis indicated that 6-difluorochloromethyl pyridine derivatives were the best surrogates of the C-region for previous leads. Among them, compound 31 showed excellent antagonism to capsaicin as well as to multiple hTRPV1 activators. It demonstrated strong analgesic activity in the formalin test in mice with full efficacy and it blocked capsaicin-induced hypothermia invivo. PMID:25659771

  1. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O.M. Zack

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and antiinflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  2. Ablation of TRPV1 Abolishes Endothelin Induced Increases in Afferent Renal Nerve Activity: Mechanisms and Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoqin; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) and its receptors, ETA and ETB, play an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure, and these components are expressed in sensory nerves. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels expressed in sensory nerves innervating the renal pelvis enhances afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), diuresis, and natriuresis. We test the hypothesis that ET1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB, whereas ETA counter-balances ETB in wild type (WT) but not TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV?/?) mice. ET-1 alone or with BQ123, an ETA antagonist, perfused into the left renal pelvis increased ipsilaterel ARNA in WT but not TRPV?/? mice, and ARNA increases were greater in the latter. [Ala1, 3,11,15]-endothelin 1 (4 Ala-ET-1), an ETB agonist, increased ARNA that was greater than that induced by ET-1 in WT mice only. 4 Ala-ET-1-induced increases in ARNA were abolished by chelerythrine (CHE), a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, but not by H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Neither CHE, H89, nor BQ788, an ETB antagonist, affected ARNA triggered by capsaicin (CAP) in WT mice. Substance P (SP) release from the renal pelvis was increased by 4 Ala-ET-1 in WT mice only, and the increase was abolished by CHE but not by H89. Neither CHE, H89, nor BQ788 affected CAP-induced SP release. Our data show that ET1 increases ARNA via activation of ETB whereas ETA counter-balances ETB in WT but not TRPV?/? mice, suggesting that TRPV1 mediates ETB-dependent increases in ARNA, diuresis, and natriuresis via possibly the PKC pathway. PMID:19858408

  3. Distribution of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1-expressing nerve fibers in mouse esophagus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hosoya, Takuji; Ishikawa, Eriko; Tashima, Kimihito; Amagase, Kikuko; Kato, Shinichi; Murayama, Toshihiko; Horie, Syunji

    2014-12-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) plays a role in esophageal function. However, the distribution of TRPV1 nerve fibers in the esophagus is currently not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of TRPV1 and neurotransmitters released from TRPV1 nerve fibers in the mouse lower esophagus. Furthermore, we investigated changes in the presence of TRPV1 in the mouse model of esophagitis. Numerous TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibers were seen in both the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus of the lower esophagus and colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). TRPV1 colocalized with substance P in axons in the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus. TRPV1 colocalized with neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the myenteric plexus. We observed some colocalization of CGRP with the vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter, packaging of ACh into synaptic vesicles after its synthesis in terminal cytoplasm, in the submucosal layer and myenteric plexus. In the esophagitis model, the number of the TRPV1 nerve fibers did not change, but their immunoreactive intensity increased compared with sham-operated mice. Inhibitory effect of exogenous capsaicin on electrically stimulated twitch contraction significantly increased in esophagitis model compared with the effect in sham-operated mice. Overall, these results suggest that TRPV1 nerve fibers projecting to both the submucosal and muscle layer of the esophagus are extrinsic spinal and vagal afferent neurons. Furthermore, TRPV1 nerve fibers contain CGRP, substance P, nitric oxide, and ACh. Therefore, acid influx-mediated TRPV1 activation may play a role in regulating esophageal relaxation. PMID:25002127

  4. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Amol M.; Akopian, Armen N.; Ruparel, Nikita B.; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T.; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs. PMID:20424317

  5. Mapping the Binding Site of TRPV1 on AKAP79: Implications for Inflammatory Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Katherine; McNaughton, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation causes hyperalgesia, an enhanced sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a thermo-TRP ion channel activated by painful levels of heat, is an important contributor because hyperalgesia is reduced when TRPV1 is either genetically deleted or pharmacologically blocked. Inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin-E2 or bradykinin cause hyperalgesia by activating cellular kinases that phosphorylate TRPV1, a process that has recently been shown to rely on a scaffolding protein, AKAP79, to target the kinases to TRPV1. Here we use Förster resonance energy transfer, immunoprecipitation, and TRPV1 membrane trafficking experiments to identify a key region on AKAP79, between amino acids 326–336, which is responsible for its interaction with TRPV1. A peptide identical to this domain inhibited sensitization of TRPV1 in vitro, and when covalently linked to a TAT peptide to promote uptake across the cell membrane the peptide inhibited in vivo inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice. Critically, it did so without affecting pain thresholds in the absence of inflammation. These results suggest that antagonizing the TRPV1–AKAP79 interaction will be a useful strategy for inhibiting inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:23699529

  6. Effects of some natural carotenoids on TRPA1- and TRPV1-induced neurogenic inflammatory processes in vivo in the mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Horvth, Gyrgyi; Kemny, gnes; Barth, Lornd; Molnr, Pter; Deli, Jzsef; Szente, Lajos; Boz, Tams; Pl, Szilrd; Sndor, Katalin; Sz?ke, va; Szolcsnyi, Jnos; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2015-05-01

    Mechanisms of the potent anti-inflammatory actions of carotenoids are unknown. Since carotenoids are incorporated into membranes, they might modulate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and TRPV1) activation predominantly on peptidergic sensory nerves. We therefore investigated the effects of three carotenoids (?-carotene, lutein and lycopene) on cutaneous neurogenic inflammation. Acute neurogenic edema and inflammatory cell recruitment were induced by smearing the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil (5%) or the TRPV1 activator capsaicin (2.5%) on the mouse ear. Ear thickness was then determined by micrometry, microcirculation by laser Doppler imaging and neutrophil accumulation by histopathology and spectrophotometric determination of myeloperoxidase activity. The effects of lutein on the stimulatory action of the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were also tested on the guinea-pig small intestine, in isolated organ experiments. Mustard oil evoked 50-55% ear edema and granulocyte influx, as shown by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. Swelling was significantly reduced between 2 and 4 h after administration of lutein or ?-carotene (100 mg/kg subcutane three times during 24 h). Lutein also decreased neutrophil accumulation induced by TRPA1 activation, but did not affect mustard oil-evoked intestinal contraction. Lycopene had no effect on any of these parameters. None of the three carotenoids altered capsaicin-evoked inflammation. It is proposed that the dihydroxycarotenoid lutein selectively inhibits TRPA1 activation and consequent neurogenic inflammation, possibly by modulating lipid rafts. PMID:25645682

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel analgesic agents targeting both cyclooxygenase and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Pan, Miaobo; Fu, Mian; Wang, Jingjie; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-02-15

    Multitarget-directed ligands might offer certain advantages over traditional single-target drugs and/or drug combinations. In the present study, a series of novel analgesic agents targeting both cyclooxygenase and TRPV1 were prepared and evaluated in an effort to optimize properties of previously described lead compounds from piperazine, ethanediamine cores. These compounds were evaluated for antagonism of hTRPV1 activation by capsaicin and the ability to inhibit Ovine COX-1 and human recombinant COX-2 in vitro. The favorable potentials of these test compounds were further characterized in preliminary analgesic and side-effects tests in vivo. On the basis of comprehensive evaluations, compound 8d which showed strong TRPV1 antagonistic activity, middle COX-2 inhibition, weak ulcerogenic action and had no hyperthermia side-effect was considered as a safe candidate for the further development of analgesic drugs. PMID:26795113

  8. Functional and Structural Divergence in Human TRPV1 Channel Subunits by Oxidative Cysteine Modification.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Nozomi; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Fujiwara, Kenji; Polat, Onur Kerem; Badr, Heba; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-02-19

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is a tetrameric protein that acts as a sensor for noxious stimuli such as heat and for diverse inflammatory mediators such as oxidative stress to mediate nociception in a subset of sensory neurons. In TRPV1 oxidation sensing, cysteine (Cys) oxidation has been considered as the principle mechanism; however, its biochemical basis remains elusive. Here, we characterize the oxidative status of Cys residues in differential redox environments and propose a model of TRPV1 activation by oxidation. Through employing a combination of non-reducing SDS-PAGE, electrophysiology, and mass spectrometry we have identified the formation of subunit dimers carrying a stable intersubunit disulfide bond between Cys-258 and Cys-742 of human TRPV1 (hTRPV1). C258S and C742S hTRPV1 mutants have a decreased protein half-life, reflecting the role of the intersubunit disulfide bond in supporting channel stability. Interestingly, the C258S hTRPV1 mutant shows an abolished response to oxidants. Mass spectrometric analysis of Cys residues of hTRPV1 treated with hydrogen peroxide shows that Cys-258 is highly sensitive to oxidation. Our results suggest that Cys-258 residues are heterogeneously modified in the hTRPV1 tetrameric complex and comprise Cys-258 with free thiol for oxidation sensing and Cys-258, which is involved in the disulfide bond for assisting subunit dimerization. Thus, the hTRPV1 channel has a heterogeneous subunit composition in terms of both redox status and function. PMID:26702055

  9. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  10. Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of pain: structure-activity relationships for ureas with quinoline, isoquinoline, quinazoline, phthalazine, quinoxaline, and cinnoline moieties.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Bayburt, Erol K; Schmidt, Robert G; Zheng, Guo Zhu; Perner, Richard J; Didomenico, Stanley; Koenig, John R; Turner, Sean; Jinkerson, Tammie; Drizin, Irene; Hannick, Steven M; Macri, Bryan S; McDonald, Heath A; Honore, Prisca; Wismer, Carol T; Marsh, Kennan C; Wetter, Jill; Stewart, Kent D; Oie, Tetsuro; Jarvis, Michael F; Surowy, Carol S; Faltynek, Connie R; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2005-02-10

    Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonists with various bicyclic heteroaromatic pharmacophores were synthesized, and their in vitro activity in blocking capsaicin activation of TRPV1 was assessed. On the basis of the contribution of these pharmacophores to the in vitro potency, they were ranked in the order of 5-isoquinoline > 8-quinoline = 8-quinazoline > 8-isoquinoline > or = cinnoline approximately phthalazine approximately quinoxaline approximately 5-quinoline. The 5-isoquinoline-containing compound 14a (hTRPV1 IC50 = 4 nM) exhibited 46% oral bioavailability and in vivo activity in animal models of visceral and inflammatory pain. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of 14a are substantial improvements over the profile of the high-throughput screening hit 1 (hTRPV1 IC50 = 22 nM), which was not efficacious in animal pain models and was not orally bioavailable. PMID:15689158

  11. Relative contributions of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in the activation of vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibres by the endogenous autacoid 4-oxononenal

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Clark, T E; McAlexander, M A; Nassenstein, C; Sheardown, S A; Wilson, S; Thornton, J; Carr, M J; Undem, B J

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 channels are cation channels found preferentially on nociceptive sensory neurones, including capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1-expressing vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibres, and are activated by electrophilic compounds such as mustard oil and cinnamaldehyde. Oxidative stress, a pathological feature of many respiratory diseases, causes the endogenous formation of a number of reactive electrophilic alkenals via lipid peroxidation. One such alkenal, 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), activates TRPA1 in cultured sensory neurones. However, our data demonstrate that 100 ?m 4HNE was unable to evoke significant action potential discharge or tachykinin release from bronchopulmonary C-fibre terminals. Instead, another endogenously produced alkenal, 4-oxononenal (4ONE, 10 ?m), which is far more electrophilic than 4HNE, caused substantial action potential discharge and tachykinin release from bronchopulmonary C-fibre terminals. The activation of mouse bronchopulmonary C-fibre terminals by 4ONE (10100 ?m) was mediated entirely by TRPA1 channels, based on the absence of responses in C-fibre terminals from TRPA1 knockout mice. Interestingly, although the robust increases in calcium caused by 4ONE (0.110 ?m) in dissociated vagal neurones were essentially abolished in TRPA1 knockout mice, at 100 ?m 4ONE caused a large TRPV1-dependent response. Furthermore, 4ONE (100 ?m) was shown to activate TRPV1 channel-expressing HEK cells. In conclusion, the data support the hypothesis that 4-ONE is a relevant endogenous activator of vagal C-fibres via an interaction with TRPA1, and at less relevant concentrations, it may activate nerves via TRPV1. PMID:18499726

  12. Topical capsaicin for pain management: therapeutic potential and mechanisms of action of the new high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch

