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Sample records for capture therapy treat

  1. Using the TREAT reactor in support of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experiments: A feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grasseschi, G.L.; Schaefer, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    The technical feasibility of using the TREAT reactor facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research was assessed. Using one-dimensional neutronics calculations, it was shown that the TREAT core neutron spectrum can be filtered to reduce the undesired radiation (contamination) dose per desired neutron more effectively than can the core spectra from two prominent candidate reactors. Using two-dimensional calculations, it was demonstrated that a non-optimized filter replacing the TREAT thermal column can yield a fluence of desired-energy neutrons more than twice as large as the fluence believed to be required and, at the same time, have a contamination dose per desired neutron almost as low as that from any other candidate facility. The time, effort and cost required to adapt TREAT for a mission supporting BNCT research would be modest.

  2. Estimation of absorbed dose in the covering skin of human melanoma treated by neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hiratsuka, J.; Karashima, H.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Ichihashi, M.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    A patient with malignant melanoma was treated by thermal neutron capture therapy using 10B-paraboronophenylalanine. The compound was injected subcutaneously into ten locations in the tumor-surrounding skin, and the patient was then irradiated with thermal neutrons from the Musashi Reactor at reactor power of 100 KW and neutron flux of 1.2 X 10(9) n/cm{sup 2}/s. Total absorbed dose to the skin was 11.7-12.5 Gy in the radiation field. The dose equivalents of these doses were estimated as 21.5 and 24.4 Sv, respectively. Early skin reaction after irradiation was checked from day 1 to day 60. The maximum and mean skin scores were 2.0 and 1.5, respectively, and the therapy was safely completed as far as skin reaction was concerned. Some factors influencing the absorbed dose and dose equivalent to the skin are discussed.

  3. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  4. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  5. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  6. Apoptosis through Bcl-2/Bax and Cleaved Caspase Up-Regulation in Melanoma Treated by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faião-Flores, Fernanda; Coelho, Paulo Rogério Pinto; Toledo Arruda-Neto, João Dias; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Tiago, Manoela; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Giorgi, Ricardo Rodrigues; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment involving selective accumulation of boron carriers in a tumor followed by irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam. The neutron capture reaction with a boron-10 nucleus yields high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, alpha and 7Li, with a range of 5 to 9 µm. These particles can only travel very short distances and release their damaging energy directly into the cells containing the boron compound. We aimed to evaluate proliferation, apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) modifications of B16F10 melanoma and normal human melanocytes after BNCT. The amounts of soluble collagen and Hsp47, indicating collagen synthesis in the ECM, as well as the cellular markers of apoptosis, were investigated. BNCT decreased proliferation, altered the ECM by decreasing collagen synthesis and induced apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2/Bax in melanoma. Additionally, BNCT also increased the levels of TNF receptor and the cleaved caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9 in melanoma. These results suggest that multiple pathways related to cell death and cell cycle arrest are involved in the treatment of melanoma by BNCT. PMID:23527236

  7. Boron-neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, A. M.; Moschini, G.; Valkovic, Vlado; Zafiropoulos, D.

    1995-03-01

    The final goal of any radiotherapy project is to expose the tumor as the target to a lethal dose of ionizing radiation, sparing thereby the surrounding healthy tissues to a maximum extent. Precise treatment is nevertheless essential for cure, since the danger exists that the tumor might re-establish itself if every cancer cell is not destroyed. The conventional therapy treatments existing to date, e.g., surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, have been successful in curing some kinds of cancers, but still there are many exceptions. In the following, the progress of a promising therapy tool, called the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), which has made its dynamic evolution in recent years, is briefly described. The approach towards clinical trials with BNCT is described in detail.

  8. Gadolinium as a Neutron Capture Therapy Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jing-Luen Allen

    The clinical results of treating brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy are very encouraging and researchers around the world are once again making efforts to develop this therapeutic modality. Boron-10 is the agent receiving the most attention for neutron capture therapy but ^{157}Gd is a nuclide that also holds interesting properties of being a neutron capture therapy agent. The objective of this study is to evaluate ^{157}Gd as a neutron capture therapy agent. In this study it is determined that tumor concentrations of about 300 mug ^{157}Gd/g tumor can be achieved in brain tumors with some FDA approved MRI contrast agents such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, and up to 628 mug ^{157 }Gd/g tumor can be established in bone tumors with Gd-EDTMP. Monte Carlo calculations show that with only 250 ppm of ^{157}Gd in tumor, neutron capture therapy can deliver 2,000 cGy to a tumor of 2 cm diameter or larger with 5 times 10^{12} n/cm ^2 fluence at the tumor. Dose measurements which were made with films and TLD's in phantoms verified these calculations. More extended Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that neutron capture therapy with Gd possesses comparable dose distribution to B neutron capture therapy. With 5 times 10^{12 } n/cm^2 thermal neutrons at the tumor, Auger electrons from the Gd produced an optical density enhancement on the films that is similar to the effect caused by about 300 cGy of Gd prompt gamma dose which will further enhance the therapeutic effects. A technique that combines brachytherapy with Gd neutron capture therapy has been evaluated. Monte Carlo calculations show that 5,000 cGy of prompt gamma dose can be delivered to a treatment volume of 40 cm^3 with a 3-plane implant of a total of 9 Gd needles. The tumor to normal tissue advantage of this method is as good as ^{60} Co brachytherapy. Measurements of prompt gamma dose with films and TLD-700's in a lucite phantom verify the Monte Carlo evaluation. A technique which displays the Gd

  9. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  11. Accelerators and Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A.

    2002-08-01

    Within the frame of Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), the 7Li (p,n) 7Be reaction, relatively near its energy threshold is one of the most promising, due to its high yield and low neutron energy. In this work a thick LiF target irradiated with a proton beam was studied as a neutron source. The 1.88-2.0 MeV proton beam was produced by the tandem accelerator TANDAR at CNEA's facilities in Buenos Aires. A water-filled phantom, containing a boron sample was irradiated with the resulting neutron flux. The 10B(n,αγ)7Li boron neutron capture reaction produces a 0.478 MeV gamma ray in 94% of the cases. The neutron yield was measured through the detection of this gamma ray using a hyperpure germanium detector with an anti-Compton shield. In addition, the thermal neutron flux was evaluated at different depths inside the phantom using bare and Cd-covered gold foils. A maximum neutron thermal flux of 1.4×108 cm-2s-1mA-1 was obtained at 4.2 cm from the phantom surface. In order to optimize the design of the neutron production target and the beam shaping assembly extensive Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) simulations have been performed. Neutron fields from a thick LiF and a Li metal target (with both a D2O-graphite and a Al/AlF3-graphite moderator/reflector assembly) were evaluated along the centerline of a head and a whole body phantom. Simulations were carried out for 1.89, 2.0 and 2.3 MeV proton beams. The results show that it is more advantageous to irradiate the target with 2.3 MeV near-resonance protons, instead of very near threshold, because of the higher neutron yield at this energy. On the other hand, the Al/AlF3-graphite exhibits a more efficient performance than D2O in terms of tumor to maximum healthy tissue dose ratio. Treatment times of less than 15 min and tumor control probabilities larger than 98% are obtained for a 50 mA, 2.3 MeV proton beam. The alternative neutron-producing reaction 13C(d,n) is also briefly reviewed. A

  12. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer. PMID:27461603

  14. Approach to magnetic neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. . E-mail: spod@sky.chph.ras.ru; Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Filippov, Victor I.; Komissarova, Lubov Kh.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy can be described as a combination of two methods: magnetic localization of drugs using magnetically targeted carriers and neutron capture therapy itself. Methods and Materials: In this work, we produced and tested two types of particles for such therapy. Composite ultradispersed ferro-carbon (Fe-C) and iron-boron (Fe-B) particles were formed from vapors of respective materials. Results: Two-component ultradispersed particles, containing Fe and C, were tested as magnetic adsorbent of L-boronophenylalanine and borax and were shown that borax sorption could be effective for creation of high concentration of boron atoms in the area of tumor. Kinetics of boron release into the physiologic solution demonstrate that ultradispersed Fe-B (10%) could be applied for an effective magnetic neutron capture therapy. Conclusion: Both types of the particles have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, allow to form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  15. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  16. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V.; Moore, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  18. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V. ); Moore, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  19. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    2000-09-05

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data.

  20. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy for the prevention of restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Delfaus, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty is under investigation at Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The process of Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a balloon dilation catheter into the occluded artery. The balloon is then inflated for several minutes to dilate the artery. The blockage is decreased, and blood flow through the artery is improved. This procedure is, initially, very successful. However, 30 to 60% of patients treated also show restenosis within 6 months. Although many physiological processes may contribute to restenosis, the primary mechanism is thought to be abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle cells in the treated artery.

  2. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  3. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  4. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

  5. A beam-modification assembly for experimental neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Kalef-Ezra, J.A.; Saraf, S.K.; Joel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent attempts to treat intracerebral rat gliomas by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been somewhat disappointing, perhaps in part because of excessive whole-body and nasopharyngeal irradiation. Intracerebral rat gliomas were treated by BNCT with more success using a new beam-modification assembly. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Role of gel dosimeters in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Khajeali, Azim; Farajollahi, Ali Reza; Khodadadi, Roghayeh; Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalili, Assef

    2015-09-01

    Gel dosimeters have acquired a unique status in radiotherapy, especially with the advent of the new techniques in which there is a need for three-dimensional dose measurement with high spatial resolution. One of the techniques in which the use of gel dosimeters has drawn the attention of the researchers is the boron neutron capture therapy. Exploring the history of gel dosimeters, this paper sets out to study their role in the boron neutron capture therapy dosimetric process. PMID:26070173

  7. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

  8. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  14. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  15. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  16. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  17. [Possibilities of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kanygin, V V; Kichigin, A I; Gubanova, N V; Taskaev, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that is of the highest attractiveness due to its selective action directly on malignant tumor cells is a promising approach to treating cancers. Clinical interest in BNCT focuses in neuro-oncology on therapy for gliomas, glioblastoma in particular, and BNCT may be used in brain metastatic involvement. This needs an epithermal neutron source that complies with the requirements for BNCT, as well as a 10B-containing agent that will selectively accumulate in tumor tissue. The introduction of BNCT into clinical practice to treat patients with glial tumors will be able to enhance therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26999933

  18. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  19. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  20. [How I treat... onychomycosis by topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2015-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent and challenging disease to treat. Well conducted oral therapies are commonly quite effective for a short term period. However, recurrences are frequent. Topical therapies appear globally less active. Studies in this field are rare, although the promotional advertisements to the general public abound nowadays. Various microscopic fungi (dermatophytes, yeasts, molds) should be targeted by the treatment, In addition, the distinct activity conditions of both growth and quiescence of the pathogen fungi should be influenced by the treatments. This is not frequently considered by drug companies and encountered in practice. The antifungal drug penetration inside all the nail layers is important to be performed. PMID:25902599

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy of intracerebral rat gliosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Joel, D D; Fairchild, R G; Laissue, J A; Saraf, S K; Kalef-Ezra, J A; Slatkin, D N

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of intracerebrally implanted rat gliosarcomas was tested. Preferential accumulation of 10B in tumors was achieved by continuous infusion of the sulfhydryl borane dimer, Na4(10)B24H22S2, at a rate of 45-50 micrograms of 10B per g of body weight per day from day 11 to day 14 after tumor initiation (day 0). This infusion schedule resulted in average blood 10B concentrations of 35 micrograms/ml in a group of 12 gliosarcoma-bearing rats and 45 micrograms/ml in a group of 10 similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated by BNCT. Estimated tumor 10B levels in these two groups were 26 and 34 micrograms/g, respectively. On day 14, boron-treated and non-boron-treated rats were exposed to 5.0 or 7.5 MW.min of radiation from the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor that yielded thermal neutron fluences of approximately 2.0 x 10(12) or approximately 3.0 x 10(12) n/cm2, respectively, in the tumors. Untreated rats had a median postinitiation survival time of 21 days. Reactor radiation alone increased median postinitiation survival time to 26 (5.0 MW.min) or 28 (7.5 MW.min) days. The 12 rats that received 5 MW.min of BNCT had a median postinitiation survival time of 60 days. Two of these animals survived greater than 15 months. In the 7.5 MW.min group, the median survival time is not calculable since 6 of the 10 animals remain alive greater than 10 months after BNCT. The estimated radiation doses to tumors in the two BNCT groups were 14.2 and 25.6 Gy equivalents, respectively. Similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated with 15.0 or 22.5 Gy of 250-kilovolt peak x-rays had median survival times of only 26 or 31 days, respectively, after tumor initiation. Images PMID:2263630

  2. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles. PMID:26033767

  3. Neutron capture therapy with sup 235 U seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.; Shih, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    A combination of brachytherapy and neutron capture therapy has been evaluated using {sup 235}U metal seeds and external neutron beam irradiation. When thermal neutrons are absorbed by {sup 235}U, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays are produced and some of these deposit energy in surrounding tissue. A Monte Carlo program, using the code MCNP, has been used to evaluate two sizes of {sup 235}U seeds in a water phantom. The results of flux suppression around the seeds and dose distributions are illustrated and discussed. The results show that high doses can be delivered in a relatively short time by using {sup 235}U seeds with neutron capture therapy. This therapy with multiple needles or seeds can be envisioned as a substitute for traditional brachytherapy to give an effective killing dose.

