Science.gov

Sample records for capture study funded

  1. Funding Gap Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmyer, Joe; McIntyre, Chuck

    The "funding gap" in public higher education in California represents the difference between state appropriations and the amount needed to fully support each segment's educational mission. This report identifies and defines the funding gap for the California Community Colleges (CCC); measures the consequences of this gap on program quality and…

  2. Capturing Information on Arts Participants: Exploring Engagement Fund Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James Irvine Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Exploring Engagement Fund provides risk capital for arts nonprofits to experiment with innovative ideas about how to engage diverse Californians. In order to understand the variety of Californians engaged in arts experiences, this guide is intended to support current and future Fund grantees in collecting participant information. Exploring…

  3. International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) aims to capture global Alzheimer's disease research funding.

    PubMed

    Liggins, Charlene; Snyder, Heather M; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Ryan, Laurie; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD research and research-related resources, major funding organizations are starting to utilize the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) to categorize their funding information. This information is captured in the International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) for further analysis. As of January, 2014, over fifteen organizations from the US, Canada, Europe and Australia have contributed their information. The goal of the IADRP project is to enable funding organizations to assess the changing landscape of AD research and coordinate strategies, leverage resources, and avoid duplication of effort. PMID:24780512

  4. Dust grain resonant capture: A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzari, F.; Vanzani, V.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical approach, based on a large number of simultaneous numerical integrations, is adopted to study the capture in external mean motion resonances with the Earth of micron size dust grains perturbed by solar radiation and wind forces. We explore the dependence of the resonant capture phenomenon on the initial eccentricity e(sub 0) and perihelion argument w(sub 0) of the dust particle orbit. The intensity of both the resonant and dissipative (Poynting-Robertson and wind drag) perturbations strongly depends on the eccentricity of the particle while the perihelion argument determines, for low inclination, the mutual geometrical configuration of the particle's orbit with respect to the Earth's orbit. We present results for three j:j+1 commensurabilities (2:3, 4:5 and 6:7) and also for particle sizes s = 15, 30 microns. This study extends our previous work on the long term orbital evolution of single dust particles trapped into resonances with the Earth.

  5. Educational Opportunity Fund Legal Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tayler, Marilyn; Jackson, Curtis

    The Educational Opportunity Fund Legal Studies program addresses the need to increase access to careers in law for minority and disadvantaged students. Through early identification of interest, recognition of problems, remediation, skills enhancement, and comprehensive legal career exploration and exposure, students in Montclair State College's…

  6. Harvard University: Green Loan Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Green Loan Fund at Harvard University has been an active source of capital for energy efficiency and waste reduction projects for almost a decade. This case study examines the revolving fund's history from its inception as a pilot project in the 1990s to its regeneration in the early 2000s to its current operations today. The green revolving…

  7. Special Education Funding Reform: A Review of Impact Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Moore, Dennis; Brown, Don; Green, Vanessa A.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.

    2010-01-01

    Various models for funding special education services have been described in the literature. This paper aims at moving the debate concerning special education funding reform beyond the descriptive level by reviewing studies that investigated the impact of various models for funding special education. Systematic searches were conducted of ERIC and…

  8. The Julius Rosenwald Fund syphilis seroprevalence studies.

    PubMed

    Roy, B

    1996-05-01

    In 1929 the Julius Rosenwald Fund, in conjunction with the Public Health Service (PHS), sponsored a syphilis seroprevalence study in the South characterized as a humanitarian effort to benefit the health of rural African Americans. The study reported extraordinarily high rates of positive Wassermann tests, even among children. Despite the unreliability and nonspecificity of this test, modern authors continue to indict these subjects as syphilitic. However, there was no consistent relationship between syphilis and a positive Wassermann test. Additional treponemal pathogens that potentially caused false-positive tests could explain the results. After public outcry to the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, the Rosenwald study acquired new significance. It was used as evidence to bolster the argument that Tuskegee was a consequence of humanitarian motives that became captive to misguided methods of researchers at the Venereal Disease Division of the PHS. Humanitarianism implies the acknowledgement of a right invested in the recipient; health is an end in itself. However, African Americans were necessary as a source of cheap labor for competition in the world cotton markets and as a restraint on the market value of white labor in manufacturing. The administrative structure of the PHS, not zealous individuals, adopted utilitarianism as its paradigm for human research. Syphilis seroprevalence was a calculated use of public health as a means to economic development. PMID:8667443

  9. The Julius Rosenwald Fund syphilis seroprevalence studies.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, B.

    1996-01-01

    In 1929 the Julius Rosenwald Fund, in conjunction with the Public Health Service (PHS), sponsored a syphilis seroprevalence study in the South characterized as a humanitarian effort to benefit the health of rural African Americans. The study reported extraordinarily high rates of positive Wassermann tests, even among children. Despite the unreliability and nonspecificity of this test, modern authors continue to indict these subjects as syphilitic. However, there was no consistent relationship between syphilis and a positive Wassermann test. Additional treponemal pathogens that potentially caused false-positive tests could explain the results. After public outcry to the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, the Rosenwald study acquired new significance. It was used as evidence to bolster the argument that Tuskegee was a consequence of humanitarian motives that became captive to misguided methods of researchers at the Venereal Disease Division of the PHS. Humanitarianism implies the acknowledgement of a right invested in the recipient; health is an end in itself. However, African Americans were necessary as a source of cheap labor for competition in the world cotton markets and as a restraint on the market value of white labor in manufacturing. The administrative structure of the PHS, not zealous individuals, adopted utilitarianism as its paradigm for human research. Syphilis seroprevalence was a calculated use of public health as a means to economic development. PMID:8667443

  10. Rf capture studies for injection into a synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.S.; Cho, Y.

    1993-07-01

    The capture process for a rapid cycling protron synchrotron is studied by numerical simulation. The rf-programming is optimized to allow efficient capture such that minimum particle losses and reasonable capture voltage are attained. The total capture time is constrained to be less than 700 {mu}seconds. Two methods of trapping the injected beam by the synchrotron rf system are examined: by stationary adiabatic capture and by synchronous injection in a standing bucket of the ring. In the adiabatic method, the non-linear function of Lilliequist and Symon is employed. The simulation allows the ``tracking back`` of the original distribution of any set of particles, in particular of those not captured at a given time, which is useful in studying injection alternatives such as shaping the phase-space density prior to injection. The simulation results will be used to design a chopper system to facilitate loss-free injection.

  11. Estimation methodology in contemporary small mammal capture-recapture studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Pollock, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Estimators of population size and survival rate based on the Jolly-Seber capture-recapture model and the 'enumeration method' are described. Enumeration estimators are shown to estimate complicated functions of capture and survival probabilities and, in the case of the population size estimator, population size. Frequently-listed reasons for preferring enumeration estimators are discussed and the Jolly-Seber estimators are shown to be superior even in the case of heterogeneity and trap-happy response, the two sources of unequal capture probability most likely to occur in small mammal studies. New developments in probabilistic capture-recapture models are described, and these models are recommended for future small mammal capture-recapture studies.

  12. Sensitivity studies for the weak r process: neutron capture rates

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, R.; Mumpower, M.; Sinclair, R.; Jones, K. L.; Hix, W. R.; McLaughlin, G. C.

    2014-04-15

    Rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis involves thousands of nuclear species far from stability, whose nuclear properties need to be understood in order to accurately predict nucleosynthetic outcomes. Recently sensitivity studies have provided a deeper understanding of how the r process proceeds and have identified pieces of nuclear data of interest for further experimental or theoretical study. A key result of these studies has been to point out the importance of individual neutron capture rates in setting the final r-process abundance pattern for a ‘main’ (A ∼ 130 peak and above) r process. Here we examine neutron capture in the context of a ‘weak’ r process that forms primarily the A ∼ 80 r-process abundance peak. We identify the astrophysical conditions required to produce this peak region through weak r-processing and point out the neutron capture rates that most strongly influence the final abundance pattern.

  13. Carbon investment funds

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-15

    The report is a study of the development of funds to invest in the purchase of carbon credits. It takes a look at the growing market for carbon credits, the rise of carbon investment funds, and the current state of carbon investing. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of climate change, greenhouse gases, and the Kyoto Protocols. Analysis of the alternatives for reducing carbon emissions including nitrous oxide reduction, coal mine methane capture and carbon capture and storage; Discussion of the different types of carbon credits; Discussion of the basics of carbon trading; Evaluation of the current status of carbon investing; and Profiles of 37 major carbon investment funds worldwide.

  14. 7 CFR 4280.173 - Grant funding for feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... America Program General Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study Grants § 4280.173 Grant funding for... for an eligible feasibility study project under this subpart to any one recipient will not exceed $50... studies shall be specific to the completion of the feasibility study (refer to Appendix E of this...

  15. 7 CFR 4280.173 - Grant funding for feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... America Program General Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study Grants § 4280.173 Grant funding for... for an eligible feasibility study project under this subpart to any one recipient will not exceed $50... studies shall be specific to the completion of the feasibility study (refer to Appendix E of this...

  16. 7 CFR 4280.173 - Grant funding for feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... America Program General Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study Grants § 4280.173 Grant funding for... for an eligible feasibility study project under this subpart to any one recipient will not exceed $50... studies shall be specific to the completion of the feasibility study (refer to Appendix E of this...

  17. Study of the gravitational capture of a spacecraft by Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, P. I. O.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Deienno, R.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    An extensive analysis of the gravitational capture of a spacecraft by Jupiter is performed for the main regions of interest around this planet. Four different dynamical models are used to study the problem. Our methodology is analogous to the one used to study the gravitational capture maneuvers in the Earth-Moon system. However, here the motion of the spacecraft is free to occupy the three-dimensional space rather than been limited to the orbital plane of the primaries, that is the most usual approach available in the literature. Similarly to what was done in the Earth-Moon system, the two-body energy Jupiter-spacecraft is monitored all the time and an impulsive maneuver should be applied to complete the capture when the spacecraft reaches the periapsis of the close approach trajectory. Our results show that the presence of the oblateness of Jupiter in the dynamical model is essential to obtain lower values for the two-body energy in times that are not too long for practical missions. The Galilean satellites are also very important, and despite their contribution in the gravitational capture maneuver itself, they can be used as a source of swing-bys that decrease the two-body energy Jupiter-spacecraft.

  18. Revisiting the Effect of Capture Heterogeneity on Survival Estimates in Capture-Mark-Recapture Studies: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Fitsum; Botha, Andre; Altwegg, Res

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed capture-mark-recapture methods allow us to account for capture heterogeneity among individuals in the form of discrete mixtures and continuous individual random effects. In this article, we used simulations and two case studies to evaluate the effectiveness of continuously distributed individual random effects at removing potential bias due to capture heterogeneity, and to evaluate in what situation the added complexity of these models is justified. Simulations and case studies showed that ignoring individual capture heterogeneity generally led to a small negative bias in survival estimates and that individual random effects effectively removed this bias. As expected, accounting for capture heterogeneity also led to slightly less precise survival estimates. Our case studies also showed that accounting for capture heterogeneity increased in importance towards the end of study. Though ignoring capture heterogeneity led to a small bias in survival estimates, such bias may greatly impact management decisions. We advocate reducing potential heterogeneity at the sampling design stage. Where this is insufficient, we recommend modelling individual capture heterogeneity in situations such as when a large proportion of the individuals has a low detection probability (e.g. in the presence of floaters) and situations where the most recent survival estimates are of great interest (e.g. in applied conservation). PMID:23646131

  19. Western Michigan University: Quasi-Revolving Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Western Michigan University has designed an innovative "Quasi-Revolving Fund" model that demonstrates the institution's full commitment to incorporating sustainability into campus operations. The Quasi-Revolving Fund recaptures money from cost-savings, similar to a typical green revolving fund, but it also sources capital from the broader…

  20. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  1. Voucher Funding of Training: A Study of the GI Bill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, David; Ross, Sue Geotz

    The study assessed the use of vouchers for funding manpower training, using the GI bill as a test case. Focus was on vocational training, although on-the-job training (OJT), correspondence, and college training were also examined. The value of training was estimated by the extent to which it leads to increased earnings. Longitudinal earnings…

  2. Field Initiated Studies Program: Abstracts of Funded Projects, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Research.

    Projects funded in 1993 as part of the Field-Initiated Studies program of the U.S. Department of Education are described, including information on research objective, project design, principal investigators, amount of award, and report availability. Program titles and locations of principal investigator are: "Promoting Equity in Teacher Education…

  3. Study of Systemic Risk Involved in Mutual Funds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Kishore C.; Dash, Monika

    Systemic risk, may be defined as the risk that contaminates to the whole system, consisting of many interacting agents that fail one after another. These agents, in an economic context, could be firms, banks, funds, or other financial institutions. Systemic risk is a macroscopic property of a system which emerges due to the nonlinear interaction of agents on a microscopic level. A stock market itself is a system in which there are many sub-systems, like Dowjones, Nifty, Sensex, Nasdaq, Nikkei and other market indices in global perspective. In Indian market, subsystems may be like Sensex, Nifty, BSE200, Bankex, smallcap index, midcap index, S&P CNX 500 and many others. Similarly there are many mutual funds, which have their own portfolio of different stocks, bonds etc. We have attempted to study the systemic risk involved in a fund as a macroscopic object with regard to its microscopic components as different stocks in its portfolio. It is observed that fund managers do manage to reduce the systemic risk just like we take precautions to control the spread of an epidemic.

  4. Funding, Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Micah

    2009-01-01

    I show herein how to develop fundable proposals to support your research. Although the proposal strategy I discuss is commonly used in successful proposals, most junior faculty (and many senior scholars) in political science and other social sciences seem to be unaware of it. I dispel myths about funding, and discuss how to find funders and target…

  5. Current Developments in Community College Performance Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Friedel, Janice N.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Thornton, Zoë M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the initiation of performance funding in Tennessee in the late 1970s, approximately 30 states have, at some point, attempted a funding model that includes performance on a set of indicators. The purpose of the present study was to capture the current status of performance funding in public statewide community college systems and to assess…

  6. Preparation of radioactive rare earth targets for neutron capture study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. G.; Rogers, P. S. Z.; Palmer, P. D.; Dry, D. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The understanding of thc details of nucleosynthesis in stars remains a great challenge. Though the basic mechanisms governing the processes have been known since the pioneering work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (l), we are now evolving into a condition where we can ask more specific questions. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the s ('slow') process. In this process the general condition is one in which sequential neutron captures occur at time scales long compared with the beta decay half lives of the capturing nuclides. The nucleosynthesis period for C or Ne burning stellar shells is believed to be in the year to few year time frame (2). This means that radionuclides with similar half lives to this burning period serve as 'branch point' nuclides. That is, there will be a competition between a capture to the next heavier isotope and a beta decay to the element of nexl higher atomic number. By understanding the abundances of these competing reactions we can learn about the dynamics of the nucleosynthesis process in the stellar medium. Crucial to this understanding is that we have a knowledge of the underlying neutron reaction cross sections on these unstable nuclides in the relevant stellar energy regions (neutrons of 0.1-100 KeV). Tm (1.9 years) and ls'Sm (90 ycws) have decay properties that permit their handling in an open fume hood. These Iwo were therefore selected to be the first radionuclides for neutron capture study in what will be an ongoing effort.

  7. Boston University: Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Boston University's (BU) Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund was created in 2008 through an allocation of $1 million from the university's administrative budget. The fund is administered by the Vice President of Operations. Potential projects are identified by the university's Director of Energy Administration and Operations along with the…

  8. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  9. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; et al

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  10. Scissors Mode of 162Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ') reactions.

  11. Iowa State University: Live Green Revolving Loan Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The $3 million Live Green Revolving Loan Fund (LGRLF) at Iowa State University (ISU) was launched in 2008. The LGRLF is unique in its decentralized implementation structure which allows each department and building to reap the benefits of their own efficiency measures and gives individual departments the incentive to propose resource-saving…

  12. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  13. An adverse event capture and management system for cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive capture of Adverse Events (AEs) is crucial for monitoring for side effects of a therapy while assessing efficacy. For cancer studies, the National Cancer Institute has developed the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) as a required standard for recording attributes and grading AEs. The AE assessments should be part of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) system; yet, due to patient-centric EHR design and implementation, many EHR's don't provide straightforward functions to assess ongoing AEs to indicate a resolution or a grade change for clinical trials. Methods At UAMS, we have implemented a standards-based Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) that is integrated with the Epic EHR and other research systems to track new and existing AEs, including automated lab result grading in a regulatory compliant manner. Within a patient's chart, providers can launch AERS, which opens the patient's ongoing AEs as default and allows providers to assess (resolution/ongoing) existing AEs. In another tab, it allows providers to create a new AE. Also, we have separated symptoms from diagnoses in the CTCAE to minimize inaccurate designation of the clinical observations. Upon completion of assessments, a physician would submit the AEs to the EHR via a Health Level 7 (HL7) message and then to other systems utilizing a Representational State Transfer Web Service. Conclusions AERS currently supports CTCAE version 3 and 4 with more than 65 cancer studies and 350 patients on those studies. This type of standard integrated into the EHR aids in research and data sharing in a compliant, efficient, and safe manner. PMID:26424052

  14. A Study of Late Funding of Elementary and Secondary Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., Washington, DC.

    This publication presents findings of a nationwide study of the impact of late or uncertain funding on elementary secondary educational programs funded by the U.S. Office of Education (USOE). Emphasis of the report is on detailed documentation of the problems created by current funding flow patterns to state and local education agencies. In phase…

  15. Time Capture Tool (TimeCaT): Development of a Comprehensive Application to Support Data Capture for Time Motion Studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lopetegui, Marcelo; Yen, Po-Yin; Lai, Albert M.; Embi, Peter J.; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Time Motion Studies (TMS) have proved to be the gold standard method to measure and quantify clinical workflow, and have been widely used to assess the impact of health information systems implementation. Although there are tools available to conduct TMS, they provide different approaches for multitasking, interruptions, inter-observer reliability assessment and task taxonomy, making results across studies not comparable. We postulate that a significant contributing factor towards the standardization and spread of TMS would be the availability and spread of an accessible, scalable and dynamic tool. We present the development of a comprehensive Time Capture Tool (TimeCaT): a web application developed to support data capture for TMS. Ongoing and continuous development of TimeCaT includes the development and validation of a realistic inter-observer reliability scoring algorithm, the creation of an online clinical tasks ontology, and a novel quantitative workflow comparison method. PMID:23304332

  16. Source of funding in experimental studies of mobile phone use on health: Update of systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nierop, Lotte E.; Röösli, Martin; Egger, Matthias; Huss, Anke

    2010-11-01

    A previous review showed that among 59 studies published in 1995-2005, industry-funded studies were least likely to report effects of controlled exposure to mobile phone radiation on health-related outcomes. We updated literature searches in 2005-2009 and extracted data on funding, conflicts of interest and results. Of 75 additional studies 12% were industry-funded, 44% had public and 19% mixed funding; funding was unclear in 25%. Previous findings were confirmed: industry-sponsored studies were least likely to report results suggesting effects. Interestingly, the proportion of studies indicating effects declined in 1995-2009, regardless of funding source. Source of funding and conflicts of interest are important in this field of research.

  17. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  18. Comparative studies in direct slow-neutron capture calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.

    1987-08-01

    Primary E1 transitions due to thermal neutron capture by the nuclides /sup 9/Be, /sup 32,34/S, /sup 40,42,44,46,48/Ca, and /sup 58/Ni are quantitatively interpreted by the Lane-Lynn formula and are compared with recent optical model calculations. The two approaches are equivalent provided the internal region of the nucleus is excluded in the optical model approach. Theoretical justifications for such a procedure are briefly presented. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. An Exploratory Study of Staff Capture at the South African Inspectorate of Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Steven

    2012-01-01

    When prison inspectorates are co-opted or “captured” by those they are monitoring, their ability to bring transparency, accountability, and a human rights culture to prisons becomes harder. Using survey data from 102 staff at the South African Judicial Inspectorate of Prisons (JIOP), this exploratory study measured the severity of staff capture (i.e. they were not protecting the exclusive interests of prisoners) and potential correlates of capture. Overall, study participants exhibited significant levels of capture with Ordinary Least Squares regression indicating higher levels of capture among staff that were African, thought about someday working for the Department of Correctional Services, felt powerless when prison officials ignored them, and if prison officials respected their work (p’s < .05). Length of JIOP employment was not associated with capture. These findings suggest that the JIOP’s policy of not renewing many staffs’ three year contracts could ironically be putting them at risk for capture. PMID:22581999

  20. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  1. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  2. Laser Capture Microdissection as a Tool to Study Tumor Stroma.