    PubMed Central

    Anand, P.; Bley, K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Topical capsaicin formulations are used for pain management. Safety and modest efficacy of low-concentration capsaicin formulations, which require repeated daily self-administration, are supported by meta-analyses of numerous studies. A high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza) was recently approved in the EU and USA. A single 60-min application in patients with neuropathic pain produced effective pain relief for up to 12 weeks. Advantages of the high-concentration capsaicin patch include longer duration of effect, patient compliance, and low risk for systemic effects or drugdrug interactions. The mechanism of action of topical capsaicin has been ascribed to depletion of substance P. However, experimental and clinical studies show that depletion of substance P from nociceptors is only a correlate of capsaicin treatment and has little, if any, causative role in pain relief. Rather, topical capsaicin acts in the skin to attenuate cutaneous hypersensitivity and reduce pain by a process best described as defunctionalization of nociceptor fibres. Defunctionalization is due to a number of effects that include temporary loss of membrane potential, inability to transport neurotrophic factors leading to altered phenotype, and reversible retraction of epidermal and dermal nerve fibre terminals. Peripheral neuropathic hypersensitivity is mediated by diverse mechanisms, including altered expression of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 or other key ion channels in affected or intact adjacent peripheral nociceptive nerve fibres, aberrant re-innervation, and collateral sprouting, all of which are defunctionalized by topical capsaicin. Evidence suggests that the utility of topical capsaicin may extend beyond painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21852280

  13. Trans-activation of TRPV1 by D1R in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons is modulated by a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays important roles in motor control, cognition, and pain modulation in the CNS, and acts via a variety of dopamine receptors (D1R-D5R), a class of GPCRs. Although nociceptive sensory neurons express D1-like receptors, very little is known about the effect of dopamine on TRPV1 in the peripheral nervous system. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of D1R activation on TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons using Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The D1R agonist SKF-38393 induced reproducible Ca(2+) responses via Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 rather than Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed co-expression of D1R and TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons. The PLC-specific inhibitor blocked the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response, whereas the PKC, DAG lipase, AC, and PKA inhibitors had no effect on the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response. Taken together, our results suggest that the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response results from the direct activation of TRPV1 by a PLC/DAG-mediated membrane-delimited pathway. These results provide evidence that the trans-activation of TRPV1 following D1R activation may contribute to the modulation of pain signaling in nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:26319554

  14. Sensitization of Primary Afferent Nociceptors Induced by Intradermal Capsaicin Involves the Peripheral Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Driven by Dorsal Root Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dingge; Ren, Yong; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from axons of primary afferent nociceptive neurons are the key elements for the incidence of neurogenic inflammation and their release is associated with dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). However, whether the release is due to the triggering of DRRs and plays a role in inflammation-induced pain still remain to be determined. The present study assessed the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) following intradermal injection of capsaicin and determined if this release is due to activation of primary afferent neurons antidromically by triggering of DRRs. Under dorsal root intact conditions, primary afferent nociceptive fibers recorded in anesthetized rats could be sensitized by capsaicin injection, as shown by an increase in afferent responses and lowering of the response threshold to mechanical stimuli. After DRRs were removed by dorsal rhizotomy, the capsaicin-evoked sensitization was significantly reduced. In dorsal root intact rats, peripheral pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist could dose-dependently reduce the capsaicin-induced sensitization. Peripheral post-treatment with CGRP could dose-dependently restore the capsaicin-induced sensitization under dorsal rhizotomized conditions. Capsaicin injection evoked increases in numbers of single and double labeled TRPV1 and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). After dorsal rhizotomy, these evoked expressions were significantly inhibited. Perspective These data indicate that the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation enhances sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by capsaicin injection. The underlying mechanism involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors whereby CGRP is released peripherally. PMID:18701354

  15. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RAR?, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  16. Selective Activation of hTRPV1 by N-Geranyl Cyclopropylcarboxamide, an Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Yiseul; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lyall, Vijay; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    TRPV1t, a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been proposed as a constitutively active, non-selective cation channel as a putative amiloride-insensitive salt taste receptor and shares many properties with TRPV1. Based on our previous chorda tympani taste nerve recordings in rodents and human sensory evaluations, we proposed that N-geranylcyclopropylcarboxamide (NGCC), a novel synthetic compound, acts as a salt taste enhancer by modulating the amiloride/benzamil-insensitive Na+ entry pathways. As an extension of this work, we investigated NGCC-induced human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) activation using a Ca2+-flux signaling assay in cultured cells. NGCC enhanced Ca2+ influx in hTRPV1-expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner (EC50?=?115 M). NGCC-induced Ca2+ influx was significantly attenuated by ruthenium red (RR; 30 M), a non-specific blocker of TRP channels and capsazepine (CZP; 5 M), a specific antagonist of TRPV1, implying that NGCC directly activates hTRPV1. TRPA1 is often co-expressed with TRPV1 in sensory neurons. Therefore, we also investigated the effects of NGCC on hTRPA1-expressing cells. Similar to hTRPV1, NGCC enhanced Ca2+ influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells (EC50?=?83.65 M). The NGCC-induced Ca2+ influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells was blocked by RR (30 M) and HC-030031 (100 M), a specific antagonist of TRPA1. These results suggested that NGCC selectively activates TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cultured cells. These data may provide additional support for our previous hypothesis that NGCC interacts with TRPV1 variant cation channel, a putative amiloride/benzamil-insensitive salt taste pathway in the anterior taste receptive field. PMID:24586504

  17. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel regulates diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Lee, Yongjin; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Wang, Hsun-Fan; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent studies have shown a metabolic role of capsaicin that may be mediated via the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel. In this study, TRPV1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (as controls) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and metabolic studies were performed to measure insulin and leptin action. The TRPV1 KO mice became more obese than the WT mice after HFD, partly attributed to altered energy balance and leptin resistance in the KO mice. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment showed that the TRPV1 KO mice were more insulin resistant after HFD because of the ?40% reduction in glucose metabolism in the white and brown adipose tissue, compared with that in the WT mice. Leptin treatment failed to suppress food intake, and leptin-mediated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activity was blunted in the TRPV1 KO mice. We also found that the TRPV1 KO mice were more obese and insulin resistant than the WT mice at 9 mo of age. Taken together, these results indicate that lacking TRPV1 exacerbates the obesity and insulin resistance associated with an HFD and aging, and our findings further suggest that TRPV1 has a major role in regulating glucose metabolism and hypothalamic leptin's effects in obesity. PMID:25888600

  18. TRPV1 and TRPA1 Function and Modulation are Target Tissue-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Sacha; Molliver, Derek; Christianson, Julie A.; Schwartz, Erica S.; Cornuet, Pam; Albers, Kathryn M.; Davis, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The NGF and GDNF families of growth factors regulate the sensitivity of sensory neurons. The ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 are necessary for development of inflammatory hypersensitivity and are functionally potentiated by growth factors. We have shown previously that inflamed skin exhibits rapid increases in artemin mRNA with slower, smaller increases in NGF mRNA. Here, using mice we show that in inflamed colon, mRNA for both growth factors increased with a pattern distinct from that seen in skin. Differences were also seen in the pattern of TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression in DRG innervating inflamed skin and colon. Growth factors potentiated capsaicin (a specific TRPV1 agonist) and mustard oil (a specific TRPA1 agonist) behavioral responses in vivo, raising the question as to how these growth factors affect individual afferents. Because individual tissues are innervated by afferents with unique properties, we investigated modulation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in identified afferents projecting to muscle, skin and colon. Muscle and colon afferents are twice as likely as skin afferents to express functional TRPV1 and TRPA1. TRPV1 and TRPA1 responses were potentiated by growth factors in all afferent types, but compared to skin afferents, muscle afferents were twice as likely to exhibit NGF-induced potentiation and half as likely to exhibit artemin-induced potentiation of TRPV1. Furthermore, skin afferents showed no GDNF-induced potentiation of TRPA1, but 43% of muscle and 38% of colon afferents exhibited GDNF-induced potentiation. These results show that interpretation of afferent homeostatic mechanisms must incorporate properties that are specific to the target tissue. PMID:21775597

  19. Anandamide acts as an intracellular messenger amplifying Ca2+ influx via TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    van der Stelt, Mario; Trevisani, Marcello; Vellani, Vittorio; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Campi, Barbara; McNaughton, Peter; Geppetti, Piero; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide is able to interact with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels at a molecular level. As yet, endogenously produced anandamide has not been shown to activate TRPV1, but this is of importance to understand the physiological function of this interaction. Here, we show that intracellular Ca2+ mobilization via the purinergic receptor agonist ATP, the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol or the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin leads to formation of anandamide, and subsequent TRPV1-dependent Ca2+ influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Anandamide metabolism and efflux from the cell tonically limit TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ entry. In DRG neurons, this mechanism was found to lead to TRPV1-mediated currents that were enhanced by selective blockade of anandamide cellular efflux. Thus, endogenous anandamide is formed on stimulation of metabotropic receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate pathway and then signals to TRPV1 channels. This novel intracellular function of anandamide may precede its action at cannabinoid receptors, and might be relevant to its control over neurotransmitter release. PMID:16107881

  20. Reduction of TRPV1 expression in the trigeminal system by botulinum neurotoxin type-A.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Shibata, Mamoru; Toriumi, Haruki; Iwashita, Tatsuo; Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Hitoshi; Kuroi, Toshiya; Ebine, Taeko; Koizumi, Kenzo; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) is clinically used for patients with pain disorders and dystonia. The precise mechanism whereby BoNT-A controls pain remains elusive. Here, we studied how BoNT-A affects the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), a cation channel critically implicated in nociception, in the trigeminal system. Histological studies revealed that subcutaneous BoNT-A injection (0.25, 0.5, or 5 ng/kg) into the face targeted the ophthalmic division of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and decreased TRPV1-immunoreactive neurons in the TG and TRPV1-immunoreactive fibers in rat trigeminal terminals. Of note, TG neurons that received projections from the dura mater, a principal site of headache generation, had reduced TRPV1 expression. BoNT-A-induced cleavage of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25-kDa) in the TG became obvious 2 days after BoNT-A administration and persisted for at least 14 days. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) data indicated that the TRPV1-decreasing effects of BoNT-A were not mediated by transcriptional downregulation. By employing a surface protein biotin-labeling assay, we demonstrated that BoNT-A inhibited TRPV1 trafficking to the plasma membrane in primary TG neurons. Moreover, Y200F-mutated TRPV1, which is incapable of trafficking to the plasma membrane, was expressed in PC12 cells by transfection, and pharmacological studies revealed that TRPV1 in the cytoplasm was more predisposed to proteasome-mediated proteolysis than plasma membrane-located TRPV1. We conclude that the mechanism by which BoNT-A reduces TRPV1 expression involves the inhibition of TRPV1 plasma membrane trafficking and proteasome-mediated degradation in the cytoplasm. This paradigm seems to explain how BoNT-A alleviates TRPV1-mediated pain. Our data reveal a likely molecular mechanism whereby BoNT-A treatment reduces TRPV1 expression in the trigeminal system and provide important clues to novel therapeutic measures for ameliorating craniofacial pain. PMID:22820141

  1. Physiological and behavioral evidence of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV-like channel in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Summers, Torrie; Holec, Sara; Burrell, Brian D

    2014-12-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels are found throughout the animal kingdom, where they play an important role in sensory transduction. In this study, we combined physiological studies with in vivo behavioral experiments to examine the presence of a putative TRPV-like receptor in the medicinal leech, building upon earlier studies in this lophotrochozoan invertebrate. The leech polymodal nociceptive neuron was activated by both peripheral and central application of the TRPV1-activator capsaicin in a concentration-dependent manner, with 100 ?mol l(-1) being the lowest effective concentration. Responses to capsaicin were inhibited by the selective TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. The polymodal nociceptive neuron also responded to noxious thermal stimuli (>40C), and this response was also blocked by SB366791. Capsaicin sensitivity was selective to the polymodal nociceptor with no direct response being elicited in the mechanical nociceptive neuron or in the non-nociceptive touch- or pressure-sensitive neurons. Capsaicin also elicited nocifensive behavioral responses (withdrawals and locomotion) in a concentration-dependent manner, and these behavioral responses were significantly attenuated with SB366791. These results suggest the presence of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV-like channel in the medicinal leech central nervous system and are relevant to the evolution of nociceptive signaling. PMID:25324339

  2. Auto-oxidation products of epigallocatechin gallate activate TRPA1 and TRPV1 in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurogi, Mako; Kawai, Yasushi; Nagatomo, Katsuhiro; Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The sensation of astringency is elicited by catechins and their polymers in wine and tea. It has been considered that catechins in green tea are unstable and auto-oxidized to induce more astringent taste. Here, we examined how mammalian transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) and TRPA1, which are nociceptive sensors, are activated by green tea catechins during the auto-oxidation process. Neither TRPV1 nor TRPA1 could be activated by any of the freshly prepared catechin. When one of the major catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), was preincubated for 3h in Hank's balanced salt solution, it significantly activated both TRP channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Even after incubation, other catechins showed much less effects. Results suggest that only oxidative products of EGCG activate both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons were also activated by the incubated EGCG through TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that theasinensins A and D are formed during incubation of EGCG. We found that purified theasinensin A activates both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and that it stimulates DRG neurons through TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. Results suggested a possibility that TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels are involved in the sense of astringent taste of green tea. PMID:25422365