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  5. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Theoretical and experimental physical methods of neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    This review is based to a substantial degree on our priority developments and research at the IR-8 reactor of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. New theoretical and experimental methods of neutron-capture therapy are developed and applied in practice; these are: A general analytical and semi-empiric theory of neutron-capture therapy (NCT) based on classical neutron physics and its main sections (elementary theories of moderation, diffuse, reflection, and absorption of neutrons) rather than on methods of mathematical simulation. The theory is, first of all, intended for practical application by physicists, engineers, biologists, and physicians. This theory can be mastered by anyone with a higher education of almost any kind and minimal experience in operating a personal computer.

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy: from physics to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabel, Detlef

    1997-02-01

    For successful application of boron neutron capture therapy for treatment of cancer, it is required that the tumor receives a higher radiation dose than the surrounding healthy tissue. This is achieved by the use of appropriate boron compounds with selective accumulation or retention, and the subsequent irradiation with neutrons of suitable characteristics. The basics of these two requirement are given, and the implementation in clinical trials is discussed.

  8. Could New 'Talk Therapy' Cut Cost of Treating Depression?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Could New 'Talk Therapy' Cut Cost of Treating Depression? Behavioral activation would be more accessible than currently ... gold-standard treatment -- cognitive behavioral therapy -- for treating depression in adults, a new study suggests. The researchers ...

  9. Treating alcohol problems with couple therapy.

    PubMed

    McCrady, Barbara S

    2012-05-01

    Couple therapy for treating alcohol use disorders (AUDs) results in less drinking and greater relationship stability and satisfaction in both men and women with AUDs. The theoretical tenets, treatment methods, and research evidence for Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) are summarized. The application of ABCT is illustrated through the treatment of a 42-year-old woman with an AUD and her 56-year-old husband. During 12 sessions over a 6-month period, the woman attained abstinence from alcohol and learned cognitive and behavioral coping skills to deal with drinking antecedents. Her husband learned to support her abstinence by stopping drinking himself, helping her cope with drinking urges, and reinforcing her successes. The couple increased positive pleasurable activities that did not involve alcohol and improved their communication skills. Challenges in the treatment included her ambivalence about abstaining, their complicated work and travel schedules, and other life stressors. PMID:22504611

  10. Treating Immunodeficiency through HSC Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has been successfully employed as a therapeutic option to treat specific inherited immune deficiencies, including severe combined immune deficiencies (SCID) over the past two decades. Initial clinical trials using first-generation gamma-retroviral vectors to transfer corrective DNA demonstrated clinical benefit for patients, but were associated with leukemogenesis in a number of cases. Safer vectors have since been developed, affording comparable efficacy with an improved biosafety profile. These vectors are now in Phase I/II clinical trials for a number of immune disorders with more preclinical studies underway. Targeted gene editing allowing precise DNA correction via platforms such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 may now offer promising strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in the future. PMID:26993219

  11. Treating cancer with sonodynamic therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Costley, David; Mc Ewan, Conor; Fowley, Colin; McHale, Anthony P; Atchison, Jordan; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Callan, John F

    2015-03-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has emerged as a promising option for the minimally invasive treatment of solid cancerous tumours. SDT requires the combination of three distinct components: a sensitising drug, ultrasound, and molecular oxygen. Individually, these components are non-toxic but when combined together generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The major advantage of SDT over its close relative photodynamic therapy (PDT), is the increased penetration of ultrasound through mammalian tissue compared to light. As a result, SDT can be used to treat a wider array of deeper and less accessible tumours than PDT. In this article, we critically review the current literature on SDT and discuss strategies that have been developed in combination with SDT to enhance the therapeutic outcome. PMID:25582025

  12. A Systematic Approach for Evaluation of Capture Zones at Pump and Treat Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document describes a systematic approach for performing capture zone analysis associated with ground water pump and treat systems. A “capture zone” refers to the three-dimensional region that contributes the ground water extracted by one or more wells or drains. A capture ...

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  15. Gadolinium in human glioblastoma cells for gadolinium neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    De Stasio, G; Casalbore, P; Pallini, R; Gilbert, B; Sanità, F; Ciotti, M T; Rosi, G; Festinesi, A; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Perret, D; Mogk, D W; Perfetti, P; Mehta, M P; Mercanti, D

    2001-05-15

    157Gd is a potential agent for neutron capture cancer therapy (GdNCT). We directly observed the microdistribution of Gd in cultured human glioblastoma cells exposed to Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We demonstrated, with three independent techniques, that Gd-DTPA penetrates the plasma membrane, and we observed no deleterious effect on cell survival. A systematic microchemical analysis revealed a higher Gd accumulation in cell nuclei compared with cytoplasm. This is significant for prospective GdNCT because the proximity of Gd to DNA increases the cell-killing potential of the short-range, high-energy electrons emitted during the neutron capture reaction. We also exposed Gd-containing cells to thermal neutrons and demonstrated the GdNC reaction effectiveness in inducing cell death. These results in vitro stimulated in vivo Gd-DTPA uptake studies, currently underway, in human glioblastoma patients. PMID:11358855

  16. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to tumor-associated antigens are attractive for concentrating /sup 10/B in cancer tissue, in part because neutron capture therapy (NCT) is not disadvantaged by the hours to days required to optimize tumor:background concentration ratios of MoAbs or their F(ab')/sub 2/ or Fab fragments. Since direct coupling of /sup 10/B compounds in amounts sufficient for radiotherapy appears to inactivate MoAbs, the authors used dextran intermediate carriers to provide high levels of /sup 10/B per MoAb while modifying fewer amino acid residues.

  17. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  18. Treating Psoriasis: Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... or safe. Read more about herbal remedies » Mind/Body Therapies Mind-body techniques can help reduce your stress levels. Learn about mind/body therapies » Alternative Therapies Some psoriasis patients report hands- ...

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: An experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, B.S.; Larsson, B.; Roberto, A. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that some thioamides, e.g., thiouracil, are incorporated as false precursors into melanin during its synthesis. If boronated analogs of the thioamides share this property, the melanin of melanotic melanomas offers a possibility for specific tumoural uptake and retention of boron as a basis for neutron capture therapy. We report on the synthesis of boronated 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (B-TZT), boronated 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (B-CTU), and boronated 5-diethylaminomethyl-2-thiouracil (B-DEAMTU) and the localization of these substances in melanotic melanomas transplanted to mice. The distribution in the mice was studied by boron neutron capture radiography. B-TZT and B-CTU showed the highest tumour:normal tissue concentration ratios, with tumour:liver ratios of about 4 and tumour:muscle ratios of about 14; B-DEAMTU showed corresponding ratios of 1.4 and 5, respectively. The absolute concentration of boron in the tumours, however, was more than three times higher in the mice injected with B-TZT, compared with B-CTU. The results suggest that B-TZT may be the most promising compound of the three tested with regard to possible therapy of melanotic melanomas.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Markovic, V M; Jovanovic, Z; Milenkovic, B; Nikezic, D; Atanackovic, J

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. PMID:24435912

  1. New compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT) and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Clearly the most effective tumor therapy would be obtained by the selective targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumor cells. Although many biomolecules are known to be taken up in tumors, the targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumors is limited by the fact that other essential cell pools compete with equal or even greater effectiveness. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, with activation by means of an external radiation beam, is advantageous for two reasons: (1) it obviates problems associated with high uptake of isotopes in normal tissues, as these cell pools can be excluded from the radiation field, and (2) the general tumor area can be included in the activating beam field; thus, the possibility exists that all microscopic tumor extensions can be irradiated. As long as range of reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to the tumor, with a resultant high therapeutic ratio. This method can be accomplished with either photon activation therapy (PAT) or Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), the latter will be emphasized here. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10 ..mu..m, or one cell diameter; hence this reaction is optimal for cell killing. A number of biomolecules have been investigated as possible vehicles for transport of boron to tumors, including phenothiazines, thiouracils, porphyrins, nucleosides, and amino acids. Biodistributions of these compounds show selective concentration in tumor adequate for therapy. The biological halflives are in the order of days, allowing the possibility of fractionated or protracted irradiations. The radiobiological and physical implication of these parameters on NCT are discussed. The possibility of using an approximately-monoenergetic, scandium-filtered beam of about 2 keV, to reduce the dose from background radiations by about 85%, is also discussed. (ERB)

  2. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  3. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  4. Real-time dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1994-09-01

    Epithermal/thermal boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is promising treatment method for malignant tumors. Because the doses and dose rates for medical therapeutic radiation are very close to the normal tissue tolerance, small errors in radiation delivery can result in harmful overdoses. A substantial need exists for a device that will monitor, in real time, the radiation dose being delivered to a patient. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a scintillating glass optical fiber that is sensitive to thermal neutrons. The small size of the fibers offers the possibility of in vivo dose monitoring at several points within the radiation field. The count rate of such detectors can approach 10 MHz because the lifetime of the cerium activator is fast. Fluxes typical of those in BNCT (i.e., 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/sec) may be measured because of this potentially high count rate and the small diameter of the fiber.

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  6. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  7. A comparison of the COG and MCNP codes in computational neutron capture therapy modeling, Part II: gadolinium neutron capture therapy models and therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wangerin, K; Culbertson, C N; Jevremovic, T

    2005-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the COG Monte Carlo radiation transport code, developed and tested by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) related modeling. The validity of COG NCT model has been established for this model, and here the calculation was extended to analyze the effect of various gadolinium concentrations on dose distribution and cell-kill effect of the GdNCT modality and to determine the optimum therapeutic conditions for treating brain cancers. The computational results were compared with the widely used MCNP code. The differences between the COG and MCNP predictions were generally small and suggest that the COG code can be applied to similar research problems in NCT. Results for this study also showed that a concentration of 100 ppm gadolinium in the tumor was most beneficial when using an epithermal neutron beam. PMID:16010124

  8. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  9. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1991-06-04

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  10. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  11. Directly observed therapy for treating tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Karumbi, Jamlick; Garner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    quality evidence). Specific patient categories A trial of 300 intravenous drug users in the USA evaluated direct observation with no observation in TB prophylaxis to prevent active disease and showed little difference in treatment completion (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.13; one trial, 300 participants, low quality evidence). Authors' conclusions From the existing trials, DOT did not provide a solution to poor adherence in TB treatment. Given the large resource and cost implications of DOT, policy makers might want to reconsider strategies that depend on direct observation. Other options might take into account financial and logistical barriers to care; approaches that motivate patients and staff; and defaulter follow-up. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Directly observing people with TB take their drugs to help them complete their treatment This Cochrane Review summarises trials evaluating the effects of directly observed therapy (DOT) for treating people with tuberculosis (TB) or people on prophylaxis to prevent active disease compared to self-administered treatment. After searching for relevant trials up to 13 January 2015, we included 11 randomized controlled trials, enrolling 5662 people with TB, and conducted between 1995 and 2008. What is DOT and how might it improve treatment outcomes for people with TB DOT is one strategy to ensure that patients with TB take all their medication. An 'observer' acceptable to the patient and the health system observes the patient taking every dose of their medication, and records this for the health system to monitor. The World Health Organization currently recommends that people with TB are treated for at least six months to achieve cure. These long durations of treatment can be difficult for patients to complete, especially once they are well and need to return to work. Failure to complete treatment can lead to relapse and even death in individuals, and also has important public health consequences, such as increased TB transmission and the