    PubMed

    Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag

    2016-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (or LCM) allows for isolation of cells from specific tissue compartments, which can then be followed by DNA, RNA, and/or protein isolation and downstream characterization. Unlike other methods for cell isolation, LCM can be directed towards cells situated in specific anatomical contexts, and is therefore of significant value when investigating the tumor microenvironment, where localization is often key to function. Here, we present a summary of ways in which LCM can be utilized, as well as protocols for the isolation of tumor and tumor-associated stromal elements from frozen breast cancer samples, with a focus on preparation of samples for RNA characterization. PMID:27581011

  3. How Many Sexual Partners of an Individual Need to Be Evaluated to Capture HIV/STI Risk Behavior in a Study?

    PubMed

    Pequegnat, Willo; Hartwell, Tyler D; Green, Annette M; Strader, Lisa C

    2016-06-01

    Investigators conducting HIV studies ask participants multiple questions about sexual risk behaviors with their partners to ensure that they can describe the level of HIV risky sexual behavior. The assessment should be as short as possible because of the expense of collecting the data, the burden to the research subject, and ethical concerns. This study used data from the NIMH Collaborative HIV/STD Prevention Trial to answer the question about how many non-spousal/non live-in partners a research participant needs to be asked about to capture sufficient sexual risk behavior (not using a condom with a non-spousal/non live-in partner in the last 3 months). The data provided evidence that 95 % of the sexual risk behavior was captured by asking about two partners while 98 % was captured by three partners. As research funds become increasingly limited, it is important to design as parsimonious and robust a study as possible. PMID:26350636

  4. Mechanical stability study of capture cavity II at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Problematic resonant conditions at both 18 Hz and 180 Hz were encountered and identified early during the commissioning of Capture Cavity II (CC2) at Fermilab. CC2 consists of an external vacuum vessel and a superconducting high gradient (close to 25 MV/m) 9-cell 1.3 GHz niobium cavity, transported from DESY for use in the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab. An ANSYS modal finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to isolate the source of the resonance and directed the effort towards stabilization. Using a fast piezoelectric tuner to excite (or shake) the cavity at different frequencies (from 5 Hz to 250 Hz) at a low-range sweep for analysis purposes. Both warm (300 K) and cold (1.8 K) accelerometer measurements at the cavity were taken as the resonant ''fix'' was applied. FEA results, cultural and technical noise investigation, and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  5. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Desai, Monica; Rudge, James W; Adisasmito, Wiku; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has played an important role in financing the response to HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) in Indonesia. As part of a series of case studies, we assessed the nature and extent of integration of Global Fund portfolios into the national HIV and TB programmes, integration of the HIV and TB programmes within the general health system, and system-wide effects of Global Fund support on the health care system in Indonesia. The study relied on a literature review and interviews with 22 key informants using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. Global Fund programmes in Indonesia are highly vertical and centralized, in contrast with the decentralized nature of the Indonesian health system. Consequently, there is more integration of all functions at local levels than centrally. There is a high level of integration of planning of Global Fund HIV and TB portfolios into the National AIDS and TB programmes and some limited integration of these programmes with other disease programmes, through joint working groups. Other synergies include strengthening of stewardship and governance and increased staff recruitment encouraged by incentive payments and training. Monitoring and evaluation functions of the Global Fund programmes are not integrated with the disease programmes, with parallel indicators and reporting systems. System-wide effects include greater awareness of governance and stewardship in response to the temporary suspension of Global Fund funding in 2008, and increased awareness of the need to integrate programme planning, financing and service delivery. Global Fund investment has freed up resources for other programmes, particularly at local levels. However, this may hinder a robust exit strategy from Global Fund funding. Furthermore, Global Fund monetary incentives may result in staff shifting into HIV and TB programmes. PMID:20966109

  6. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  7. Early Childhood Funding at the Community Level: A Case Study from Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, David; Joseph, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Early Childhood Block Grant (ECBG) distributes state funding for preschool and birth-to-three programs in Illinois. The authors conducted a case study in Evanston, a city in north Cook County, Illinois, interviewing community representatives and analyzing ECBG program data to discern how ECBG funds are used to provide early childhood services.…

  8. Neutron capture studies of 206Pb at a cold neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Belgya, T.; Borella, A.; Kopecky, S.; Mengoni, A.; Quétel, C. R.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Trešl, I.; Wynants, R.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma-ray transitions following neutron capture in 206Pb have been studied at the cold neutron beam facility of the Budapest Neutron Centre using a metallic sample enriched in 206Pb and a natural lead nitrate powder pellet. The measurements were performed using a coaxial HPGe detector with Compton suppression. The observed -rays have been incorporated into a decay scheme for neutron capture in 206Pb . Partial capture cross sections for 206Pb(n,) at thermal energy have been derived relative to the cross section for the 1884keV transition after neutron capture in 14N . From the average crossing sum a total thermal neutron capture cross section of mb was derived for the 206Pb(n,) reaction. The thermal neutron capture cross section for 206Pb has been compared with contributions due to both direct capture and distant unbound s-wave resonances. From the same measurements a thermal neutron-induced capture cross section of mb was determined for the 207Pb(n,) reaction.

  9. A mobile and asynchronous electronic data capture system for epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jens; Fredrich, Daniel; Piegsa, Jens; Habes, Mohamad; van den Berg, Neeltje; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    A Central Data Management (CDM) system based on electronic data capture (EDC) software and study specific databases is an essential component for assessment and management of large data volumes in epidemiologic studies. Conventional CDM systems using web applications for data capture depend on permanent access to a network. However, in many study settings permanent network access cannot be guaranteed, e.g. when participants/patients are visited in their homes. In such cases a different concept for data capture is needed. The utilized EDC software must be able to ensure data capture as stand-alone instance and to synchronize captured data with the server at a later point in time. This article describes the design of the mobile information capture (MInCa) system an EDC software meeting these requirements. In particular, we focus on client and server design, data synchronization, and data privacy as well as data security measures. The MInCa software has already proven its efficiency in epidemiologic studies revealing strengths and weaknesses concerning both concept and practical application which will be addressed in this article. PMID:23195493

  10. University of Colorado at Boulder: Energy and Climate Revolving Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caine, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The University of Colorado at Boulder's student run Environmental Center leads the campus' sustainability efforts. The Center created the Energy and Climate Revolving Fund (ECRF) in 2007 to finance energy-efficiency upgrades. The ECRF functions as a source of funding for project loans and provides a method of financing projects that seeks to save…

  11. The Power of a Question: A Case Study of Two Organizational Knowledge Capture Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynn P.

    2003-01-01

    This document represents a presentation regarding organizational knowledge capture systems which was delivered at the HICSS-36 conference held from January 6-9, 2003. An exploratory case study of two knowledge resources is offered. Then, two organizational knowledge capture systems are briefly described: knowledge transfer from practitioner and the use of questions to represent knowledge. Finally, the creation of a database of peer review questions is suggested as a method of promoting organizational discussions and knowledge representation and exchange.

  12. Feasibility study of algae-based CO2 capture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The biomass of microalgae contains approximately 50% carbon, which is commonly obtained from the atmosphere, but can also be taken from commercial sources that produce CO2, such as coal-fired power plants. A study of operational demonstration projects is being underta...

  13. Feasibility study of algae-based CO2 capture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biomass of microalgae contains approximately 50% carbon, which is commonly obtained from the atmosphere, but can also be taken from commercial sources that produce CO2, such as coal-fired power plants. A study of operational demonstration projects is being undertaken to eval...

  14. Capturing splicing complexes to study structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jurica, Melissa S; Moore, Melissa J

    2002-11-01

    At its most basic level, pre-mRNA splicing can be described as two coordinated nuclease reactions that cleave an intron at either end and result in ligation of the flanking exons. The fact that these reactions are catalyzed by a approximately 3-MDa behemoth of protein and RNA (the spliceosome) challenges most biochemical and structural approaches currently used to characterize lesser-sized enzymes. In addition to this molecular complexity, the highly dynamic nature of splicing complexes provides additional hurdles for mechanistic studies or three-dimensional structure determination. Thus, the methods used to study the spliceosome often probe individual properties of the machine, but no complete, high-resolution picture of splicing catalysis has yet emerged. To facilitate biochemical and structural studies of native splicing complexes, we recently described purification of the catalytic form of the spliceosome (known as C complex). This native complex is suitable for electron microscopic structure determination by single-particle methods. In this paper, we describe the purification in detail and discuss additional methods for trapping and analyzing other splicing complexes. PMID:12431437

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of metal capture during incineration process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Wey, M.Y.; Yan, M.H.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental studies and thermodynamic equilibrium analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of operating conditions and input waste compositions on the adsorption of heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Zn, and Cd) on silica sand during incineration processes. The experiments were performed with a pilot-scale fluidized bed incinerator, and the evaluated parameters include (1) sand bed temperature (500, 700, and 900 C); and (2) the addition of organic chloride (PVC), inorganic chlorides (NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}), and sulfide (Na{sub 2}S). The experimental and simulating results indicated that the addition of organic chloride (PVC) would increase the formation of volatile metallic chlorides, and decrease the adsorption efficiency of silica sand. On the other hand, the addition of inorganic chlorides (NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}) worked differently, which increased the adsorption efficiency of silica sand. The addition of sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) would increase the adsorption efficiencies of the four metals in silica sand because sulfide inhibited the formation of metallic chlorides. The hexavalent chromium content in the sand bed decreased for the addition of organic chloride (PVC), and increased for the addition of inorganic chlorides (NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}).

  16. Comprehensive capture of cutaneous melanoma by the Ontario Cancer Registry: validation study using community pathology reports.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Rodrigo; Fung, Kinwah; Rochon, Paula; Chan, An-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is often managed outside hospital settings, creating the potential for underreporting to cancer registries. To our knowledge, completeness of melanoma capture in cancer registries has not been assessed using external data sources since the 1980s. We evaluated the melanoma capture rate from 1993 to 2009 in a provincial cancer registry. We identified all melanoma diagnoses in pathology reports from a major community laboratory in Ontario, Canada. Pathologically confirmed diagnoses were linked to Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) records using health insurance numbers. We calculated capture rates as the proportion of patients with melanoma confirmed by a pathology report, with a corresponding melanoma diagnosis in OCR. OCR captured 3,798 of 4,275 (88.8, 95 % confidence interval: 87.9, 89.8 %) invasive melanoma diagnoses over the 17-year period. Annual capture rates of 94 % or higher were found for over half the study period. Among all 29,133 melanoma diagnoses in OCR, 27.6 % were registered based on a pathology report alone, compared with 3.4 % for non-cutaneous malignancies. This suggests that comprehensive capture of melanoma cases by a provincial cancer registry is achievable using source data from community laboratories. There is a need for ongoing validation to ensure data remain accurate and complete to reliably inform clinical care, research, and policy. PMID:26537120

  17. The Australian Research Quality Framework: A Live Experiment in Capturing the Social, Economic, Environmental, and Cultural Returns of Publicly Funded Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Claire

    2008-01-01

    The author regards development of Australia's ill-fated Research Quality Framework (RQF) as a "live experiment" in determining the most appropriate approach to evaluating the extra-academic returns, or "impact," of a nation's publicly funded research. The RQF was at the forefront of an international movement toward richer qualitative,…

  18. Sustainable funding for biocuration: The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) as a case study of a subscription-based funding model.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Leonore; Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Muller, Robert; Strait, Emily M; Li, Qian; Mezheritsky, Yarik; Vetushko, Andrey; Huala, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Databases and data repositories provide essential functions for the research community by integrating, curating, archiving and otherwise packaging data to facilitate discovery and reuse. Despite their importance, funding for maintenance of these resources is increasingly hard to obtain. Fueled by a desire to find long term, sustainable solutions to database funding, staff from the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), founded the nonprofit organization, Phoenix Bioinformatics, using TAIR as a test case for user-based funding. Subscription-based funding has been proposed as an alternative to grant funding but its application has been very limited within the nonprofit sector. Our testing of this model indicates that it is a viable option, at least for some databases, and that it is possible to strike a balance that maximizes access while still incentivizing subscriptions. One year after transitioning to subscription support, TAIR is self-sustaining and Phoenix is poised to expand and support additional resources that wish to incorporate user-based funding strategies. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org. PMID:26989150

  19. Sustainable funding for biocuration: The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) as a case study of a subscription-based funding model

    PubMed Central

    Berardini, Tanya Z.; Li, Donghui; Muller, Robert; Strait, Emily M.; Li, Qian; Mezheritsky, Yarik; Vetushko, Andrey; Huala, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Databases and data repositories provide essential functions for the research community by integrating, curating, archiving and otherwise packaging data to facilitate discovery and reuse. Despite their importance, funding for maintenance of these resources is increasingly hard to obtain. Fueled by a desire to find long term, sustainable solutions to database funding, staff from the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), founded the nonprofit organization, Phoenix Bioinformatics, using TAIR as a test case for user-based funding. Subscription-based funding has been proposed as an alternative to grant funding but its application has been very limited within the nonprofit sector. Our testing of this model indicates that it is a viable option, at least for some databases, and that it is possible to strike a balance that maximizes access while still incentivizing subscriptions. One year after transitioning to subscription support, TAIR is self-sustaining and Phoenix is poised to expand and support additional resources that wish to incorporate user-based funding strategies. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org PMID:26989150

  20. Study of the Effectiveness of OCR for Decentralized Data Capture and Conversion. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, David M.; And Others

    The ERIC network conversion to an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) mode of data entry was studied to analyze the potential effectiveness of OCR data entry for future EPC/s (Editorial Processing Centers). Study results are also applicable to any other system involving decentralized bibliographic data capture and conversion functions. The report…

  1. Pioneering radiation study funded by federal cleanup grant

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a three-year, $900,000 grant to a team of researchers at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and Colorado State University to conduct a pioneering study on the ecological effects radiation and other pollutants. This program focuses on long-term, low-level radiation exposure on non-human species.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of ion capture from water by a model ionophore, tetraprotonated cryptand SC24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owenson, Brian; Macelroy, Robert D.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamics of chloride capture from water by the tetraprotonated cryptand SC24 has been studied for the cases of 19 distances between the criptand and the chloride. The chloride capture is found to be characterized by a rapid cooperative change in the conformation of the cryptand when the Cl(-) begins to enter the ligand and just as it encounters the energy barrier. The conformational transition is associated with a shift of three N-H bonds from the pure endo orientation, such that they point toward the chloride.

  3. Subaru/HDS study of CH stars: elemental abundances for stellar neutron-capture process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Aoki, Wako; Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive abundance analysis providing rare insight into the chemical history of lead stars is still lacking. We present results from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) spectral analyses of three CH stars, HD 26, HD 198269 and HD 224959, and, a carbon star with a dusty envelope, HD 100764. Previous studies on these objects are limited by both resolution and wavelength regions and the results differ significantly from each other. We have undertaken to reanalyse the chemical composition of these objects based on high-resolution Subaru spectra covering the wavelength regions 4020-6775 Å. Considering local thermodynamic equilibrium and using model atmospheres, we have derived the stellar parameters, the effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, and metallicities [Fe/H] for these objects. The derived parameters for HD 26, HD 100764, HD 198269 and HD 224959 are (5000, 1.6, -1.13), (4750, 2.0 -0.86), (4500, 1.5, -2.06) and (5050, 2.1, -2.44), respectively. The stars are found to exhibit large enhancements of heavy elements relative to iron in conformity to previous studies. Large enhancement of Pb with respect to iron is also confirmed. Updates on the elemental abundances for several s-process elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Sm and Pb) along with the first-time estimates of abundances for a number of other heavy elements (Sr, Ba, Pr, Eu, Er and W) are reported. Our analysis suggests that neutron-capture elements in HD 26 primarily originate in the s-process while the major contributions to the abundances of neutron-capture elements in the more metal-poor objects HD 224959 and HD 198269 are from the r-process, possibly from materials that are pre-enriched with products of the r-process.

  4. British government, industry agree to fund Hotel launcher studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. A.

    1986-02-01

    A program status assessment is presented for the horizontal takeoff and landing 'Hotol' single-stage-to-orbit space launcher, for which parallel, two-year airframe and propulsion system proof-of-concept studies have been approved. A two-year initial development program for the airframe would be followed by a four-year development and manufacturing phase that would begin upon the propulsion system concept's successful demonstration. Flight trials could begin in 1996. A number of significant modifications have already been made to the initial design concept, such as to the foreplanes, afterbody, engine intake, and orbital control system.

  5. State funding for local public health: observations from six case studies.

    PubMed

    Potter, Margaret A; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe state funding of local public health within the context of state public health system types. These types are based on administrative relationships, legal structures, and relative proportion of state funding in local public health budgets. We selected six states representing various types and geographic regions. A case study for each state summarized available information and was validated by state public health officials. An analysis of the case studies reveals that the variability of state public health systems--even within a given type--is matched by variability in approaches to funding local public health. Nevertheless, some meaningful associations appear. For example, higher proportions of state funding occur along with higher levels of state oversight and the existence of local service mandates in state law. These associations suggest topics for future research on public health financing in relation to local accountability, local input to state priority-setting, mandated local services, and the absence of state funds for public health services in some local jurisdictions. PMID:17299320

  6. Process comparison study. MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, T.; Krawiec, J.

    1992-11-01

    A process comparison study was conducted using four different advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate a composite solid rocket booster systems tunnel cover. Costs and labor hours were tracked to provide the comparison between the processes. A relative structural comparison of the components is also included. The processes utilized included filament winding, pultrusion, automated tape laying, and thermoplastic thermoforming. The hand layup technique is also compared. Of the four advanced processes evaluated, the thermoformed thermoplastic component resulted in the least total cost. The automated tape laying and filament winding techniques closely followed the thermoplastic component in terms of total cost; and, these techniques show the most promise for high quality components and lower production costs. The pultruded component, with its expensive tooling and material requirements, was by far the most expensive process evaluated, although the results obtained would not be representative of large production runs.

  7. Process comparison study. MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T.; Krawiec, J.

    1992-01-01

    A process comparison study was conducted using four different advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate a composite solid rocket booster systems tunnel cover. Costs and labor hours were tracked to provide the comparison between the processes. A relative structural comparison of the components is also included. The processes utilized included filament winding, pultrusion, automated tape laying, and thermoplastic thermoforming. The hand layup technique is also compared. Of the four advanced processes evaluated, the thermoformed thermoplastic component resulted in the least total cost. The automated tape laying and filament winding techniques closely followed the thermoplastic component in terms of total cost; and, these techniques show the most promise for high quality components and lower production costs. The pultruded component, with its expensive tooling and material requirements, was by far the most expensive process evaluated, although the results obtained would not be representative of large production runs.

  8. Ionization and capture in water: a multi-differential cross sections study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Christophe; Galassi, Mariel E.; Weck, Philippe F.; Fojón, Omar; Hanssen, Jocelyn; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2012-11-01

    Two quantum mechanical models (CB1 and CDW-EIS) are here presented to provide accurate multiple differential and total cross sections for describing the two most important ionizing processes, namely, ionization and capture induced by heavy charged particles in water. A detailed study of the influence of the target description on the cross section calculations is also provided.

  9. Student Appraisal Study and Allocation Formula: Priorities and Equitable Funding in a University Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repp, Joan; Woods, Julia A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a study of utilization of student employees at Bowling Green State University Library and the development of an allocation formula to provide proportional funding to tasks prioritized by relative operational importance. The study further produced an objective basis for reallocating resources from less essential to more essential tasks.…

  10. Funding Vocational Education. A Study To Enhance Employability Standards of Students in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Doug; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the costs of vocational education programs in excess of, or in addition to, the costs of "regular" education for grades 7-12 in New Mexico. Data were gathered through a literature review, a study of vocational education funding formulas of other states; a review of the data from the New Mexico…

  11. Descriptive Analysis of Title VII-Funded State Education Agency Activities. Volume II: Nine Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nava, Hector; And Others

    Results of a national study of the use of funds provided by the 1974 amendments to Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by the state education agencies (SEAs) are presented. The study was undertaken to (1) describe and analyze SEA policies and activities regarding bilingual education, (2) describe and analyze the SEA-level…

  12. Studying Pensions Funds Through an Infinite Servers Nodes Network: A Theoretical Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M. A. M.; Andrade, M.; Filipe, J. A.

    2012-11-01

    This study intends to present a representation of a pensions fund through a stochastic network with two infinite servers nodes. With this representation it is allowed to deduce an equilibrium condition of the system with basis on the identity of the random rates expected values, for which the contributions arrive to the fund and the pensions are paid by the fund. In our study a stochastic network is constructed where traffic is represented. This network allows to study the equilibrium in the system and it is admissible to get a balance to a pensions fund. A specific case is studied. When the arrivals from outside at nodes A and B are according to a Poisson process, with rates λA and λB, respectively, the system may be seen as a two nodes network where the first node is a M/G/∞ queue and second a Mt/G/∞ queue. For this case in the long term the conditions of equilibrium are as follows: mAλAαA = mB(ρλA + λB)αB. In this formula it is established a relationship among the two nodes. Several examples are given in the study.

  13. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Warakamin, Busaba; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    As part of a series of case studies on the interactions between programmes supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and health systems, we assessed the extent of integration of national HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria programmes with the general health system, the integration of the Global Fund-portfolios within the national disease programmes, and system-wide effects on the health system in Thailand. The study relied on a literature review and 34 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. In Thailand, the HIV, TB and malaria programmes' structures and functions are well established in the general health care system, with the Department for Disease Control and the Ministry of Public Health's network of health providers at sub-national levels as the main responsible organizations for stewardship and governance, service delivery, monitoring and evaluation, planning, and to some extent, demand generation. Civil society groups are active in certain areas, particularly in demand generation for HIV/AIDS. Overall, the Global Fund-supported programmes were almost fully integrated and coordinated with the general health system. The extent of integration varied across disease portfolios because of different number of actors and the nature of programme activities. There were also specific requirements by Global Fund that limit integration for some health system functions namely financing and monitoring and evaluation. From the view of stakeholders in Thailand, the Global Fund has contributed significantly to the three diseases, particularly HIV/AIDS. Financial support from the early Global Fund rounds was particularly helpful to the disease programmes during the time of major structural change in the MoPH. It also promoted collaborative networks of stakeholders, especially civil societies. However, the impacts on the overall health system, which is relatively well developed, are seen as

  14. Preliminary carbon dioxide capture technical and economic feasibility study evaluation of carbon dioxide capture from existing fired plants by hybrid sorption using solid sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Steven; Envergex, Srivats; Browers, Bruce; Thumbi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Barr Engineering Co. was retained by the Institute for Energy Studies (IES) at University of North Dakota (UND) to conduct a technical and economic feasibility analysis of an innovative hybrid sorbent technology (CACHYS™) for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion–derived flue gas. The project team for this effort consists of the University of North Dakota, Envergex LLC, Barr Engineering Co., and Solex Thermal Science, along with industrial support from Allete, BNI Coal, SaskPower, and the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council. An initial economic and feasibility study of the CACHYS™ concept, including definition of the process, development of process flow diagrams (PFDs), material and energy balances, equipment selection, sizing and costing, and estimation of overall capital and operating costs, is performed by Barr with information provided by UND and Envergex. The technology—Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents Capture (CACHYS™)—is a novel solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, utilization of novel process chemistry, contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO2 heat of reaction and promote fast CO2 capture, and a low-cost method of heat management. The technology’s other key component is the use of a low-cost sorbent.