  3. Contributions of TRPV1, endovanilloids, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cell death in vitro and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Karen C.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Romero, Erin G.; Dull, Randal O.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (endovanilloids) are implicated as mediators of lung injury during inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that endovanilloids produced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment activate TRPV1 and cause endoplasmic reticulum stress/GADD153 expression in lung cells, representing a mechanistic component of lung injury. The TRPV1 agonist nonivamide induced GADD153 expression and caused cytotoxicity in immortalized and primary human bronchial, bronchiolar/alveolar, and microvascular endothelial cells, proportional to TRPV1 mRNA expression. In CF-1 mice, Trpv1 mRNA was most abundant in the alveoli, and intratracheal nonivamide treatment promoted Gadd153 expression in the alveolar region. Treatment of CF-1 mice with LPS increased Gadd153 in the lung, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio. Cotreating mice with LPS and the TRPV1 antagonist LJO-328 reduced Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL but did not inhibit increases in lung wet-to-dry ratio. In Trpv1?/? mice treated with LPS, Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL were reduced relative to wild-type mice, and the wet-to-dry weight ratios of lungs from both wild-type and Trpv1?/? mice decreased. Organic extracts of blood collected from LPS-treated mice were more cytotoxic to TRPV1-overexpressing cells compared with BEAS-2B cells and extracts from control mice, however, most pure endovanilloids did not produce cytotoxicity in a characteristic TRPV1-dependent manner. Collectively, these data indicate a role for TRPV1, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists, in ER stress and cytotoxicity in lung cells but demonstrate that ER stress and cytotoxicity are not essential for pulmonary edema. PMID:21949157

  4. Unveiling TRPV1 Spatio-Temporal Organization in Live Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Barbara; Di Rienzo, Carmine; Cardarelli, Francesco; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Beltram, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel that integrates several stimuli into nociception and neurogenic inflammation. Here we investigated the subtle TRPV1 interplay with candidate membrane partners in live cells by a combination of spatio-temporal fluctuation techniques and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. We show that TRPV1 is split into three populations with fairly different molecular properties: one binding to caveolin-1 and confined into caveolar structures, one actively guided by microtubules through selective binding, and one which diffuses freely and is not directly implicated in regulating receptor functionality. The emergence of caveolin-1 as a new interactor of TRPV1 evokes caveolar endocytosis as the main desensitization pathway of TRPV1 receptor, while microtubule binding agrees with previous data suggesting the receptor stabilization in functional form by these cytoskeletal components. Our results shed light on the hitherto unknown relationships between spatial organization and TRPV1 function in live-cell membranes. PMID:25764349

  5. Propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity via a TRPA1-, nitric oxide synthase-dependent activation of PKC?.

    PubMed

    Sinharoy, Pritam; Zhang, Hongyu; Sinha, Sayantani; Prudner, Bethany C; Bratz, Ian N; Damron, Derek S

    2015-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that the intravenous anesthetic, propofol, restores the sensitivity of transient receptor potential vanilloid channel subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors via a protein kinase C epsilon (PKC?)-dependent and transient receptor potential ankyrin channel subtype-1 (TRPA1)-dependent pathway in sensory neurons. The extent to which the two pathways are directly linked or operating in parallel has not been determined. Using a molecular approach, our objectives of the current study were to confirm that TRPA1 activation directly results in PKC? activation and to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which this occurs. F-11 cells were transfected with complimentary DNA (cDNA) for TRPV1 only or both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. An immunoblot analysis of the total and phosphorylated forms of PKC?, nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and TRPV1 was also performed. In F-11 cells containing both channels, PKC? inhibition prevented the propofol- and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity to agonist stimulation as well as increased phosphorylation of PKC? and TRPV1. In cells containing TRPV1 only, neither agonist induced PKC? or TRPV1 phosphorylation. Moreover, NOS inhibition blocked propofol-and AITC-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity and PKC? phosphorylation, and PKC? inhibition prevented the nitric oxide donor, SNAP, from restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Also, propofol-and AITC-induced phosphorylation of nNOS and nitric oxide (NO) production were blocked with the TRPA1-antagonist, HC-030031. These data indicate that the AITC- and propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity is mediated by a TRPA1-dependent, nitric oxide synthase-dependent activation of PKC?. PMID:26171233

  6. Propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity via a TRPA1-, nitric oxide synthase-dependent activation of PKCε

    PubMed Central

    Sinharoy, Pritam; Zhang, Hongyu; Sinha, Sayantani; Prudner, Bethany C; Bratz, Ian N; Damron, Derek S

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the intravenous anesthetic, propofol, restores the sensitivity of transient receptor potential vanilloid channel subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors via a protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε)-dependent and transient receptor potential ankyrin channel subtype-1 (TRPA1)-dependent pathway in sensory neurons. The extent to which the two pathways are directly linked or operating in parallel has not been determined. Using a molecular approach, our objectives of the current study were to confirm that TRPA1 activation directly results in PKCε activation and to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which this occurs. F-11 cells were transfected with complimentary DNA (cDNA) for TRPV1 only or both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. An immunoblot analysis of the total and phosphorylated forms of PKCε, nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and TRPV1 was also performed. In F-11 cells containing both channels, PKCε inhibition prevented the propofol- and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity to agonist stimulation as well as increased phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1. In cells containing TRPV1 only, neither agonist induced PKCε or TRPV1 phosphorylation. Moreover, NOS inhibition blocked propofol-and AITC-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity and PKCε phosphorylation, and PKCε inhibition prevented the nitric oxide donor, SNAP, from restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Also, propofol-and AITC-induced phosphorylation of nNOS and nitric oxide (NO) production were blocked with the TRPA1-antagonist, HC-030031. These data indicate that the AITC- and propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity is mediated by a TRPA1-dependent, nitric oxide synthase-dependent activation of PKCε. PMID:26171233

  7. Cough sensors. II. Transient receptor potential membrane receptors on cough sensors.

    PubMed

    Materazzi, S; Nassini, R; Gatti, R; Trevisani, M; Geppetti, P

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels is represented by at least six members in primary sensory neurons. These include the TRP vanilloid subtypes 1 (TRPV1), 2, 3, and 4, the cold and menthol receptor TRPM8, and TRPA1. Much interest has been directed to the study of the TRPV1, because capsaicin has been instrumental in discovering the unique role of a subset of primary sensory neurons in causing nociceptive responses, in activating reflex pathways including cough, and in producing neurogenic inflammation. TRPV1 is now regarded as an integrator of diverse sensory modalities because it undergoes marked plasticity and sensitization through a variety of mechanisms, including activation of G-protein-coupled or tyrosine kinase receptors. Evidence in experimental animals and in patients with airway diseases indicates a marked hypersensitivity to cough induced by TRPV1 agonists. Recent studies with newly developed high-affinity and selective TRPV1 antagonists have revealed that TRPV1 inhibition reduces cough induced by citric acid or antigen challenge. PMID:18825335

  8. Quantification of TRPV1 protein levels in rat tissues to understand its physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping; Korepanova, Alla V; Vos, Melissa H; Moreland, Robert B; Chiu, Mark L; Faltynek, Connie R

    2013-05-01

    Transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel expressed in both the peripheral and central nervous systems (CNS). TRPV1 protein levels in rat tissues were determined under normal and pain states using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In naive rats, brain TRPV1 protein concentrations ranged from 1.5 to 4 ng/mg in hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. Rat spinal cord TRPV1 protein levels were 40-50 ng/mg in L1-L5 of the lumbar regions, but increased to 97 9.3 ng/mg toward the end of the lumbar region (L6-S1). In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, TRPV1 protein level significantly increased on both the contralateral (36.5 %, p < 0.05) and ipsilateral (31.4 %, p < 0.05) L4-L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG). TRPV1 protein levels also increased 33.3 % (p < 0.05) on the ipsilateral sciatic nerve, but no significant change in the lumbar spinal cord of CFA rats. In the monoiodoacetate-induced rat knee joint pain model, TRPV1 protein level was significantly reduced in the ipsilateral L3-L5 DRG (33.3 %, p < 0.01), no significant difference was detected in the lumbar region of the spinal cord. Quantitative determination of TRPV1 protein levels may help to elucidate the TRPV1 physiological roles and regulatory mechanisms in various pain states. PMID:22798269

  9. TRPV1 ablation aggravates inflammatory responses and organ damage during endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youping; Wang, Donna H

    2013-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that ablation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels leads to exacerbated inflammatory responses and organ damage during endotoxic shock, lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 million endotoxin units/kg of body weight) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1(-/-)) mice. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate, determined by radiotelemetry, were severely depressed after LPS injection into WT and TRPV1(-/-) mice, with no distinction between the two strains. At 24 h after LPS injection, renal glomerular hypercellularity and hepatocellular injury were observed in both strains, accompanying further elevated serum levels of creatinine and alanine aminotransferase in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to those in WT mice. At 6 or 24 h after LPS injection, neutrophil recruitment into kidneys and livers, serum cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-?], interleukin 1? [IL-1?], IL-6) and renal chemokine (KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 [MIP-2]) levels, and renal VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression were greater in TRPV1(-/-) mice than WT mice. In addition, increased plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels observed in WT mice 6 h after LPS injection were absent in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Thus, TRPV1 ablation aggravates inflammatory responses, including neutrophil infiltration, proinflammatory cytokine production, and adhesion molecule expression, leading to intensified organ damage during endotoxic shock in the absence of worsened circulatory failure. The data indicate that TRPV1 activation may attenuate endotoxin-induced organ damage, possibly via its anti-inflammatory action rather than alteration of hemodynamics. PMID:23637043

  10. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Samivel, Ramachandran; Kim, Dae Woo; Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-?B, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR. PMID:26700618

  11. 2-Alkyl/alkenyl substituted pyridine C-region analogues of 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides as highly potent TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ryu, HyungChul; Seo, Sejin; Cho, Seong-Hee; Kim, Ho Shin; Jung, Aeran; Kang, Dong Wook; Son, Karam; Cui, Minghua; Hong, Sun-hye; Sharma, Pankaz Kumar; Choi, Sun; Blumberg, Peter M; Frank-Foltyn, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas; Frormann, Sven; Lee, Jeewoo

    2014-08-15

    A series of 2-alkyl/alkenyl pyridine C-region derivatives of 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl)propanamides were investigated as hTRPV1 antagonists. Multiple compounds showed excellent and stereospecific TRPV1 antagonism with better potency than previous lead 2. Among them, compound 15f demonstrated a strong analgesic profile in a rat neuropathic pain model and blocked capsaicin-induced hypothermia in a dose-dependent manner. Docking analysis of (S)-15f with our hTRPV1 homology model provided insight into its specific binding mode. PMID:24948568

  12. Acidic pH facilitates peripheral αβmeATP-mediated nociception in rats: differential roles of P2X, P2Y, ASIC and TRPV1 receptors in ATP-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyoung-Sig; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2011-03-01

    Peripheral ischemia is commonly associated with an increase in tissue ATP concentration and a decrease in tissue pH. Although in vitro data suggest that low tissue pH can affect ATP-binding affinities to P2 receptors, the mechanistic relationship between ATP and low pH on peripheral nociception has not been fully examined. This study was designed to investigate the potential role of an acidified environment on intraplantar αβmeATP-induced peripheral pain responses in rats. The mechanical allodynia (MA) produced by injection of αβmeATP was significantly increased in animals that received the drug diluted in pH 4.0 saline compared to those that received the drug diluted in pH 7.0 saline. Moreover, animals injected with αβmeATP (100 nmol) in pH 4.0 saline developed thermal hyperalgesia (TH), which did not occur in animals treated with αβmeATP diluted in pH 7.0 saline. To elucidate which receptors were involved in this pH-related facilitation of αβmeATP-induced MA and TH, rats were pretreated with PPADS (P2 antagonist), TNP-ATP (P2X antagonist), MRS2179 (P2Y1 antagonist), AMG9810 (TRPV1 antagonist) or amiloride (ASIC blocker). Both PPADS and TNP-ATP dose-dependently blocked pH-facilitated MA, while TH was significantly reduced by pre-treatment with MRS2179 or AMG9810. Moreover, amiloride injection significantly reduced low pH-induced facilitation of αβmeATP-mediated MA, but not TH. These results demonstrate that low tissue pH facilitates ATP-mediated MA via the activation of P2X receptors and ASICs, whereas TH induced by ATP under low pH conditions is mediated by the P2Y1 receptor and TRPV1, but not ASIC. Thus distinct mechanisms are responsible for the development of MA and TH under conditions of tissue acidosis and increased ATP. PMID:21172361