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  13. Topical herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Background Before extraction and synthetic chemistry were invented, musculoskeletal complaints were treated with preparations from medicinal plants. They were either administered orally or topically. In contrast to the oral medicinal plant products, topicals act in part as counterirritants or are toxic when given orally. Objectives To update the previous Cochrane review of herbal therapy for osteoarthritis from 2000 by evaluating the evidence on effectiveness for topical medicinal plant products. Search methods Databases for mainstream and complementary medicine were searched using terms to include all forms of arthritis combined with medicinal plant products. We searched electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to February 2013, unrestricted by language. We also searched the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of herbal interventions used topically, compared with inert (placebo) or active controls, in people with osteoarthritis were included. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. Main results Seven studies (seven different medicinal plant interventions; 785 participants) were included. Single studies (five studies, six interventions) and non-comparable studies (two studies, one intervention) precluded pooling of results. Moderate evidence from a single study of 174 people with hand osteoarthritis indicated that treatment with Arnica extract gel probably results in similar benefits as treatment with ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) with a similar number of adverse events. Mean pain in the ibuprofen group was 44.2 points on a 100 point scale; treatment with Arnica gel reduced the pain by 4 points after three weeks: mean difference (MD

  14. GE PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bosko, A; Zhilchenkov, D; Reece, W D

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses the use of a General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy. In particular, the standard PETtrace (18)O target is considered. The resulting dose from the neutrons emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at different depths in a brain phantom. MCNP-simulated results are presented at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 cm depth inside this brain phantom. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in the current configuration allows treating tumors at a depth of up to 4 cm with reasonable treatment times. Further increase of a beam current should significantly improve the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths. PMID:15308192

  15. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  16. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  17. Treating angina pectoris by acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lixian; Xu, Hao; Gao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Dominic P

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy on PC 6 (Neiguan) has a therapeutic effect on cardiac and chest ailments including angina pectoris. Additional beneficial acupuncture points are PC 4 (Ximen), HT 7 (Shenmen point), PC 7 (Daling point), PC 5 (Jianshi point), PC 3 (Quze point), CV 17 (Danzhong point), CV 6 (Qihai point), BL 15 (Xinshu point), L 20 (Pishu point), BL 17 (Geshu point), BL23 (Shenshu point), BL18 (Ganshu point), HT 5 (Tongli point), and ST36 (Zusanli point). Acupuncture not only quickly relieve the symptoms of acute angina pectoris, but also improve nitroglycerine's therapeutic effects. Therefore, it is an efficient simple therapeutic method used for emergency and for regular angina treatment. Review of studies on acupuncture therapy has shown effectiveness were between 80% to 96.2% that are almost as effective as conventional drug regimen. When compared with conventional medical treatment, the acupuncture therapy shows the obvious advantage of lacking, adverse side effects commonly associated with the Western anti-anginal drugs such as 1) Nitroglycerine (headache--63% with nitroglycerine patch and 50% with spray; syncope--4%; and dizziness--8% with patch; hypotension--4% with patch; and increased angina 2% with patch). 2) Isosorbide mononitrate (dizziness--3 to 5%; nausea/vomiting--2 to 4% and other reactions including hypotension, and syncope even with small doses). 3) Propranolol (bradycardia, chest pain, hypotension, worsening of AV conduction disturbance, Raynaud's syndrome, mental depression, hyperglycemia, etc.). Many conventional anti-anginal medications cause inter-drug reactions with other medications the patients taking for other diseases. Whereas, acupuncture therapy does not pose such an interference with patient's medications. Nevertheless, surgery is still the treatment of choice when acupuncture or conventional drug therapy fails. Combination of conventional drug therapy and acupuncture would considerably decrease the frequency and the required dosage

  18. Therapies for Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or neuropathy. Neurologists from the American Academy of Neurology are doctors who identify and treat diseases of ... an educational service of the American Academy of Neurology. It is based on an assessment of current ...

  19. [Using alternative therapies in treating sleep disturbance].

    PubMed

    Hung, Hsuan-Man; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2011-02-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common health problem among adults, and enhancing sleep quality is an issue of significant importance to healthcare providers. As sleep quality worsens into insomnia, individuals may seek assistance from medication. However, sedative hypnotic drugs pose potentially adverse effects. Also, most medical treatments (e.g., positive pressure assistant ventilators) represent invasive interventions that must be prescribed by physicians. Non-pharmacological alternative therapies are commonly recommended and adopted by community nurses. Alternative therapies for sleep disturbance included exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, multiple strategies, music, and acupressure. In general, moderately intensive walking exercise is the intervention most recommended by professionals to help patients deal with sleep disturbance. Therefore, it is suggested that future researchers devise sleep quality promotion strategies that are suitable for home practice in order to apply the findings and spirit of research already done in this area. PMID:21328208

  20. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  1. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  2. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  3. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  4. [How I treat... chronic insomnia by cognitive and behavioral therapy].

    PubMed

    Dethier, M; Blairy, S; Poirrier, R

    2016-04-01

    Today, insomnia is predominantly treated by pharmacotherapy. Yet, cognitive-behavioral therapy has better long-term outcomes. In this paper, we describe the basic principles of this short-term psychotherapeutic treatment. It combines methods of sleep restriction and stimulus control, the learning of relaxation techniques, advices on sleep hygiene and cognitive therapy techniques applied to cognitions that overwhelm insomniac moments. PMID:27295894

  5. Isodose Curves and Treatment Planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.

    The development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been progressing in both ^{10 }B compound development and testing and neutron beam delivery. Animal tests are now in progress with several ^{10}B compounds and once the results of these animal tests are promising, patient trials can be initiated. The objective of this study is to create a treatment planning method based on the dose calculations by a Monte Carlo code of a mixed radiation field to provide linkage between phantom dosimetry and patient irradiation. The research started with an overall review of the development of BNCT. Three epithermal neutron facilities are described, including the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) beam, the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) beam, and a designed accelerator based neutron source. The flux and dose distributions in a head model have been calculated for irradiation by these neutron beams. Different beam parameters were inter -compared for effectiveness. Dosimetric measurements in an elliptical lucite phantom and a cylindrical water phantom were made and compared to the MCNP calculations for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Repeated measurements were made and show consistent. To improve the statistical results calculated by MCNP, a neutron source plane was designed to start neutrons at the BMRR irradiation port. The source plane was used with the phantoms for dosimetric calculations. After being verified by different phantom dosimetry and in-air flux measurements at the irradiation port, the source plane was used to calculate the flux and dose distributions in the head model. A treatment planning program was created for use on a PC which uses the MCNP calculated results as input. This program calculates the thermal neutron flux and dose distributions of each component of radiation in the central coronal section of the head model for irradiation by a neutron beam. Different combinations of head orientations and irradiation

  6. The EORTC Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Group: achievements and future projects.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, W; Zurlo, A

    2002-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an experimental treatment modality that takes place in a nuclear research reactor. To progress from preclinical studies to patient treatment is a challenge requiring strict quality management and special solutions to licensing, liability, insurance, responsibility and logistics. The European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BNCT group has started the first European clinical trial of BNCT for glioblastoma patients at the European High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, conducted by the Department of Radiotherapy of the University of Essen, Germany. A very strict quality management had to be installed following the European rules on safety and quality assurance for nuclear research reactors, for radioprotection, for radiotherapy and for clinical trials. The EORTC BNCT Group has created a virtual European-wide hospital to handle the complex management of patients treated with BNCT. New clinical trials are currently under development. PMID:11858961

  7. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  8. [Principles of therapy with fission neutrons and boron neutron capture therapy for radioresistant head-neck malignancies].

    PubMed

    Clasen, B

    1990-08-01

    Neutron therapy has proven to be clinically useful in cases of advanced, slow-growing radioresistant head and neck carcinoma. Therapeutic effects might be based on direct DNA damaging and thus immediate cell-killing, on the generation of free oxygen radicals and, among others, on the fact that heavy particle radiation is said to be less dependent on the presence of oxygen than gamma rays, i.e. on a lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). The smaller difference in reaction between oxygenated and nonoxygenated cells could entail advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on the characteristics of the tumor cell population and of the normal tissue. It is therefore essential to select patients and tumours with an expectedly high therapeutic gain factor. Fission neutrons for tumour therapy: As evaluated by several in vitro and in vivo studies (11/13) the biological efficiency (RBE) of the RENT (Reactor Neutron Therapy) beam in Munich seems to be among the highest of all clinically used neutron beams. For a single dose range between 2 and 8 Gy the RBE for chronic radiation damage is relatively small (2). Consequently, patients with recurrent or metastatic carcinomas of the head and neck are treated with a single dose of 200-250 cGy after previous surgery and/or combined radiochemotherapy. The main limitation of fission neutrons is the small penetration depth. Possibilities of clinical implementation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in otorhinolaryngology: In near surface tumours it is possible to administer high doses of 10boron not selectively, i.e. no selective tumour-seeking compound is needed. Animal experiments with intratumoural injection of 10boron glycine have shown a strong effect on tumour growth delay (18).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2222692

  9. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC): application for photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kawabata, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Hao, Erhong; Vicente, M Graça H

    2015-03-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC's applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm(2) ) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 10(12) n/cm(2) ) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37-43 days). PMID:25546823

  10. Tetrakis(p-Carboranylthio-Tetrafluorophenyl)Chlorin (TPFC): Application for Photodynamic Therapy and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMATSU, RYO; KAWABATA, SHINJI; TANAKA, HIROKI; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; SUZUKI, MINORU; ONO, KOJI; MIYATAKE, SHIN-ICHI; KUROIWA, TOSHIHIKO; HAO, ERHONG; VICENTE, M. GRAÇA H.

    2015-01-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC’s applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm2) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 1012 n/cm2) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37–43 days). PMID:25546823

  11. Carborane derivatives loaded into liposomes as efficient delivery systems for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Altieri, S; Balzi, M; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Ciani, L; Clerici, A M; Faraoni, P; Ferrari, C; Gadan, M A; Panza, L; Pietrangeli, D; Ricciardi, G; Ristori, S

    2009-12-10

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an anticancer therapy based on the incorporation of (10)B in tumors, followed by neutron irradiation. Recently, the synthesis and delivery of new boronated compounds have been recognized as some of the main challenges in BNCT application. Here, we report on the use of liposomes as carriers for BNCT active compounds. Two carborane derivatives, i.e., o-closocarboranyl beta-lactoside (LCOB) and 1-methyl-o-closocarboranyl-2-hexylthioporphyrazine (H(2)PzCOB), were loaded into liposomes bearing different surface charges. The efficacy of these formulations was tested on model cell cultures, that is, DHD/K12/TRb rat colon carcinoma and B16-F10 murine melanoma. These induce liver and lung metastases, respectively, and are used to study the uptake of standard BNCT drugs, including borophenylalanine (BPA). Boron concentration in treated cells was measured by alpha spectrometry at the TRIGA mark II reactor (University of Pavia). Results showed high performance of the proposed formulations. In particular, the use of cationic liposomes increased the cellular concentration of (10)B by at least 30 times more than that achieved by BPA. PMID:19954249

  12. Monte Carlo Calculations of Selected Dose Components in a Head Model for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymińska, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a very promising form of cancer therapy, consisting in irradiating a stable isotope of boron (10B) concentrated in tumor cells with a low energy neutron beam. This technique makes it possible to destroy tumor cells, leaving healthy tissues practically unaffected. In order to carry out the therapy in the proper way, the proper range of the neutron beam energy has to be chosen. In this paper we present the results of the calculations, using the MCNP code, aiming at studying the energetic dependence of the absorbed dose from the neutron capture reaction on boron (the therapeutic dose), and hydrogen and nitrogen (the injuring dose).

  13. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  14. Stem cell therapies for treating osteoarthritis: prescient or premature?