  15. New Study Programs and Specializations: The Effect of Governmental Funding and Paradigmatic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Jeroen

    1997-01-01

    A study of Dutch universities from 1974-93 examined factors in the emergence of new academic programs and specializations, particularly the effects of government funding mechanisms (external factor) and level of paradigmatic development (internal factor), drawing on social exchange and resource dependency theory. Results indicate these two factors…

  16. Computer-Based Basic Skills Instruction in a CETA Funded Project: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Robert M.; Hedl, John J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study that (1) examined the effectiveness of computer-based education in developing literacy and mathematics skills in young adults to enable them to secure unsubsidized employment and (2) compared motivation of CETA-funded students with those who sought training voluntarily. Discusses failures of CETA training projects and makes…

  17. A Study of the Validity and Feasibility of Impact Ratings for Use in Funding and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Carol Kehr; And Others

    This study was the second year of a project that attempted to formulate criteria for project evaluation and funding decisions. Activities were designed to produce measures of project impact for vocational education projects. The second year's work focused on refinement of impact variables, and a survey of directors of vocational education…

  18. Community College Noncredit Occupational Programming: A Study of State Policies and Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleksiw, Catherine A.; Kremidas, Chloe C.; Johnson-Lewis, Mark; Lekes, Natasha

    2007-01-01

    This study inventoried state policies and regulations on and financial support for noncredit occupational programming offered by community colleges. Information collected from state- and community college-level administrators and Web-based searches is organized by a range of issues related to noncredit occupational programming and funding, such as…

  19. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease. PMID:24882441

  20. Capture-recapture studies for multiple strata including non-markovian transitions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Pollock, K.H.; Hestbeck, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    We consider capture-recapture studies where release and recapture data are available from each of a number of strata on every capture occasion. Strata may, for example, be geographic locations or physiological states. Movement of animals among strata occurs with unknown probabilities, and estimation of these unknown transition probabilities is the objective. We describe a computer routine for carrying out the analysis under a model that assumes Markovian transitions and under reduced parameter versions of this model. We also introduce models that relax the Markovian assumption and allow 'memory' to operate (i.e., allow dependence of the transition probabilities on the previous state). For these models, we sugg st an analysis based on a conditional likelihood approach. Methods are illustrated with data from a large study on Canada geese (Branta canadensis) banded in three geographic regions. The assumption of Markovian transitions is rejected convincingly for these data, emphasizing the importance of the more general models that allow memory.

  1. Capture of gas-phase arsenic oxide by lime: kinetic and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, R A; Fan, L S

    2001-02-15

    Trace metal emission from coal combustion is a major concern for coal-burning utilities. Toxic compounds such as arsenic species are difficult to control because of their high volatility. Mineral sorbents such as lime and hydrated lime have been shown to be effective in capturing arsenic from the gas phase over a wide temperature range. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between arsenic oxide (As2O3) and lime (CaO) is studied over the range of 300-1000 degrees C. The interaction between these two components is found to depend on the temperature; tricalcium orthoarsenate (Ca3As2O8) is found to be the product of the reaction below 600 degrees C, whereas dicalcium pyroarsenate (Ca2As2O7) is found to be the reaction product in the range of 700-900 degrees C. Maximum capture of arsenic oxide is found to occur in the range of 500-600 degrees C. At 500 degrees C, a high reactivity calcium carbonate is found to capture arsenic oxide by a combination of physical and chemical adsorption. Intrinsic kinetics of the reaction between calcium oxide and arsenic oxide in the medium-temperature range of 300-500 degrees C is studied in a differential bed flow-through reactor. Using the shrinking core model, the order of reaction with respect to arsenic oxide concentration is found to be about 1, and the activation energy is calculated to be 5.1 kcal/mol. The effect of initial surface area of CaO sorbent is studied over a range of 2.7-45 m2/g using the grain model. The effect of other major acidic flue gas species (SO2 and HCl) on arsenic capture is found to be minimal under the conditions of the experiment. PMID:11349294

  2. Analysis of introducing e-services: a case study of Health Insurance Fund of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Goce; Vlahu-Gjorgievska, Elena; Trajkovik, Vladimir

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - Information systems play a significant role in the improving of health and healthcare, as well as in the planning and financing of health services. Fund's Information System is an essential component of the information infrastructure that allows assessment of the impact of changes in health insurance and healthcare for the population. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of the affection of e-services and electronic data exchange (between Fund's information systems and other IT systems) at the quality of service for insured people and savings funds. Design/methodology/approach - The authors opted for an exploratory study using the e-services implemented in Health Insurance Fund (HIF) of Macedonia and data which were complemented by documentary analysis, including brand documents and descriptions of internal processes. In this paper is presented an analysis of the financial aspects of some e-services in HIF of Macedonia by using computer-based information systems and calculating the financial implications on insured people, companies and healthcare providers. Findings - The analysis conducted in this paper shows that the HIF's e-services would have a positive impact for the insured people, healthcare providers and companies when fulfilling their administrative obligations and exercising their rights. Originality/value - The analysis presented in this paper can serve as a valuable input for the healthcare authorities in making decisions related to introducing e-services in healthcare. These enhanced e-services will improve the quality service of the HIF. PMID:27119391

  3. Experimental study of transport and capture of colloids in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Harmand, B.; Rodier, E.; Sardin, M.; Dodds, J.

    1995-12-01

    In the field of radioactive wastes storage, it is well known that radioactive substances can be transported in the geosphere by colloids. The mechanisms which control the interactions between radionuclide and colloid and the transport and capture of colloids are therefore studied in artificial and in natural porous media. Liquid chromatography methods are used to carry out impulse and step injections of latex suspensions in glass beads and sand columns. The physico-chemical and hydrodynamic conditions are changed to determine the effects of parameters as liquid flow rate, ionic strength, and pH on the retention of colloids. The main result is that conditions of low flow rate and high ionic strength can induce a delayed breakthrough of colloids in the medium. The definition of two types of capture sites is proposed from the good simulation of experimental curves with a linear mixing-cell-in-series model.

  4. Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental

  5. Efficient capture of magnetic microbeads by sequentially switched electroosmotic flow—an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debarun; Al-Rjoub, Marwan F.; Heineman, William R.; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetophoretic separation is a commonly used immunoassay technique in microfluidic platforms where magnetic microbeads (mMBs) coated with specific epitopes (antibodies) entrap target pathogens by antigen-antibody kinetics. The mMB-cell complexes are then separated from the continuous flow using an external magnetic field. The goal of this study was to design and test a microfluidic device for efficient separation of fluorescence-tagged mMBs driven by electroosmotic flow (EOF) under steady (time invariant) and switched (time varying) electric field conditions. The EOF was driven at electric fields of 100–180 V cm‑1. The mMBs were captured by a neodymium (NdFeB) permanent earth magnet. The capture efficiency (η c) of these mMBs was improved by sequential switching of the applied electric field driven-EOF. The fluorescent images of the captured mMBs, obtained using an inverted epifluorescence microscope, were quantified using image processing tools. In steady EOF, induced by constant electric field, the number of captured mMBs decreased by 72.3% when the electric field was increased from 100 V cm‑1 to 180 V cm‑1. However, alternating the direction of flow through sequential switching of EOF increased the η c by bringing the escaped mMBs back to the capture zone and increasing their residence time in the area of higher magnetic fields. The average increase in η c was 54.3% for an mMB concentration of 1  ×  106 beads ml‑1 (C 1) and 41.6% for a concentration of 2  ×  106 beads ml‑1 (C 2). These improvements were particularly significant at higher electric fields where the η c with switching was, on average, ~70% more compared to flow without switching. The technique of sequential switching demonstrates an efficient method for capture of mMBs for application in magnetophoretic immunoassay.

  6. Stress response of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) during capture-release health assessment studies.

    PubMed

    Fair, Patricia A; Schaefer, Adam M; Romano, Tracy A; Bossart, Gregory D; Lamb, Stephen V; Reif, John S

    2014-09-15

    There is a growing concern about the impacts of stress in marine mammals as they face a greater array of threats. The stress response of free-ranging dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was examined by measuring their physiologic response to capture and handling. Samples were collected from 168 dolphins during capture-release health assessments 2003-2007 at two study sites: Charleston, SC (CHS) and the Indian River Lagoon, FL (IRL). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone (ALD) and catecholamines (epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NOR), dopamine (DA)), were measured in blood and cortisol in urine. Mean time to collect pre-examination samples after netting the animals was 22min; post-examination samples were taken prior to release (mean 1h 37min). EPI and DA concentrations decreased significantly with increased time to blood sampling. ACTH and cortisol levels increased from the initial capture event to the post-examination sample. EPI concentrations increased significantly with increasing time to the pre-examination sample and decreased significantly with time between the pre- and post-examination sample. Cortisol concentrations increased between the pre- and post-examination in CHS dolphins. Age- and sex-adjusted mean pre-examination values of catecholamines were significantly higher in CHS dolphins; ALD was higher in IRL dolphins. Significant differences related to age or sex included higher NOR concentrations in males; higher ALD and urine cortisol levels in juveniles than adults. Wild dolphins exhibited a typical mammalian response to acute stress of capture and restraint. Further studies that relate hormone levels to biological and health endpoints are warranted. PMID:25019655

  7. 21 CFR 20.106 - Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.106 Section 20.106 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Categories of Records § 20.106 Studies and reports prepared by or with funds provided by the Food and...

  8. AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

    2001-06-30

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

  9. Sizing the Problem of Improving Discovery and Access to NIH-Funded Data: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study informs efforts to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical datasets by providing a preliminary estimate of the number and type of datasets generated annually by research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It focuses on those datasets that are “invisible” or not deposited in a known repository. Methods We analyzed NIH-funded journal articles that were published in 2011, cited in PubMed and deposited in PubMed Central (PMC) to identify those that indicate data were submitted to a known repository. After excluding those articles, we analyzed a random sample of the remaining articles to estimate how many and what types of invisible datasets were used in each article. Results About 12% of the articles explicitly mention deposition of datasets in recognized repositories, leaving 88% that are invisible datasets. Among articles with invisible datasets, we found an average of 2.9 to 3.4 datasets, suggesting there were approximately 200,000 to 235,000 invisible datasets generated from NIH-funded research published in 2011. Approximately 87% of the invisible datasets consist of data newly collected for the research reported; 13% reflect reuse of existing data. More than 50% of the datasets were derived from live human or non-human animal subjects. Conclusion In addition to providing a rough estimate of the total number of datasets produced per year by NIH-funded researchers, this study identifies additional issues that must be addressed to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical research data: the definition of a “dataset,” determination of which (if any) data are valuable for archiving and preservation, and better methods for estimating the number of datasets of interest. Lack of consensus amongst annotators about the number of datasets in a given article reinforces the need for a principled way of thinking about how to identify and characterize biomedical datasets. PMID:26207759

  10. Bayesian inference in camera trapping studies for a class of spatial capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Karanth, K. Ullas; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; Kumar, N. Samba

    2009-01-01

    We develop a class of models for inference about abundance or density using spatial capture-recapture data from studies based on camera trapping and related methods. The model is a hierarchical model composed of two components: a point process model describing the distribution of individuals in space (or their home range centers) and a model describing the observation of individuals in traps. We suppose that trap- and individual-specific capture probabilities are a function of distance between individual home range centers and trap locations. We show that the models can be regarded as generalized linear mixed models, where the individual home range centers are random effects. We adopt a Bayesian framework for inference under these models using a formulation based on data augmentation. We apply the models to camera trapping data on tigers from the Nagarahole Reserve, India, collected over 48 nights in 2006. For this study, 120 camera locations were used, but cameras were only operational at 30 locations during any given sample occasion. Movement of traps is common in many camera-trapping studies and represents an important feature of the observation model that we address explicitly in our application.

  11. Is there evidence for biased reporting of published adverse effects data in pharmaceutical industry-funded studies?

    PubMed Central

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon K

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECTIndustry-funded studies tend to emphasize favourable beneficial effects of the sponsor's product, but we do not know if reports of adverse effects are downplayed.Pharmaceutical companies are required to collate and accurately report adverse effects data in order to fulfil regulatory requirements. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDSThe bias found in the studies looking at the association between industry funding and reporting of beneficial effects may not be as prominent when considering adverse effects data.Industry-funded studies do not appear to differ from non-industry-funded studies in reporting the raw adverse effects data, but the interpretation and conclusions may be slanted to favour the sponsor's product.Readers of industry-funded studies should critically examine the raw safety data themselves rather than be swayed by the authors’ interpretation. AIM To investigate whether adverse effects data for the sponsor's product are presented more favourably in pharmaceutical industry-funded studies than in non-industry-funded studies. METHODS We conducted a systematic review of methodological evaluations that had assessed the relationship between industry funding and the reported risk of adverse effects. Searches were undertaken in 10 databases and supplemented with other sources of information such as handsearching, citation searching, checking conference proceedings and discussion with experts. Two reviewers independently screened the records and carried out data extraction for potentially relevant papers. We included studies that compared the results and interpretation of the adverse effects data according to funding source (e.g. adverse effects data in pharmaceutical industry research vs. data from nonprofit organizations, or from one manufacturer vs. another). Methodological evaluations were excluded if categories of funding source were not explicitly specified by the researchers, and if we were uncertain that industry-funded

  12. How Does Spatial Study Design Influence Density Estimates from Spatial Capture-Recapture Models?

    PubMed Central

    Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2012-01-01

    When estimating population density from data collected on non-invasive detector arrays, recently developed spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models present an advance over non-spatial models by accounting for individual movement. While these models should be more robust to changes in trapping designs, they have not been well tested. Here we investigate how the spatial arrangement and size of the trapping array influence parameter estimates for SCR models. We analysed black bear data collected with 123 hair snares with an SCR model accounting for differences in detection and movement between sexes and across the trapping occasions. To see how the size of the trap array and trap dispersion influence parameter estimates, we repeated analysis for data from subsets of traps: 50% chosen at random, 50% in the centre of the array and 20% in the South of the array. Additionally, we simulated and analysed data under a suite of trap designs and home range sizes. In the black bear study, we found that results were similar across trap arrays, except when only 20% of the array was used. Black bear density was approximately 10 individuals per 100 km2. Our simulation study showed that SCR models performed well as long as the extent of the trap array was similar to or larger than the extent of individual movement during the study period, and movement was at least half the distance between traps. SCR models performed well across a range of spatial trap setups and animal movements. Contrary to non-spatial capture-recapture models, they do not require the trapping grid to cover an area several times the average home range of the studied species. This renders SCR models more appropriate for the study of wide-ranging mammals and more flexible to design studies targeting multiple species. PMID:22539949

  13. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1988-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30 percent. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  14. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1987-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30%. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  15. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Phase B: Data capture facility definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Aerospace Administration (NASA) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) initiated the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) to obtain more accurate measurements of tropical rainfall then ever before. The measurements are to improve scientific understanding and knowledge of the mechanisms effecting the intra-annual and interannual variability of the Earth's climate. The TRMM is largely dependent upon the handling and processing of the data by the TRMM Ground System supporting the mission. The objective of the TRMM is to obtain three years of climatological determinations of rainfall in the tropics, culminating in data sets of 30-day average rainfall over 5-degree square areas, and associated estimates of vertical distribution of latent heat release. The scope of this study is limited to the functions performed by TRMM Data Capture Facility (TDCF). These functions include capturing the TRMM spacecraft return link data stream; processing the data in the real-time, quick-look, and routine production modes, as appropriate; and distributing real time, quick-look, and production data products to users. The following topics are addressed: (1) TRMM end-to-end system description; (2) TRMM mission operations concept; (3) baseline requirements; (4) assumptions related to mission requirements; (5) external interface; (6) TDCF architecture and design options; (7) critical issues and tradeoffs; and (8) recommendation for the final TDCF selection process.

  16. The illusion of specific capture: surface and solution studies of suboptimal oligonucleotide hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization based assays and capture systems depend on the specificity of hybridization between a probe and its intended target. A common guideline in the construction of DNA microarrays, for instance, is that avoiding complementary stretches of more than 15 nucleic acids in a 50 or 60-mer probe will eliminate sequence specific cross-hybridization reactions. Here we present a study of the behavior of partially matched oligonucleotide pairs with complementary stretches starting well below this threshold complementarity length – in silico, in solution, and at the microarray surface. The modeled behavior of pairs of oligonucleotide probes and their targets suggests that even a complementary stretch of sequence 12 nt in length would give rise to specific cross-hybridization. We designed a set of binding partners to a 50-mer oligonucleotide containing complementary stretches from 6 nt to 21 nt in length. Results Solution melting experiments demonstrate that stable partial duplexes can form when only 12 bp of complementary sequence are present; surface hybridization experiments confirm that a signal close in magnitude to full-strength signal can be obtained from hybridization of a 12 bp duplex within a 50mer oligonucleotide. Conclusions Microarray and other molecular capture strategies that rely on a 15 nt lower complementarity bound for eliminating specific cross-hybridization may not be sufficiently conservative. PMID:23445545

  17. Mechanistic Study on Electron Capture Dissociation of the Oligosaccharide-Mg2+ Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqun; Pu, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) has shown great potential in structural characterization of glycans. However, our current understanding of the glycan ECD process is inadequate for accurate interpretation of the complex glycan ECD spectra. Here, we present the first comprehensive theoretical investigation on the ECD fragmentation behavior of metal-adducted glycans, using the cellobiose-Mg2+ complex as the model system. Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to determine the typical glycan-Mg2+ binding patterns and the lowest-energy conformer identified was used as the initial geometry for density functional theory-based theoretical modeling. It was found that the electron is preferentially captured by Mg2+ and the resultant Mg+• can abstract a hydroxyl group from the glycan moiety to form a carbon radical. Subsequent radical migration and α-cleavage(s) result in the formation of a variety of product ions. The proposed hydroxyl abstraction mechanism correlates well with the major features in the ECD spectrum of the Mg2+-adducted cellohexaose. The mechanism presented here also predicts the presence of secondary, radical-induced fragmentation pathways. These secondary fragment ions could be misinterpreted, leading to erroneous structural determination. The present study highlights an urgent need for continuing investigation of the glycan ECD mechanism, which is imperative for successful development of bioinformatics tools that can take advantage of the rich structural information provided by ECD of metal-adducted glycans.

  18. A Parametric Study for Regenerative Ammonia-Based Scrubbing for the Capture of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Resnik, K.P.; Garber, W.; Hreda, D.C.; Yeh, J.T.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-09-01

    A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO2 capture is currently being demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO2 from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO2 in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of the continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO2 and N2 gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. Recently, a series of tests have been conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO2 removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied include absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH3 concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. Results from this current testing campaign conducted in the continuous scrubbing unit as well as test results from a 5-cycle semi-batch reactor will be discussed.

  19. The Political Origins of Higher Education Performance Funding in Six States. CCRC Brief. Number 47

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Kevin J.; Natow, Rebecca S.; Hare, Rachel J.; Vega, Blanca E.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief summarizes a study that examined the origins of state performance funding in six states: Tennessee, Missouri, Florida, South Carolina, Washington, and Illinois. In order to capture a wide range of possible forces at work in the origins of performance funding, the authors selected states that differed in a variety of ways, including when…

  20. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of plain film radiographs between original film and smartphone capture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Licurse, Mindy Y; Kim, Sung H; Kim, Woojin; Ruutiainen, Alexander T; Cook, Tessa S

    2015-12-01

    The use of mobile devices for medical image capture has become increasingly popular given the widespread use of smartphone cameras. Prior studies have generally compared mobile phone capture images to digitized images. However, many underserved and rural areas without picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) still depend greatly on the use of film radiographs. Additionally, there is a scarcity of specialty-trained or formally licensed radiologists in many of these regions. Subsequently, there is great potential for the use of smartphone capture of plain radiograph films which would allow for increased access to economical and efficient consultation from board-certified radiologists abroad. The present study addresses the ability to diagnose a subset of radiographic findings identified on both the original film radiograph and the captured camera phone image. PMID:25840654

  1. The pricing and procurement of antiretroviral drugs: an observational study of data from the Global Fund.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Ashwin; Hoos, David; Mukherjee, Joia S; Farmer, Paul E; Rosenfield, Allan G; Perriëns, Joseph H

    2006-05-01

    The Purchase price report released in August 2004 by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (Global Fund) was the first publication of a significant amount of real transaction purchase data for antiretrovirals (ARVs). We did an observational study of the ARV transaction data in the Purchase price report to examine the procurement behaviour of principal recipients of Global Fund grants in developing countries. We found that, with a few exceptions for specific products (e.g. lamivudine) and regions (e.g. eastern Europe), prices in low-income countries were broadly consistent or lower than the lowest differential prices quoted by the research and development sector of the pharmaceutical industry. In lower middle-income countries, prices were more varied and in several instances (lopinavir/ritonavir, didanosine, and zidovudine/lamivudine) were very high compared with the per capita income of the country. In all low- and lower middle-income countries, ARV prices were still significantly high given limited local purchasing power and economic strength, thus reaffirming the need for donor support to achieve rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy. However, the price of ARVs will have to decrease to render scale-up financially sustainable for donors and eventually for governments themselves. An important first step in reducing prices will be to make available in the public domain as much ARV transaction data as possible to provide a factual basis for discussions on pricing. The price of ARVs has considerable implications for the sustainability of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) treatment in the developing world. PMID:16710550

  2. The pricing and procurement of antiretroviral drugs: an observational study of data from the Global Fund.

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, Ashwin; Hoos, David; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Farmer, Paul E.; Rosenfield, Allan G.; Perriëns, Joseph H.