  13. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid directly activates TRPV1 through a C-terminal binding site.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Posadas, Andrs; Picazo-Jurez, Giovanni; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrs; Morales-Lzaro, Sara; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Islas, Len D; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, there has been growing evidence that the bioactive phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose amounts are increased upon tissue injury, activates primary nociceptors resulting in neuropathic pain. The TRPV1 ion channel is expressed in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by physical and chemical stimuli. Here we show that in control mice LPA produces acute pain-like behaviors, which are substantially reduced in Trpv1-null animals. Our data also demonstrate that LPA activates TRPV1 through a unique mechanism that is independent of G protein-coupled receptors, contrary to what has been widely shown for other ion channels, by directly interacting with the C terminus of the channel. We conclude that TRPV1 is a direct molecular target of the pain-producing molecule LPA and that this constitutes, to our knowledge, the first example of LPA binding directly to an ion channel to acutely regulate its function. PMID:22101604

  15. Modulation of transient receptor vanilloid 1 activity by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Viola; Stein, Christoph; Zllner, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective ligand-gated cation channel responding to noxious heat, protons, and chemicals such as capsaicin. TRPV1 is expressed in sensory neurons and plays a critical role in pain associated with tissue injury, inflammation, and nerve lesions. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is coexpressed with TRPV1. It is activated by compounds that cause a burning sensation (e.g., mustard oil) and, indirectly, by components of the inflammatory milieu eliciting nociceptor excitation and pain hypersensitivity. Previous studies indicate an interaction of TRPV1 and TRPA1 signaling pathways. Here we sought to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions in nociceptive neurons. We first excluded physical interactions of both channels using radioligand binding studies. By microfluorimetry, electrophysiological experiments, cAMP measurements, and site-directed mutagenesis we found a sensitization of TRPV1 after TRPA1 stimulation with mustard oil in a calcium and cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. TRPA1 stimulation enhanced TRPV1 phosphorylation via the putative PKA phosphorylation site serine 116. We also detected calcium-sensitive increased TRPV1 activity after TRPA1 activation in dorsal root ganglion neurons. The inhibition of TRPA1 by HC-030031 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-1,3-dimethyl-N-[4-(1-methylethyl)phenyl]-2,6-dioxo-7H-purine-7-acetamide, 2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide) after its initial stimulation (and the calcium-insensitive TRPA1 mutant D477A) still showed increased capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity. This excludes a calcium-induced additive TRPA1 current after TRPV1 stimulation. Our study shows sensitization of TRPV1 via activation of TRPA1, which involves adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP, subsequent translocation and activation of PKA, and phosphorylation of TRPV1 at PKA phosphorylation residues. This suggests that cross-sensitization of TRP channels contributes to enhanced pain sensitivity in inflamed tissues. PMID:24275229

  16. TRPV1 channels in the nucleus of the solitary tract mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR in decerebrate piglets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Elevating body temperature or just the temperature of the dorsal medulla by approximately 2 C prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) in decerebrate neonatal piglets. We tested the hypothesis that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR. We studied the effect of a selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist on thermal prolongation of the LCR, and we tested the effect of a TRPV1 agonist on the duration of the LCR under normothermic conditions. We studied 37 decerebrate neonatal piglets between the ages of post-natal days 4 and 7. The TRPV1 receptor antagonist, 5?iodoresiniferatoxin (65 microM/L in 100 nL), blocked thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected bilaterally into the region of the NTS. The TRPV1 agonist, resiniferatoxin (0.65-1.0 mM/L in 100 nL), prolonged the LCR after bilateral injection into the NTS even when the body temperature of each piglet was normal. The effect of the TRPV1 agonists could be blocked by treatment with the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, whether given intravenously (0.3 mg/kg) or focally injected bilaterally into the NTS (10 mM in 100nL). We conclude that TRPV1 receptors in the NTS mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR. PMID:21276877

  17. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Fawley, Jessica A; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 ?M QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1- ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1- inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  18. External QX-314 inhibits evoked cranial primary afferent synaptic transmission independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The cell-impermeant lidocaine derivative QX-314 blocks sodium channels via intracellular mechanisms. In somatosensory nociceptive neurons, open transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors provide a transmembrane passageway for QX-314 to produce long-lasting analgesia. Many cranial primary afferents express TRPV1 at synapses on neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). Here, we investigated whether QX-314 interrupts neurotransmission from primary afferents in rat brain-stem slices. Shocks to the solitary tract (ST) activated highly synchronous evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs). Application of 300 ?M QX-314 increased the ST-EPSC latency from TRPV1+ ST afferents, but, surprisingly, it had similar actions at TRPV1? ST afferents. Continued exposure to QX-314 blocked evoked ST-EPSCs at both afferent types. Neither the time to onset of latency changes nor the time to ST-EPSC failure differed between responses for TRPV1+ and TRPV1? inputs. Likewise, the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine failed to prevent the actions of QX-314. Whereas QX-314 blocked ST-evoked release, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs remained unaltered. In neurons exposed to QX-314, intracellular current injection evoked action potentials suggesting a presynaptic site of action. QX-314 acted similarly at Vc neurons to increase latency and block EPSCs evoked from trigeminal tract afferents. Our results demonstrate that QX-314 blocked nerve conduction in cranial primary afferents without interrupting the glutamate release mechanism or generation of postsynaptic action potentials. The TRPV1 independence suggests that QX-314 either acted extracellularly or more likely entered these axons through an undetermined pathway common to all cranial primary afferents. PMID:25185814

  19. NOX3 NADPH Oxidase Couples Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 to Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-Mediated Inflammation and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 999–1010. PMID:20712533

  20. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24?h, which recovered by 72?h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. PMID:20712533

  1. Ameliorating Endothelial Mitochondrial Dysfunction Restores Coronary Function via Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Mediated Protein Kinase A/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiqiang; Wang, Peijian; Ma, Liqun; Gao, Peng; Gong, Liuping; Li, Li; Li, Qiang; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Xunmei; He, Hongbo; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiogenic death worldwide. Mitochondria are the principal source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and defective oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributes to ROS generation. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an adaptive antioxidant defense factor, protects against mitochondrial ROS-induced endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) attenuates vascular dysfunction. Therefore, whether TRPV1 activation antagonizes coronary lesions by alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the activity of the protein kinase A/UCP2 pathway warrants examination. ApoE(-/-), ApoE(-/-)/TRPV1(-/-), and ApoE(-/-)/UCP2(-/-) mice were fed standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or the HFD plus 0.01% capsaicin. HFD intake profoundly impaired coronary vasodilatation and myocardial perfusion and shortened the survival duration of ApoE(-/-) mice. TRPV1 or UCP2 deficiency exacerbated HFD-induced coronary dysfunction and was associated with increased ROS generation and reduced nitric oxide production in the endothelium. The activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin upregulated UCP2 expression via protein kinase A phosphorylation, thereby alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting mitochondrial ROS generation. In vivo, dietary capsaicin supplementation enhanced coronary relaxation and prolonged the survival duration of HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. These effects were not observed in ApoE(-/-) mice lacking the TRPV1 or UCP2 gene. The upregulation of protein kinase A /UCP2 via TRPV1 activation ameliorates coronary dysfunction and prolongs the lifespan of atherosclerotic mice by ameliorating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction. Dietary capsaicin supplementation may represent a promising intervention for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease. PMID:26667415

  2. TRPV1 mediates cell death in rat synovial fibroblasts through calcium entry-dependent ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Fen; Sun Wenwu; Zhao Xiao Ting; Cui Zongjie Yang Wenxiu

    2008-05-16

    Synoviocyte hyperplasia is critical for rheumatoid arthritis, therefore, potentially an important target for therapeutics. It was found in this work that a TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, and acidic solution (pH 5.5) induced increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in synoviocytes isolated from a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis. The increases in both [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and ROS production were completely abolished in calcium-free buffer or by a TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Further experiments revealed that capsaicin and pH 5.5 solution caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reduction in cell viability; such effects were inhibited by capsazepine, or the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. Both capsaicin and pH 5.5 buffer induced apoptosis as shown by nuclear condensation and fragmentation. Furthermore, RT-PCR readily detected TRPV1 mRNA expression in the isolated synoviocytes. Taken together, these data indicated that TRPV1 activation triggered synoviocyte death by [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} elevation, ROS production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

  3. Targeting TRPV1 for Body Weight Control using TRPV1(-/-) Mice and Electroacupuncture.

    PubMed

    Choowanthanapakorn, Monchanok; Lu, Kung-Wen; Yang, Jun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a global social medical problem resulting in morbidity as high as 20-30%. Here we investigated whether the manipulation of TRPV1 can control mice body weight through electroacupuncture (EA). The results demonstrated that body weight increased with time in the control group (108.19??1.31%, n?=?7). The increase of mice body weight was significantly less in the EA group (104.41??0.76%, p?TRPV1 knock mice (107.94??0.41% and 107.79??1.04% for TRPV1(-/-) and TRPV1(-/-) with EA, respectively, p?>?0.05). The visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) weight was lower in the EA group at 4 weeks after manipulation. Moreover, the protein levels of TRPV1, pPKA, pPKC, and pERK were increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord (SC) after EA treatment but not in the sham EA and TRPV1(-/-) mice. This study suggests that targeting TRPV1 is beneficial in controlling body weight and TRPV1-associated mechanisms in mice. PMID:26621679

  4. Cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 Regulates TRPV1 Phosphorylation in Sensory Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Patwardhan, Amol M.; Gamper, Nikita; Price, Theodore J.; Akopian, Armen N.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids are known to have multiple sites of action in the nociceptive system, leading to reduced pain sensation. However, the peripheral mechanism(s) by which this phenomenon occurs remains an issue that has yet to be resolved. Because phosphorylation of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential subtype V1) plays a key role in the induction of thermal hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain models, we evaluated whether the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) regulates the phosphorylation state of TRPV1. Here, we show that treatment of primary rat trigeminal ganglion cultures with WIN led to dephosphorylation of TRPV1, specifically at threonine residues. Utilizing Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, we demonstrate that Thr144 and Thr370 were dephosphorylated, leading to desensitization of the TRPV1 receptor. This post-translational modification occurred through activation of the phosphatase calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) following WIN treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of TRPA1 (transient receptor potential subtype A1) expression in sensory neurons by specific small interfering RNA abolished the WIN effect on TRPV1 dephosphorylation, suggesting that WIN acts through TRPA1. We also confirm the importance of TRPA1 in WIN-induced dephosphorylation of TRPV1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells through targeted expression of one or both receptor channels. These results imply that the cannabinoid WIN modulates the sensitivity of sensory neurons to TRPV1 activation by altering receptor phosphorylation. In addition, our data could serve as a useful strategy in determining the potential use of certain cannabinoids as peripheral analgesics. PMID:16954222

  5. Opioids and TRPV1 in the peripheral control of neuropathic pain - Defining a target site in the injured nerve.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Spahn, Viola; Celik, Melih zgr; Machelska, Halina

    2016-02-01

    Targeting peripheral neuropathic pain at its origin may prevent the development of hypersensitivity. Recently we showed this can be mediated by opioid receptors at the injured nerve trunk. Here, we searched for the most relevant peripheral site to block transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), and investigated analgesic interactions between TRPV1 and opioids in neuropathy. In a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, we assessed the effects of ?-, ?- and ?-opioid receptor agonists and TRPV1 antagonist (SB366791) injected at the CCI site or into the injured nerve-innervated paw on spontaneous paw lifting, heat and mechanical sensitivity. We also examined TRPV1 expression in total membrane and plasma membrane fractions from nerves and paws. We found that opioids and SB366791 co-injected in per se nonanalgesic doses at the CCI site or into the paw diminished heat and mechanical sensitivity. SB366791 alone dose-dependently alleviated heat and mechanical sensitivity. TRPV1 blockade in the paw was more effective than at the CCI site. None of the treatments diminished spontaneous paw lifting. TRPV1 expression analysis suggests that the levels of functional TRPV1 do not critically determine the TRPV1 antagonist-mediated analgesia. Together, the identification of the primary action site in damaged nerves is crucial for effective pain control. Contrary to opioids, the TRPV1 blockade in the injured nerve peripheral terminals, rather than at the nerve trunk, appears promising against heat pain. Opioid/TRPV1 antagonist combinations at both locations partially reduced neuropathy-triggered heat and mechanical pain. PMID:26453963