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Banks, Tania A

    2014-12-01

    There has been unprecedented interest in recent years in the use of stem cells as therapy for an array of diseases in companion animals. Stem cells have already been deployed therapeutically in a number of clinical settings, in particular the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteoarthritis in horses and dogs. However, an assessment of the scientific literature highlights a marked disparity between the purported benefits of stem cell therapies and their proven abilities as defined by rigorously controlled scientific studies. Although preliminary data generated from clinical trials in human patients are encouraging, therapies currently available to treat animals are supported by very limited clinical evidence, and the commercialisation of these treatments may be premature. This review introduces the three main types of stem cells relevant to veterinary applications, namely, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, and draws together research findings from in vitro and in vivo studies to give an overview of current stem cell therapies for the treatment of osteoarthritis in animals. Recent advances in tissue engineering, which is proposed as the future direction of stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis, are also discussed. PMID:25457267

  15. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  16. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-12-31

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  17. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  18. Current Controversies in Newer Therapies to Treat Birth Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Despite major advances in monitoring technology and knowledge of fetal and neonatal pathophysiology, neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains one of the main causes of severe adverse neurological outcome in children. Until recently, there were no therapies other than supportive measures. Over the past several years, mild hypothermia has been proven to be safe to treat HIE. Unfortunately, this neuroprotective strategy seems efficient in preventing brain injury in some asphyxiated newborns, but not in all of them. Thus, there is increasing interest to rapidly understand how to refine hypothermia therapy and add neuroprotective or neurorestorative strategies. Several promising newer treatments to treat birth asphyxia and prevent its devastating neurological consequences are currently being tested. In this paper, the physiopathology behind HIE, the currently available treatment, the potential alternatives, and the next steps before implementation of these other treatments are reviewed. PMID:22164181

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy: treating a venomous insect bite.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael S; Ortegon, Marta; McDaniel, Cheryl

    2007-03-01

    Reports of spider bites appear throughout North America. Bites associated with the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles recluse) cause serious medical complications because the venom of this spider contains a powerful necrotising agent with the potential to cause severe cutaneous necrosis. Although not much is known regarding the application of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) to spider bites, this therapy has considerable literature support for its efficacy, cost-effectiveness and ease of use in chronic, difficult-to-heal wounds. A case study using NPWT to successfully treat a non healing upper arm wound presumed due to a venomous spider bite is presented here. The patient was successfully treated with a new, less costly NPWT product called the Versatile 1 and a new combination drain plus dressing called the Miller DermiVex drain, both manufactured by Blue Sky Medical (Carlsbad, CA). PMID:17425551

  20. Dosimetric implications of new compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Systemic application of radiolabeled or cytotoxic agents should allow targeting of primary and metastatic neoplasms on a cellular level. In fact, drug uptake in non-target cell pools often exceeds toxic levels before sufficient amounts are delivered to tumor. In addition, at the large concentration of molecules necessary for therapy, effects of saturation are often found. Application of NCT can circumvent problems associated with high uptake in competing non-target cell pools, as the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is activated only within the radiation field. A comparison with other modes of particle therapy indicated that NCT provides significant advantages. It is however, difficult to obtain vehicles for boron transport which demonstrate both the tumor specificity and concentration requisite for NCT. A number of biomolecules have been investigated which show both the necessary concentration and specificity. These include chlorpromazine, thiouracil, porphyrins, amino acids, and nucleosides. However, these analogs have yet to be made available for NCT. Dosimetric implications of binding sites are considered, as well as alternate neutron sources. (ERB)

  1. Treatment of malignant melanoma by selective thermal neutron capture therapy using melanoma-seeking compound

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hatta, S.; Ueda, M.; Honda, C.; Suzuki, T.

    1989-05-01

    As pigment cells undergo melanoma genesis, accentuated melanogenesis concurrently occurs in principle. Subsequent to the understanding of intrinsic factors controlling both processes, we found our selective melanoma neutron capture therapy (NCT) using 10B-dopa (melanin substrate) analogue, 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA), followed by 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction, induced by essentially harmless thermal neutrons, which releases energy of 2.33 MeV to 14 mu, the diameter of melanoma cells. In vitro/in vivo radiobiological analysis revealed the highly enhanced melanoma killing effect of 10B1-BPA. Chemical and prompt gamma ray spectrometry assays of 10B accumulated within melanoma cells after 10B1-BPA administration in vitro and in vivo show high affinity, e.g., 10B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5. After successfully eradicating melanoma transplanted into hamsters with NCT, we advanced to preclinical studies using spontaneously occurring melanoma in Duroc pig skin. We cured three melanoma cases, 4.6 to 12 cm in diameter, by single neutron capture treatment. Complete disappearance of melanoma was obtained without substantial side effects. Acute and subacute toxicity as well as pharmacodynamics of 10B1-BPA have been studied in relation to therapeutic dosage requirements. Clinical radiation dosimetry using human phantom has been carried out. Further preclinical studies using human melanoma transplanted into nude mouse have been a useful model for obtaining optimal results for each melanoma type. We recently treated the first human melanoma patient with our NCT, using essentially the method for Duroc pig melanoma, and obtained similar regression time course leading to cure.

  2. Couples Therapy: Treating Selected Personality-disordered Couples Within a Dynamic Therapy Framework

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Personality disordered couples present unique challenges for couples therapy. Novice therapists may feel daunted when taking on such a case, especially given the limited literature available to guide them in this specific area of therapy. Much of what is written on couples therapy is embedded in the larger body of literature on family therapy. While family therapy techniques may apply to couples therapy, this jump requires a level of understanding the novice therapist may not yet have. Additionally, the treatment focus within the body of literature on couples therapy tends to be situation-based (how to treat couples dealing with divorce, an affair, illness), neglecting how to treat couples whose dysfunction is not the product of a crisis, but rather a longstanding pattern escalated to the level of crisis. This is exactly the issue in therapy with personality disordered couples, and it is an important topic, as couples with personality pathology often do present for treatment. This article strives to present practical techniques, modeled in case vignettes, that can be applied directly to couples therapy— specifically therapy with personality disordered couples. PMID:24800131

  3. Calculation of dose components in head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ademir X; Crispim, Verginia R

    2002-11-01

    Application of neutrons to cancer treatment has been a subject of considerable clinical and research interest since the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick in 1932 (3). Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique of radiation oncology which is used in treating brain cancer (glioblastoma multiform) or melanoma and that consists of preferentially loading a compound containing 10B into the tumor location, followed by the irradiation of the patient with a beam of neutron. Dose distribution for BNCT is mainly based on Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, the absorbed dose spatial distribution resultant from an idealized neutron beam incident upon ahead phantom is investigated using the Monte Carlo N-particles code, MCNP 4B. The phantom model used is based on the geometry of a circular cylinder on which sits an elliptical cylinder capped by half an ellipsoid representing the neck and head, both filled with tissue-equivalent material. The neutron flux and the contribution of individual absorbed dose components, as a function of depths and of radial distance from the beam axis (dose profiles) in phantom model, is presented and discussed. For the studied beam the maximum thermal neutron flux is at a depth of 2 cm and the maximum gamma dose at a depth of 4 cm. PMID:12622057

  4. Inhibition of human pancreatic cancer growth in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagië, H.; Tomita, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujii, Y.; Nonaka, Y.; Saegusa, Y.; Hasumi, K.; Eriguchi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ono, K.

    1997-01-01

    Immunoliposomes were prepared by conjugating anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody with liposomes containing [10B]compound. These immunoliposomes were shown to bind selectively to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) bearing CEA on their surface. The cytotoxic effects of locally injected [10B]compound, multilamellar liposomes containing [10B]compound or [10B]immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with [10B]solution, 10B-containing liposomes or [10B]immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of [10B]immunoliposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with intratumoral injection of immunoliposomes is able to destroy malignant cells in the marginal portion between normal tissues and cancer tissues from the side of 4He generation. Images Figure 2 PMID:9043021

  5. Neutron capture therapy: a comparison between dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rahmani, Faezeh; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs for neutron capture therapy. A (252)Cf source was simulated to obtain its dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and total dose rates. These results were compared with previously published data. Using (252)Cf as a neutron source, the in-tumour dose enhancements in the presence of atomic (10)B, (157)Gd and (33)S agents; (10)B, (157)Gd, (33)S nanoparticles; and Bortezomib and Amifostine chemotherapy drugs were calculated and compared in neutron capture therapy. Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for simulation of the (252)Cf source, a soft tissue phantom, and a tumour containing each capture agent. Dose enhancement for 100, 200 and 500 ppm of the mentioned media was calculated. Calculated dosimetric parameters of the (252)Cf source were in agreement with previously published values. In comparison to other agents, maximum dose enhancement factor was obtained for 500 ppm of atomic (10)B agent and (10)B nanoparticles, equal to 1.06 and 1.08, respectively. Additionally, Bortezomib showed a considerable dose enhancement level. From a dose enhancement point of view, media containing (10)B are the best agents in neutron capture therapy. Bortezomib is a chemotherapy drug containing boron and can be proposed as an agent in boron neutron capture therapy. However, it should be noted that other physical, chemical and medical criteria should be considered in comparing the mentioned agents before their clinical use in neutron capture therapy. PMID:24961208

  6. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-09-03

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity.

  7. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Program for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) during March 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine, analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination, dosimetry, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, PBF operations.

  8. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  9. Clinical Efficacy of Mudpack Therapy in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jie; Wu, Dongying; Li, Jian’an

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of mudpack therapy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis and identify the likely factors associated with the high heterogeneity of combined studies. Design The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials in which mudpack therapy was used to treat knee osteoarthritis. Results Ten publications that reported the results from a total of 1010 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of improvement in joint function at the final follow-up visit suggested, given that the follow-up time was less than 4 mos, that the combined effect size of four studies was −0.30 (−0.62 to 0.02) and the difference did not reach the level of statistical significance. When the follow-up time reached 4 mos, the combined effect size was −1.10 (−2.07 to −0.14) and the difference was significant. The I2 values of the two groups were 21.4% and 93.8%. Conclusion Functional improvement of the knee joint in patients treated with mudpack therapy was not significantly different from that of control subjects at the end of the 4-mo follow-up. The quality of current publications was a factor causing heterogeneity. PMID:26203645

  10. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  11. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  12. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia successfully treated with bronchoscopic segmental lavage therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Shota; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Hara, Shintaro; Kitaichi, Masanori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    A 65-y-old Japanese man was referred to the respiratory medicine department because of abnormal radiologic findings. High-resolution chest computed tomography scans revealed a geographic distribution of ground-glass opacities and associated thickening of the interlobular septa (crazy-paving patterns) in both lower lobes. He had a habit of drinking 400-500 mL of milk and 400-800 mL of canned coffee with milk every day. A swallowing function test revealed liquid dysphagia. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology findings showed multiple lipid-laden macrophages. Taken together, these findings revealed exogenous lipoid pneumonia. We performed bronchoscopic segmental lavage therapy 3 times in the left lung. After the treatment, the radiologic findings improved in both lungs. The patient has not experienced a recurrence of lipoid pneumonia in 2 y to date. In conclusion, a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was successfully treated with bronchoscopic segmental lavage therapy. PMID:25161297

  13. Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vitzthum, Lucas K.; Brown, Lindsay C.; Rooney, Jessica W.; Foote, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas (HNSTSs) are rare and heterogeneous cancers in which radiation therapy (RT) has an important role in local tumor control (LC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes and patterns of treatment failure in patients with HNSTS treated with RT. A retrospective review was performed of adult patients with HNSTS treated with RT from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2012. LC, locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and predictors thereof were assessed. Forty-eight patients with HNSTS were evaluated. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 87, 73, 63, and 83%, respectively. Angiosarcomas were found to be associated with worse LC, LRC, DFS, and OS. Patients over the age of 60 had lower rates of DFS. HNSTSs comprise a diverse group of tumors that can be managed with various treatment regimens involving RT. Angiosarcomas have higher recurrence and mortality rates. PMID:27441072

  14. Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on Normal Liver Regeneration: Towards a Novel Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Cardoso; Elisa M. Heber; David W. Nigg; Osvaldo Calzetta; Herman Blaumann; Juan Longhino; Maria E. Itoiz; Eduardo Bumaschny; Emiliano Pozzi; Amanda E.Schwint; Verónica A. Trivillin

    2007-10-01

    The “TAORMINA project” developed a new method for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of human multifocal unresectable liver metastases based on whole liver ex-situ BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), followed by whole liver autograft. This technique involved a high risk, prolonged anhepatic phase. The Roffo Institute liver surgeons (JEC) herein propose a novel technique to pursue ex-situ liver BNCT studies with a drastically lower surgical risk for the patient. The technique would involve, sequentially, ex-situ BNCT of left liver segments II and III, partial liver autograft, and induction of partial atrophy of the untreated right liver. The working hypothesis is that the atrophy of the right, untreated, diseased liver would stimulate regeneration of the left, treated, “cured” liver to yield a healthy liver mass, allowing for the resection of the remaining portion of diseased liver. This technique does not involve an anhepatic phase and would thus pose a drastically lower surgical risk to the patient but requires sine qua non that BNCT should not impair the regenerative capacity of normal hepatocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of therapeutic doses of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 (Na2 10B10H10) or (GB- 10 + BPA) on normal liver regeneration in the Wistar rat employing partial hepatectomy as a regenerative stimulus. BNCT did not cause alterations in the outcome of normal liver regeneration, regenerated liver function or histology. We provide proof of principle to support the development of a novel, promising BNCT technique for the treatment of liver metastases.