    2006-01-01

    The Purchase price report released in August 2004 by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (Global Fund) was the first publication of a significant amount of real transaction purchase data for antiretrovirals (ARVs). We did an observational study of the ARV transaction data in the Purchase price report to examine the procurement behaviour of principal recipients of Global Fund grants in developing countries. We found that, with a few exceptions for specific products (e.g. lamivudine) and regions (e.g. eastern Europe), prices in low-income countries were broadly consistent or lower than the lowest differential prices quoted by the research and development sector of the pharmaceutical industry. In lower middle-income countries, prices were more varied and in several instances (lopinavir/ritonavir, didanosine, and zidovudine/lamivudine) were very high compared with the per capita income of the country. In all low- and lower middle-income countries, ARV prices were still significantly high given limited local purchasing power and economic strength, thus reaffirming the need for donor support to achieve rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy. However, the price of ARVs will have to decrease to render scale-up financially sustainable for donors and eventually for governments themselves. An important first step in reducing prices will be to make available in the public domain as much ARV transaction data as possible to provide a factual basis for discussions on pricing. The price of ARVs has considerable implications for the sustainability of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) treatment in the developing world. PMID:16710550

  3. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  4. Neutron Induced Capture Reaction Studies in the Resonance Region at GELINA

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, Peter; Borella, A.; Kopecky, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.; Ware, T.

    2009-01-28

    The neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA installed at the IRMM Geel (B) has been designed to study neutron-induced reactions in the resonance region. It is a multi-user facility, providing a pulsed white neutron source, with a neutron energy range between 10 meV and 20 MeV and a time resolution of 1 ns. The research program concentrates on cross section data needs for nuclear energy applications. In this paper efforts to improve the quality of cross section data for neutron induced capture reactions in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are presented together with examples of cross section data to support the development of advanced reactor concepts and to optimize the use of present nuclear power plants.

  5. Studies of electron correlation effects in multicharged ion atom collisions involving double capture

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Sommer, K.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    We review measurements of L-Coster Kronig and Auger electron production in slow, multicharged collision systems to study electron correlation effects in the process of double electron capture. The n/sup /minus/3/ law was confirmed for the production of the Coster-Kronig configurations 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ (n greater than or equal to 6) in O/sup 6 +/ + He collisions. Enhancement of high angular momentum /ell/ in specific 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations was observed by means of high-resolution measurements of the Coster-Kronig lines. The importance of electron correlation effects in couplings of potential energy curves leading to the 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations is verified by means of Landau-Zener model calculations. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.

  7. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Rudge, James W; Phuanakoonon, Suparat; Nema, K Henry; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    In Papua New Guinea, investment by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund) has played an important role in scaling up the response to HIV and tuberculosis (TB). As part of a series of case studies on how Global Fund-supported programmes interact with national health systems, we assessed the nature and extent of integration of the Global Fund portfolios within the national HIV and TB programmes, the integration of the HIV and TB programmes within the general health system, and system-wide effects of Global Fund support in Papua New Guinea. The study relied on a literature review and 30 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. Global Fund-supported activities were found to be largely integrated, or at least coordinated, with the national HIV and TB programmes. However, this has reinforced the vertical nature of these programmes with respect to the general health system, with parallel systems established to meet the demands of programme scale-up and the performance-based nature of Global Fund investment in the weak health system context of Papua New Guinea. The more parallel functions include monitoring and evaluation, and procurement and supply chain systems, while human resources and infrastructure for service delivery are increasingly integrated at more local levels. Positive synergies of Global Fund support include engagement of civil-society partners, and a reliable supply of high-quality drugs which may have increased patient confidence in the health system. However, the severely limited and overburdened pool of human resources has been skewed towards the three diseases, both at management and service delivery levels. There is also concern surrounding the sustainability of the disease programmes, given their dependence on donors. Increasing Global Fund attention towards health system strengthening was viewed positively, but should acknowledge that system changes are slow

  8. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Rudge, James W; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaxay; Chanthapadith, Chansouk; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    In Lao PDR, investment by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has played an important role in scaling up the response to HIV and tuberculosis (TB). As part of a series of case studies on how Global Fund-supported programmes interact with national health systems, we assessed the nature and extent of integration of the Global Fund portfolios within the national HIV and TB programmes, the integration of the HIV and TB programmes within the general health system, and system-wide effects of Global Fund support in Lao PDR. The study relied on a literature review and 35 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. In Lao PDR, the HIV and TB programmes remain vertical and mostly weakly integrated with the general health system. However, Global Fund investments have extended the network of facilities delivering care at local level, resulting in greater integration with primary care and improved access for patients, particularly for TB. For HIV, as the prevalence remains low, services primarily target high-risk groups in urban areas. Less integrated functions include procurement and drug supply, and monitoring and evaluation. HIV and TB programmes are only starting to coordinate with each other. Global Fund-supported activities are generally integrated within the national disease programmes, except for monitoring and evaluation. Synergies of Global Fund support with the health system include improved access to services, institutional strengthening and capacity building, improved family planning (with wider condom distribution through HIV/AIDS social marketing programmes), and the delivery of add-on interventions, such as vaccinations and health education, alongside Global Fund-supported interventions at community level. Unintended consequences concern the lack of alignment between national stated priorities (maternal and child health) and the strong focus of external partners, such as the Global Fund

  9. Innovation, renewable energy, and state investment: Case studies of leading clean energy funds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Milford, Lewis; Porter, Kevin; Clark, Roger

    2002-09-01

    Over the last several years, many U.S. states have established clean energy funds to help support the growth of renewable energy markets. Most often funded by system-benefits charges (SBC), the 15 states that have established such funds are slated to collect nearly $3.5 billion from 1998 to 2012 for renewable energy investments. These clean energy funds are expected to have a sizable impact on the energy future of the states in which the funds are being collected and used. For many of the organizations tapped to administer these funds, however, this is a relatively new role that presents the challenge of using public funds in the most effective and innovative fashion possible. Fortunately, each state is not alone in its efforts; many other U.S. states and a number of countries are undertaking similar efforts. Early lessons are beginning to be learned by clean energy funds about how to effectively target public funds towards creating and building renewable energy markets. A number of innovative programs have already been developed that show significant leadership by U.S. states in supporting renewable energy. It is important that clean energy fund administrators learn from this emerging experience.

  10. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John S. F.; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002–13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009–13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  11. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding.

    PubMed

    Begum, Mursheda; Lewison, Grant; Wright, John S F; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002-13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009-13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  12. A transcriptomic analysis of the stress induced by capture-release health assessment studies in wild dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Mancia, A; Warr, G W; Chapman, R W

    2008-06-01

    The health of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) is typically evaluated by the study of animals that are captured and released back into the wild after examination. The impact of such studies on gene expression in peripheral blood cells was investigated using microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods. Significantly increased expression was observed in two major classes of genes: (i) energy metabolism, and (ii) responsiveness to stress and trauma, the latter effect suggesting the initiation of an acute-phase response. The value of data obtained in capture/release studies may need to be weighed against the potential physiological impacts of such studies. PMID:18466235

  13. Do glucocorticoids in droppings reflect baseline level in birds captured in the wild? A case study in snow geese.

    PubMed

    Legagneux, Pierre; Gauthier, Gilles; Chastel, Olivier; Picard, Gérald; Bêty, Joël

    2011-07-01

    Baseline glucocorticoid (CORT) levels in plasma are increasingly used as physiological indices of the relative condition or health of individuals and populations. The major limitation is that CORT production is stimulated by the stress associated with capture and handling. Measuring fecal CORT is one way to solve this problem because elevation of fecal CORT usually does not occur before 1-12h after a stressful event in captive animals. However, the effect of capture and handling on fecal CORT levels has seldom been investigated in the wild. In a first experiment, we validated that fecal CORT levels starts to increase in droppings (a mixture of fecal and urinary material) about 1-2h following injection of CORT-release hormone (ACTH) in captive greater snow geese (Chen caerulescens atlantica). In a second experiment, we investigated whether dropping and plasma CORT were related and if the capture affected fecal CORT levels in wild birds. Baseline CORT was obtained by bleeding individuals within 4 min after capture. No relationship was found between baseline and CORT in droppings shortly after capture (<4 min). In addition, CORT levels in droppings increased linearly with time after capture and was already elevated by a factor two 40 min after capture. The different turnover time of CORT between urine and feces could explain such results. We conclude that droppings cannot provide an index of basal CORT levels in snow geese captured in the wild. Such a result contrast with previous studies conducted on habituated, captive animals. We thus recommend that use of droppings as a non-invasive technique to measure baseline CORT be restricted to non-manipulated individuals in the wild. PMID:21510949

  14. Spectroscopic Studies of Very Metal-poor Stars with the Subaru High Dispersion Spectrograph. III. Light Neutron-Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Wako; Honda, Satoshi; Beers, Timothy C.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Ando, Hiroyasu; Norris, John E.; Ryan, Sean G.; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Sadakane, Kozo; Takada-Hidai, Masahide

    2005-10-01

    Elemental abundance measurements have been obtained for a sample of 18 very metal-poor stars using spectra obtained with the Subaru Telescope High Dispersion Spectrograph. Seventeen stars, among which 16 are newly analyzed in the present work, were selected from candidate metal-poor stars identified in the HK survey of Beers and colleagues. The metallicity range covered by our sample is -3.1<~[Fe/H]<~-2.4. The abundances of carbon, α-elements, and iron-peak elements determined for these stars confirm the trends found by previous work. One exception is the large overabundance of Mg, Al, and Sc found in BS 16934-002, a giant with [Fe/H]=-2.8. Interestingly, this is the most metal-rich star (by about 1 dex in [Fe/H]) known with such large overabundances in these elements. Furthermore, BS 16934-002 does not share the large overabundances of carbon that are associated with the two other, otherwise similar, extremely metal-poor stars CS 22949-037 and CS 29498-043. By combining our new results with those of previous studies, we investigate the distribution of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars, focusing on the production of the light neutron-capture elements (e.g., Sr, Y, and Zr). Large scatter is found in the abundance ratios between the light and heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g., Sr/Ba, Y/Eu) for stars with low abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements. Most of these stars have extremely low metallicity ([Fe/H]<~-3). By contrast, the observed scatter in these ratios is much smaller in stars with excesses of heavy neutron-capture elements and with higher metallicity. These results can be naturally explained by assuming that two processes independently enriched the neutron-capture elements in the early Galaxy. One process increases both light and heavy neutron-capture elements and affects stars with [Fe/H]>~-3, while the other process contributes only to the light neutron-capture elements and affects most stars with [Fe/H]>~-3.5. Interestingly, the

  15. Rights and Responsibilities of Tuberculosis Patients, and the Global Fund: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Atif, Muhammad; Javaid, Sareema; Farooqui, Maryam; Sarwar, Muhammad Rehan

    2016-01-01

    Background Implementation of the Charter to protect patients’ rights is an important criterion to achieve patient-centered approach and receive financial support from the Global Fund. Our study aims to explore the knowledge of tuberculosis (TB) patients about their rights and responsibilities at the Chest Disease Unit of the Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Methods This was a qualitative study. The data from purposefully selected TB patients was collected by in-depth interviews. Eligibility criteria included confirmed diagnosis of TB and enrollment in the TB program. A pilot tested interview protocol was based upon the objectives of the study, and was used uniformly in each interview to maintain the consistency. The sample size was limited by applying the saturation criteria. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Inductive thematic content analysis was applied to analyze the data and draw conclusions. Results Out of the total 16 patients, four were female, and seven were illiterate. Eight patients were known cases of multi-drug resistant TB. Analysis of the data yielded seven themes; tuberculosis care services, moral support and stigmatization, dignity and privacy, complaints, fear of losing job, information sharing and compliance to the treatment plan, and contribution to eradicate TB. First five represented the rights section while latter two were related to the responsibilities section of the Charter. Conclusion Discriminatory access to TB care services and the right to privacy were two major concerns identified in this study. However, the respondents recognized their responsibilities as a TB patient. To ensure uninterrupted investment from the Global Fund, there is a need to implement fair TB care policies which support human rights-based approach. PMID:26998830

  16. How funding structures for HIV/AIDS research shape outputs and utilization: a Swiss case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research policy in the field of HIV has changed substantially in recent decades in Switzerland. Until 2004, social science research on HIV/AIDS was funded by specialized funding agencies. After 2004, funding of such research was “normalized” and integrated into the Swiss National Science Foundation as the main funding agency for scientific research in Switzerland. This paper offers a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between the changing nature of funding structures on the one hand and the production and communication of policy-relevant scientific knowledge in the field of HIV on the other hand. Methods The analysis relies on an inventory of all social sciences research projects on HIV in Switzerland that were funded between 1987 and 2010, including topics covered and disciplines involved, as well as financial data. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 stakeholders. Results The analysis highlights that the pre-2004 funding policy ensured good coverage of important social science research themes. Specific incentives and explicit promotion of social science research related to HIV gave rise to a multidisciplinary, integrative and health-oriented approach. The abolition of a specific funding policy in 2004 was paralleled by a drastic reduction in the number of social science research projects submitted for funding, and a decline of public money dedicated to such research. Although the public administration in charge of HIV policy still acknowledges the relevance of findings from social sciences for the development of prevention, treatment and care, HIV-related social science research does not flourish under current funding conditions. Conclusions The Swiss experience sheds light on the difficulties of sustaining social science research and multidisciplinary approaches related to HIV without specialized funding agencies. Future funding policy might not necessarily require specialized agencies, but should better take into

  17. Methods to Mark Termites with Protein for Mark-Release-Recapture and Mark-Capture Type Studies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of marking the southwestern desert subterranean termite, Heterotermes aureus (Snyder), with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein for mark-release-recapture (MRR) and mark-capture type studies. Qualitative laboratory studies were conducted to de...

  18. DCB Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Biology (DCB) funds and supports extramural basic research that investigates the fundamental biology behind cancer. Find out more about DCB's grants process and funding opportunities.

  19. Borehole parametric study for neutron induced capture gamma-ray spectrometry using the MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, M; Sohrabpour, M

    2000-01-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate neutron transport from an Am-Be source into a granite formation surrounding a borehole. The effects of the moisture and the neutron poison on the thermal neutron flux distribution and the capture by the absorbing elements has been calculated. Thermal and nonthermal captures for certain absorbers having resonance structures in the epithermal and fast energy regions such as W and Si were performed. It is shown that for those absorbers having large resonances in the epithermal regions when they are present in dry formation or when accompanied by neutron poisons the resonance captures may be significant compared to the thermal captures. PMID:10670932

  20. Boulder Capture System Design Options for the Asteroid Robotic Redirect Mission Alternate Approach Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belbin, Scott P.; Merrill, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a boulder acquisition and asteroid surface interaction electromechanical concept developed for the Asteroid Robotic Redirect Mission (ARRM) option to capture a free standing boulder on the surface of a 100 m or larger Near Earth Asteroid (NEA). It details the down select process and ranking of potential boulder capture methods, the evolution of a simple yet elegant articulating spaceframe, and ongoing risk reduction and concept refinement efforts. The capture system configuration leverages the spaceframe, heritage manipulators, and a new microspine technology to enable the ARRM boulder capture. While at the NEA it enables attenuation of terminal descent velocity, ascent to escape velocity, boulder collection and restraint. After departure from the NEA it enables, robotic inspection, sample caching, and crew Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA).

  1. Capturing heterogeneous group differences using mixture-of-experts: Application to a study of aging.

    PubMed

    Eavani, Harini; Hsieh, Meng Kang; An, Yang; Erus, Guray; Beason-Held, Lori; Resnick, Susan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-15

    In MRI studies, linear multi-variate methods are often employed to identify regions or connections that are affected due to disease or normal aging. Such linear models inherently assume that there is a single, homogeneous abnormality pattern that is present in all affected individuals. While kernel-based methods can implicitly model a non-linear effect, and therefore the heterogeneity in the affected group, extracting and interpreting information about affected regions is difficult. In this paper, we present a method that explicitly models and captures heterogeneous patterns of change in the affected group relative to a reference group of controls. For this purpose, we use the Mixture-of-Experts (MOE) framework, which combines unsupervised modeling of mixtures of distributions with supervised learning of classifiers. MOE approximates the non-linear boundary between the two groups with a piece-wise linear boundary, thus allowing discovery of multiple patterns of group differences. In the case of patient/control comparisons, each such pattern aims to capture a different dimension of a disease, and hence to identify patient subgroups. We validated our model using multiple simulation scenarios and performance measures. We applied this method to resting state functional MRI data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, to investigate heterogeneous effects of aging on brain function in cognitively normal older adults (>85years) relative to a reference group of normal young to middle-aged adults (<60years). We found strong evidence for the presence of two subgroups of older adults, with similar age distributions in each subgroup, but different connectivity patterns associated with aging. While both older subgroups showed reduced functional connectivity in the Default Mode Network (DMN), increases in functional connectivity within the pre-frontal cortex as well as the bilateral insula were observed only for one of the two subgroups. Interestingly, the subgroup

  2. Mechanism Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Ambient Air by Hydration Energy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Lackner, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydration of neutral and ionic species on solid interfaces plays an important role in a wide range of natural and engineered processes within energy systems as well as biological and environmental systems. Various chemical reactions are significantly enhanced, both in the rate and the extent of the reaction, because of water molecules present or absent at the interface. A novel technology for carbon dioxide capture, driven by the free energy difference between more or less hydrated states of an anionic exchange resin is studied for a new approach to absorb CO2 from ambient air. For these materials the affinity to CO2 is dramatically lowered as the availability of water is increased. This makes it possible to absorb CO2 from air in a dry environment and release it at two orders of magnitude larger partial pressures in a wet environment. While the absorption process and the thermodynamic properties of air capture via ion exchange resins have been demonstrated, the underlying physical mechanisms remain to be understood. In order to rationally design better sorbent materials, the present work elucidates through molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical modeling the energy changes in the carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide ions that are induced by hydration, and how these changes affect sorbent properties. A methodology is developed to determine the free energy change during carbonate ion hydrolysis changes with different numbers of water molecules present. This makes it possible to calculate the equilibrium in the reaction CO3--•nH2O ↔ HCO3- • m1H2O + OH- • m2H2O + (n - 1 - m1 - m2)H2O Molecular dynamics models are used to calculate free energies of hydration for the CO32- ion, the HCO3- ion, and the OH- ion as function of the amount of water that is present. A quantum mechanical model is employed to study the equilibrium of the reaction Na2CO3 + H2O ↔ NaHCO3 + NaOHin a vacuum and at room temperature. The computational analysis of the free energy of

  3. The advantage of laser-capture microdissection over whole tissue analysis in proteomic profiling studies.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Braakman, Rene B H; Stingl, Christoph; van Duijn, Martijn M; Smid, Marcel; Foekens, John A; Luider, Theo M; Martens, John W M; Umar, Arzu

    2016-05-01

    Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) offers a reliable cell population enrichment tool and has been successfully coupled to MS analysis. Despite this, most proteomic studies employ whole tissue lysate (WTL) analysis in the discovery of disease biomarkers and in profiling analyses. Furthermore, the influence of tissue heterogeneity in WTL analysis, nor its impact in biomarker discovery studies have been completely elucidated. In order to address this, we compared previously obtained high resolution MS data from a cohort of 38 breast cancer tissues, of which both LCM enriched tumor epithelial cells and WTL samples were analyzed. Label-free quantification (LFQ) analysis through MaxQuant software showed a significantly higher number of identified and quantified proteins in LCM enriched samples (3404) compared to WTLs (2837). Furthermore, WTL samples displayed a higher amount of missing data compared to LCM both at peptide and protein levels (p-value < 0.001). 2D analysis on co-expressed proteins revealed discrepant expression of immune system and lipid metabolisms related proteins between LCM and WTL samples. We hereby show that LCM better dissected the biology of breast tumor epithelial cells, possibly due to lower interference from surrounding tissues and highly abundant proteins. All data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002381 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002381). PMID:27030549

  4. Shell model study on the astrophysical neutron capture of 8Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Yan, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Xi-Zhen

    2012-09-01

    The astrophysical important neutron capture of 8Li is investigated by combining the shell model and potential model. Three effective interactions, SFO, PSDMK2 and PSDWBP are used to calculate the spectroscopic factors and reaction widths. For the resonant capture from 8Li to the first continuum state of 9Li , the three effective interactions give similar neutron partial widths, and they are well compared with the experimental results. However, the calculated photon widths are over 5 times less than the previous estimate. This will make the substantial difference that, at high temperature, the direct capture mechanism still dominates. The calculated capture rates generally agree well with the experimental data. The uncertainty of calculated cross-sections and capture rates mainly results from the different prediction of spectroscopic factors for the three effective interactions. The total neutron capture rates in our calculations are less than 4300 cm3 mole-1 s-1 for T 9 < 5 which confirms that the main reaction flow will proceed through the reaction 8Li ( α, n) 11B in the stellar environments.

  5. A qualitative study of post-settlement influences on State tobacco control funding.

    PubMed

    Austin-Lane, Joy; Girasek, Deborah C; Barbour, Galen L

    2004-07-01

    State settlements with the tobacco industry increased the availability of funds that might be used for improving health outcomes and increased scrutiny of tobacco control funding overall. This research identified potential explanatory factors for state tobacco control funding and developed a conceptual framework to guide further exploration. Key informant interviews with 14 tobacco policy professionals were conducted to augment the information available in the scientific literature on funding influences. Interviews yielded a comprehensive list of 26 factors that were returned to key informants for ratings of importance using a modified Delphi process. Results indicate that the top funding influences are budgetary constraints, lobbying, advocacy, tobacco economy, legislative priorities, public opinion, and leadership by the governor or state legislators. A conceptual diagram is presented of all factors clustered into three categories. Further research is planned to quantify these factors and assess their explanatory value PMID:15231096

  6. A numerical study of ENO and TVD schemes for shock capturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shih-Hung; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1988-01-01

    The numerical performance of a second-order upwind-based total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and that of a uniform second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme for shock capturing are compared. The TVD scheme used is a modified version of Liou, using the flux-difference splitting (FDS) of Roe and his superbee function as the limiter. The construction of the basic ENO scheme is based on Harten, Engquist, Osher, and Chakravarthy, and the 2-D extensions are obtained by using a Strang-type of fractional-step time-splitting method. Numerical results presented include both steady and unsteady, 1-D and 2-D calculations. All the chosen test problems have exact solutions so that numerical performance can be measured by comparing the computer results to them. For 1-D calculations, the standard shock-tube problems of Sod and Lax are chosen. A very strong shock-tube problem, with the initial density ratio of 400 to 1 and pressure ratio of 500 to 1, is also used to study the behavior of the two schemes. For 2-D calculations, the shock wave reflection problems are adopted for testing. The cases presented in this report include flows with Mach numbers of 2.9, 5.0, and 10.0.