  6. Zingerone enhances glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels in the adult rat substantia gelatinosa.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2013-08-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are thought to play a role in regulating nociceptive transmission to spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. It remains to be unveiled whether the TRP channels in the central nervous system are different in property from those involved in receiving nociceptive stimuli in the peripheral nervous system. We examined the effect of the vanilloid compound zingerone, which activates TRPV1 channels in the cell body of a primary afferent neuron, on glutamatergic excitatory transmission in the SG neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices by using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Bath-applied zingerone reversibly and concentration-dependently increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency. This effect was accompanied by an inward current at -70 mV that was resistant to glutamate receptor antagonists. These zingerone effects were repeated and persisted in Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin-, La(3+)-, or IP3-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate-containing or Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. Zingerone activity was resistant to the selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine but sensitive to the nonselective TRP antagonist ruthenium red, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, and the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release inhibitor dantrolene. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate but not capsaicin inhibited the facilitatory effect of zingerone. On the other hand, zingerone reduced monosynaptically evoked EPSC amplitudes, as did TRPA1 agonists. Like allyl isothiocyanate, zingerone enhanced GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory transmission in a manner sensitive to tetrodotoxin. We conclude that zingerone presynaptically facilitates spontaneous excitatory transmission, probably through Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanisms, and produces a membrane depolarization in SG neurons by activating TRPA1 but not TRPV1 channels. PMID:23657286

  7. Differential bitterness in capsaicin, piperine, and ethanol associates with polymorphisms in multiple bitter taste receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Nolden, Alissa A; McGeary, John E; Hayes, John E

    2016-03-15

    To date, the majority of research exploring associations with genetic variability in bitter taste receptors has understandably focused on compounds and foods that are predominantly or solely perceived as bitter. However, other chemosensory stimuli are also known to elicit bitterness as a secondary sensation. Here we investigated whether TAS2R variation explains individual differences in bitterness elicited by chemesthetic stimuli, including capsaicin, piperine and ethanol. We confirmed that capsaicin, piperine and ethanol elicit bitterness in addition to burning/stinging sensations. Variability in perceived bitterness of capsaicin and ethanol were significantly associated with TAS2R38 and TAS2R3/4/5 diplotypes. For TAS2R38, PAV homozygotes perceived greater bitterness from capsaicin and ethanol presented on circumvallate papillae, compared to heterozygotes and AVI homozygotes. For TAS2R3/4/5, CCCAGT homozygotes rated the greatest bitterness, compared to heterozygotes and TTGGAG homozygotes, for both ethanol and capsaicin when presented on circumvallate papillae. Additional work is needed to determine how these and other chemesthetic stimuli differ in bitterness perception across concentrations and presentation methods. Furthermore, it would be beneficial to determine which TAS2R receptors are activated in vitro by chemesthetic compounds. PMID:26785164

  8. TRPV1 channel-mediated bilateral allodynia induced by unilateral masseter muscle inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Simonic-Kocijan, Suncana; Zhao, Xuehong; Liu, Wen; Wu, Yuwei; Uhac, Ivone; Wang, KeWei

    2013-01-01

    Pain in masticatory muscles is among the most prominent symptoms of temperomandibular disorders (TMDs) that have diverse and complex etiology. A common complaint of TMD is that unilateral pain of craniofacial muscle can cause a widespread of bilateral pain sensation, although the underlying mechanism remains unknown. To investigate whether unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle can cause a bilateral allodynia, we generated masseter muscle inflammation induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, and measured the bilateral head withdrawal threshold at different time points using a von Frey anesthesiometer. After behavioral assessment, both right and left trigeminal ganglia (TRG) were dissected and examined for histopathology and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. A significant increase in TRPV1 mRNA expression occurred in TRG ipsilateral to CFA injected masseter muscle, whereas no significant alteration in TRPV1 occurred in the contralateral TRG. Interestingly, central injection of TRPV1 antagonist 5-iodoresiniferatoxin into the hippocampus significantly attenuated the head withdrawal response of both CFA injected and non-CFA injected contralateral masseter muscle. Our findings show that unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle is capable of inducing bilateral allodynia in rats. Upregulation of TRPV1 at the TRG level is due to nociception caused by inflammation, whereas contralateral nocifensive behavior in masticatory muscle nociception is likely mediated by central TRPV1, pointing to the involvement of altered information processing in higher centers. PMID:24377488

  9. Effects of Moxibustion Temperature on Blood Cholesterol Level in a Mice Model of Acute Hyperlipidemia: Role of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Ying; Wang, Ling-Ling; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Jiang, Jin-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effects of moxibustion at two different temperatures (38C and 46C) on the blood cholesterol level in a mice model of acute hyperlipidemia, to detect the different expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) in the dorsal root ganglions of the wild mice, and to explore the correlation between TRPV1 and moxibustion's cholesterol-lowering effects. Method. Two different mice models were used: C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and TRPV1 gene knockout (TRPV1?/?). Each model was randomly divided into control group and model group with three subgroups after acute hyperlipidemia was established: model control group, 38C moxibustion group, and 46C moxibustion group. The mice in 38C group and 46C group were subject to moxibustion. After the therapy, the cholesterol concentration in serum was measured, and the expression of TRPV1 was quantified. Results. In WT mice, moxibustion caused a decrease in blood cholesterol level and upregulation of TRPV1 at the mRNA level, which was significantly greater in the 46C group. In contrast, in TRPV1?/? mice, the differences of cholesterol-lowering effects of moxibustion were lost. Conclusions. Temperature is one of the important factors affecting the effects of moxibustion, and the cholesterol -lowering effect of moxibustion is related to the activation of TRPV1. PMID:23935685

  10. Short-Term Increases in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 Mediate Stress-Induced Enhancement of Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Weitlauf, Carl; Ward, Nicholas J.; Lambert, Wendi S.; Sidorova, Tatiana N.; Ho, Karen W.; Sappington, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Progression of neurodegeneration in disease and injury is influenced by the response of individual neurons to stressful stimuli and whether this response includes mechanisms to counter declining function. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels transduce a variety of disease-relevant stimuli and can mediate diverse stress-dependent changes in physiology, both presynaptic and postsynaptic. Recently, we demonstrated that knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of the TRP vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) capsaicin-sensitive subunit accelerates degeneration of retinal ganglion cell neurons and their axons with elevated ocular pressure, the critical stressor in the most common optic neuropathy, glaucoma. Here we probed the mechanism of the influence of TRPV1 on ganglion cell survival in mouse models of glaucoma. We found that induced elevations of ocular pressure increased TRPV1 in ganglion cells and its colocalization at excitatory synapses to their dendrites, whereas chronic elevation progressively increased ganglion cell Trpv1 mRNA. Enhanced TRPV1 expression in ganglion cells was transient and supported a reversal of the effect of TRPV1 on ganglion cells from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing, which was also transient. Short-term enhancement of TRPV1-mediated activity led to a delayed increase in axonal spontaneous excitation that was absent in ganglion cells from Trpv1−/− retina. In isolated ganglion cells, pharmacologically activated TRPV1 mobilized to discrete nodes along ganglion cell dendrites that corresponded to sites of elevated Ca2+. These results suggest that TRPV1 may promote retinal ganglion cell survival through transient enhancement of local excitation and axonal activity in response to ocular stress. PMID:25392504

  11. Short-term increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mediate stress-induced enhancement of neuronal excitation.

    PubMed

    Weitlauf, Carl; Ward, Nicholas J; Lambert, Wendi S; Sidorova, Tatiana N; Ho, Karen W; Sappington, Rebecca M; Calkins, David J

    2014-11-12

    Progression of neurodegeneration in disease and injury is influenced by the response of individual neurons to stressful stimuli and whether this response includes mechanisms to counter declining function. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels transduce a variety of disease-relevant stimuli and can mediate diverse stress-dependent changes in physiology, both presynaptic and postsynaptic. Recently, we demonstrated that knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of the TRP vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) capsaicin-sensitive subunit accelerates degeneration of retinal ganglion cell neurons and their axons with elevated ocular pressure, the critical stressor in the most common optic neuropathy, glaucoma. Here we probed the mechanism of the influence of TRPV1 on ganglion cell survival in mouse models of glaucoma. We found that induced elevations of ocular pressure increased TRPV1 in ganglion cells and its colocalization at excitatory synapses to their dendrites, whereas chronic elevation progressively increased ganglion cell Trpv1 mRNA. Enhanced TRPV1 expression in ganglion cells was transient and supported a reversal of the effect of TRPV1 on ganglion cells from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing, which was also transient. Short-term enhancement of TRPV1-mediated activity led to a delayed increase in axonal spontaneous excitation that was absent in ganglion cells from Trpv1(-/-) retina. In isolated ganglion cells, pharmacologically activated TRPV1 mobilized to discrete nodes along ganglion cell dendrites that corresponded to sites of elevated Ca(2+). These results suggest that TRPV1 may promote retinal ganglion cell survival through transient enhancement of local excitation and axonal activity in response to ocular stress. PMID:25392504

  12. Neuroprotection induced by vitamin E against oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons: involvement of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Crouzin, Nadine; Ferreira, Marie-Céleste de Jesus; Cohen-Solal, Catherine; Barbanel, Gérard; Guiramand, Janique; Vignes, Michel

    2010-04-01

    Pretreatment of cultured hippocampal neurons with a low concentration of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TP), the major component of vitamin E, results in a long-lasting protection against oxidative damages, via genomic effects. This neuroprotection is associated with the attenuation of a calcium influx triggered by oxidative agents such as Fe(2+) ions. This Ca(2+) influx is supported by a TRP-like channel, also partly involved in capacitive calcium entry within neurons. Here, we evidence the contribution of TRPV1 channels in this mechanism. TRPV1 channels are activated by various agents including capsaicin, the pungent component of hot chili peppers and blocked by capsazepine (CPZ) or 5'-iodo-resiniferatoxin. Both TRPV1 inhibitors strongly reduced Fe(2+) ion-mediated toxicity and Ca(2+) influx, in the same way as to alpha-TP pretreatment. Moreover, CPZ also decreased capacitive calcium entry in hippocampal neurons. Finally, both CPZ and 5'-iodo-resiniferatoxin reduced spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission; this depression of synaptic transmission being largely occluded in alpha-TP-pretreated neurons. In conclusion, in our experimental model, TRPV1 channels are involved in the Fe(2+) ion-induced neuronal death and a negative modulation of this channel activity by alpha-TP pretreatment may account, at least in part, for the long-lasting neuroprotection against oxidative stress. PMID:20087852

  13. Respiratory action of capsaicin microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract: involvement of vanilloid and tachykinin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Geraghty, Dominic P

    1999-01-01

    The respiratory response to microinjection of capsaicin into the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS) of urethane-anaesthetized rats was investigated in the absence and presence of the competitive vanilloid (capsaicin) antagonist, capsazepine, and selective tachykinin NK1, NK2 and NK3 antagonists (RP?67580, SR?48968 and SR?142801, respectively).Microinjection of capsaicin reduced respiratory frequency but not tidal volume (VT), leading to an overall reduction in minute ventilation (V{dot above]E). The effect was dose-dependent between 0.5 and 2?nmol capsaicin. Doses greater than 2?nmol produced apnoea. Tachyphylaxis was observed following repeated injection of capsaicin (1?nmol, 30?min apart).Capsazepine (1?nmol) had no effect on frequency or VT when injected alone but completely blocked the respiratory response to capsaicin (1?nmol).RP?67580 (1 but not 5?nmol) alone depressed frequency and VT slightly. Moreover, RP?67580 appeared to potentiate the bradypnoeic effect of capsaicin. In contrast, SR?48968 and SR?142801 (1 and 5?nmol) alone had no significant effect on respiration. However, both agents significantly attenuated the reduction in frequency produced by capsaicin.In conclusion, microinjection of capsaicin into the cNTS decreases overall ventilation, primarily by reducing frequency. The action of capsaicin appears from the data to be mediated by vanilloid receptors since it is blocked by the competitive vanilloid antagonist capsazepine and is subject to tachyphylaxis. However, since NK2 (SR?48968) and NK3 (SR?142801) receptor antagonists block the actions of capsaicin, we propose that capsaicin acts also by releasing tachykinins from central afferent terminals in the cNTS. PMID:10385248

  14. Hunting for origins of migraine pain: cluster analysis of spontaneous and capsaicin-induced firing in meningeal trigeminal nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, A.; Vitale, C.; Kilinc, E.; Koroleva, K.; Fayuk, D.; Shelukhina, I.; Naumenko, N.; Skorinkin, A.; Khazipov, R.; Giniatullin, R.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal nerves in meninges are implicated in generation of nociceptive firing underlying migraine pain. However, the neurochemical mechanisms of nociceptive firing in meningeal trigeminal nerves are little understood. In this study, using suction electrode recordings from peripheral branches of the trigeminal nerve in isolated rat meninges, we analyzed spontaneous and capsaicin-induced orthodromic spiking activity. In control, biphasic single spikes with variable amplitude and shapes were observed. Application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin to meninges dramatically increased firing whereas the amplitudes and shapes of spikes remained essentially unchanged. This effect was antagonized by the specific TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Using the clustering approach, several groups of uniform spikes (clusters) were identified. The clustering approach combined with capsaicin application allowed us to detect and to distinguish responder (65%) from non-responder clusters (35%). Notably, responders fired spikes at frequencies exceeding 10 Hz, high enough to provide postsynaptic temporal summation of excitation at brainstem and spinal cord level. Almost all spikes were suppressed by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting an involvement of the TTX-sensitive sodium channels in nociceptive signaling at the peripheral branches of trigeminal neurons. Our analysis also identified transient (desensitizing) and long-lasting (slowly desensitizing) responses to the continuous application of capsaicin. Thus, the persistent activation of nociceptors in capsaicin-sensitive nerve fibers shown here may be involved in trigeminal pain signaling and plasticity along with the release of migraine-related neuropeptides from TRPV1 positive neurons. Furthermore, cluster analysis could be widely used to characterize the temporal and neurochemical profiles of other pain transducers likely implicated in migraine. PMID:26283923