  15. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  16. 33S for Neutron Capture Therapy: Nuclear Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Esquinas, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    A study of the nuclear data required for the Monte Carlo simulation of boron neutron capture therapy including the 33S isotope as an enhancer of the dose at small depths has been performed. In particular, the controversy on the available data for the 33S(n, α) cross section will be shown, which motivates new measurements. In addition to this, kerma factors for the main components of tissue are calculated with the use of fitting functions. Finally, we have applied these data to a potential neutron capture treatment with boron and sulfur addition to tissue in which part of the hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium, which improves the procedure.

  17. Aquapuncture Using Stem Cell Therapy to Treat Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Greyson Vitor Zanatta; Pignatari, Graciela Conceição; Rodrigues, Marcio Nogueira; Bertagnon, Heloisa Godoi; Fernandes, Isabella Rodrigues; Nascimento, Nanci; Tabosa, Angela Maria Florencio; Beltrão-Braga, Patrícia Cristina Baleeiro; Miglino, Maria Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) occurs due to genetic mutations that lead to absence or decrease of dystrophin protein generating progressive muscle degeneration. Cell therapy using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) has been described as a treatment to DMD. In this work, MSC derived from deciduous teeth, called stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), were injected in acupoint as an alternative therapy to minimize muscle degeneration in twenty-two mdx mice. The treatment occurred three times with intervals of 21 days, and animals were analyzed four times: seven days prior treatment (T-7); 10 days after first treatment (T10); 10 days after second treatment (T31); and 10 days after third treatment (T52). Animals were evaluated by wire test for estimate strength and blood was collected to perform a creatinine phosphokinase analysis. After euthanasia, cranial tibial muscles were collected and submitted to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Treated groups presented improvement of strength and reduced creatinine phosphokinase levels. Also, a slight dystrophin increase was observed in tibial cranial muscle when aquapuncture was associated SHED. All therapies have minimized muscle degeneration, but the association of aquapuncture with SHED appears to have better effect, reducing muscle damage, suggesting a therapeutic value. PMID:26074983

  18. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  19. Trend of Pharmacopuncture Therapy for Treating Cervical Disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hee; Jung, Da-Jung; Choi, Yoo-Min; Kim, Jong-Uk; Yook, Tae-Han

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to analyze trends in domestic studies on pharmacopuncture therapy for treating cervical disease. Methods: This study was carried out on original copies and abstracts of theses listed in databases or published until July 2014. The search was made on the Oriental medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS) the National Digital Science Library (NDSL), and the Korean traditional knowledge portal. Search words were ‘pain on cervical spine’, ‘cervical pain’, ‘ruptured cervical disk’, ‘cervical disc disorder’, ‘stiffness of the neck’, ‘cervical disk’, ‘whiplash injury’, ‘cervicalgia’, ‘posterior cervical pain’, ‘neck disability’, ‘Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP)’, and ‘Herniated Intervertebral Disc (HIVD)’. Results: Twenty-five clinical theses related to pharmacopuncture were selected and were analyzed by year according to the type of pharmacopuncture used, the academic journal in which the publication appeared, and the effect of pharmacopuncture therapy. Conclusion: The significant conclusions are as follows: (1) Pharmacopunctures used for cervical pain were Bee venom pharmacopuncture, Carthami-flos pharmacopuncture, Scolopendra pharmacopuncture, Ouhyul pharmacopuncturen, Hwangryun pharmacopuncture, Corpus pharmacopuncture, Soyeom pharmacopuncture, Hwangryunhaedoktang pharmacopuncture, Shinbaro phamacopuncture. (2) Randomized controlled trials showed that pharmacopuncture therapy combined with other methods was more effective. (3) In the past, studies oriented toward Bee venom pharmacopuncture were actively pursued, but the number of studies on various other types of pharmacopuncture gradually began to increase. (4) For treating a patient with cervical pain, the type of pharmacopuncture to be used should be selected based on the cause of the disease and the patient’s condition. PMID:25780714

  20. Optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Thomasz, Lisa M.Sc.; Longhino, Juan; Perona, Marina; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Rebagliati, Raul Jimenez; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the possible increase in efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) by using p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) plus 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (BOPP) and BPA plus nicotinamide (NA) as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT reaction. Methods and Materials: Nude mice were transplanted with a human UTC cell line (ARO), and after 15 days they were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) NCT (neutrons alone), (3) NCT plus NA (100 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day for 3 days), (4) BPA (350 mg/kg bw) + neutrons, (5) BPA + NA + neutrons, and (6) BPA + BOPP (60 mg/kg bw) + neutrons. The flux of the mixed (thermal + epithermal) neutron beam was 2.8 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/sec for 83.4 min. Results: Neutrons alone or with NA caused some tumor growth delay, whereas in the BPA, BPA + NA, and BPA + BOPP groups a 100% halt of tumor growth was observed in all mice at 26 days after irradiation. When the initial tumor volume was 50 mm{sup 3} or less, complete remission was found with BPA + NA (2 of 2 mice), BPA (1 of 4), and BPA + BOPP (7 of 7). After 90 days of complete regression, recurrence of the tumor was observed in BPA + NA (2 of 2) and BPA + BOPP (1 of 7). The determination of apoptosis in tumor samples by measurements of caspase-3 activity showed an increase in the BNCT (BPA + NA) group at 24 h (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and after the first week after irradiation in the three BNCT groups. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis confirmed these results. Conclusions: Although NA combined with BPA showed an increase of apoptosis at early times, only the group irradiated after the combined administration of BPA and BOPP showed a significantly improved therapeutic response.

  1. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  2. Power burst facility/boron neutron capture therapy program for cancer treatment. [Borocaptate sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-11-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program in November, 1990 are described. One of our major projects is support of technological development. In this area, progress has been seen in gross boron analysis of biological samples, higher purity borocaptate sodium (BSH), planning of experiments to investigate BSH biochemistry and oxidation products, bidding out for an ion microscope to investigate subcellular distribution of boron, and reduction of the gamma field in the irradiation room due to addition of lithiated polyethylene shielding. No progress was made on noninvasive boron quantitation, because the MRI system used is being upgraded, and the boron MR software must be rewritten. Brandy'' Hoff, a canine patient in the Large Animal Model studies, passed her one year physical and neurological exam. Three of the last four dogs treated for spontaneous brain tumors are doing well. Researchers at the University of Utah are planning human pharmacokinetic studies of BSH. BSH and BSS uptake in exemptions of terminal glioblastoma patients will be investigated. Layout and planning of tasks to begin PBF/BNCT Program reactor modifications have been initiated. The final design review for the bismuth reflector core partition sheet and lower orifice plate was completed on November 20, 1990. Agreements with DOE-ID relating to expenditure of the $13M for the PBF/BNCT Program have been reached. A review of the program by the National Academy of Science was requested by Admiral Watkins and took place in Washington, DC on November 5, 1990. This progress report also contains a summary of the 1990 accomplishments within the melanoma project. 2 figs. (MHB)

  3. Exploring Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Farías, Rubén O; Bortolussi, Silva; Menéndez, Pablo R; González, Sara J

    2014-12-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high LET radiation. It consists in the enrichment of tumour with (10)B and in the successive irradiation of the target with low energy neutrons producing charged particles that mainly cause non-repairable damages to the cells. The feasibility to treat Non Small Cells Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with BNCT was explored. This paper proposes a new approach to determine treatment plans, introducing the possibility to choose the irradiation start and duration to maximize the tumour dose. A Tumour Control Probability (TCP) suited for lung BNCT as well as other high dose radiotherapy schemes was also introduced. Treatment plans were evaluated in localized and disseminated lung tumours. Semi-ideal and real energy spectra beams were employed to assess the best energy range and the performance of non-tailored neutron sources for lung tumour treatments. The optimal neutron energy is within [500 eV-3 keV], lower than the 10 keV suggested for the treatment of deep-seated tumours in the brain. TCPs higher than 0.6 and up to 0.95 are obtained for all cases. Conclusions drawn from [Suzuki et al., Int Canc Conf J 1 (4) (2012) 235-238] supporting the feasibility of BNCT for shallow lung tumours are confirmed, however discussions favouring the treatment of deeper lesions and disseminated disease are also opened. Since BNCT gives the possibility to deliver a safe and potentially effective treatment for NSCLC, it can be considered a suitable alternative for patients with few or no treatment options. PMID:25176019

  4. Design and preparation of ethyl cellulose microcapsules of gadopentetate dimeglumine for neutron-capture therapy using the Wurster process.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Y; Ichikawa, H; Tokumitsu, H; Miyamoto, M; Jono, K; Kanamori, R; Akine, Y; Tokita, N

    1993-06-01

    Microcapsules of hygroscopic, highly water-soluble gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA-DM) for use in preliminary in vivo experiments for neutron-capture therapy were designed. They were prepared with such properties as a particle size small enough to be suspended and injected through a syringe, a negligible release of Gd-DTPA-DM, and a high drug content by means of the Wurster process, a spray coating method using a spouted bed with a draft tube. They were composed of lactose cores of 53-63 microm, an undercoat of ethyl cellulose (EC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a drug-layer of Gd-DTPA-DM, EC and PVP, a waterproof coat and a release-sustaining overcoat of EC and cholesterol (1:1), and a surface treated with hydrogenated egg lecithin. By curing at 110 degrees C for 30 min after mixing with 20% pulverized mannitol powder, the 20% overcoating suppressed the release of Gd-DTPA-DM from 75-106 microm microcapsules to less than 10% for the first 20 min, which was the period required to prepare a suspension, inject it and irradiate the neutron. The microcapsules could be used to confirm that the intracellular presence of Gd is not critical in gadolinium neutron-capture therapy. PMID:8370113

  5. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality. PMID:18439836

  6. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-05-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- routine operations continue. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Improvement of depth dose distribution using multiple-field irradiation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, N; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Takata, T; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Kinashi, Y; Masunaga, S; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K; Suzuki, M

    2015-12-01

    It is important that improvements are made to depth dose distribution in boron neutron capture therapy, because the neutrons do not reach the innermost regions of the human body. Here, we evaluated the dose distribution obtained using multiple-field irradiation in simulation. From a dose volume histogram analysis, it was found that the mean and minimum tumor doses were increased using two-field irradiation, because of improved dose distribution for deeper-sited tumors. PMID:26282566

  8. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  9. Carboranyl amino acids for the specific neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.

    1991-01-15

    We are pleased to summarize the very significant progress made since our last report dated April 6, 1990. Significant progress has been made toward our twin objectives of both the steroselective and non-steroselective synthesis of carborane-containing amino acids for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma. Additionally, we have developed a new, general procedure for the synthesis of a variety of {alpha}-amino acids which may find wide applicability in this area. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  11. Treating the untreatable: a single case study of a psychopathic inpatient treated with schema therapy.