  7. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  8. Coping with unobservable and mis-classified states in capture-recapture studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Multistate mark-recapture methods provide an excellent conceptual framework for considering estimation in studies of marked animals. Traditional methods include the assumptions that (1) each state an animal occupies is observable, and (2) state is assigned correctly at each point in time. Failure of either of these assumptions can lead to biased estimates of demographic parameters. I review design and analysis options for minimizing or eliminating these biases. Unobservable states can be adjusted for by including them in the state space of the statistical model, with zero capture probability, and incorporating the robust design, or observing animals in the unobservable state through telemetry, tag recoveries, or incidental observations. Mis-classification can be adjusted for by auxiliary data or incorporating the robust design, in order to estimate the probability of detecting the state an animal occupies. For both unobservable and mis-classified states, the key feature of the robust design is the assumption that the state of the animal is static for at least two sampling occasions.

  9. A novel mobile-cloud system for capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering data: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Jones, Maria; Liu, Tao; Hao, Wei; Yan, Yuqing; Qian, Gang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to provide a new approach for capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering data, which are critical for evaluating wheelchair users' activity levels. We proposed a mobile-cloud (MC) system, which incorporated the emerging mobile and cloud computing technologies. The MC system employed smartphone sensors to collect wheelchair maneuvering data and transmit them to the cloud for storage and analysis. A k-nearest neighbor (KNN) machine-learning algorithm was developed to mitigate the impact of sensor noise and recognize wheelchair maneuvering patterns. We conducted 30 trials in an indoor setting, where each trial contained 10 bouts (i.e., periods of continuous wheelchair movement). We also verified our approach in a different building. Different from existing approaches that require sensors to be attached to wheelchairs' wheels, we placed the smartphone into a smartphone holder attached to the wheelchair. Experimental results illustrate that our approach correctly identified all 300 bouts. Compared to existing approaches, our approach was easier to use while achieving similar accuracy in analyzing the accumulated movement time and maximum period of continuous movement (p > 0.8). Overall, the MC system provided a feasible way to ease the data collection process and generated accurate analysis results for evaluating activity levels. PMID:26479684

  10. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) Funding for Studies of Hospital-Associated Bacterial Pathogens: Are Funds Proportionate to Burden of Disease?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are associated with a considerable burden of disease and direct costs greater than $17 billion. The pathogens that cause the majority of serious HAIs are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species, referred as ESCKAPE. We aimed to determine the amount of funding the National Institute of Health (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) allocates to research on antimicrobial resistant pathogens, particularly ESCKAPE pathogens. Methods The NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) database was used to identify NIAID antimicrobial resistance research grants funded in 2007-2009 using the terms "antibiotic resistance," "antimicrobial resistance," and "hospital-associated infection." Results Funding for antimicrobial resistance grants has increased from 2007-2009. Antimicrobial resistance funding for bacterial pathogens has seen a smaller increase than non-bacterial pathogens. The total funding for all ESKCAPE pathogens was $ 22,005,943 in 2007, $ 30,810,153 in 2008 and $ 49,801,227 in 2009. S. aureus grants received $ 29,193,264 in FY2009, the highest funding amount of all the ESCKAPE pathogens. Based on 2009 funding data, approximately $1,565 of research money was spent per S. aureus related death and $750 of was spent per C. difficile related death. Conclusions Although the funding for ESCKAPE pathogens has increased from 2007 to 2009, funding levels for antimicrobial resistant bacteria-related grants is still lower than funding for antimicrobial resistant non-bacterial pathogens. Efforts may be needed to improve research funding for resistant-bacterial pathogens, particularly as their clinical burden increases. PMID:22958856

  11. Formula Funding Mechanisms for State Support of Public Colleges and Universities in Michigan Based on a Study of Funding Mechanisms Across the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    Alternative funding mechanisms for appropriating operating and capital outlay revenue for public colleges and universities are described. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) Budget formulas are utilized by 25 of the 50 states in allocating funds to higher education. (2) Budget formulas are used predominantly in budget areas where data related…

  12. Comparative study of metal-organic frameworks for carbon capture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jason; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Hui; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-03-01

    With the current prevalence of hydrocarbon-based energy sources, carbon capture and sequestration are essential technologies for minimizing the emission of carbon dioxide and the resulting increased atmospheric concentration of CO2. Current technologies based on absorption require high temperature regeneration of the solvent, ultimately leading to significantly decreased efficiency and increased cost. Development of an adsorption-based technology, based on physical adsorption in optimized porous media, would greatly reduce the regeneration costs. Here we discuss the carbon capture performance of a range of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), including both high surface area materials as well as those with sites that have been engineered to have enhanced binding. In particular, we demonstrate that MOFs can capture significant amounts of CO2 and that the CO2 can be readily removed from the MOF using standard pressure/vacuum swing techniques, yielding cyclic capture capacities in excess of 5 mmol/g. Further, we discuss the role of pore geometry and surface chemistry in the capacity of CO2 that can be removed in order to best optimize these materials. Lastly, we will address the effect of flue gas impurities on the carbon capture performance of these MOFs.

  13. Spatial capture-recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Capture-Recapture provides a revolutionary extension of traditional capture-recapture methods for studying animal populations using data from live trapping, camera trapping, DNA sampling, acoustic sampling, and related field methods. This book is a conceptual and methodological synthesis of spatial capture-recapture modeling. As a comprehensive how-to manual, this reference contains detailed examples of a wide range of relevant spatial capture-recapture models for inference about population size and spatial and temporal variation in demographic parameters. Practicing field biologists studying animal populations will find this book to be a useful resource, as will graduate students and professionals in ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries and wildlife management.

  14. The use of a robust capture-recapture design in small mammal population studies: A field example with Microtus pennsylvanicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Pollock, K.H.; Hines, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The robust design of Pollock (1982) was used to estimate parameters of a Maryland M. pennsylvanicus population. Closed model tests provided strong evidence of heterogeneity of capture probability, and model M eta (Otis et al., 1978) was selected as the most appropriate model for estimating population size. The Jolly-Seber model goodness-of-fit test indicated rejection of the model for this data set, and the M eta estimates of population size were all higher than the Jolly-Seber estimates. Both of these results are consistent with the evidence of heterogeneous capture probabilities. The authors thus used M eta estimates of population size, Jolly-Seber estimates of survival rate, and estimates of birth-immigration based on a combination of the population size and survival rate estimates. Advantages of the robust design estimates for certain inference procedures are discussed, and the design is recommended for future small mammal capture-recapture studies directed at estimation.

  15. [Studies of Yersinia pestis in wild animals captured in Ankara, Konya and Nevsehir].

    PubMed

    Ozsan, K; Fazli, A; Aktan, M; Beyoğlu, K

    1976-01-01

    No Yersinia pestis could be isolated, by culturing and by inoculations to 1212 guinea-pigs and 150 mice; from 623 citellus, 41 Mus musculus, 55 Microtus, 442 Meriones, 70 Rattus rattus, 56 turtle, 89 hare, 1 hamster, 1 hedgehog, 1 sea snake, altogether 790 dead, 589 alive, i.e. 1379. wild animals captured in Ankara, Konya (Karapinar), Urfa (Akçakale) and in Nevşehir. In 141 sera taken from citellus captured alive, and in 174 sera taken from guinea-pigs inoculated with spleen, liver and kidney suspensions of wild animals, 1/20 - 1/80 agglutination titers (one of the sera from a guinea-pig inoculated with hare organ suspension) were obtained. These findings, probably were due to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, because this organism was isolated from citellus captured in Ankara and Konya. PMID:933892

  16. The robust design for capture-recapture studies: analysis using program MARK

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    Collecting capture-recapture data under Pollock?s robust design provides an additional source of information on capture probability that can be used to provide less biased and more efficient estimates of population dynamics parameters. In addition, it can be used to estimate the probability of being available for capture, which in some cases (e.g., breeding proportion) has ecological significance. This phenomenon can be modeled as a completely random process, Markovian, or with temporary trap dependence. Analysis of this type of data is one of the options in program MARK. By using MARK the relationship between parameters and covariates can be modeled, and various approaches to goodness of fit, model selection, and model averaging can be implemented.

  17. Case Study for the ARRA-funded GSHP Demonstration at University at Albany

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Xiong, Zeyu

    2015-03-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects—a distributed GSHP system at a new 500-bed apartment-style student residence hall at the University at Albany. This case study is based on the analysis of detailed design documents, measured performance data, published catalog data of heat pump equipment, and actual construction costs. Simulations with a calibrated computer model are performed for both the demonstrated GSHP system and a baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system to determine the energy savings and other related benefits achieved by the GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, as well as the pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the demonstrated GSHP system compared with the baseline HVAC system. This case study also identifies opportunities for improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  18. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  19. Relationships of a Circular Singer Arm Gesture to Acoustical and Perceptual Measures of Singing: A Motion Capture Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunkan, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate previous research that suggests using movement in conjunction with singing tasks can affect intonation and perception of the task. Singers (N = 49) were video and audio recorded, using a motion capture system, while singing a phrase from a familiar song, first with no motion, and then while doing a low,…

  20. Opportunities and Obstacles: Implementing Stimulus-Funded School Improvement Grants in Maryland, Michigan, and Idaho. Study Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the study methods used for the "Opportunities and Obstacles: Implementing Stimulus-Funded School Improvement Grants in Maryland, Michigan, and Idaho" report. The purpose of this study was to describe how Title I 1003(g) School Improvement Grants awarded through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) in the 2010-11…

  1. Early Implementation Experiences of the 2010 Teacher Incentive Fund Grantees. NCEE Study Snapshot. NCEE 2014-4021

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) provides grants to support performance-based compensation systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools. The study measures the impact of pay-for-performance bonuses as part of a comprehensive compensation system within a large, multisite random assignment study design. The treatment schools were to…

  2. Suicide in the Military: Army-NIH Funded Study Points to Risk and Protective Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office 301-443-4536 NIMHpress@nih.gov More Science News about Basic Research Military Service Members Suicide ... the Field News from the Field NIMH-Funded Science on EurekAlert Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's ...

  3. Hoofbeats From the Currituck Outer Banks: A Study of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund Adoption Program.

    PubMed

    Koncel, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Research on the adoption and relinquishment of horses, both domestic and wild, remains limited. As a result, little is known about adopters, their adopted horses, and their adoption experience. This study surveyed and interviewed 17 adopters of Colonial Spanish mustangs through the Corolla Wild Horse Fund (CWHF). Together, they adopted 22 horses of varying ages and genders from 2002 to 2012. The participants, who had a range of previous experience with and knowledge of horses, were generally very satisfied with their horses and their adoption experience. Being able to adopt a gentled/trained mustang and receiving support from the CWHF during the adoption process played key roles in adoption success. Additionally, participants' strong desire to preserve a perceived endangered species or national treasure appeared to be a major reason for adopting a Colonial Spanish mustang and served as motivation for making the adoption successful. The results of the study provide insights into ways to improve the number and success of adoptions through other equine programs, especially the Bureau of Land Management's wild horse and burro program. PMID:26480204

  4. Investigation of model capability in capturing vertical coastal processes: A case study in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKiver, William; Sannino, Gianmaria; Bellafiore, Debora

    2015-04-01

    Coastal horizontal and vertical processes play an important role in ocean dynamics. Being the interface between land and sea, they are strongly influenced by winds, river inputs, tides, heat and water fluxes, topographic features, as well as human activities. In this work we perform a set of simulations using two different models, SHYFEM and MITgcm, each employing very different numerical approaches (finite elements and finite volume respectively). This allows us to access their capability to capture a number of coastal processes, specifically considering the role of upwelling and downwelling in the Northern Adriatic Sea. We focus on the Adriatic as its topography, having a very shallow northern basin becoming deeper towards the south, as well as the local atmospheric conditions and its large number of freshwater sources (about a third of the entire Mediterranean), make it prone to dense water events, when cold north-easterly winter winds induce dense water formation in the shallow northern coastal shelf. These extreme dense water events have many complex influences and thus are particularly challenging to understand and model, though their impact on the wider ocean circulation has made them an important topic of research. In this study we focus on one particularly strong dense water formation event that occurred in the beginning of 2012. This serves as an interesting test case to assess both the models strengths and weaknesses, while giving an opportunity to understand how these events affect coastal upwelling and downwelling processes. Using the two very different models we examine the impact of different resolutions (horizontal and vertical), different preconditionings as well as assessing the importance of non-hydrostatic dynamics, in order to identify the crucial model characteristics needed to best reproduce coastal processes.

  5. Interactive Business Development, Capturing Business Knowledge and Practice: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvie, Gregor; Dotsika, Fefie; Patrick, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to follow the planning and development of MapaWiki, a Knowledge Management System for Mapa, an independent research company that specialises in competitor benchmarking. Starting with the standard requirements to capture, store and share information and knowledge, a system was sought that would allow growth and…

  6. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  7. Dynamic modeling and transient studies of a solid-sorbent adsorber for CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    (ACM). The BFB stages are of overflow-type configuration where the solids leave the stage by flowing over the overflow-weir. Each bed is divided into three regions, namely emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake regions. In all three regions, the model considers mass and energy balances. Along with the models of the BFB stages, models of other associated hardware are developed and integrated in a single flowsheet. A valid pressure-flow network is developed and a lower-level control system is designed so that the overall CO{sub 2} capture can be maintained at a desired level in face of the typical disturbances. The dynamic model is used for studying the transient responses of a number of important process variables as a result of the disturbances that are typical of post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture processes.

  8. STUDY OF THE HUMAN CHRONIC WOUND TISSUE: ADDRESSING LOGISTIC BARRIERS AND PRODUCTIVE USE OF LASER CAPTURE MICRODISSECTION

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    Direct procurement of tissue samples from clinically presented chronic human wounds is a powerful approach to understand mechanism at play in an actual problem wound. While such approach suffers from limitations related to lack of reproducible conditions across wounds, something that we are used to the laboratory while studying wounds on experimental animals, the direct study of human wound tissue helps recognize the right questions to ask in the laboratory. Going back and forth between human wound and experimental animal studies helps steer studies on experimental wounds in a clinically relevant direction. In this article, we describe critical factors that need to be considered prior to planning a study involving human wound samples. In addition, we describe an approach to capture wound hyperproliferative epithelium (HE) from chronic human wound biopsies using laser capture microdissection (LCM). LCM is a new technology applicable to a broad range of clinical research and represents a catalyst of sophisticated translational research. PMID:24029938

  9. Facts and Narrative - the Concept of 4d Capturing of Heritage Building; a Case Study of Sompur Mahavihara, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Md. M.; Rahaman, H.

    2013-07-01

    This study embarked upon a premise that considers architecture of building as a dynamic phenomenon. A building from its conception is susceptible to change due to various reasons. An historical building that is several hundred years old must have undergone through changes due to political, social, religious and most importantly functional reasons. Hence capturing building and its dynamic evolution is necessary to appreciate its architecture as well as its heritage value. Whereas the conventional method of fact based historiography only captures the building in particular moment. It makes architectural historians to become perplexed over to which particular moment to be documented. It is a great challenge for the architectural historians to bring back these dynamic characters of the building that are mostly inconspicuous in nature from this point of time. In this situation the historical discourse also remains elusive and blurred. The idea of 4d capturing comes in front in this scenario. Current research would venture into this emerging idea to record the architecture of the early period. This paper highlights the need for a flexible tool to capture this dynamic character of the building. By citing the case study of the 7th century Buddhist Monastery in Bengal, this paper thus argues for the need of capturing the narrative of a historical building than the facts to get a complete picture of its architecture. This study aims at capturing the narrative of Sompur Mahavihara, the UNESCO World Heritage site in Bangladesh, which is currently in ruinous condition. However, it's few hundred years life suggests that as architecture it was subject to change due to different reasons, mainly political, religious and rituals. Being a monument that belongs to the flourishing phase of a society, traditionally this monastery architecture certainly played a role as a stage for religious and political pageantry as well as different religious performances. As architecture it works as

  10. From Awareness to Funding: A Study of Library Support in America. A Report to the OCLC Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to conduct research, develop strategies, create materials and evaluate the potential of marketing and communications programs to sustain and increase funding for U.S. public libraries. The quantitative study targeted two audiences: residents in U.S.…

  11. 43 CFR 404.33 - How much Federal funding can Reclamation provide for the completion of a feasibility study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How much Federal funding can Reclamation provide for the completion of a feasibility study? 404.33 Section 404.33 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Cost-Sharing § 404.33...

  12. The Dual Promise of Green Jobs: A Qualitative Study of Federally Funded Energy Training Programmes in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully-Russ, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to review the policy literature on green jobs and green jobs training in the USA and to present findings of a qualitative study on the start-up of two Energy Training Partnerships (ETP) funded by the US Department of Labour to train workers for green jobs. Design/methodology/approach: The paper includes a review…

  13. 43 CFR 404.33 - How much Federal funding can Reclamation provide for the completion of a feasibility study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How much Federal funding can Reclamation provide for the completion of a feasibility study? 404.33 Section 404.33 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Cost-Sharing § 404.33...

  14. Public School Funding and Legislated Policy-Making: A Case Study of the 1985 Indiana General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert O.

    To generate a theoretical model for future interpretation, this study analyzed the 1985 Indiana Legislature concerning educational policymaking in public school funding. Previous research indicates that the classical rational actor model of policymaking inadequately addresses multidimensional pressures at work in state legislatures. A model is…

  15. Has industry funding biased studies of the protective effects of alcohol on cardiovascular disease? A preliminary investigation of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    McCambridge, Jim; Hartwell, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction And Aims There have been no previous quantitative analyses of the possible effects of industry funding on alcohol and health research. This study examines whether findings of alcohol's protective effects on cardiovascular disease may be biased by industry funding. Design and Methods Findings from a recent systematic review of prospective cohort studies were combined with public domain data on alcohol industry funding. The six outcomes evaluated were alcohol's effects on cardiovascular disease mortality, incident coronary heart disease, coronary heart disease mortality, incident stroke, stroke mortality and mortality from all causes. Results We find no evidence of possible funding effects for outcomes other than stroke. Whether studies find alcohol to be a risk factor or protective against incident stroke depends on whether or not there is possible industry funding [risk ratio (RR) 1.07 (0.97–1.17) for those without concern about industry funding compared with RR 0.88 (0.81–0.94)]. For stroke mortality, a similar difference is not statistically significant, most likely because there are too few studies. Discussion and Conclusions Dedicated high-quality studies of possible alcohol industry funding effects should be undertaken, and these should be broad in scope. They also need to investigate specific areas of concern, such as stroke, in greater depth. [McCambridge J, Hartwell G. Has industry funding biased studies of the protective effects of alcohol on cardiovascular disease? A preliminary investigation of prospective cohort studies. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:58–66] PMID:24602075

  16. Novel Sorption/Desorption Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture (Feasibility Study)

    SciTech Connect

    William Tuminello; Maciej Radosz; Youqing Shen

    2008-11-01

    Western Research Institute and the University of Wyoming Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute have tested a novel approach to carbon dioxide capture in power plants and industrial operations. This approach is expected to provide considerable cost savings, in terms of regeneration of the sorbent. It is proposed that low molecular weight, low volatility liquid fluorocarbons be utilized to absorb CO{sub 2} due to their unusual affinity for the gas. The energy savings would be realized by cooling the fluorocarbon liquids below their melting point where the CO{sub 2} would be released even at elevated pressure. Thus, the expense of heating currently used sorbents, saturated with CO{sub 2}, under low pressure conditions and then having to compress the released gas would not be realized. However, these fluorinated materials have been shown to be poor carbon dioxide absorbers under conditions currently required for carbon capture. The project was terminated.

  17. Study on Capturing Functional Requirements of the New Product Based on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Song, Liya; Bai, Zhonghang; Zhang, Peng

    In order to exist in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, it is important for corporations to forecast the evolutionary direction of new products rapidly and effectively. Most products in the world are developed based on the design of existing products. In the product design, capturing functional requirements is a key step. Function is continuously evolving, which is driven by the evolution of needs and technologies. So the functional requirements of new product can be forecasted based on the functions of existing product. Eight laws of function evolution are put forward in this paper. The process model of capturing the functional requirements of new product based on function evolution is proposed. An example illustrates the design process.

  18. Information-theoretic model selection and model averaging for closed-population capture-recapture studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R.; Burnham, K.P.

    1998-01-01

    Specification of an appropriate model is critical to valid stalistical inference. Given the "true model" for the data is unknown, the goal of model selection is to select a plausible approximating model that balances model bias and sampling variance. Model selection based on information criteria such as AIC or its variant AICc, or criteria like CAIC, has proven useful in a variety of contexts including the analysis of open-population capture-recapture data. These criteria have not been intensively evaluated for closed-population capture-recapture models, which are integer parameter models used to estimate population size (N), and there is concern that they will not perform well. To address this concern, we evaluated AIC, AICc, and CAIC model selection for closed-population capture-recapture models by empirically assessing the quality of inference for the population size parameter N. We found that AIC-, AICc-, and CAIC-selected models had smaller relative mean squared errors than randomly selected models, but that confidence interval coverage on N was poor unless unconditional variance estimates (which incorporate model uncertainty) were used to compute confidence intervals. Overall, AIC and AICc outperformed CAIC, and are preferred to CAIC for selection among the closed-population capture-recapture models we investigated. A model averaging approach to estimation, using AIC. AICc, or CAIC to estimate weights, was also investigated and proved superior to estimation using AIC-, AICc-, or CAIC-selected models. Our results suggested that, for model averaging, AIC or AICc. should be favored over CAIC for estimating weights.