  15. Hunting for origins of migraine pain: cluster analysis of spontaneous and capsaicin-induced firing in meningeal trigeminal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, A; Vitale, C; Kilinc, E; Koroleva, K; Fayuk, D; Shelukhina, I; Naumenko, N; Skorinkin, A; Khazipov, R; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal nerves in meninges are implicated in generation of nociceptive firing underlying migraine pain. However, the neurochemical mechanisms of nociceptive firing in meningeal trigeminal nerves are little understood. In this study, using suction electrode recordings from peripheral branches of the trigeminal nerve in isolated rat meninges, we analyzed spontaneous and capsaicin-induced orthodromic spiking activity. In control, biphasic single spikes with variable amplitude and shapes were observed. Application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin to meninges dramatically increased firing whereas the amplitudes and shapes of spikes remained essentially unchanged. This effect was antagonized by the specific TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Using the clustering approach, several groups of uniform spikes (clusters) were identified. The clustering approach combined with capsaicin application allowed us to detect and to distinguish "responder" (65%) from "non-responder" clusters (35%). Notably, responders fired spikes at frequencies exceeding 10 Hz, high enough to provide postsynaptic temporal summation of excitation at brainstem and spinal cord level. Almost all spikes were suppressed by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting an involvement of the TTX-sensitive sodium channels in nociceptive signaling at the peripheral branches of trigeminal neurons. Our analysis also identified transient (desensitizing) and long-lasting (slowly desensitizing) responses to the continuous application of capsaicin. Thus, the persistent activation of nociceptors in capsaicin-sensitive nerve fibers shown here may be involved in trigeminal pain signaling and plasticity along with the release of migraine-related neuropeptides from TRPV1 positive neurons. Furthermore, cluster analysis could be widely used to characterize the temporal and neurochemical profiles of other pain transducers likely implicated in migraine. PMID:26283923

  16. Resiniferatoxin and its analogs provide novel insights into the pharmacology of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent constituent of chili peppers, represents the paradigm for the capsaicinoids or vanilloids, a family of compounds shown to stimulate and then desensitize specific subpopulations of sensory receptors, including C-polymodal nociceptors, A-delta mechanoheat nociceptors and warm receptors of the skin, as well as enteroceptors of thin afferent fibers. An exciting recent advance in the field has been the finding that resiniferatoxin (RTX), a naturally occurring diterpene containing a homovanillic acid ester, a key structural motif of capsaicin, functions as an ultrapotent capsaicin analog. For most of the responses characteristic of capsaicin, RTX is 100-10,000 fold more potent. Structure/activity analysis indicates, however, that RTX and related homovanillyl-diterpene esters display distinct spectra of activity. Specific ({sup 3}H)RTX binding provides the first direct proof for the existence of vanilloid receptors. We expect that the RTX class of vanilloids will promote rapid progress in understanding of vanilloid structure/activity requirements and mechanism.

  17. Subgroup-Elimination Transcriptomics Identifies Signaling Proteins that Define Subclasses of TRPV1-Positive Neurons and a Novel Paracrine Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Isensee, Jrg; Wenzel, Carsten; Buschow, Rene; Weissmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Hucho, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Normal and painful stimuli are detected by specialized subgroups of peripheral sensory neurons. The understanding of the functional differences of each neuronal subgroup would be strongly enhanced by knowledge of the respective subgroup transcriptome. The separation of the subgroup of interest, however, has proven challenging as they can hardly be enriched. Instead of enriching, we now rapidly eliminated the subgroup of neurons expressing the heat-gated cation channel TRPV1 from dissociated rat sensory ganglia. Elimination was accomplished by brief treatment with TRPV1 agonists followed by the removal of compromised TRPV1(+) neurons using density centrifugation. By differential microarray and sequencing (RNA-Seq) based expression profiling we compared the transcriptome of all cells within sensory ganglia versus the same cells lacking TRPV1 expressing neurons, which revealed 240 differentially expressed genes (adj. p<0.05, fold-change>1.5). Corroborating the specificity of the approach, many of these genes have been reported to be involved in noxious heat or pain sensitization. Beyond the expected enrichment of ion channels, we found the TRPV1 transcriptome to be enriched for GPCRs and other signaling proteins involved in adenosine, calcium, and phosphatidylinositol signaling. Quantitative population analysis using a recent High Content Screening (HCS) microscopy approach identified substantial heterogeneity of expressed target proteins even within TRPV1-positive neurons. Signaling components defined distinct further subgroups within the population of TRPV1-positive neurons. Analysis of one such signaling system showed that the pain sensitizing prostaglandin PGD2 activates DP1 receptors expressed predominantly on TRPV1(+) neurons. In contrast, we found the PGD2 producing prostaglandin D synthase to be expressed exclusively in myelinated large-diameter neurons lacking TRPV1, which suggests a novel paracrine neuron-neuron communication. Thus, subgroup analysis based on the elimination rather than enrichment of the subgroup of interest revealed proteins that define subclasses of TRPV1-positive neurons and suggests a novel paracrine circuit. PMID:25551770

  18. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O M Zack

    2014-12-28

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and anti-inflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  19. Botulinum toxin type A selectivity for certain types of pain is associated with capsaicin-sensitive neurons.

    PubMed

    Matak, Ivica; Rossetto, Ornella; Lackovi?, Zdravko

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most classical analgesics, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) does not alter acute nociceptive thresholds, and shows selectivity primarily for allodynic and hyperalgesic responses in certain pain conditions. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be explained by characterizing the sensory neurons targeted by BoNT/A in the central nervous system after its axonal transport. BoNT/A's central antinociceptive activity following its application into the rat whisker pad was examined in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) and higher-level nociceptive brain areas using BoNT/A-cleaved synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Occurrence of cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC was examined after nonselective ganglion ablation with formalin or selective denervation of capsaicin-sensitive (vanilloid receptor-1 or TRPV1-expressing) neurons, and in relation to different cellular and neuronal markers. Regional c-Fos activation and effect of TRPV1-expressing afferent denervation on toxin's antinociceptive action were studied in formalin-induced orofacial pain. BoNT/A-cleaved SNAP-25 was observed in TNC, but not in higher-level nociceptive nuclei. Cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC disappeared after formalin-induced trigeminal ganglion ablation or capsaicin-induced sensory denervation. Occurrence of cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC and BoNT/A antinociceptive activity in formalin-induced orofacial pain were prevented by denervation with capsaicin. Cleaved SNAP-25 localization demonstrated toxin's presynaptic activity in TRPV1-expressing neurons. BoNT/A reduced the c-Fos activation in TNC, locus coeruleus, and periaqueductal gray. Present experiments suggest that BoNT/A alters the nociceptive transmission at the central synapse of primary afferents. Targeting of TRPV1-expressing neurons might be associated with observed selectivity of BoNT/A action only in certain types of pain. PMID:24793910

  20. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain. PMID:26376215

  1. Targeting TRPV1 for Body Weight Control using TRPV1−/− Mice and Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Choowanthanapakorn, Monchanok; Lu, Kung-Wen; Yang, Jun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a global social medical problem resulting in morbidity as high as 20–30%. Here we investigated whether the manipulation of TRPV1 can control mice body weight through electroacupuncture (EA). The results demonstrated that body weight increased with time in the control group (108.19 ± 1.31%, n = 7). The increase of mice body weight was significantly less in the EA group (104.41 ± 0.76%, p < 0.05, compared with the control group, n = 7) but not in the sham EA group (109.1 ± 0.63%, p < 0.05, compared with EA group, n = 7). EA did not decrease the gain of body weight in TRPV1 knock mice (107.94 ± 0.41% and 107.79 ± 1.04% for TRPV1−/− and TRPV1−/− with EA, respectively, p > 0.05). The visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) weight was lower in the EA group at 4 weeks after manipulation. Moreover, the protein levels of TRPV1, pPKA, pPKC, and pERK were increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord (SC) after EA treatment but not in the sham EA and TRPV1−/− mice. This study suggests that targeting TRPV1 is beneficial in controlling body weight and TRPV1-associated mechanisms in mice. PMID:26621679

  2. TRPV1 on astrocytes rescues nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease via CNTF.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin H; Park, Eun S; Won, So-Yoon; Lee, Yu A; Kim, Kyoung I; Jeong, Jae Y; Baek, Jeong Y; Cho, Eun J; Jin, Minyoung; Chung, Young C; Lee, Byoung D; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Eung-Gook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Woo, Dong Ho; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Sang R; Bok, Eugene; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Ahn, Tae-Beom; Ko, Hyuk Wan; Brahmachari, Saurav; Pletinkova, Olga; Troconso, Juan C; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Jin, Byung K

    2015-12-01

    Currently there is no neuroprotective or neurorestorative therapy for Parkinson's disease. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on astrocytes mediates endogenous production of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which prevents the active degeneration of dopamine neurons and leads to behavioural recovery through CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR?) on nigral dopamine neurons in both the MPP(+)-lesioned or adeno-associated virus ?-synuclein rat models of Parkinson's disease. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of human post-mortem substantia nigra from Parkinson's disease suggests that this endogenous neuroprotective system (TRPV1 and CNTF on astrocytes, and CNTFR? on dopamine neurons) might have relevance to human Parkinson's disease. Our results suggest that activation of astrocytic TRPV1 activates endogenous neuroprotective machinery in vivo and that it is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26490328

  3. TRPV1 promotes repetitive febrile seizures by pro-inflammatory cytokines in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Xian; Yu, Fang; Sanchez, Russell M; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder in children, and children with FS are regarded as a high risk for the eventual development of epilepsy. Brain inflammation may be implicated in the mechanism of FS. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is believed to act as a monitor and regulator of body temperature. The role of inflammation in synaptic plasticity mediation indicates that TRPV1 is relevant to several nervous system diseases, such as epilepsy. Here, we report a critical role for TRPV1 in a febrile seizure mouse model and reveal increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the immature brain. Animals were subjected to hyperthermia for 30 min, which generates seizures lasting approximately 20 min, and then were used for experiments. To invoke frequently repetitive febrile seizures, mice are exposed to hyperthermia for three times daily at an interval of 4h between every time induced seizure, and a total of 4 days to induce. Behavioral testing for febrile seizures revealed that a TRPV1 knock-out mouse model demonstrated a prolonged onset latency and a shortened duration and seizure grade of febrile seizure when compared with wild type (WT) mice. The expression levels of both TRPV1 mRNA and protein increased after a hyperthermia-induced febrile seizure in WT mice. Notably, TRPV1 activation resulted in a significant elevation in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-? and HMGB1) in the hippocampus and cortex. These data indicate that the reduction of TRPV1 expression parallels a decreased susceptibility to febrile seizures. Thus, preventative strategies might be developed for use during febrile seizures. PMID:25801060

  4. Measuring distances between TRPV1 and the plasma membrane using a noncanonical amino acid and transition metal ion FRET.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, William N; Gordon, Moshe T; Senning, Eric N; Munari, Mika A; Gordon, Sharona E

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent advances, the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in cell membranes remain elusive. We implemented transition metal ion fluorescence resonance energy transfer (tmFRET) to measure distances between sites on the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domains (ARDs) of the pain-transducing ion channel TRPV1 and the intracellular surface of the plasma membrane. To preserve the native context, we used unroofed cells, and to specifically label sites in TRPV1, we incorporated a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid, L-ANAP. A metal chelating lipid was used to decorate the plasma membrane with high-density/high-affinity metal-binding sites. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies between L-ANAP in TRPV1 and Co(2+) bound to the plasma membrane were consistent with the arrangement of the ARDs in recent cryoelectron microscopy structures of TRPV1. No change in tmFRET was observed with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. These results demonstrate the power of tmFRET for measuring structure and rearrangements of membrane proteins relative to the cell membrane. PMID:26755770