    PubMed

    Chakhssi, Farid; Kersten, Truus; de Ruiter, Corine; Bernstein, David P

    2014-09-01

    From its first conceptualization in modern psychiatry, psychopathy has been considered difficult if not impossible to treat. Schema Therapy (ST) is a psychotherapeutic approach that has shown efficacy in patients with borderline personality disorder. ST has recently been adapted for personality disordered forensic patients, including patients with high levels of psychopathy. The present case study examined the process of individual ST, combined with movement therapy and milieu therapy by the nursing staff, with a forensic inpatient with psychopathic features (Psychopathy Checklist-Revised total score = 28.4). The patient had been sentenced to a mandatory treatment order in relation to a sexual assault. We assessed change using independent assessments of psychopathic traits, cognitive schemas, and risk-related behaviors over the 4-year treatment period and a 3-year follow-up. We also assessed the quality of the working alliance. Reliable change analyses showed significant improvements in psychopathic traits, cognitive schemas, and risk-related outcomes. At 3 years posttreatment, the patient was living independently outside of the forensic institution without judicial supervision and he had not reoffended. While many questions remain about the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic treatment for psychopathic patients, our study challenges the view that they are untreatable. PMID:24684220

  12. Carcinoma of the nasal vestibule treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Parsons, J.T.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Twenty-two patients with squamous carcinoma of the nasal vestibule were treated at the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy with curative intent. Fifteen lesions were de novo and seven recurrent after surgery. By AJCC classification, 7 lesions were Tx or T1, 2 were T2, 2 were T3, and 11 were T4. Management of the primary tumor and regional lymphatic drainage was highly individualized. Local control was achieved in 19 out of 22 lesions. The ultimate regional lymph node control rate was 22 out of 22, although two patients required radical neck dissection after development of lymph node disease in untreated regional lymphatics. Two patients have died of cancer and three of intercurrent disease. Cosmetic results are generally excellent but may be compromised by previous surgery in recurrent lesions or tumor destruction of normal tissues in advanced lesions. Complications of treatment are minimal.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: treating a systemic disease with systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Walsh, R Matthew; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Khorana, Alok A

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, even when resectable, remains highly lethal. Although surgical outcomes have improved considerably, median overall survival after surgery and adjuvant therapy such as single-agent gemcitabine remains less than 2 years. We discuss preclinical and clinical data supporting the contention that even early-stage pancreatic cancer is a systemic disease. Autopsy series reveal that 70% to 85% of patients die of systemic recurrence, rather than local disease, after pancreatic cancer resection. Preclinical studies using genomics and mouse models reveal evidence of metastatic spread even before histopathologic evidence of a pancreatic tumor. Analogous to breast cancer, we propose that the Halstedian approach of treating pancreatic cancer as a local, surgical problem should be replaced by Fisher's alternative hypothesis of cancer as a systemic disease. Newer multiagent chemotherapy regimens have shown meaningful response rates and improvement in overall survival in the metastatic setting and, for the first time, offer investigators an opportunity to use effective systemic therapy. We emphasize that a surgery-first approach is not resonant with our current understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinoma biology and that an upfront systemic approach for even resectable pancreatic cancer warrants testing in clinical trials. PMID:24563516

  14. A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy. Part I. High-resolution quantitative autoradiography applied to microdosimetry in neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, G.R.; Zamenhof, R.G. |

    1995-10-01

    A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy has been developed using high-resolution quantitative autoradiography (HRQAR) and two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation. This approach has been applied using actual cell morophology (nuclear and cytoplasmic cell structures) and the measured microdistribution of boron-10 in a transplanted murine brain tumor (GL261) containing p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron compound. The 2D Monte Carlo transport code for the {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions has been developed as a surrogate to a full 3D approach to calculate a variety of different microdosimetric parameters. The HRQAR method and the surrogate 2D Monte Carlo approach are described in detail and examples of their use are presented. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  16. A rationale for treating leg length discrepancy using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Johnson, Crystal; Diab, Mohammed; Wilson, Brian C.; Burch, Shane

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in regulating bone development with a view to its potential role in treating Juvenile leg length discrepancy (LLD). Transgenic mice expressing the luciferase firefly gene upon activation of a promoter sequence specific to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene were subject to benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid (BPD-MA)-mediated PDT in the right, tibial epiphyseal growth plate at the age of 3 weeks. BPD-MA was administered intracardially (2mg/kg) followed 10 mins later by a laser light (690 +/- 5 nm) at a range of doses (5-27J, 50 mW output) delivered either as a single or repeat regimen (x2-3). Contra-lateral legs served as no-light controls. Further controls included animals that received light treatment in the absence of photosensitizer or no treatment. Mice were imaged for VEGF related bioluminescence (photons/sec/steradian) at t= 0, 24, 48, 72 h and 1-4 weeks post PDT. FaxitronTM x-ray images provided accurate assessment of bone morphometry. Upon sacrifice, the tibia and femur of the treated and untreated limbs were harvested, imaged and measured again and prepared for histology. A number of animals were sacrificed at 24 h post PDT to allow immunohistochemical staining for CD31, VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 alpha) within the bone. PDT-treated (10 J, x2) mice displayed enhanced bioluminescence at the treatment site (and ear nick) for up to 4 weeks post treatment while control mice were bioluminescent at the ear-nick site only. Repeat regimens provided greater shortening of the limb than the corresponding single treatment. PDT-treated limbs were shorter by 3-4 mm on average as compared to the contra lateral and light only controls (10 J, x2). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the enhanced expression VEGF and CD31 at 4 weeks post-treatment although no increase in HIF-1α was evident at either 24 h or 4 weeks post PDT treatment. Results confirm the utility of PDT to provide localized

  17. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonglu

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm2 treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm2 collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm 10B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm2 fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm2 collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm2 tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm 10B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in the head phantom for the 5.0-cm thick

  18. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in

  19. Cardiac metastases of neuroendocrine tumors treated with 177Lu DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or 131I-MIBG therapy.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Bryanton, Mark; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have a propensity to metastasize to the heart, although the reason for this remains unknown. A review of 251 neuroendocrine tumor patients treated with Lu DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or I-MIBG therapy at our institution since 2003 revealed 2 patients with cardiac metastases (incidence, 0.8%), one treated with Lu DOTATATE and one with I-MIBG. We present the imaging findings of these 2 patients, as well as their management and responses to therapy. PMID:26359563

  20. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, {alpha})7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,{gamma})2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  2. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  3. Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Petten, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Daquino, G. G.; Moss, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiotherapy for the treatment of tumour lesions. Since the cancer cells in the treatment volume are targeted with 10B, a higher dose is given to these cancer cells due to the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction, in comparison with the surrounding healthy cells. In Petten (The Netherlands), at the High Flux Reactor, a specially tailored neutron beam has been designed and installed. Over 30 patients have been treated with BNCT in 2 clinical protocols: a phase I study for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and a phase II study on the treatment of malignant melanoma. Furthermore, activities concerning the extra-corporal treatment of metastasis in the liver (from colorectal cancer) are in progress. The irradiation beam at the HFR contains both neutrons and gammas that, together with the complex geometries of both patient and beam set-up, demands for very detailed treatment planning calculations. A well designed Treatment Planning System (TPS) should obey the following general scheme: (1) a pre-processing phase (CT and/or MRI scans to create the geometric solid model, cross-section files for neutrons and/or gammas); (2) calculations (3D radiation transport, estimation of neutron and gamma fluences, macroscopic and microscopic dose); (3) post-processing phase (displaying of the results, iso-doses and -fluences). Treatment planning in BNCT is performed making use of Monte Carlo codes incorporated in a framework, which includes also the pre- and post-processing phases. In particular, the glioblastoma multiforme protocol used BNCT_rtpe, while the melanoma metastases protocol uses NCTPlan. In addition, an ad hoc Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based treatment planning system (BDTPS) has been implemented in order to integrate the real macroscopic boron distribution obtained from PET scanning. BDTPS is patented and uses MCNP as the calculation engine. The precision obtained by the Monte Carlo based TPSs exploited at Petten

  4. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J.

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  5. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV {gamma}-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry.

  6. LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray detector for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, M.; Shmanin, E.; Galavanov, A.; Shustov, A.; Ulin, S.; Vlasik, K.; Dmitrenko, V.; Novikov, A.; Orlov, A.; Petrenko, D.; Shmurak, S.; Uteshev, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Results of developing of a gamma-ray detector based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillation crystal for neutron capture therapy are presented. An energy resolution of the detector measured by photomultiplier tube Hamamatsu R6233-100 is showed. It was 2.93% for gamma line 662 keV from a source 137Cs. For radiative capture gamma line of isotope 10B (478 keV) and annihilation line (511 keV) the values were 3.33 and 3.24% respectively. Data analysis of gamma spectra for an estimation of energy resolution threshold required for visual identification gamma lines 478 and 511 keV was made.

  7. {sup 33}S for Neutron Capture Therapy: Nuclear Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, I.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Esquinas, P.L.

    2014-06-15

    A study of the nuclear data required for the Monte Carlo simulation of boron neutron capture therapy including the {sup 33}S isotope as an enhancer of the dose at small depths has been performed. In particular, the controversy on the available data for the {sup 33}S(n, α) cross section will be shown, which motivates new measurements. In addition to this, kerma factors for the main components of tissue are calculated with the use of fitting functions. Finally, we have applied these data to a potential neutron capture treatment with boron and sulfur addition to tissue in which part of the hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium, which improves the procedure.

  8. Deformity incidence in leprosy patients treated with multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Subramanian, M; Subramanian, G

    1994-01-01

    The records of 2,285 (2,007 paucibacillary (PB) and 278 multibacillary (MB)) cases of leprosy which were declared as released from treatment (RFT) after multidrug therapy (MDT) and under surveillance as per the National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP) guidelines in the rural field practice area of Central Leprosy Teaching & Research Institute (CLTRI), Chengalpattu, between September 1986 and September 1993 were analyzed for collecting data on the incidence of deformity. Of the 2,285 cases 2,053 (1,947 PB and 106 MB) did not have deformity at the commencement of treatment. Three MB cases and one PB case out of the 2,053 developed deformity (all grade II) during the course of treatment. No patient developed deformity during surveillance. Thus the deformity incidence in the population of patients was 0.681 per 1000 person-years of observation. Age, sex, type of disease, prior dapsone monotherapy and nerve involvement at the commencement of treatment appear to influence the deformity incidence. The risk of development of deformity in patients treated with MDT appear to be very low and analysis of larger data sets is suggested to corroborate the above findings as the information would be useful for planning prevention and management of deformity services. PMID:7714354

  9. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Parsons, J.T.; Vogel, S.B.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    This is an analysis of 34 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy with curative intent at the University of Florida between September 1966 and May 1985. All patients have a minimum 2-year follow-up and 28 (82%) have at least 5 years of follow-up. Patients were staged according to the recommendations of the AJCC. Patients who died within 2 years of treatment with the primary site continuously disease-free were excluded from the local control analysis; all patients were included in the analysis of complications and survival. Irradiation resulted in control of the primary lesion in 1 of 2 patients who presented with T1 lesions, in 4 of the 12 patients with T2 lesions, and 3 of 17 patients who presented with T3 lesions. One patient with a T3 lesion that recurred locally was successfully salvaged by an operation. The 5-year absolute survival rates by stage were as follows: no patients with stage I lesions survived; of 11 stage II patients, one survived; and of 16 stage III patients, three survived. Interestingly, all four of the 5-year survivors were women.

  10. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  11. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Jo Hong, Key; Suk Suh, Tae

    2014-02-01

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  12. Improved performance in synthetic diamond neutron detectors: Application to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal and fast neutrons detector is obtained, modifying a recently proposed multilayered homoepitaxial Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond detector (M. Marinelli, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 (2006) 143509), where a 6LiF layer deposited on the sensing layer was used to convert thermal neutrons into charged particles. By sandwiching this layer between two CVD diamond detectors connected in parallel, a better signal-to-background separation is achieved. This allows to use 10B as converting element, so to realize a detector suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy dosimetry. Also, the doubled detector volume enhances the sensitivity to fast neutrons.

  13. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  14. Boron containing magnetic nanoparticles for neutron capture therapy--an innovative approach for specifically targeting tumors.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Dürr, Stephan; Lyer, Stefan; Canella, Lea; Kudejova, Petra; Wagner, Franz M; Petry, Winfried; Taccardi, Nicola; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    The selective delivery of (10)B into the tumor tissue remains to be further improved for successful and reliable Boron Neutron Capture Therapy applications. Magnetic Drug Targeting using intraarterially administered superparamagnetic nanoparticles and external magnetic fields already exhibited convincing results in terms of highly efficient and selective drug deposition. Using the same technique for the targeted (10)B delivery is a promising new approach. Here, systematic irradiation experiments of phantom cubes containing different concentrations of boron and nanoparticles as well as varying three-dimensional arrangements have been performed. PMID:26242559

  15. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key

    2014-02-24

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  16. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-06-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,l-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. PMID:24447933

  17. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  19. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  20. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martin, G.

    2008-08-11

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT.

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, α) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg 10B/g blood.

  2. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martín, G.