  19. Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Dziedzic; Kenneth B. Gross; Robert A. Gorski; John T. Johnson

    2006-12-15

    A laboratory-scale reactor was developed to evaluate the capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a gas into a liquid as an approach to control greenhouse gases emitted from fixed sources. CO{sub 2} at 5-50% concentrations was passed through a gas-exchange membrane and transferred into liquid media - tap water or simulated brine. When using water, capture efficiencies exceeded 50% and could be enhanced by adding base (e.g., sodium hydroxide) or the combination of base and carbonic anhydrase, a catalyst that speeds the conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonic acid. The transferred CO{sub 2} formed ions, such as bicarbonate or carbonate, depending on the amount of base present. Adding precipitating cations, like Ca{sup ++}, produced insoluble carbonate salts. Simulated brine proved nearly as efficient as water in absorbing CO{sub 2}, with less than a 6% reduction in CO{sub 2} transferred. The CO{sub 2} either dissolved into the brine or formed a mixture of gas and ions. If the chemistry was favorable, carbonate precipitate spontaneously formed. Energy expenditure of pumping brine up and down from subterranean depths was modeled. We concluded that using brine in a gas-exchange membrane system for capturing CO{sub 2} from a gas stream to liquid is technically feasible and can be accomplished at a reasonable expenditure of energy. 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs., 1 app.

  20. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  1. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Murray, Thomas D; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Brunger, Axel T; Berger, James M

    2015-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources. PMID:25849403

  2. Study of Design Knowledge Capture (DKC) schemes implemented in magnetic bearing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A design knowledge capture (DKC) scheme was implemented using frame-based techniques. The objective of such a system is to capture not only the knowledge which describes a design, but also that which explains how the design decisions were reached. These knowledge types were labelled definitive and explanatory, respectively. Examination of the design process helped determine what knowledge to retain and at what stage that knowledge is used. A discussion of frames resulted in the recognition of their value to knowledge representation and organization. The FORMS frame system was used as a basis for further development, and for examples using magnetic bearing design. The specific contributions made by this research include: determination that frame-based systems provide a useful methodology for management and application of design knowledge; definition of specific user interface requirements, (this consists of a window-based browser); specification of syntax for DKC commands; and demonstration of the feasibility of DKC by applications to existing designs. It was determined that design knowledge capture could become an extremely valuable engineering tool for complicated, long-life systems, but that further work was needed, particularly the development of a graphic, window-based interface.

  3. Capture of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) by the blood clot: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Margaret T; Rickles, Frederick R; Armstrong, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  4. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  5. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources. PMID:25849403

  6. Capture of Lipopolysaccharide (Endotoxin) by the Blood Clot: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Margaret T.; Rickles, Frederick R.; Armstrong, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  7. School Facility Logistics. A Study for Alberta Education Dealing with School Planning, Acquisition, and Funding Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Gordon and Co., Toronto (Ontario).

    Alternatives to current provincial policies and procedures relating to school construction and its funding are identified and examined. The report sets out findings and recommendations in four sections. In the first section, School Facility Planning, Policies, and Procedures, school building is proposed as an integral part of shared community…

  8. Funds of Knowledge: An Approach to Studying Latina(o) Students' Transition to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Kiyama, Judy Marquez

    2012-01-01

    A feature of the existing literature on minority students' transition to college is the preponderance of models that have "imagined" what students (and their families) need to have in order to be successful. In this paper we discuss how the theoretical framework of funds of knowledge can be used by researchers in higher education to challenge…

  9. The California Community College Crisis: A Study of Mission, Governance, and Funding, 1981-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lowell Janes

    This report describes a financial and governance crisis that occurred in the California Community Colleges between 1981 and 1987. Following prefatory materials, chapter 1 provides an overview of the system, describing growth between 1950 and 1980, funding, governance, and the colleges' mission. Chapter 2 presents background to the crisis up to…

  10. 75 FR 47525 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Renewable Energy Feasibility Studies Grants Under the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...://fedgov.dnb.com/webform . Submit completed paper applications to the Rural Development State Office in the... to move funds is subject to the limitation contained in section 9007(c)(3)(B) of the Farm Security... in accordance with this Notice and 7 CFR part 4280, subpart B, as applicable. Applicants must...

  11. An Experimental Study Evaluating Professional Development Activities within a State Funded Pre-Kindergarten Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Swank, Paul R.; Anthony, Jason L.; Assel, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation for scaling up a comprehensive early childhood teacher professional development program into 11 communities across 2 years with funding through state legislative actions. The comprehensive program had four major components based on results from a previous multi-condition random assignment…

  12. Formula Funding, the Delaware Study, and the University of North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrigan, Sarah D.

    2008-01-01

    Public higher education has relied on a variety of funding structures since the 1950s. Layzell (2007) describes five general approaches in contemporary use in the United States. "Incremental (baseline) budgeting" uses the current year budget as the base and then makes adjustments to account for expected changes in activities, revenues, and…

  13. Enhancing Doctoral Completion in Women: Evidence from a Qualitative Study of a Unique Federally Funded Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Drake-Clark, Donna; Grasso, Maureen; Banta, Trudy

    2014-01-01

    In an era where campus environments were often unwelcoming to women, and there were few women role models, an innovative program funded by the National Institute of Education produced 100% completion by female and minority doctoral students. At a 25-year reunion, the graduates reflected on their program experiences and careers. Reflections were…

  14. Funds of Knowledge in Child-Headed Households: A Ugandan Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Maureen; Kakuru, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research on orphan and vulnerable children in sub-Saharan Africa has focused on their risks and vulnerabilities. This article describes the "funds of knowledge" (Moll and Greenberg, 1990) and means of acquiring new knowledge of children living in child-headed households in Uganda's Rakai District. Using ethnographic methods, the…

  15. McDonald's and the Environmental Defense Fund: A Case Study of a Green Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Sharon M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the public discourse of McDonald's and the Environmental Defense Fund's alliance. Shows that both partners drew from the emerging discourse of market environmentalism and from the older paradigm of command and control. Argues that this rhetorical ambivalence is emblematic of the contemporaneous sociopolitical conflict over how the…

  16. Aluminum-based water treatment residual use in a constructed wetland for capturing urban runoff phosphorus: Column study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (Al-WTR) have a strong affinity to sorb phosphorus. In a proof-of-concept greenhouse column study, Al-WTR was surface-applied at 0, 62, 124, and 248 Mg/ha to 15 cm of soil on top of 46 cm of sand; Al-WTR rates were estimated to capture 0, 10, 20, and 40 year...

  17. Capturing Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Lynda

    2007-01-01

    The idea for the art lesson presented in this article grew out of watching the lively actions of fourth grade students. Since drawing is the author's first love, she is always looking for new ways to teach it. This time, instead of setting up a still life, she decided to teach students how to capture their actions on paper. (Contains 5 online…

  18. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  19. Report on all ARRA Funded Technical Work

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-10-05

    The main focus of this American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funded project was to design an energy efficient carbon capture and storage (CCS) process using the Recipients membrane system for H{sub 2} separation and CO{sub 2} capture. In the ARRA-funded project, the Recipient accelerated development and scale-up of ongoing hydrogen membrane technology research and development (R&D). Specifically, this project focused on accelerating the current R&D work scope of the base program-funded project, involving lab scale tests, detail design of a 250 lb/day H{sub 2} process development unit (PDU), and scale-up of membrane tube and coating manufacturing. This project scope included the site selection and a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study of a nominally 4 to 10 ton-per-day (TPD) Pre-Commercial Module (PCM) hydrogen separation membrane system. Process models and techno-economic analysis were updated to include studies on integration of this technology into an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation system with CCS.

  20. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key

    2014-02-24

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  1. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Jo Hong, Key; Suk Suh, Tae

    2014-02-01

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  2. Funding Backlash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William E.; Clark, Charlene H.

    1976-01-01

    Using California as an example, the authors illustrate how a state legislative decision relating to funding of the state university system effects the financial and academic conditions of the community colleges. (DC)

  3. The biological deep sea hydrothermal vent as a model to study carbon dioxide capturing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO₂ from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO₂ fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO₂ fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture. PMID:21673885

  4. Video capture on student-owned mobile devices to facilitate psychomotor skills acquisition: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Hinck, Glori; Bergmann, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the feasibility of using mobile device technology to allow students to record their own psychomotor skills so that these recordings can be used for self-reflection and formative evaluation. Methods Students were given the choice of using DVD recorders, zip drive video capture equipment, or their personal mobile phone, device, or digital camera to record specific psychomotor skills. During the last week of the term, they were asked to complete a 9-question survey regarding their recording experience, including details of mobile phone ownership, technology preferences, technical difficulties, and satisfaction with the recording experience and video critique process. Results Of those completing the survey, 83% currently owned a mobile phone with video capability. Of the mobile phone owners 62% reported having email capability on their phone and that they could transfer their video recording successfully to their computer, making it available for upload to the learning management system. Viewing the video recording of the psychomotor skill was valuable to 88% of respondents. Conclusions Our results suggest that mobile phones are a viable technology to use for the video capture and critique of psychomotor skills, as most students own this technology and their satisfaction with this method is high. PMID:23957324

  5. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: a case study in multiscale modeling and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Mebane, David S; Storlie, Curt; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V; Agarwal, Deb; Tong, Charles; Zitney, Stephen E; Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran; Ryan, Emily; Engel, Dave; Dale, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multiscale modeling and simulation have the potential to dramatically reduce the time and cost to develop new carbon capture technologies. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry, and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of such tools, including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk-analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models. PMID:24797817

  6. The Biological Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent as a Model to Study Carbon Dioxide Capturing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D.

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO2 from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO2 fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO2 fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture. PMID:21673885

  7. Bench-scale studies of in-duct mercury capture using cupric chloride-impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sang-Sup Lee; Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener

    2009-04-15

    A brominated activated carbon (Darco Hg-LH) and cupric chloride-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl{sub 2}-ACs) sorbent have been tested in a bench-scale entrained-flow reactor system which was developed for simulating in-flight mercury capture in ducts upstream of particulate matter control devices. The bench-scale experimental system has been operated with the conditions of a residence time of 0.75 s and a gas temperature of 140{sup o}C to simulate typical conditions in the duct of coal-fired exhaust gas. In addition, sorbent deposition on walls which can occur in a laboratory-scale system more than in a full-scale system was significantly reduced so that additional mercury capture by the deposited sorbent was minimized. In the entrained-flow system, CuCl{sub 2}-ACs demonstrated similar performance in Hg adsorption and better performance in Hg{sup 0} oxidation than Darco Hg-LH. In addition, the carbon content of those sorbents was found to determine their Hg adsorption capability in the entrained-flow system. The bench-scale entrained-flow system was able to demonstrate the important Hg adsorption and oxidation characteristics of the tested sorbents. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Capturing citation activity in three health sciences departments: a comparison study of Scopus and Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Alexandra; Slyman, Alison; Wu, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Scopus and Web of Science are the two major citation databases that collect and disseminate bibliometric statistics about research articles, journals, institutions, and individual authors. Liaison librarians are now regularly called upon to utilize these databases to assist faculty in finding citation activity on their published works for tenure and promotion, grant applications, and more. But questions about the accuracy, scope, and coverage of these tools deserve closer scrutiny. Discrepancies in citation capture led to a systematic study on how Scopus and Web of Science compared in a real-life situation encountered by liaisons: comparing three different disciplines at a medical school and nursing program. How many articles would each database retrieve for each faculty member using the author-searching tools provided? How many cited references for each faculty member would each tool generate? Results demonstrated troubling differences in publication and citation activity capture between Scopus and Web of Science. Implications for librarians are discussed. PMID:25927511

  9. Reduction in Public Funding for Postsecondary Education in Colorado from 1970 to 2010: A Study Documenting Change and the Resulting Shift from Public to Private Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines and chronicles the change in public funding for postsecondary education in Colorado from 1970 to 2010. Colorado was ranked sixth among states in per capita funding for public higher education in 1970 and declined to 48th in 2010. The study analyzed state appropriations over this time period in five broad categories of spending:…

  10. Alternative Patterns for Strengthening Community Service Programs in Institutions of Higher Education. A Study of the Residual Effects of Federal Developmental Funding through Title I, HEA, 1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, James A., Jr.; Knox, Alan B.

    A two-year, nationwide research study was funded in 1974 with discretionary funds of Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA) to identify alternative patterns for developing community service programs. The study focused on methods used by decisionmakers in a variety of settings in which it was felt that strengthening had occurred as a…

  11. The debate about the funding of Herceptin: a case study of 'countervailing powers'.

    PubMed

    Gabe, Jonathan; Chamberlain, Kerry; Norris, Pauline; Dew, Kevin; Madden, Helen; Hodgetts, Darrin

    2012-12-01

    In December 2008 the newly elected Prime Minister of New Zealand bypassed the agency that negotiates with manufacturers about the cost of medicines and agreed to fund Herceptin for women with early stage breast cancer for a twelve months course of treatment. This paper describes the unfolding of this decision and seeks to explain it in terms of the theory of countervailing powers, which has recently been applied to understand the rapid growth of medicines and the governance of the pharmaceutical industry. We explore the role of various actors in this debate about Herceptin funding, drawing on documentary analysis based on a systematic search of journals, websites and media databases. The case of Herceptin both confirms and questions the propositions of countervailing powers theory. On the one hand the manufacturers of the drug proved to be highly influential in their attempts to get Herceptin funded and were generally supported by consumer groups. On the other hand some scientists and regulators attempted to challenge the power of the manufacturers, with the regulators not showing signs of corporate bias as one might expect. Groups did not, as has been proposed, exert power monolithically, with several groups exhibiting opposing factions. The media, ignored in this literature, are considered as a potential countervailing force in the debate. In the end the government bypassed the recommendation of its regulators, thereby undermining the latter's efforts to act as a countervailing power. PMID:23036988

  12. Capturing Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured these two images of Jupiter's outermost large moon, Callisto, as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in late February. New Horizons' closest approach distance to Jupiter was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles), not far outside Callisto's orbit, which has a radius of 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles). However, Callisto happened to be on the opposite side of Jupiter during the spacecraft's pass through the Jupiter system, so these images, taken from 4.7 million kilometers (3.0 million miles) and 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) away, are the closest of Callisto that New Horizons obtained.

    Callisto's ancient, crater-scarred surface makes it very different from its three more active sibling satellites, Io, Europa and Ganymede. Callisto, 4,800 kilometers (3000 miles) in diameter, displays no large-scale geological features other than impact craters, and every bright spot in these images is a crater. The largest impact feature on Callisto, the huge basin Valhalla, is visible as a bright patch at the 10 o'clock position. The craters are bright because they have excavated material relatively rich in water ice from beneath the dark, dusty material that coats most of the surface.

    The two images show essentially the same side of Callisto -- the side that faces Jupiter -- under different illumination conditions. The images accompanied scans of Callisto's infrared spectrum with New Horizons' Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The New Horizons science team designed these scans to study how the infrared spectrum of Callisto's water ice changes as lighting and viewing conditions change, and as the ice cools through Callisto's late afternoon. The infrared spectrum of water ice depends slightly on its temperature, and a goal of New Horizons when it reaches the Pluto system (in 2015) is to use the water ice features in the spectrum of Pluto's moon Charon, and

  13. Feasibility study of nuclear transmutation by negative muon capture reaction using the PHITS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of nuclear transmutation of fission products in high-level radioactive waste by negative muon capture reaction is investigated using the Particle and Heave Ion Transport code System (PHITS). It is found that about 80 % of stopped negative muons contribute to transmute target nuclide into stable or short-lived nuclide in the case of 135Cs, which is one of the most important nuclide in the transmutation. The simulation result also indicates that the position of transmutation is controllable by changing the energy of incident negative muon. Based on our simulation, it takes approximately 8.5 × 108years to transmute 500 g of 135Cs by negative muon beam with the highest intensity currently available.

  14. Channeling, volume reflection, and volume capture study of electrons in a bent silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistisen, T. N.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Wienands, U.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Noble, R. J.; Benson, B. C.; Smith, T.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Holtzapple, R.; Tucker, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the experimental data and analysis of experiments conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory investigating the processes of channeling, volume-reflection and volume-capture along the (111) plane in a strongly bent quasimosaic silicon crystal. These phenomena were investigated at 5 energies: 3.35, 4.2, 6.3, 10.5, and 14.0 GeV with a crystal with bending radius of 0.15 m, corresponding to curvatures of 0.053, 0.066, 0.099, 0.16, and 0.22 times the critical curvature, respectively. Based on the parameters of fitting functions we have extracted important parameters describing the channeling process such as the dechanneling length, the angle of volume reflection, the surface transmission, and the widths of the distribution of channeled particles parallel and orthogonal to the plane.

  15. Preparation of thin arsenic and radioarsenic targets for neutron capture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    A simple method for the electrodeposition of elemental arsenic (As) on a metal backing from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method was successfully applied to stable As (As-75). Thin (2.5 mg {center_dot} cm{sup -2}) coherent, smooth layers of the metalloid on Ti foils (2.5 {micro}m thickness) were obtained. Electrodeposits served as targets for {sup 75}As(n,{gamma}) {sup 76}As neutron capture experiments at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Respective {sup 73}As(n,{gamma}) {sup 74}As experiments are planned for the near future, and {sup 73}As targets will be prepared in a similar fashion utilizing the introduced electrodeposition method. The preparation of an {sup 73}As (half-life 80.3 d) plating bath solution from proton irradiated germanium has been demonstrated. Germanium target irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF).

  16. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamic research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions. Research at the NWTC is crucial to understanding how wind turbines function in large, multiple-row wind plants. These conditions impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural components that ultimately effect the useful lifetime of wind turbines. This work also is essential for understanding and maximizing turbine and wind plant energy production. Both turbine lifetime and wind plant energy production are key determinants of the cost of wind-generated electricity.

  17. Attentional capture and understanding of nutrition labelling: a study based on response times.

    PubMed

    Ares, Gastón; Giménez, Ana; Bruzzone, Fernanda; Antúnez, Lucía; Sapolinski, Alejandra; Vidal, Leticia; Maiche, Alejandro

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of nutrition information format on attentional capture and consumers' understanding. Sixteen labels of two products (yoghurt and pan bread) were designed following a four 2-level factors full factorial design with the following variables: label background design, type of product, nutrition information format and traffic light system. The labels were presented to 178 consumers, who were asked to decide whether the fat/sodium content of each yoghurt/pan bread label was medium or low. Participant responses and reaction times were recorded. Results showed that type of product, nutrition information format and traffic light system significantly affected the time needed by consumers to find the nutrition information and to classify the labels according to their content of a given nutrient. Meanwhile, consumers' understanding of the labels was mostly affected by the content of the nutrient and the presence of the traffic light system. PMID:22273500

  18. Model-Based Systems Engineering for Capturing Mission Architecture System Processes with an Application Case Study - Orion Flight Test 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonanne, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Model-based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging methodology that can be leveraged to enhance many system development processes. MBSE allows for the centralization of an architecture description that would otherwise be stored in various locations and formats, thus simplifying communication among the project stakeholders, inducing commonality in representation, and expediting report generation. This paper outlines the MBSE approach taken to capture the processes of two different, but related, architectures by employing the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) as a standard for architecture description and the modeling tool MagicDraw. The overarching goal of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of MBSE as a means of capturing and designing a mission systems architecture. The first portion of the project focused on capturing the necessary system engineering activities that occur when designing, developing, and deploying a mission systems architecture for a space mission. The second part applies activities from the first to an application problem - the system engineering of the Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT-1) End-to-End Information System (EEIS). By modeling the activities required to create a space mission architecture and then implementing those activities in an application problem, the utility of MBSE as an approach to systems engineering can be demonstrated.

  19. A discrete choice experiment investigating preferences for funding drugs used to treat orphan diseases: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; Stefanowska, Patricia; Hurley, Jeremiah

    2011-07-01

    Policy debate about funding criteria for drugs used to treat rare, orphan diseases is gaining prominence. This study presents evidence from a discrete choice experiment using a convenience sample of university students to investigate individual preferences regarding public funding for drugs used to treat rare diseases and common diseases. This pilot study finds that: other things equal, the respondents do not prefer to have the government spend more for drugs used to treat rare diseases; that respondents are not willing to pay more per life year gained for a rare disease than a common disease; and that respondents weigh relevant attributes of the coverage decisions (e.g. costs, disease severity and treatment effectiveness) similarly for both rare and common diseases. The results confirm the importance of severity and treatment effectiveness in preferences for public funding. Although this is the first study of its kind, the results send a cautionary message regarding the special treatment of orphan drugs in coverage decision-making. PMID:21205401

  20. Creatively Employing Funding to Support Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Luke; Hargreaves, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Innovations within higher education are often prompted through the capture of supportive funding. One of the largest examples of this arose from the Centres for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETLs) initiative in England (2005-2010). Drawing on the experience of two such Centres, this paper analyses some of the consequences of that funding.…

  1. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: A Case Study in Multi-Scale Modeling and New Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Syamlal, Madhava; Mebane, David; Storlie, Curtis; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Agarwal, Deborah A.; Tong, Charles; Zitney, Stephen E.; Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran; Ryan, Emily M.; Engel, David W.; Dale, Crystal

    2014-04-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamic (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models.

  2. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: A Case Study in Multi-Scale Modeling and New Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2014-06-07

    Abstract: Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamic (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models.

  3. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jay; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hsueh, Yen-Wan; Yeh, Kuan-Chuan; Wang, Jeng-Ning; Tsai, Wen-Pin

    2007-03-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li(2)CO(3) was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice. PMID:17327660

  4. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hsueh, Yen-Wan; Yeh, Kuan-Chuan; Wang, Jeng-Ning; Tsai, Wen-Pin

    2007-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice.