  5. Astrocytic TRPV1 ion channels detect blood-borne signals in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Mannari, Tetsuya; Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Tominaga, Makoto; Miyata, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    The circumventricular organs (CVOs), including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP) sense a variety of blood-borne molecules because they lack typical blood-brain barrier. Though a few signaling pathways are known, it is not known how endogenous ligands for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 ion channel (TRPV1) are sensed in the CVOs. In this study, we aimed to examine whether or not astrocytic TRPV1 senses directly blood-borne molecules in the OVLT, SFO, and AP of adult mice. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western analysis revealed the expression of TRPV1 in the CVOs. Confocal microscopic immunohistochemistry further showed that TRPV1 was localized prominently at thick cellular processes of astrocytes rather than fine cellular processes and cell bodies. TRPV1-expressing cellular processes of astrocytes surrounded the vasculature to constitute dense networks. The expression of TRPV1 was also found at neuronal dendrites but not somata in the CVOs. The intravenous administration of a TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) prominently induced Fos expression at astrocytes in the OVLT, SFO, and AP and neurons in adjacent related nuclei of the median preoptic nuclei (MnPO) and nucleus of the solitary tract (Sol) of wild-type but not TRPV1-knockout mice. The intracerebroventricular infusion of RTX induced Fos expression at both astrocytes and neurons in the CVOs, MnPO, and Sol. Thus, this study demonstrates that blood-borne molecules are sensed directly by astrocytic TRPV1 of the CVOs in adult mammalians. PMID:23468425

  6. Full-length transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels mediate calcium signals and possibly contribute to osmoreception in vasopressin neurones in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Taiki; Shibasaki, Rina; Kayano, Tomohiko; Takebuchi, Nami; Ichimura, Momoko; Kitamura, Naoki; Asano, Atsushi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Forostyak, Oksana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan; Shibuya, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Neurones in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus possess intrinsic osmosensing mechanisms, which are lost in transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1)-knock-out mice. The molecular nature of the osmosensory mechanism in SON neurones is believed to be associated with the N-terminal splice variant of Trpv1, although their entire molecular structures have not been hitherto identified. In this study, we sought for TRPV1-related molecules and their function in the rat SON. We performed RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry to detect TRPV1-related molecules in the SON, and patch-clamp and imaging of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to measure responses to osmolality changes and TRPV-related drugs in acutely dissociated SON neurones of rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed full-length Trpv1 and a new N-terminal splice variant, Trpv1_SON (LC008303) in the SON. Positive immunostaining was observed using an antibody against the N-terminal portion of TRPV1 in arginine vasopressin (AVP)-immunoreactive neurones, but not in oxytocin (OT)-immunoreactive neurones. Approximately 20% of SON neurones responded to mannitol (50 mM) with increased action potential firing, inward currents, and [Ca(2+)]i mobilization. Mannitol-induced responses were observed in AVP neurones isolated from AVP-eGFP transgenic rats and identified by GFP fluorescence, but not in OT neurones isolated from OT-mRFP transgenic rats and identified by RFP fluorescence. The mannitol-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses were reversibly blocked by the non-selective TRPV antagonist, ruthenium red (10 ?M) and the TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine (10 ?M) and BCTC (10 ?M). Although the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin (100 nM) evoked no response at room temperature, it triggered cationic currents and [Ca(2+)]i elevation when the temperature was increased to 36C. These results suggest that AVP neurones in the rat SON possess functional full-length TRPV1. Moreover, differences between the responses to capsaicin or hyperosmolality obtained in rat SON neurones and those obtained from dorsal root ganglion neurones or TRPV1-expressing cells indicate that the osmoreceptor expressed in the SON may be a heteromultimer in which TRPV1 is co-assembled with some other, yet unidentified, molecules. PMID:25479918

  7. [Capsaicin and lidocaine usage in functional disorders of urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Kajetan; Thor, Piotr J

    2011-01-01

    Most of the drugs in the treatment of functional disorders of the urinary bladder has a peripheral effect. Their work consists mainly in reducing detrusor contractility of the bladder, or effects on the afferent innervation. Anticholinergics are the first drugs of choice. An alternative pharmacological treatment is to eliminate the overactivity by acting on the bladder afferent innervation, while not inhibiting its contractility. One option is to modulate the pharmacological activity of sensory mechanisms governing the functioning of the bladder via the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and ancyrin (TRPA1). Intravesical treatment with capsaicin or lidocaine only partially reduces bladder sensation. Furthermore, clinical use of lidocaine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is reduced to intravesical supply before capsaicin instillation to reduce the symptoms associated with initial phase of C-fibres sensitization. This paper presents the current state of knowledge regarding the use of capsaicin and lidocaine in functional disorders of the urinary bladder, as well as discusses the impact of these substances on afferent C-fibres and the activity of the urinary bladder. Based on previous studies intravesical capsaicin and lidocaine therapy is one of the alternative treatment options in selected patients with functional disorders of the urinary bladder (in particular OAB) in addition to standard anticholinergics therapy or the newer generation of therapies using botulinum toxin. PMID:22891541

  8. The Effects of Capsaicin and Capsiate on Energy Balance: Critical Review and Meta-analyses of Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludy, Mary-Jon; Moore, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of spicy foods containing capsaicin, the major pungent principle in hot peppers, reportedly promotes negative energy balance. However, many individuals abstain from spicy foods due to the sensory burn and pain elicited by the capsaicin molecule. A potential alternative for nonusers of spicy foods who wish to exploit this energy balance property is consumption of nonpungent peppers rich in capsiate, a recently identified nonpungent capsaicin analog contained in CH-19 Sweet peppers. Capsiate activates transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the gut but not in the oral cavity. This paper critically evaluates current knowledge on the thermogenic and appetitive effects of capsaicin and capsiate from foods and in supplemental form. Meta-analyses were performed on thermogenic outcomes, with a systematic review conducted for both thermogenic and appetitive outcomes. Evidence indicates that capsaicin and capsiate both augment energy expenditure and enhance fat oxidation, especially at high doses. Furthermore, the balance of the literature suggests that capsaicin and capsiate suppress orexigenic sensations. The magnitude of these effects is small. Purposeful inclusion of these compounds in the diet may aid weight management, albeit modestly. PMID:22038945

  9. Acute Heat-Evoked Temperature Sensation Is Impaired but Not Abolished in Mice Lacking TRPV1 and TRPV3 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Ana; Gaillard, Stphane; Moqrich, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid ion channels (ThermoTRPVs) greatly advanced our molecular understanding of acute and injury-evoked heat temperature sensation. ThermoTRPV channels are activated by partially overlapping temperatures ranging from warm to supra-threshold noxious heat. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat temperature whereas TRPV3 can be activated by warm as well as noxious heat temperatures. Loss-of-function studies in single TRPV1 and TRPV3 knock-out mice have shown that heat temperature sensation is not completely abolished suggesting functional redundancies among these two channels and highlighting the need of a detailed analysis of TRPV1::TRPV3 double knock-out mice (V1V3dKO) which is hampered by the close proximity of the loci expressing the two channels. Here we describe the generation of a novel mouse model in which trpv1 and trpv3 genes have been inactivated using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. In these mice, using classical thermosensory tests such hot plate, tail flick and the thermotaxis gradient paradigms, we confirm that TRPV1 is the master channel for sensing noxious heat temperatures and identify a cooperative role of TRPV1 and TRPV3 for sensing a well-defined window of acute moderate heat temperature. Using the dynamic hot plate assay, we unravel an intriguing and unexpected pronounced escape behavior in TRPV1 knock-out mice that was attenuated in the V1V3dKO. Together, and in agreement with the temperature activation overlap between TRPV1 and TRPV3 channels, our data provide in vivo evidence of a cooperative role between skin-derived TRPV3 and primary sensory neurons-enriched TRPV1 in modulation of moderate and noxious heat temperature sensation and suggest that other mechanisms are required for heat temperature sensation. PMID:24925072

  10. Capsaicin mimics mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Naoki; Ruegg, Urs T.; Kudo, Akira; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events are important for subsequent skeletal muscle hypertrophy. We previously showed that load-induced activation of the cation channel TRPV1 caused an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and that this activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and promoted muscle hypertrophy. However, the link between mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events, and the TRPV1-mediated increases in [Ca2+]i are not fully understood. Here we show that administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, induces phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not Akt, AMPK or GSK3?. Furthermore, the TRPV1-induced phosphorylation patterns resembled those induced by mechanical load. Our results continue to highlight the importance of TRPV1-mediated calcium signaling in load-induced intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:23584166

  11. Capsaicin activation of the pain receptor, VR1: multiple open states from both partial and full binding.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwokyin; Liu, Beiying; Qin, Feng

    2003-05-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of hot peppers, has long been used to identify nociceptors. Its molecular target, the vanilloid receptor VR1, was recently cloned and confirmed functionally as a polymodal detector of multiple pain stimuli: heat, acid, and vanilloids. Previous electrophysiology studies have focused on whole-cell characteristics of the receptor. Here, we provide the first in-depth single-channel kinetic study of VR1 to understand its activation mechanism. At low to medium concentrations, channel activity appeared as bursts. Not only did the durations of the interburst gaps vary with capsaicin, the bursts also appeared ligand-dependent, with high capsaicin prolonging bursts and stabilizing openings. Gating involved at least five closed and three open states, with strong correlations between short closures and long openings, and long closures and short openings. Increasing capsaicin reduced the long closures with little effect on short ones. The open time constants changed little with capsaicin concentration, though their relative proportions varied. These results suggest that 1), the channel contains multiple capsaicin binding sites; 2), both partial and full binding are capable of opening the channel; 3), when activated, multiple open states are accessible irrespective of the level of binding; and 4), capsaicin association occurs preferentially to the closed channel. PMID:12719227

  12. Effect of the TRPV1 antagonist SB-705498 on the nasal parasympathetic reflex response in the ovalbumin sensitized guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Changani, Kumar; Hotee, Sarah; Campbell, Simon; Pindoria, Kashmira; Dinnewell, Laura; Saklatvala, Paula; Thompson, Sally-Anne; Coe, Diane; Biggadike, Keith; Vitulli, Giovanni; Lines, Marion; Busza, Albert; Denyer, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nasal sensory nerves play an important role in symptoms associated with rhinitis triggered by environmental stimuli. Here, we propose that TRPV1 is pivotal in nasal sensory nerve activation and assess the potential of SB-705498 as an intranasal therapy for rhinitis. Experimental Approach The inhibitory effect of SB-705498 on capsaicin-induced currents in guinea pig trigeminal ganglion cells innervating nasal mucosa was investigated using patch clamp electrophysiology. A guinea pig model of rhinitis was developed using intranasal challenge of capsaicin and hypertonic saline to elicit nasal secretory parasympathetic reflex responses, quantified using MRI. The inhibitory effect of SB-705498, duration of action and potency comparing oral versus intranasal route of administration were examined. Key Results SB-705498 concentration-dependently inhibited capsaicin-induced currents in isolated trigeminal ganglion cells (pIC50 7.2). In vivo, capsaicin ipsilateral nasal challenge (0.031 mM) elicited concentration-dependent increases in contralateral intranasal fluid secretion. Ten per cent hypertonic saline initiated a similar response. Atropine inhibited responses to either challenge. SB-705498 inhibited capsaicin-induced responses by ?50% at 10 mgkg?1 (oral), non-micronized 10 mgmL?1 or 1 mgmL?1 micronized SB-705498 (intranasal) suspension. Ten milligram per millilitre intranasal SB-705498, dosed 24 h prior to capsaicin challenge produced a 52% reduction in secretory response. SB-705498 (10 mgmL?1, intranasal) inhibited 10% hypertonic saline responses by 70%. Conclusions and Implications The paper reports the development of a guinea pig model of rhinitis. SB-705498 inhibits capsaicin-induced trigeminal currents and capsaicin-induced contralateral nasal secretions via oral and intranasal routes; efficacy was optimized using particle-reduced SB-705498. We propose that TRPV1 is pivotal in initiating symptoms of rhinitis. PMID:23441756

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Expression and Functionality in MCF-7 Cells: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Raffaella; Cuniberti, Barbara; Racca, Silvia; Abbadessa, Giuliana; Piccione, Francesca; Re, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel belonging to the transient receptor potential family, and it is expressed in different neoplastic tissues. Its activation is associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of this research was to study the expression and pharmacological characteristics of TRPV1 in cells derived from human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods TRPV1 presence was assessed by binding studies and Western blotting. Receptor binding characteristics were evaluated through competition assays, while 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5,-dipheyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays were performed to confirm an early hypothesis regarding the modulation of cancer cell proliferation. The functionality of TRPV1 was evaluated by measuring Ca2+ uptake in the presence of increasing concentrations of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. Results Binding studies identified a single class of TRPV1 (Bmax 1,492192 fmol/mg protein), and Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of human TRPV1. Among the different tested agonists and antagonists, anandamide (Ki: 2.810-11 M) and 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) (Ki: 5.610-11 M) showed the highest degrees of affinity for TRPV1, respectively. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. For agonists and antagonists, the efficacy of tested compounds displayed the following rank order: resiniferatoxin>anandamide>capsaicin and 5-I-RTX=capsazepine, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that both TRPV1 agonists and antagonists induce significant inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth. Even though the mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative effects of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists should be further investigated, it has been suggested that agonists cause desensitization of the receptor, leading to alteration in Ca2+-influx regulation. By contrast, antagonists cause a functional block of the receptor with consequent fatal dysregulation of cell homeostasis. PMID:25548580

  14. [TRPV1 channel-mediated thermogenesis is a common mode for the Chinese pungent-hot or pungent-warm herbs to demonstrate their natures].