    2008-08-01

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT

  3. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  4. a New Method for Neutron Capture Therapy (nct) and Related Simulation by MCNP4C Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Mousavi; Alireza, Seyed; Ali, Taheri

    2010-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is enumerated as one of the most important methods for treatment of some strong maladies among cancers in medical science thus is unavoidable controlling and protecting instances in use of this science. Among of treatment instances of this maladies with use of nuclear medical science is use of neutron therapy that is one of the most important and effective methods in treatment of cancers. But whereas fast neutrons have too destroyer effects and also sake of protection against additional absorbed energy (absorbed dose) by tissue during neutron therapy and also naught damaging to rest of healthy tissues, should be measured absorbed energy by tissue accurately, because destroyer effects of fast neutrons is almost quintuple more than gamma photons. In this article for neutron therapy act of male's liver has been simulated a system by the Monte Carlo method (MCNP4C code) and also with use of analytical method, thus absorbed dose by this tissue has been obtained for sources with different energies accurately and has been compared results of this two methods together.

  5. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  6. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schaffran, Tanja; Jiang, Nan; Bergmann, Markus; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Süss, Regine; Schubert, Rolf; Wagner, Franz M; Awad, Doaa; Gabel, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma). With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14), the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids precludes their use in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25114527

  7. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Distressed Couples: A Case Study With Two Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.; Feingold, Tal; Davidson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Although the field of couple therapy has made significant strides in recent years, there continues to be a need for theoretically sound and empirically supported treatments. The current case study examines whether Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), an experiential acceptance-based behavior therapy, can be effective in treating distressed…

  8. Using Music Therapy Techniques To Treat Teacher Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, James R.; Bradley, Loretta J.; Parr, Gerald; Lan, William

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of music therapy techniques as an intervention for teacher burnout. Results of the study indicated that teachers who participated in school-based counseling groups, using music therapy techniques in conjunction with cognitive behavioral interventions, reported lower levels of burnout symptoms…

  9. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  10. A coupled deterministic/stochastic method for computing neutron capture therapy dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Thomas Richard

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is an experimental method of treating brain tumors and other cancers by: (1) injecting or infusing the patient with a tumor-seeking, neutron target-labeled drug; and (2) irradiating the patient in an intense epithermal neutron fluence. The nuclear reaction between the neutrons and the target nuclei (e.g. sp{10}B(n,alpha)sp7Lirbrack releases energy in the form of high-LET (i.e. energy deposited within the range of a cell diameter) reaction particles which selectively kill the tumor cell. The efficacy of NCT is partly dependent on the delivery of maximum thermal neutron fluence to the tumor and the minimization of radiation dose to healthy tissue. Since the filtered neutron source (e.g. research reactor) usually provides a broad energy spectrum of highly-penetrating neutron and gamma-photon radiation, detailed transport calculations are necessary in order to plan treatments that use optimal treatment facility configurations and patient positioning. Current computational methods for NCT use either discrete ordinates calculation or, more often, Monte Carlo simulation to predict neutron fluences in the vicinity of the tumor. These methods do not, however, accurately calculate the transport of radiation throughout the entire facility or the deposition of dose in all the various parts of the body due to shortcomings of using either method alone. A computational method, specifically designed for NCT problems, has been adapted from the MASH methodology and couples a forward discrete ordinates (Ssb{n}) calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo run to predict the dose at any point within the patient. The transport from the source through the filter/collimator is performed with a forward DORT run, and this is then coupled to adjoint MORSE results at a selected coupling parallelepiped which surrounds human phantom. Another routine was written to allow the user to generate the MORSE models at various angles and positions within the treatment room. The

  11. Unorthodox Alternative Therapies Marketed to Treat Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Shapiro, Eugene D.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Baker, Phillip J.; Halperin, John J.; McSweegan, Edward; Wormser, Gary P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some patients with medically unexplained symptoms or alternative medical diagnoses suspect that they chronically suffer from the tick-borne infection Lyme disease. These patients are commonly targeted by providers of alternative therapies. This study was designed to identify and characterize the range of unorthodox alternative therapies advertised to patients with a diagnosis of Lyme disease. Methods. Internet searches using the Google search engine were performed to identify the websites of clinics and services that marketed nonantimicrobial therapies for Lyme disease. We subsequently used the PubMed search engine to identify any scientific studies evaluating such treatments for Lyme disease. Websites were included in our review so long as they advertised a commercial, nonantimicrobial product or service that specifically mentioned utility for Lyme disease. Websites with patient testimonials (such as discussion groups) were excluded unless the testimonial appeared as marketing on a commercial site. Results. More than 30 alternative treatments were identified, which fell into several broad categories: these included oxygen and reactive oxygen therapy; energy and radiation-based therapies; nutritional therapy; chelation and heavy metal therapy; and biological and pharmacological therapies ranging from certain medications without recognized therapeutic effects on Borrelia burgdorgeri to stem cell transplantation. Review of the medical literature did not substantiate efficacy or, in most cases, any rationale for the advertised treatments. Conclusions. Providers of alternative therapies commonly target patients who believe they have Lyme disease. The efficacy of these unconventional treatments for Lyme disease is not supported by scientific evidence, and in many cases they are potentially harmful. PMID:25852124

  12. A microdosimetric study of {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.C.; Sutton, M.; Evans, T.M.; Laster, B.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the most interesting cell survival experiment recently performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this experiment, the cells were first treated with a gadolinium (Gd) labeled tumor-seeking boronated porphyrin (Gd-BOPP) or with BOPP alone, and then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The resulting cell-survival curves indicate that the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions are very effective in cell killing. The death of a cell treated with Gd-BOPP was attributed to either the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions or the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions (or both). However, the quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell-survival fraction was not clear. This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the BNL experiment based on the measured experimental parameters, and the results clearly suggest a quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction. The results also suggest new research in gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) which may lead to a more practical modality than the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treating cancers.

  13. A microdosimetric study of {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.C.; Sutton, M.; Evans, T.M.; Laster, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the most interesting cell survival experiment recently performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this experiment, the cells were first treated with a gadolinium (Gd) labeled tumor-seeking boronated porphyrin (Gd-BOPP) or with BOPP alone, and then irradiated with thermal neutrons. The resulting cell survival curves indicate that the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions is very effective in cell killing. The death of a cell treated with GD-BOPP were attributed to either the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) {sup 7}Li reactions or the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reactions (or both). However, the quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction was not clear. This paper presents the microdosimetric analysis for the BNL experiment based on the measured experimental parameters, and the results clearly suggest a quantitative relationship between the two types of reaction and the cell survival fraction. The results also suggest new research in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GDNCT) which may lead to a more practical modality than the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treating cancers.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a new approach for clear cell sarcoma (CCS) treatment: Trial using a lung metastasis model of CCS.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Minoru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Sakuma, Toshiko; Sasai, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Akisue, Toshihiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In the present study, we established a lung metastasis animal model of CCS and investigated the therapeutic effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA). Biodistribution data revealed tumor-selective accumulation of (10)B. Unlike conventional gamma-ray irradiation, BNCT significantly suppressed tumor growth without damaging normal tissues, suggesting that it may be a potential new therapeutic option to treat CCS lung metastases. PMID:26337135

  15. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  16. Emerging Therapies Offer New Methods For Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Russek, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The approvals of abatacept and rituximab have invigorated the already competitive market for biologic RA treatments. The new generation of RA therapies now reaching the market presents opportunities for patients – and challenges for payers. PMID:23424348

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of spontaneous nasal planum squamous cell carcinoma in felines.

    PubMed

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Heber, Elisa M; Rao, Monica; Cantarelli, María A; Itoiz, Maria E; Nigg, David W; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan; Schwint, Amanda E

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was successfully applied to treat experimental squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the hamster cheek pouch mucosa, with no damage to normal tissue. It was also shown that treating spontaneous nasal planum SCC in terminal feline patients with low dose BNCT is safe and feasible. In an extension of this work, the present study aimed at evaluation of the response of tumor and dose-limiting normal tissues to potentially therapeutic BNCT doses. Biodistribution studies with (10)B-boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in (10)B) as a (10)B carrier were performed on three felines that showed advanced nasal planum SCC without any standard therapeutic option. Following the biodistribution studies, BNCT mediated by (10)BPA was done using the thermalized epithermal neutron beam at the RA-6 Nuclear Reactor. Follow-up included clinical evaluation, assessment of macroscopic tumor and normal tissue response and biopsies for histopathological analysis. The treated animals did not show any apparent radiation-induced toxicity. All three animals exhibited partial tumor control and an improvement in clinical condition. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy was associated with a high (10)B content of the tumor and a small tumor size. BNCT is therefore believed to be potentially effective in the treatment of spontaneous SCC. However, improvement in targeting (10)B into all tumor cells and delivering a sufficient dose at a greater depth are still required for the treatment of deep-seated, large tumors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of the dual mode cellular (e.g. BPA-BNCT) and vascular (e.g. GB-10-BNCT) targeting protocol in a preclinical scenario, employing combinations of (10)B compounds with different properties and complementary uptake mechanisms. PMID:17955256

  18. A Sealed-Accelerator-Tube Neutron Generator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.-N.; Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.; Verbeke, J.M.; Vurjic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-06-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator applications. By using a 2.5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source and a computer designed 100 keV accelerator column, peak extractable hydrogen current exceeding 1 A from a 3-mm-diameter aperture, together with H{sup +} yields over 94% have been achieved. These experimental findings together with recent moderator design will enable one to develop compact 14 MeV neutron generators based on the D-T fusion reaction. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without pumping. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, it is estimated that a treatment time of {approx} 45 minutes is needed for boron neutron capture therapy.

  19. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-05-15

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  20. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Greenberg, D.; Micca, P.L.; Joel, D.D.; Saraf, S. ); Packer, S. . Div. of Ophthalmology)

    1990-01-01

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of {sup 10}B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-04-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; operator training was conducted and pharmacokinetic data obtained using a laboratory dog; dosimetry development continues on real-time neutron and gamma monitoring to provide treatment control capability; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation -- PBF upgrades, required for environmental, safety, and OSHA compliance, continue; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- training, safety, and preventive maintenance activities continue. 3 figs.

  3. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. PMID:26242558

  4. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  5. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  6. Hybrid data capture for monitoring patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in urban Botswana.

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Hermann; Wester, C. William; Ndwapi, Ndwapi; Vanderwarker, Chris; Gaolathe, Tendani; Tirelo, Geoffrey; Avalos, Ava; Moffat, Howard; Marlink, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    Individual patient care and programme evaluation are pivotal for the success of antiretroviral treatment programmes in resource-limited countries. While computer-aided documentation and data storage are indispensable for any large programme, several important issues need to be addressed including which data are to be collected, who collects it and how it is entered into an electronic database. We describe a patient-monitoring approach, which uses patient encounter forms (in hybrid paper + electronic format) based on optical character recognition, piloted at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana's first public highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) outpatient clinic. Our novel data capture approach collects "key" data for tracking patient and programme outcomes. It saves physician time and does not detract from clinical care. PMID:16501730

  7. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  8. Imaging of boron in tissue at the cellular level for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Arlinghaus, H F; Spaar, M T; Switzer, R C; Kabalka, G W

    1997-08-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme, and other tumors involving the brain, are undergoing experimental treatment with a promising new technique: boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT relies on the capture of thermal neutrons by boron deposited biochemically in the tumor and the subsequent fission of the boron into energetic lithium ions and alpha particles. An important requirement for improved BNCT is the development of more selective boron delivery mechanisms. The ability to image the boron concentration in tissue sections and even inside individual cells would be an important aid in the development of these delivery mechanisms. We have compared both sputter-initiated resonance ionization microprobe (SIRIMP), which combines resonance ionization with a high-energy pulsed focused sputter ion beam and mass spectrometric detection of ions, with laser atomization resonance ionization microprobe (LARIMP), which uses a laser pulse instead of an ion pulse for the atomization process, to determine their characteristics in locating and quantifying boron concentrations as a function of position in tissues obtained from a rat which had been infused with a BNCT drug. The data show that the SIRIMP/LARIMP techniques are well suited for quantitative and ultrasensitive imaging of boron trace element concentrations in biological tissue sections. The LARIMP mode could be used to quickly determine the spatial boron concentration with intercellular resolution over large areas down to the low nanograms-per-gram level, while the SIRIMP mode could be used to determine the spatial boron concentration and its variability in intracellular areas. PMID:9271061

  9. Epithermal neutron beams from the 7 Li(p,n) reaction near the threshold for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Pedrosa, M.; Esquinas, P.; L. Jiménez-Bonilla, P.