  5. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  6. A Pilot Study of Mood Ratings Captured by Mobile Phone Versus Paper-and-Pencil Mood Charts in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A.; Kim, Daniel H.; de Dios, Laura Vergel; Wang, Vicki; Ceglowski, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Objective Patient reported mood charts are frequently used in management of bipolar disorder. Although mood charts have recently been programmed in electronic devices such as mobile phones, little is known about the impact of the method of data capture on the psychometric properties and validity of these data. Methods In an ongoing pilot study, a sample of outpatients with bipolar disorder were randomized to either complete mood charts on a mobile phone or a standard paper-and-pencil mood chart as part of a 12 week-intervention (primary outcomes for the trial await study completion). We compared these conditions across single item rating of mood state, and we hypothesized that mobile phone based data capture would produce greater compliance to mood ratings, variability between and within participants, and concurrent validity with blinded clinician-rated affective symptom severity. Results A total of 56 participants were randomized and 40 participants were included in the analyses. There were no significant differences between conditions on demographic or clinical variables. The rate of compliance was significantly higher in paper-and-pencil versus mobile phone ratings. Ratings demonstrated significantly more variability within individuals in the mobile phone condition. Mobile phone mood ratings were significantly correlated with clinician-rated depressive symptom severity across the study and with manic symptom severity at the Week 6 assessment, whereas paper-and-pencil ratings were not significantly associated with clinician-rated depression or mania. Conclusions Although preliminary, our results suggest a lower rate of compliance with mobile phones compared to paper-and-pencil daily mood rating in bipolar disorder, yet a greater ability to capture variability and concurrent validity in quantifying affective symptoms. This clinical trial is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01670123. PMID:23646035

  7. Mutual Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan L.

    1993-01-01

    There is good reason for college fund raisers and business officers to collaborate on common financial interests. Communication is a key element of such cooperation. Other needs include agreement on accounting and reporting of institutional finances, agreement on stewardship of gifts (particularly with restrictions or endowments), and common…

  8. Experimental study of oxy-fuel combustion and sulfur capture in a mini-CFBC

    SciTech Connect

    L. Jia; Y. Tan; C. Wang; E.J. Anthony

    2007-12-15

    Oxy-fuel technology uses effectively pure oxygen for fossil fuel combustion in order to obtain a highly concentrated CO{sub 2} stream, suitable for direct compression and sequestration. It is an effective technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere from large point sources such as power generation plants. Oxy-fuel FBC technology has the combined advantage of producing high CO{sub 2} concentration flue gas and allowing excellent fuel flexibility. In addition, with external cooling of the recirculated solids, the flue gas recirculation ratio can be reduced. CETC-Ottawa has carried out oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion with flue gas recirculation on its modified mini-CFBC. The mini-CFBC has an internal diameter of 100 mm and internal height of 5000 mm. Both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were fired. Limestone was premixed with coal and fed to the mini-CFBC. Recirculated solids were cooled in the return leg of the mini-CFBC. The bed temperature was controlled at about 850{sup o}C, while the oxygen concentration in the primary gas was about 25% and in the secondary gas was about 50%. With flue gas recycle, the CO{sub 2} concentration in the flue gas reached 82-90%. Sulfur capture efficiency and CO and NOx concentrations were also measured and were all at acceptable levels. The transition from air firing to oxy-fuel firing was a fast and relatively smooth process, and operation of the mini-CFBC under oxy-fuel firing conditions was similar to that of air firing. 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Hands-free image capture, data tagging and transfer using Google Glass: a pilot study for improved wound care management.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, Gabriel; Shluzas, Lauren Aquino; Pickham, David; Eris, Ozgur; Sadler, Joel; Joshi, Shantanu; Leifer, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds, including pressure ulcers, compromise the health of 6.5 million Americans and pose an annual estimated burden of $25 billion to the U.S. health care system. When treating chronic wounds, clinicians must use meticulous documentation to determine wound severity and to monitor healing progress over time. Yet, current wound documentation practices using digital photography are often cumbersome and labor intensive. The process of transferring photos into Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) requires many steps and can take several days. Newer smartphone and tablet-based solutions, such as Epic Haiku, have reduced EMR upload time. However, issues still exist involving patient positioning, image-capture technique, and patient identification. In this paper, we present the development and assessment of the SnapCap System for chronic wound photography. Through leveraging the sensor capabilities of Google Glass, SnapCap enables hands-free digital image capture, and the tagging and transfer of images to a patient's EMR. In a pilot study with wound care nurses at Stanford Hospital (n=16), we (i) examined feature preferences for hands-free digital image capture and documentation, and (ii) compared SnapCap to the state of the art in digital wound care photography, the Epic Haiku application. We used the Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test to evaluate differences in mean ranks between preference options. Preferred hands-free navigation features include barcode scanning for patient identification, Z(15) = -3.873, p < 0.001, r = 0.71, and double-blinking to take photographs, Z(13) = -3.606, p < 0.001, r = 0.71. In the comparison between SnapCap and Epic Haiku, the SnapCap System was preferred for sterile image-capture technique, Z(16) = -3.873, p < 0.001, r = 0.68. Responses were divided with respect to image quality and overall ease of use. The study's results have contributed to the future implementation of new features aimed at enhancing mobile hands-free digital photography

  10. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture process arrangements. The report contained a comprehensive set of design basis and economic evaluation assumptions and criteria, which are used as the main reference points for the purpose of this study. Specifically, Nexant adopted the design and economic evaluation basis from Case 12 of the above-mentioned DOE/NETL report. This case corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe (net), supercritical greenfield PC plant that utilizes an advanced MEAbased absorption system for CO2 capture and compression. For this techno-economic study, CCS’ GPS process replaces the MEA-based CO2 absorption system used in the original case. The objective of this study is to assess the performance of a full-scale GPS-based PCC design that is integrated with a supercritical PC plant similar to Case 12 of the DOE/NETL report, such that it corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe

  11. Hands-Free Image Capture, Data Tagging and Transfer Using Google Glass: A Pilot Study for Improved Wound Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Aldaz, Gabriel; Shluzas, Lauren Aquino; Pickham, David; Eris, Ozgur; Sadler, Joel; Joshi, Shantanu; Leifer, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds, including pressure ulcers, compromise the health of 6.5 million Americans and pose an annual estimated burden of $25 billion to the U.S. health care system. When treating chronic wounds, clinicians must use meticulous documentation to determine wound severity and to monitor healing progress over time. Yet, current wound documentation practices using digital photography are often cumbersome and labor intensive. The process of transferring photos into Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) requires many steps and can take several days. Newer smartphone and tablet-based solutions, such as Epic Haiku, have reduced EMR upload time. However, issues still exist involving patient positioning, image-capture technique, and patient identification. In this paper, we present the development and assessment of the SnapCap System for chronic wound photography. Through leveraging the sensor capabilities of Google Glass, SnapCap enables hands-free digital image capture, and the tagging and transfer of images to a patient’s EMR. In a pilot study with wound care nurses at Stanford Hospital (n=16), we (i) examined feature preferences for hands-free digital image capture and documentation, and (ii) compared SnapCap to the state of the art in digital wound care photography, the Epic Haiku application. We used the Wilcoxon Signed-ranks test to evaluate differences in mean ranks between preference options. Preferred hands-free navigation features include barcode scanning for patient identification, Z(15) = -3.873, p < 0.001, r = 0.71, and double-blinking to take photographs, Z(13) = -3.606, p < 0.001, r = 0.71. In the comparison between SnapCap and Epic Haiku, the SnapCap System was preferred for sterile image-capture technique, Z(16) = -3.873, p < 0.001, r = 0.68. Responses were divided with respect to image quality and overall ease of use. The study’s results have contributed to the future implementation of new features aimed at enhancing mobile hands-free digital

  12. A Mobile App for Securely Capturing and Transferring Clinical Images to the Electronic Health Record: Description and Preliminary Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Srinivas; Carlile, Narath; Rosenthal, David I; Semakov, Simon; Pallin, Daniel J; Poon, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    Background Photographs are important tools to record, track, and communicate clinical findings. Mobile devices with high-resolution cameras are now ubiquitous, giving clinicians the opportunity to capture and share images from the bedside. However, secure and efficient ways to manage and share digital images are lacking. Objective The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a secure application for capturing and storing clinical images in the electronic health record (EHR), and to describe initial user experiences. Methods We developed CliniCam, a secure Apple iOS (iPhone, iPad) application that allows for user authentication, patient selection, image capture, image annotation, and storage of images as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file in the EHR. We leveraged our organization’s enterprise service-oriented architecture to transmit the image file from CliniCam to our enterprise clinical data repository. There is no permanent storage of protected health information on the mobile device. CliniCam also required connection to our organization’s secure WiFi network. Resident physicians from emergency medicine, internal medicine, and dermatology used CliniCam in clinical practice for one month. They were then asked to complete a survey on their experience. We analyzed the survey results using descriptive statistics. Results Twenty-eight physicians participated and 19/28 (68%) completed the survey. Of the respondents who used CliniCam, 89% found it useful or very useful for clinical practice and easy to use, and wanted to continue using the app. Respondents provided constructive feedback on location of the photos in the EHR, preferring to have photos embedded in (or linked to) clinical notes instead of storing them as separate PDFs within the EHR. Some users experienced difficulty with WiFi connectivity which was addressed by enhancing CliniCam to check for connectivity on launch. Conclusions CliniCam was implemented successfully and found to be easy

  13. Capturing Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions about the Concept of Election through Metaphor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamarat, Ercenk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the perception of pre-service social studies teachers (PSSTs) about the concept of election via metaphors. A study group of this work consisted of 61 PSSTs from Nigde University, Faculty of Education, Social Studies Teaching Department. Implementation and data collection was done in 2014 to 2015 academic year.…

  14. How Does National Scientific Funding Support Emerging Interdisciplinary Research: A Comparison Study of Big Data Research in the US and China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    How do funding agencies ramp-up their capabilities to support research in a rapidly emerging area? This paper addresses this question through a comparison of research proposals awarded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of Big Data. Big data is characterized by its size and difficulties in capturing, curating, managing and processing it in reasonable periods of time. Although Big Data has its legacy in longstanding information technology research, the field grew very rapidly over a short period. We find that the extent of interdisciplinarity is a key aspect in how these funding agencies address the rise of Big Data. Our results show that both agencies have been able to marshal funding to support Big Data research in multiple areas, but the NSF relies to a greater extent on multi-program funding from different fields. We discuss how these interdisciplinary approaches reflect the research hot-spots and innovation pathways in these two countries. PMID:27219466

  15. How Does National Scientific Funding Support Emerging Interdisciplinary Research: A Comparison Study of Big Data Research in the US and China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    How do funding agencies ramp-up their capabilities to support research in a rapidly emerging area? This paper addresses this question through a comparison of research proposals awarded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of Big Data. Big data is characterized by its size and difficulties in capturing, curating, managing and processing it in reasonable periods of time. Although Big Data has its legacy in longstanding information technology research, the field grew very rapidly over a short period. We find that the extent of interdisciplinarity is a key aspect in how these funding agencies address the rise of Big Data. Our results show that both agencies have been able to marshal funding to support Big Data research in multiple areas, but the NSF relies to a greater extent on multi-program funding from different fields. We discuss how these interdisciplinary approaches reflect the research hot-spots and innovation pathways in these two countries. PMID:27219466

  16. Carbon dioxide postcombustion capture: a novel screening study of the carbon dioxide absorption performance of 76 amines

    SciTech Connect

    Graeme Puxty; Robert Rowland; Andrew Allport; Qi Yang; Mark Bown; Robert Burns; Marcel Maeder; Moetaz Attalla

    2009-08-15

    The significant and rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is recognized as necessary to mitigate the potential climate effects from global warming. The postcombustion capture (PCC) and storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced from the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation is a key technology needed to achieve these reductions. The most mature technology for CO{sub 2} capture is reversible chemical absorption into an aqueous amine solution. In this study the results from measurements of the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of aqueous amine solutions for 76 different amines are presented. Measurements were made using both a novel isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA) method and a traditional absorption apparatus. Seven amines, consisting of one primary, three secondary, and three tertiary amines, were identified as exhibiting outstanding absorption capacities. Most have a number of structural features in common including steric hindrance and hydroxyl functionality 2 or 3 carbons from the nitrogen. Initial CO{sub 2} absorption rate data from the IGA measurements was also used to indicate relative absorption rates. Most of the outstanding performers in terms of capacity also showed initial absorption rates comparable to the industry standard monoethanolamine (MEA). This indicates, in terms of both absorption capacity and kinetics, that they are promising candidates for further investigation. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  17. A new hue capturing technique for the quantitative interpretation of liquid crystal images used in convective heat transfer studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camci, C.; Kim, K.; Hippensteele, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    A new image processing based color capturing technique for the quantitative interpretation of liquid crystal images used in convective heat transfer studies is presented. This method is highly applicable to the surfaces exposed to convective heating in gas turbine engines. It is shown that, in the single-crystal mode, many of the colors appearing on the heat transfer surface correlate strongly with the local temperature. A very accurate quantitative approach using an experimentally determined linear hue vs temperature relation is found to be possible. The new hue-capturing process is discussed in terms of the strength of the light source illuminating the heat transfer surface, the effect of the orientation of the illuminating source with respect to the surface, crystal layer uniformity, and the repeatability of the process. The present method is more advantageous than the multiple filter method because of its ability to generate many isotherms simultaneously from a single-crystal image at a high resolution in a very time-efficient manner.

  18. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  19. Capture of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Simulated Blood Vessels: Effects of Proteins and Coating with Poly(ethylene glycol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee; Brazel, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have applications in cancer treatment as they can be captured and localized to a diseased site by use of an external magnetic field. After localization, cancer treatments such as magnetically targeted chemotherapy and localized hyperthermia can be applied. Previously, our lab has shown that the percent capture of MNPs is significantly reduced when MNPs are dispersed in protein solutions compared to water or aqueous polymer solutions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of proteins on capture efficiency and to investigate the ability of poly(ethylene glycol), PEG, coatings to reduce aggregation of MNPs with proteins, allowing for a greater capture of MNPs in flow. Using Tygon® tubing to simulate blood vessels, a maghemite nanoparticle solution was pumped through a capture zone, where a magnetic field was applied. After passing through the capture zone, the fluid flowed to a spectrophotometer, which measured the absorbance of the solution. The introduction of proteins into the nanoparticle solution reduced the percent capture of MNPs. However, coating the MNPs with PEG aided in preventing aggregation and led to higher capture efficiencies in protein solutions. Additionally, the effects of capture length and protein exposure time were examined. It was found that a higher percent capture is attainable with a longer capture length. Furthermore, on a scale of hours, the percent capture is not affected by the protein exposure time. Funded by NSF REU Grant 1062611 and NIH NCI R21CA 141388.

  20. Improving Capture of Vaccine History: Case Study from an Evaluation of 10-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Harris, Aaron M; Aol, George; Ouma, Dominic; Bigogo, Godfrey; Montgomery, Joel M; Whitney, Cynthia G; Breiman, Robert F; Kim, Lindsay

    2016-06-01

    With the accelerated introduction of new vaccines in low-income settings, understanding immunization program performance is critical. We sought to improve immunization history acquisition from Ministry of Health vaccination cards during a vaccine impact study of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal carriage among young children in Kenya in 2012 and 2013. We captured immunization history in a low proportion of study participants in 2012 using vaccination cards. To overcome this challenge, we implemented a household-based reminder system in 2013 using community health workers (CHWs), and increased the retrieval of vaccine cards from 62% in 2012 to 89% in 2013 (P < 0.001). The home-based reminder system using CHWs is an example of an approach that improved immunization history data quality in a resource-poor setting. PMID:27139446

  1. Does prey capture induce area-restricted search? A fine-scale study using GPS in a marine predator, the wandering albatross.

    PubMed

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Pinaud, David; Pawlowski, Frédéric; Bost, Charles-André

    2007-11-01

    In a patchy environment, predators are expected to increase turning rate and start an area-restricted search (ARS) when prey have been encountered, but few empirical data exist for large predators. By using GPS loggers with devices measuring prey capture, we studied how a marine predator adjusts foraging movements at various scales in relation to prey capture. Wandering albatrosses use two tactics, sit and wait and foraging in flight, the former tactic being three times less efficient than the latter. During flight foraging, birds caught large isolated prey and used ARS at scales varying from 5 to 90 km, with large-scale ARS being used only by young animals. Birds did not show strong responses to prey capture at a large scale, few ARS events occurred after prey capture, and birds did not have high rates of prey capture in ARS. Only at small scales did birds increase sinuosity after prey captures for a limited time period, and this occurred only after they had caught a large prey item within an ARS zone. When this species searches over a large scale, the most effective search rule was to follow a nearly straight path. ARS may be used to restrict search to a particular environment where prey capture is more predictable and profitable. PMID:17926295

  2. How Well Do Survey Studies Capture Alcohol’s Harm to Others?

    PubMed Central

    Rossow, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies assessing alcohol’s harm to others very often rely on population survey data. This study addresses some of the problems and challenges in using survey data for this purpose. Such problems include the limited capacity of population surveys in identifying infrequent harm and long-term consequences of drinking. Moreover, the drinker may report the alcohol-related harm or the person being harmed may report the damage. However, irrespective of who reports the harm, causal attribution to drinking is problematic. Challenges for future population surveys to address alcohol’s harm to others include the need for improved models and understanding of complex mechanisms to guide empirical studies within the broad range of harm. Study designs other than cross-sectional surveys, such as longitudinal study designs and combinations of population surveys and other data sources, are likely to overcome some of the identified problems in current population surveys of alcohol’s harm to others. PMID:26819555

  3. A Comparative Study of Microscopic Images Captured by a Box Type Digital Camera Versus a Standard Microscopic Photography Camera Unit

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Nandini J.; Gupta, B. D.; Patel, Pratik Narendrabhai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Obtaining images of slides viewed by a microscope can be invaluable for both diagnosis and teaching.They can be transferred among technologically-advanced hospitals for further consultation and evaluation. But a standard microscopic photography camera unit (MPCU)(MIPS-Microscopic Image projection System) is costly and not available in resource poor settings. The aim of our endeavour was to find a comparable and cheaper alternative method for photomicrography. Materials and Methods: We used a NIKON Coolpix S6150 camera (box type digital camera) with Olympus CH20i microscope and a fluorescent microscope for the purpose of this study. Results: We got comparable results for capturing images of light microscopy, but the results were not as satisfactory for fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: A box type digital camera is a comparable, less expensive and convenient alternative to microscopic photography camera unit. PMID:25478350

  4. Study on the ultrasonic inspection method using the full matrix capture for the in service railway wheel

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jianping; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Xiaorong; Wang, Zeyong; Peng, Chaoyong

    2014-02-18

    The quality of wheel is especially important for the safety of high speed railway. In this paper, a new ultrasonic array inspection method, the Full Matrix Capture (FMC) has been studied and applied to the high speed railway wheel inspection, especially in the wheel web from the tread. Firstly, the principle of FMC and TFM algorithm is discussed, and then the new optimization is applied to the standard FMC; Secondly the fundamentals of optimization is described in detail and the performance is analyzed. Finally, the experiment has been built with a standard phased array block and railway wheel, and then the testing results are discussed and analyzed. It is demonstrated that this change for the ultrasonic data acquisition and image reconstruction has higher efficiency and lower cost comparing to the FMC's procedure.

  5. Design-Based Research Principles for Student Orientation to Online Study: Capturing the Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wozniak, Helen; Pizzica, Jenny; Mahony, Mary Jane

    2012-01-01

    Few institutions have reported research on students' "use" of orientation programs designed for mature students returning to study in contemporary learning environments now regularly amalgamating distance and online strategies. We report within a design-based research framework the student experience of "GetLearning," the third stage of an…

  6. Remote Capture of Human Voice Acoustical Data by Telephone: A Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Reilly, Nicole; Mundt, James C.; Snyder, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    In this pilot study we sought to determine the reliability and validity of collecting speech and voice acoustical data via telephone transmission for possible future use in large clinical trials. Simultaneous recordings of each participant's speech and voice were made at the point of participation, the local recording (LR), and over a telephone…

  7. Collaborative Embodied Learning in Mixed Reality Motion-Capture Environments: Two Science Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C.; Birchfield, David A.; Tolentino, Lisa; Koziupa, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    These 2 studies investigate the extent to which an Embodied Mixed Reality Learning Environment (EMRELE) can enhance science learning compared to regular classroom instruction. Mixed reality means that physical tangible and digital components were present. The content for the EMRELE required that students map abstract concepts and relations onto…

  8. [Study of the coverage of pollen capture in Lyon over three seasons (1999, 2000, 2001)].

    PubMed

    Thibaudon, M; Burnichon, A; Deruaz, D; Laurent, O

    2002-05-01

    For the third consecutive year, the two sensors of the type HIRST of the National Network of aerobiology monitoring (RNSA) worked on the agglomeration of Lyon. The primary trap (Lyon 1) is located at 26 m height on a roof in southern zone of Lyon (district of Gerland), the second (Lyon 2) is located in northern zone of the city (district of Vaise) on a roof at 15 m height compared to the ground. The study of the daily variations of the pollinic counts over the first two years had shown a perfect parallelism for pollens of trees, Poaceae and Urticaceae. Only the curves of pollens of ambrosia presented different layouts between the two pollen traps. The study of this third year makes it possible to consolidate the proceeding results and to appreciate the value of the cover of a Hirst pollen trap in urban implantation within the framework of the allergo-pollinic monitoring. PMID:12108330

  9. Capturing heterogeneity: The role of a study area's extent for estimating net precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Voss, Sebastian; Metzger, Johanna Clara; Hildebrandt, Anke; Zimmermann, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and precise estimates of net precipitation are required for many hydrological applications. For instance, most interception models require high quality estimates of the canopy storage capacity and the free throughfall coefficient. Good estimates of these parameters, in turn, critically depend on the quality of throughfall estimates. Previous attempts to guide throughfall sampling focused on the selection of an appropriate sample size, support, and sampling design. Comparatively little attention has been given to the role of the extent, i.e. the size of the area under study. In this contribution we investigate the influence of the extent on the representativeness of mean throughfall estimates for simply structured and heterogeneous forest ecosystems. We based our investigation on stochastic simulations which we derived from large empirical throughfall datasets. Using the simulated throughfall fields, we conducted virtual sampling experiments using a number of typical extents. We ran these tests both for a range of event sizes and for accumulated data. Our findings suggest that the size of the study area should be carefully adapted to the required temporal resolution of the throughfall data (i.e. event-based versus long-term) and to the complexity of the system under study.