    PubMed

    Sui, Feng; Dai, Li; Li, Qian; Zhou, Hai-yu; Zhan, Hong-dan; Huo, Hai-ru; Jiang, Ting-liang

    2015-07-01

    To further uncover the scientific significance and molecular mechanism of the Chinese herbs with pungent hot or warm natures, endogenous and exogenous expression systems were established by isolation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and transfection of HEK293 cells with TRPV1 channel gene separately. On this basis, the regulation action of capsaicin, one main ingredient from chili pepper, on TRPV1 channel was further explored by using confocal microscope. Besides, the three-sites one-unit technique and method were constructed based on the brown adipose tissue (BAT), anal and tail skin temperatures. Then the effect of capsaicin on mouse energy metabolism was evaluated. Both endogenous and exogenous TRPV1 channel could be activated and this action could be specifically blocked by the TRPV1 channel inhibitor capsazepine. Simultaneously, the mice's core body temperature and BAT temperature fall down and then go up, accompanied by the increase of temperature of the mice's tail skin. Promotion of the energy metabolism by activation of TRPV1 channel might be the common way for the pungent-hot (warm) herbs to demonstrate their natures. PMID:26552144

  15. ?CGRP is essential for algesic exocytotic mobilization of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, Isabel; Ferrndiz-Huertas, Clotilde; Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Wolf, Christoph; Lujn, Rafael; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Proalgesic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors in painful syndromes is a complex molecular process poorly understood that involves mobilization of thermosensory receptors to the neuronal surface. However, whether recruitment of vesicular thermoTRP channels is a general mechanism underlying sensitization of all nociceptor types or is subtype-specific remains controversial. We report that sensitization-induced Ca2+-dependent exocytotic insertion of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors to the neuronal plasma membrane is a mechanism specifically used by peptidergic nociceptors to potentiate their excitability. Notably, we found that TRPV1 is present in large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) that were mobilized to the neuronal surface in response to a sensitizing insult. Deletion or silencing of calcitonin-generelated peptide alpha (?CGRP) gene expression drastically reduced proalgesic TRPV1 potentiation in peptidergic nociceptors by abrogating its Ca2+-dependent exocytotic recruitment. These findings uncover a context-dependent molecular mechanism of TRPV1 algesic sensitization and a previously unrecognized role of ?CGRP in LDCV mobilization in peptidergic nociceptors. Furthermore, these results imply that concurrent secretion of neuropeptides and channels in peptidergic C-type nociceptors facilitates a rapid modulation of pain signaling. PMID:25489075

  16. Non-NMDA glutamate receptors modulate capsaicin induced c-fos expression within trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Sanchez del Rio, Margarita; Waeber, Christian; Huang, Zhihong; Cutrer, F Michael; Moskowitz, Michael A

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzol[f]quinoxaline-7-sulphonamide (NBQX), the kainate receptor antagonists γ-(R-)-glutamylaminomethanesulphonic acid (GAMS) and 6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-nitro-1H-benz[g]indole-2,3-dione-3-oxime (NS-102), and the group III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist 2-amino-4-phosphono-S-butanoic acid (L-AP4) on c-fos-like immunoreactivity (c-fos LI) in trigeminal caudalis (Sp5C), lateral reticular (LRt), medullary reticular (Md) and solitary tract (Sol) nuclei, after intracisternal injection of capsaicin in urethane anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Few c-fos labelled cells were observed within Sp5C in capsaicin-vehicle treated animals. The number of positive c-fos cells increased by 17 fold after intracisternal capsaicin (5 nmol) administration. Pretreatment with CNQX (0.02, 0.1, 0.6, 3 and 15 mg kg−1) or NBQX (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg kg−1), administered intraperitoneally 15 min before capsaicin, significantly reduced labelled cells within Sp5C by a maximum of 45 and 34%, respectively. The number of c-fos LI cells within LRt, Md and Sol was not affected. Pretreatment with  L-AP4 (1, 3 and 10 mg kg−1) decreased the number of Sp5C c-fos LI cells by a maximum of 30%, whereas GAMS (1 and 10 mg kg−1) and NS-102 (1 and 5 mg kg−1) did not show any significant effect. These results suggest that blockade of AMPA receptors, but not kainate receptors, or the activation of group III mGluRs, decrease the response of Sp5C neurons to trigeminovascular activation. Thus, in addition to NMDA receptors, mGluRs and AMPA receptors may modulate cephalic pain and may provide a potential therapeutic target for antimigraine drugs. PMID:10401552

  17. Capsaicin Fluidifies the Membrane and Localizes Itself near the Lipid-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Alejandro; Schneider, Monika; Fernndez-Martnez, Ana M; Ausili, Alessio; de Godos, Ana M; Corbaln-Garca, Senena; Gmez-Fernndez, Juan C

    2015-10-21

    Capsaicin is the chemical responsible for making some peppers spicy hot, but additionally it is used as a pharmaceutical to alleviate different pain conditions. Capsaicin binds to the vanilloid receptor TRPV1, which plays a role in coordinating chemical and physical painful stimuli. A number of reports have also shown that capsaicin inserts in membranes and its capacity to modify them may be part of its molecular mode of action, affecting the activity of other membrane proteins. We have used differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, (31)P NMR, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy to show that capsaicin increases the fluidity and disorder of 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane models. By using (1)H NOESY MAS NMR based on proton-proton cross-peaks between capsaicin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine resonances, we determined the location profile of this molecule in a fluid membrane concluding that it occupies the upper part of the phospholipid monolayer, between the lipid-water interface and the double bond of the acyl chain in position sn-2. This location explains the disorganization of the membrane of both the lipid-water interface and the hydrophobic palisade. PMID:26247812

  18. Role of the outer pore domain in transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 dynamic permeability to large cations.

    PubMed

    Munns, Clare H; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E; Amzel, L Mario; Caterina, Michael J

    2015-02-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  19. Role of the Outer Pore Domain in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Dynamic Permeability to Large Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Clare H.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E.; Amzel, L. Mario; Caterina, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  20. A-425619 [1-isoquinolin-5-yl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-urea], a novel transient receptor potential type V1 receptor antagonist, relieves pathophysiological pain associated with inflammation and tissue injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Wismer, Carol T; Mikusa, Joe; Zhu, Chang Z; Zhong, Chengmin; Gauvin, Donna M; Gomtsyan, Arthur; El Kouhen, Rachid; Lee, Chih-Hung; Marsh, Kennan; Sullivan, James P; Faltynek, Connie R; Jarvis, Michael F

    2005-07-01

    The vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1, TRPV1), which is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily, is highly localized on peripheral and central processes of nociceptive afferent fibers. Activation of TRPV1 contributes to the pronociceptive effects of capsaicin, protons, heat, and various endogenous lipid agonists such as anandamide and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine. A-425619 [1-isoquinolin-5-yl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)urea] is a novel potent and selective antagonist at both human and rat TRPV1 receptors. In vivo, A-425619 dose dependently reduced capsaicin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia (ED50 = 45 micromol/kg p.o.). A-425619 was also effective in models of inflammatory pain and postoperative pain. A-425619 potently reduced complete Freund's adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain after oral administration (ED50 = 40 micromol/kg p.o.) and was also effective after either i.t. administration or local injection into the inflamed paw. Furthermore, A-425619 maintained efficacy in the postoperative pain model after twice daily dosing p.o. for 5 days. A-425619 also showed partial efficacy in models of neuropathic pain. A-425619 did not alter motor performance at the highest dose tested (300 micromol/kg p.o.). Taken together, the present data indicate that A-425619, a potent and selective antagonist of TRPV1 receptors, effectively relieves acute and chronic inflammatory pain and postoperative pain. PMID:15837818

  1. Capsaicin stimulates the non-store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry but inhibits the store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-P. . E-mail: w1994@vghtc.gov.tw; Tseng, C.-S.; Sun, S.-P.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-R.; Hsu, M.-F.

    2005-12-01

    Rat neutrophils express the mRNA encoding for transient receptor potential (TRP) V1. However, capsaicin-stimulated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation occurred only at high concentrations ({>=}100 {mu}M). This response was substantially decreased in a Ca{sup 2+}-free medium. Vanilloids displayed similar patterns of Ca{sup 2+} response with the rank order of potency as follows: scutigeral>resiniferatoxin>capsazepine>capsaicin=olvanil>isovelleral. Arachidonyl dopamine (AAD), an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, failed to desensitize the subsequent capsaicin challenge. Capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} response was not affected by 8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose (8-Br-cADPR), the ryanodine receptor blocker, but was slightly attenuated by 1-[6-[17{beta}-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,= 5-dione (U-73122), the inhibitor of phospholipase C-coupled processes, 1-[{beta}-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365), the blocker of receptor-gated and store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) channels, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), the blocker of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphospahte (IP{sub 3}) receptor and Ca{sup 2+} influx, and by ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV channels, and enhanced by the Ca{sup 2+} channels blocker, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL-12330A) and Na{sup +}-deprivation. In addition, capsaicin had no effect on the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity or the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) or on the total thiols content. Capsaicin ({>=}100 {mu}M) inhibited the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). In the absence of external Ca{sup 2+}, the robust Ca{sup 2+} entry after subsequent addition of Ca{sup 2+} was decreased by capsaicin in CPA-activated cells. Capsaicin alone increased the actin cytoskeleton, and also increased the actin filament content in cell activation with CPA. These results indicate that capsaicin activates a TRPV1-independent non-SOCE pathway in neutrophils. The reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is probably involved in the capsaicin inhibition of SOCE.

  2. Characterization of mouse orofacial pain and the effects of lesioning TRPV1-expressing neurons on operant behavior

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, John K; King, Christopher; Malphurs, Wendi; Wong, Fong; Weaver, James P; Jenkins, Alan C; Rossi, Heather L; Caudle, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Background Rodent models of orofacial pain typically use methods adapted from manipulations to hind paw; however, limitations of these models include animal restraint and subjective assessments of behavior by the experimenter. In contrast to these methods, assessment of operant responses to painful stimuli has been shown to overcome these limitations and expand the breadth of interpretation of the behavioral responses. In the current study, we used an operant model based on a reward-conflict paradigm to assess nociceptive responses in three strains of mice (SKH1-Hrhr, C57BL/6J, TRPV1 knockout). We previously validated this operant model in rats and hypothesized in this study that wild-type mice would demonstrate a similar thermal stimulus-dependent response and similar operant pain behaviors. Additionally, we evaluated the effects on operant behaviors of mice manipulated genetically (e.g., TRPV1 k.o.) or pharmacologically with resiniferatoxin (RTX), a lesioning agent for TRPV1-expressing neurons. During the reward-conflict task, mice accessed a sweetened milk reward solution by voluntarily position their face against a neutral or heated thermode (3755C). Results As the temperature of the thermal stimulus became noxiously hot, reward licking events in SKH1-Hrhr and C57BL/6J mice declined while licking events in TRPV1 k.o. mice were insensitive to noxious heat within the activation range of TRPV1 (3752C). All three strains displayed nocifensive behaviors at 55C, as indicated by a significant decrease in reward licking events. Induction of neurogenic inflammation by topical application of capsaicin reduced licking events in SKH1-Hrhr mice, and morphine rescued this response. Again, these results parallel what we previously documented using rats in this operant system. Following intracisternal treatment with RTX, C57BL/6J mice demonstrated a block of noxious heat at both 48 and 55C. RTX-treated TRPV1 k.o. mice and all vehicle-treated mice displayed similar reward licking events as compared to the pre-treatment baseline levels. Both TRPV1 k.o. and RTX-treated C57BL/6J had complete abolishment of eye-wipe responses following corneal application of capsaicin. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate the benefits of using the operant test system to investigate pain sensitivity in mice. This ability provides an essential step in the development of new treatments for patients suffering from orofacial pain disorders. PMID:18828909

  3. Involvement of TRPV1 in the Olfactory Bulb in Rimonabant-Induced Olfactory Discrimination Deficit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung

    2016-02-29

    Rimonabant is well recognized as a cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant not only antagonizes the effects induced by exogenous cannabinoids and endocanna