  10. Contingent Attentional Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Folk, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Four experiments address the degree of top-down selectivity in attention capture by feature singletons through manipulations of the spatial relationship and featural similarity of target and distractor singletons in a modified spatial cuing paradigm. Contrary to previous studies, all four experiments show that when searching for a singleton target, an irrelevant featural singleton captures attention only when defined by the same feature value as the target. Experiments 2, 3, and 4 provide a potential explanation for this empirical discrepancy by showing that irrelevant singletons can produce distraction effects that are independent of shifts of spatial attention. The results further support the notion that attentional capture is contingent on top-down attention control settings but indicates that such settings can be instantiated at the level of feature values.

  11. In vitro study of deep capture of paramagnetic particle for targeting therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Huang, Zheyong; Ma, Wenli; Ge, Junbo; Zheng, Wenling

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic targeting, a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered drug to target tissue, is limited by magnetic attenuation. To satisfy the need of deep magnetic targeting, a special apparatus in which the magnetic flux density can be focused at a distance from the pole was designed. To test the aggregation property of this apparatus, we observed the accumulation of 500-nm paramagnetic particles as flowing through a tube served as a model of blood vessels. The relationship of the accumulation of the paramagnetic particles, the magnetic flux density, the magnetic field gradient and the fluid velocity was studied by theoretical considerations.

  12. A Contra Capture Protein Array Platform for Studying Post-translationally Modified (PTM) Auto-antigenomes.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Tang, Yanyang; Kahn, Peter; Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Knabben, Vinicius; Takulapalli, Bharath; Buckner, Jane; Nepom, Gerald; LaBaer, Joshua; Qiu, Ji

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant modifications of proteins occur during disease development and elicit disease-specific antibody responses. We have developed a protein array platform that enables the modification of many proteins in parallel and assesses their immunogenicity without the need to express, purify, and modify proteins individually. We used anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a model modification and profiled antibody responses to ∼190 citrullinated proteins in 20 RA patients. We observed unique antibody reactivity patterns in both clinical anticyclic citrullinated peptide assay positive (CCP+) and CCP- RA patients. At individual antigen levels, we detected antibodies against known citrullinated autoantigens and discovered and validated five novel antibodies against specific citrullinated antigens (osteopontin (SPP1), flap endonuclease (FEN1), insulin like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP6), insulin like growth factor I (IGF1) and stanniocalcin-2 (STC2)) in RA patients. We also demonstrated the utility of our innovative array platform in the identification of immune-dominant epitope(s) for citrullinated antigens. We believe our platform will promote the study of post-translationally modified antigens at a breadth that has not been achieved before, by both identifying novel autoantigens and investigating their roles in disease development. The developed platforms can potentially be used to study many autoimmune disease-relevant modifications and their immunogenicity. PMID:27141097

  13. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Isotopic Effect on Capture Reactions: HD, D2 + CH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent wave-packet-propagation calculations are reported for the isotopic reactions, HD + CH3 and D2 + CH3, in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probabilities for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. This study shows that excitations of the HD(D2) enhances the reactivities; whereas the excitations of the CH3 umbrella mode have the opposite effects. This is consistent with the reaction of H2 + CH3. The comparison of these three isotopic reactions also shows the isotopic effects in the initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The cumulative reaction probabilities (CRP) are obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the six dimensionality calculation is employed to obtain approximate full-dimensional CRPs. The rate constant comparison shows H2 + CH3 reaction has the biggest reactivity, then HD + CH3, and D2 + CH3 has the smallest.

  14. Investigation of model capability in capturing vertical hydrodynamic coastal processes: a case study in the north Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKiver, W. J.; Sannino, G.; Braga, F.; Bellafiore, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we consider a numerical study of hydrodynamics in the coastal zone using two different models, SHYFEM (shallow water hydrodynamic finite element model) and MITgcm (Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model), to assess their capability to capture the main processes. We focus on the north Adriatic Sea during a strong dense water event that occurred at the beginning of 2012. This serves as an interesting test case to examine both the models strengths and weaknesses, while giving an opportunity to understand how these events affect coastal processes, like upwelling and downwelling, and how they interact with estuarine dynamics. Using the models we examine the impact of setup, surface and lateral boundary treatment, resolution and mixing schemes, as well as assessing the importance of nonhydrostatic dynamics in coastal processes. Both models are able to capture the dense water event, though each displays biases in different regions. The models show large differences in the reproduction of surface patterns, identifying the choice of suitable bulk formulas as a central point for the correct simulation of the thermohaline structure of the coastal zone. Moreover, the different approaches in treating lateral freshwater sources affect the vertical coastal stratification. The results indicate the importance of having high horizontal resolution in the coastal zone, specifically in close proximity to river inputs, in order to reproduce the effect of the complex coastal morphology on the hydrodynamics. A lower resolution offshore is acceptable for the reproduction of the dense water event, even if specific vortical structures are missed. Finally, it is found that nonhydrostatic processes are of little importance for the reproduction of dense water formation in the shelf of the north Adriatic Sea.

  15. Assessing the Impact of Capture on Wild Animals: The Case Study of Chemical Immobilisation on Alpine Ibex.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Francesca; Grignolio, Stefano; Sica, Nicoletta; Cerise, Stefano; Bassano, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The importance of capturing wild animals for research and conservation projects is widely shared. As this activity continues to become more common, the need to assess its negative effects increases so as to ensure ethical standards and the validity of research results. Increasing evidence has revealed that indirect (physiological and behavioural) effects of capture are as important as direct risks (death or injury) and that different capture methodologies can cause heterogeneous effects. We investigated the influence of chemical immobilisation on Alpine ibex (Capra ibex): during the days following the capture we collected data on spatial behaviour, activity levels of both males and females, and male hormone levels. Moreover, we recorded the reproductive status of each marked female during the breeding seasons of 15 years. Then, by several a priori models we investigated the effects of the capture taking into account biological factors and changes in environmental conditions. Our results showed that chemical immobilisation did not affect either spatial behaviour (for both males and females) or male hormone levels, though both sexes showed reduced activity levels up to two days after the capture. The capture did not significantly affect the likelihood for a female to give birth in the following summer. Our findings highlighted the scarce impact of chemical immobilisation on ibex biology, as we detected alteration of activity levels only immediately after the capture if compared to the following days (i.e., baseline situation). Hence, the comparison of our findings with previous research showed that our methodology is one of the less invasive procedures to capture large mammals. Nonetheless, in areas characterised by high predator density, we suggest that animals released be carefully monitored for some hours after the capture. Moreover, researchers should avoid considering data collected during the first days after the manipulation in order to avoid biased

  16. Assessing the Impact of Capture on Wild Animals: The Case Study of Chemical Immobilisation on Alpine Ibex

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Francesca; Grignolio, Stefano; Sica, Nicoletta; Cerise, Stefano; Bassano, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The importance of capturing wild animals for research and conservation projects is widely shared. As this activity continues to become more common, the need to assess its negative effects increases so as to ensure ethical standards and the validity of research results. Increasing evidence has revealed that indirect (physiological and behavioural) effects of capture are as important as direct risks (death or injury) and that different capture methodologies can cause heterogeneous effects. We investigated the influence of chemical immobilisation on Alpine ibex (Capra ibex): during the days following the capture we collected data on spatial behaviour, activity levels of both males and females, and male hormone levels. Moreover, we recorded the reproductive status of each marked female during the breeding seasons of 15 years. Then, by several a priori models we investigated the effects of the capture taking into account biological factors and changes in environmental conditions. Our results showed that chemical immobilisation did not affect either spatial behaviour (for both males and females) or male hormone levels, though both sexes showed reduced activity levels up to two days after the capture. The capture did not significantly affect the likelihood for a female to give birth in the following summer. Our findings highlighted the scarce impact of chemical immobilisation on ibex biology, as we detected alteration of activity levels only immediately after the capture if compared to the following days (i.e., baseline situation). Hence, the comparison of our findings with previous research showed that our methodology is one of the less invasive procedures to capture large mammals. Nonetheless, in areas characterised by high predator density, we suggest that animals released be carefully monitored for some hours after the capture. Moreover, researchers should avoid considering data collected during the first days after the manipulation in order to avoid biased

  17. A DFT study on SO3 capture and activation over Si- or Al-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Saeidi, Nasibeh; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the adsorption and favorable reaction mechanism of SO3 reduction by CO molecule over Si- or Al-doped graphene using DFT calculations. The adsorption energy of the most stable configuration of SO3 is calculated to be about -103 and -124 kcal/mol over the Si- and Al-doped graphene, respectively. The SO3 reduction over these surfaces proceeds through the following elementary steps (a) SO3 → SO2 + Oads and (b) Oads + CO → CO2. The estimated activation energy (Eact) for the dissociation of SO3 over the Si-doped graphene is about 9 kcal/mol smaller than that on the Al-doped graphene.

  18. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  19. Capturing high temperature protein conformations for low-temperature study using ultra-fast cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Atakisi, Hakan; Thorne, Robert

    protocols for cooling biomolecular crystals for x-ray cryocrystallography are poorly controlled, leading to crystal-to-crystal and within-crystal non-isomorphism. Furthermore, cooling times below the protein-solvent glass transition of .1 s provide ample time for biological temperature conformations to depopulate and shift. To address these issues, methods and apparatus for cooling biomolecular crystals at rates approaching 100,000 K/s have been developed. These cooling rates are sufficient to eliminate ice formation on cooling without use of cryoprotectants, and to quench additional high-temperature conformations for low-temperature study. Time scales for conformational relaxation can be characterized using variable cooling rates. Possible extension of these methods to maximize conformational quenching will be discussed.

  20. Novel Bayes Factors That Capture Expert Uncertainty in Prior Density Specification in Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Amy V.; Cox, Angela; Lin, Wei‐Yu; Easton, Douglas F.; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bayes factors (BFs) are becoming increasingly important tools in genetic association studies, partly because they provide a natural framework for including prior information. The Wakefield BF (WBF) approximation is easy to calculate and assumes a normal prior on the log odds ratio (logOR) with a mean of zero. However, the prior variance (W) must be specified. Because of the potentially high sensitivity of the WBF to the choice of W, we propose several new BF approximations with logOR ∼N(0,W), but allow W to take a probability distribution rather than a fixed value. We provide several prior distributions for W which lead to BFs that can be calculated easily in freely available software packages. These priors allow a wide range of densities for W and provide considerable flexibility. We examine some properties of the priors and BFs and show how to determine the most appropriate prior based on elicited quantiles of the prior odds ratio (OR). We show by simulation that our novel BFs have superior true‐positive rates at low false‐positive rates compared to those from both P‐value and WBF analyses across a range of sample sizes and ORs. We give an example of utilizing our BFs to fine‐map the CASP8 region using genotype data on approximately 46,000 breast cancer case and 43,000 healthy control samples from the Collaborative Oncological Gene‐environment Study (COGS) Consortium, and compare the single‐nucleotide polymorphism ranks to those obtained using WBFs and P‐values from univariate logistic regression. PMID:25727067

  1. Predictive error detection in pianists: a combined ERP and motion capture study

    PubMed Central

    Maidhof, Clemens; Pitkäniemi, Anni; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Performing a piece of music involves the interplay of several cognitive and motor processes and requires extensive training to achieve a high skill level. However, even professional musicians commit errors occasionally. Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have investigated the neurophysiological correlates of pitch errors during piano performance, and reported pre-error negativity already occurring approximately 70–100 ms before the error had been committed and audible. It was assumed that this pre-error negativity reflects predictive control processes that compare predicted consequences with actual consequences of one's own actions. However, in previous investigations, correct and incorrect pitch events were confounded by their different tempi. In addition, no data about the underlying movements were available. In the present study, we exploratively recorded the ERPs and 3D movement data of pianists' fingers simultaneously while they performed fingering exercises from memory. Results showed a pre-error negativity for incorrect keystrokes when both correct and incorrect keystrokes were performed with comparable tempi. Interestingly, even correct notes immediately preceding erroneous keystrokes elicited a very similar negativity. In addition, we explored the possibility of computing ERPs time-locked to a kinematic landmark in the finger motion trajectories defined by when a finger makes initial contact with the key surface, that is, at the onset of tactile feedback. Results suggest that incorrect notes elicited a small difference after the onset of tactile feedback, whereas correct notes preceding incorrect ones elicited negativity before the onset of tactile feedback. The results tentatively suggest that tactile feedback plays an important role in error-monitoring during piano performance, because the comparison between predicted and actual sensory (tactile) feedback may provide the information necessary for the detection of an upcoming error. PMID

  2. The SAFE ESA-funded Project: how to approach for an integrated system of earthquake physics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; De Franceschi, G.; Di Giovambattista, R.; Perrone, L.; Alfonsi, L.; Cianchini, G.; Pavón-Carrasco, F. J.; Cesaroni, C.; Spogli, L.; Malagnini, A.; Amoruso, L.; Carbone, M.; Abbattista, C.; Drimaco, D.

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of the Swarm satellite mission by ESA is to measure the magnetic signals from the Earth. The SAFE (Swarm for Earthquake study) project (funded by ESA in the framework "STSE Swarm+Innovation", 2014) aims at applying the new approach of geosystemics to the analysis of Swarm data for investigating the preparatory phase of earthquakes. The main objective is to explore the possible link between magnetic/ionospheric anomalies and large earthquakes analysing Swarm as well as ground based data (seismic, magnetic, GNSS, etc.). This presentation will show the state of the art in lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) and the expected contribution of SAFE in the field, showing some recent case studies.

  3. Theoretical studies on CO2 capture behavior of quaternary ammonium-based polymeric ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Kun; Chen, Kexian; Hou, Chenglong; Fang, Mengxiang

    2016-05-14

    Quaternary ammonium-based polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) are novel CO2 sorbents as they have high capacity, high stability and high binding energy. Moreover, the binding energy of ionic pairs to CO2 is tunable by changing the hydration state so that the sorbent can be regenerated through humidity adjustment. In this study, theoretical calculations were conducted to reveal the mechanism of the humidity swing CO2 adsorption, based on model compounds of quaternary ammonium cation and carbonate anions. The electrostatic potential map demonstrates the anion, rather than the cation, is chemically preferential for CO2 adsorption. Further, the proton transfer process from water to carbonate at the sorbent interface is successfully depicted with an intermediate which has a higher energy state. By determining the CO2 adsorption energy and activation energy at different hydration states, it is discovered that water could promote CO2 adsorption by reducing the energy barrier of proton transfer. The adsorption/desorption equilibrium would shift to desorption by adding water, which constitutes the theoretical basis for humidity swing. By analyzing the hydrogen bonding and structure of the water molecules, it is interesting to find that the CO2 adsorption weakens the hydrophilicity of the sorbent and results in release of water. The requirement of latent heat for the phase change of water could significantly reduce the heat of adsorption. The special "self-cooling" effect during gas adsorption can lower the temperature of the sorbent and benefit the adsorption isotherms. PMID:27115032

  4. Tactile capture of auditory localization: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Patrick; Röder, Brigitte

    2010-05-01

    The well-known ventriloquist illusion arises when sounds are mislocalized towards a synchronous but spatially discrepant visual stimulus, and a similar effect of touch on audition has also been reported. By manipulating hand position, we recently demonstrated that this audiotactile ventriloquism effect predominantly operates in an external coordinate system. Using event-related potentials, the present study investigated the neural correlates of this audiotactile ventriloquism effect. Participants reported the perceived location of brief auditory stimuli that were presented either alone or with concurrent tactile stimuli to the fingertips, which were situated at the left and right side of the speaker array. Concurrent electroencephalogram recordings suggested a biasing of cortical activity by the tactile stimuli, which was only observed for trials in which a ventriloquist illusion was elicited. Irrespective of the physical location of the sound source in the bimodal trials, centrally perceived sounds elicited an enhanced centrally distributed negativity, compared to laterally perceived sounds, between 260 and 400 ms following stimulus onset, similar to unimodal auditory stimuli that were actually presented from central and lateral positions, respectively. Moreover, this effect was modulated by hand posture. When external and anatomically centred reference frames were in conflict, the event-related potential effect was reduced for small audiotactile spatial discrepancies, which corresponded to the behavioural finding of a reduced audiotactile ventriloquism effect compared to a parallel hand posture. The present data suggest that the cortical representation of auditory space is adjusted to coincide with spatially disparate tactile input. PMID:20584189

  5. Biweekly disturbance capture and attribution: case study in western Alberta grizzly bear habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilker, Thomas; Coops, Nicholas C.; Gaulton, Rachel; Wulder, Michael A.; Cranston, Jerome; Stenhouse, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the impact of landscape disturbance on ecosystems. Satellite remote sensing can be used for mapping disturbances, and fusion techniques of sensors with complimentary characteristics can help to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite-based mapping techniques. Classification of different disturbance types from satellite observations is difficult, yet important, especially in an ecological context as different disturbance types might have different impacts on vegetation recovery, wildlife habitats, and food resources. We demonstrate a possible approach for classifying common disturbance types by means of their spatial characteristics. First, landscape level change is characterized on a near biweekly basis through application of a data fusion model (spatial temporal adaptive algorithm for mapping reflectance change) and a number of spatial and temporal characteristics of the predicted disturbance patches are inferred. A regression tree approach is then used to classify disturbance events. Our results show that spatial and temporal disturbance characteristics can be used to classify disturbance events with an overall accuracy of 86% of the disturbed area observed. The date of disturbance was identified as the most powerful predictor of the disturbance type, together with the patch core area, patch size, and contiguity.

  6. Low energy proton capture study of the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Stephen Michael

    The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction regulates the rate of energy production for stars slightly more massive than the sun throughout stable hydrogen burning on the main sequence. The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction rate also determines the luminosity for all stars after leaving the main sequence when their cores have exhausted hydrogen fuel, and later when they become red giant stars. The significant role that this reaction plays in stellar evolution has far-reaching consequences, from neutrino production in our Sun, to age estimates of globular clusters in our Galaxy. The weak cross section and inherent coincidence summing in the 15O gamma-ray decay scheme make a precision measurement of the astrophysical S-factor especially challenging, particularly for the ground-state transition. The present study, performed in the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA), was aimed at measuring the ground-state transition at low energy by utilizing a new 24-element, position-sensitive, NaI(Tl) detector array. Because the array is highly segmented, the 14N( p,gamma)15O S-factor was evaluated for transitions to the ground, 5.18, 6.18, and 6.79 MeV states without the need for coincidence summing corrections. Additionally, the position-sensitivity of the detector was exploited to measure the angular correlation of the two-photon cascades. Software cuts were made to the data in order to identify single and coincident gamma-ray events and a fraction fit analysis technique was used to extract the characteristic 15O peaks from the composite gamma-ray spectrum. The results from the current work demonstrated a new approach to measuring weak nuclear cross sections near astrophysically relevant energies that, with refinements, has broader applications in gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Eliciting and activating funds of knowledge in an environmental science community college classroom: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Niel, John J.

    Many non-traditional students are currently underperforming in college and yet may have untapped knowledge and skills that could support their academic success if appropriately utilized. Previous practices that students experience as a part of their lives are what Gonzales and other researchers call "funds of knowledge" (FOK). There is ample evidence to show that utilization of students' FOK in K-12 instructional contexts can be beneficial. In contrast, little formal FOK research has been done with higher education students. To address this gap, this study explores how environmental college courses could be designed so as to better elicit and capitalize on students' FOK, with the ultimate goal of increasing student engagement and learning. More specifically, using an action research paradigm, I designed, implemented and studied an intervention in two sections of the required environmental science course I taught in Fall 2009 at the community college where I am employed. The intervention consisted of two phases: (1) eliciting FOK from the students enrolled in one section of the course through a draft survey, and (2) refining that survey tool in order to better elicit FOK, development of other methods of elicitation of FOK and activating (or incorporating) the FOK thus identified as relevant to enhance the learning experience of the students in both sections of the course. The designs of the intervention as well as data collection and analysis were informed by the following research questions: Q1. What are effective strategies for eliciting FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q2. What relevant FOK do students bring to this class? Q3. What were instances where FOK were activated in the course? Q4. What are effective strategies for activating FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q5. What evidence was there that students took up new practices due to the intervention? Data were collected from a

  8. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  9. Medical Registry Data Collection Efficiency: A Crossover Study Comparing Web-Based Electronic Data Capture and a Standard Spreadsheet

    PubMed Central

    Staziaki, Pedro Vinícius; Kim, Phillip; Vadvala, Harshna V

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic medical records and electronic data capture (EDC) have changed data collection in clinical and translational research. However, spreadsheet programs, such as Microsoft Excel, are still used as data repository to record and organize patient data for research. Objective The objective of this study is to assess the efficiency of EDC as against a standard spreadsheet in regards to time to collect data and data accuracy, measured in number of errors after adjudication. Methods This was a crossover study comparing the time to collect data in minutes between EDC and a spreadsheet. The EDC tool used was Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), whereas the spreadsheet was Microsoft Excel. The data collected was part of a registry of patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography in the emergency setting. Two data collectors with the same experience went over the same patients and collected relevant data on a case report form identical to the one used in our Emergency Department (ED) registry. Data collection tool was switched after the patient that represented half the cohort. For this, the patient cohort was exactly 30 days of our ED coronary Computed Tomography Angiography registry and the point of crossover was determined beforehand to be 15 days. We measured the number of patients admitted, and time to collect data. Accuracy was defined as absence of blank fields and errors, and was assessed by comparing data between data collectors and counting every time the data differed. Statistical analysis was made using paired t -test. Results The study included 61 patients (122 observations) and 55 variables. The crossover occurred after the 30th patient. Mean time to collect data using EDC in minutes was 6.2±2.3, whereas using Excel was 8.0±2.0 (P <.001), a difference of 1.8 minutes between both means (22%). The cohort was evenly distributed with 3 admissions in the first half of the crossover and 4 in the second half. We saw 2 (<0

  10. Accountability and Rural Development Partnerships: A Study of Objective 5b EAGGF Funding in South West England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Julie; Warren, Martyn; Turner, Martin; Hutchcroft, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Funding for Rural Development Partnerships has signalled a shift in rural policy, towards actively involving the rural population in determining the direction and implementation of change. However, early experience with partnerships has indicated that the funding bodies have retained significant control. One reason for this is that they are…