    2016-11-01

    Two applications for neutron capture therapy of epithermal neutron beams calculated from the 7Li ( p , n reaction are discussed. In particular, i) for a proton beam of 1920 keV of a 30 mA, a neutron beam of adequate features for BNCT is found at an angle of 80° from the forward direction; and ii) for a proton beam of 1910 keV, a neutron beam is obtained at the forward direction suitable for performing radiobiology experiments for the determination of the biological weighting factors of the fast dose component in neutron capture therapy.

  10. The role of metabolic therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Maroon, Joseph C; Seyfried, Thomas N; Donohue, Joseph P; Bost, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive and nearly uniformly fatal malignancy of the central nervous system. Despite extensive research and clinical trials over the past 50 years, very little progress has been made to significantly alter its lethal prognosis. The current standard of care (SOC) includes maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy and chemotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ), including the selective use of glucocorticoids for symptom control. These same treatments, however, have the potential to create an environment that may actually facilitate tumor growth and survival. Research investigating the unique metabolic needs of tumor cells has led to the proposal of a new metabolic treatment for various cancers including GBMs that may enhance the effectiveness of the SOC. The goal of metabolic cancer therapy is to restrict GBM cells of glucose, their main energy substrate. By recognizing the underlying energy production requirements of cancer cells, newly proposed metabolic therapy is being used as an adjunct to standard GBM therapies. This review will discuss the calorie restricted ketogenic diet (CR-KD) as a promising potential adjunctive metabolic therapy for patients with GBMs. The effectiveness of the CR-KD is based on the "Warburg Effect" of cancer metabolism and the microenvironment of GBM tumors. We will review recent case reports, clinical studies, review articles, and animal model research using the CR-KD and explain the principles of the Warburg Effect as it relates to CR-KD and GBMs. PMID:25949849

  11. The role of metabolic therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Maroon, Joseph C.; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Donohue, Joseph P.; Bost, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive and nearly uniformly fatal malignancy of the central nervous system. Despite extensive research and clinical trials over the past 50 years, very little progress has been made to significantly alter its lethal prognosis. The current standard of care (SOC) includes maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy and chemotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ), including the selective use of glucocorticoids for symptom control. These same treatments, however, have the potential to create an environment that may actually facilitate tumor growth and survival. Research investigating the unique metabolic needs of tumor cells has led to the proposal of a new metabolic treatment for various cancers including GBMs that may enhance the effectiveness of the SOC. The goal of metabolic cancer therapy is to restrict GBM cells of glucose, their main energy substrate. By recognizing the underlying energy production requirements of cancer cells, newly proposed metabolic therapy is being used as an adjunct to standard GBM therapies. This review will discuss the calorie restricted ketogenic diet (CR-KD) as a promising potential adjunctive metabolic therapy for patients with GBMs. The effectiveness of the CR-KD is based on the “Warburg Effect” of cancer metabolism and the microenvironment of GBM tumors. We will review recent case reports, clinical studies, review articles, and animal model research using the CR-KD and explain the principles of the Warburg Effect as it relates to CR-KD and GBMs. PMID:25949849

  12. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  13. Treating Inhibited Sexual Desire: A Marital Therapy Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Defines inhibited sexual desire (ISD) as a relational phenomenon best treated in the marital context. Discusses ISD as it relates to the central marital issues of power, intimacy, and boundaries. (JAC)

  14. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  15. A Project of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System based on a Proton Linac Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshikai; Asano, Kenji; Arakawa, Akihiro; Fukuchi, Shin; Hiraga, Fujio; Kimura, Kenju; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Kubota, Michio; Kumada, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Sakae, Takeji; Saitoh, Kimiaki; Shibata, Tokushi; Yoshioka, Masakazu

    At present, the clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are being performed at research reactor facilities. However, an accelerator based BNCT has a merit that it can be built in a hospital. So, we just launched a development project for the BNCT based on an accelerator in order to establish and to spread the BNCT as an effective therapy in the near future. In the project, a compact proton linac installed in a hospital will be applied as a neutron source, and energy of the proton beam is planned to be less than about 10 MeV to reduce the radioactivity. The BNCT requires epithermal neutron beam with an intensity of around 1x109 (n/cm2/sec) to deliver the therapeutic dose to a deeper region in a body and to complete the irradiation within an hour. From this condition, the current of the proton beam required is estimated to be a few mA on average. Enormous heat deposition in the target is a big issue. We are aiming at total optimization of the accelerator based BNCT from the linac to the irradiation position. Here, the outline of the project is introduced and the moderator design is presented.

  16. Hyaluronan as carrier of carboranes for tumor targeting in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Meo, Chiara Di; Panza, Luigi; Capitani, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria; Renier, Davide; Rosato, Antonio; Crescenzi, Vittorio

    2007-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) represents a promising approach for tumor therapy. A critical requirement for BNCT is tumor targeting, a goal that is currently addressed with the development of low and high molecular weight agents capable of interacting with receptors expressed by cancer cells. Here, we describe a new bioconjugate (HApCB) composed by n-propyl carborane linked to hyaluronan (HA) via an ester linkage for a degree of substitution of approximately 30%, leading to a water-soluble derivative. The structure and main physicochemical characteristics of the new HA derivative were determined by means of Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, and 1H, 13C, and 10B NMR analysis and are herein reported in detail. As HA is recognized by the CD44 antigen, densely populating the surface of many tumor cells, HApCB is expected to deliver boron atoms from the locally released carborane cages directly to target cells for antitumor application in BNCT. In vitro biological experiments showed that HApCB was not toxic for a variety of human tumor cells of different histotypes, specifically interacted with CD44 as the native unconjugated HA, and underwent uptake by tumor cells, leading to accumulation of amounts of boron atoms largely exceeding those required for a successful BNCT approach. Thus, HApCB may be regarded as a promising new BNCT agent for specific targeting of cancer cells overexpressing the CD44 receptor. PMID:17291079

  17. Long-circulating gadolinium-encapsulated liposomes for potential application in tumor neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Le, Uyen M; Cui, Zhengrong

    2006-04-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality. One of the key factors for a successful Gd-NCT is to deliver and maintain a sufficient amount of Gd in tumor tissues during neutron irradiation. We proposed to prepare a Gd delivery system by complexing a Gd-containing compound, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), with a polycationic peptide, poly-L-lysine (pLL), and then encapsulate the complexed Gd-DTPA into PEGylated liposomes. Complexation of Gd-DTPA with pLL not only enhanced the encapsulation efficiency of Gd-DTPA in liposomes, but also significantly limited the release of Gd-DTPA from the liposomes. A Gd-DTPA-encapsulated liposome formulation that contained 6.8+/-0.3 mg/mL of pure encapsulated Gd was prepared. The blood half-life of the Gd encapsulated into the liposome formulation was estimated to be about 24 h in healthy tumor-free mice. About 12 h after the Gd-encapsulated liposomes were intravenously injected into mice with pre-established model tumors, the Gd content in the tumors reached an average of 159 microg/g of wet tumor tissue. This Gd-DTPA encapsulated liposome may be used to deliver Gd into solid tumors for NCT and tumor imaging. PMID:16457973

  18. Photodynamic Therapy: The Imminent Milieu For Treating Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Neeta; Jalaluddin, MD; Kotina, Sreekanth; Routray, Samapika; Ingale, Yashwant

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in curative and palliative treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and other oral lesions. Oral infections (such as mucosal and endodontic infections, periodontal diseases, caries, and peri-implantitis) are among the specific targets where PDT can be applied Photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy depends on the local dose deposited in the lesion as well as oxygen availability in the lesion. Further long-term clinical studies are necessary in establishing a more specific place of the technique in the field of dentistry. PMID:23905154

  19. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  20. Polyvinylidene fluoride/silane-treated hydroxyapatite mixed matrix membrane for enzyme capturing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junfen; Cao, Zhenzhen; Wu, Lishun

    2015-02-01

    The silane coupling agent, N-(β-aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (KH792), was employed to modify the surfaces of nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles. The mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) were prepared by embedding pure HAP and HAP modified with KH792 (KH792-HAP) inside polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix respectively. The MMMs were further characterized concerning permeability and adsorption capacity. Langmuir adsorption isotherm provides better fit for HAP and KH792-HAP than Freundlich isotherm. KH792-HAP has better distribution in the polymeric matrix compared to HAP in the polymeric matrix. The MMMs showed purification of enzyme via static adsorption and dynamic adsorption, and showed the potential of using MMMs for enzyme capturing in enzyme purification techniques. The lysozyme (LZ) was used as a model enzyme. The properties and structures of MMMs prepared by immersion phase separation process were characterized by pure water flux, LZ adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:25575349

  1. Optimizing topical therapies for treating psoriasis: a consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Lebwohl, Mark G; Menter, Alan; Bagel, Jerry; Del Rosso, James Q; Elewski, Boni E; Feldman, Steven R; Kircik, Leon H; Koo, John; Gold, Linda Stein; Tanghetti, Emil

    2010-09-01

    In 2010, an expert committee of physicians and researchers in the field of dermatology working together as the Psoriasis Process of Care Consensus Panel developed consensus guidelines for the treatment of psoriasis. As much as possible, the guidelines were evidence based but also included the extensive clinical experience of the dermatologists. Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that requires long-term treatment and 80% of psoriasis patients have mild to moderate disease. Topical therapies play an important role in the treatment of psoriasis, especially in patients with mild to moderate disease. Patients usually start with monotherapy; however, in more severe cases (> 10% body surface area [BSA], severely impaired quality of life [QOL], or recalcitrant psoriatic lesions), multiple treatment modalities may be used as part of combination, sequential, or rotational therapeutic regimens. Main treatment options include topical steroids, systemic therapies, topical vitamin D treatments such as vitamin D3 ointment, retinoids, phototherapy, and biologic therapies. Other topical therapies include the following steroid-sparing agents: coal tar, anthralin, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytics, and emollients. Therapeutic considerations also should focus on adherence, improving QOL, and promoting a good patient-physician relationship. PMID:21049712

  2. Treating Social Anxiety in Adolescents: Ten Group Therapy Lesson Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur-Elmer, Alison; McBride, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents and concludes by offering a set of 10 group therapy lesson plans for SAD that therapists can use in their practice. The overview includes a description of social anxiety disorder and highlights various theories of anxiety. The…

  3. Chronic PTSD Treated with Metacognitive Therapy: An Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Adrian; Welford, Mary; Fraser, Janelle; King, Paul; Mendel, Elizabeth; Wisely, Julie; Knight, Alice; Rees, David

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on an open trial of metacognitive therapy (MCT) for chronic PTSD. MCT does not require imaginal reliving, prolonged exposure, or challenging of thoughts about trauma. It is based on an information-processing model of factors that impede normal and in-built recovery processes. It is targeted at modifying maladaptive styles of…

  4. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients Many ... arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that involves surgically removing the torn part of the meniscus and stabilizing it, or ...

  5. Transurethral electrolaser complex therapy to treat chronic prostatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2000-05-01

    According to the world statistics, from 30 to 60 percent of elderly male population suffer from chronic prostatitis in different countries. This disease has a number of consequences such as urino-genital inflammation, dysuria, perineal pain, reduction in the physiological activity of smooth muscles, blockage of the anus passages with micro-organism vital activity products, appearance of stagnant zones and low blood circulation complicated by disorders of the sexual function. Most of these features make it difficult to use standard drug therapies with antibiotics or immunocorrectors. For that reason, the objective of this study is to develop and to investigate a novel combined electrolaser therapy which improves drug delivery in the prostate gland and simultaneously provides an independent physiotherapeutic effect. The main feature of this therapy is the utilization of two diode lasers emitting in the red (0.67 micrometer, 10 mW) and in the infrared (0.85 micrometer, 1 W) spectrum ranges in combination with transurethral electrostimulation. An electrolaser catheter containing both hollow cylindrical electrodes and an axial optical fiber to deliver laser radiation was brought along the urethra to the seminal vesicles. The red laser in combination with a photosensitizer ('Photosens,' Russia) was used to realize the antibacterial treatment of the urethra. The infrared laser was employed to heat the prostate gland and to stimulate the blood perfusion without thermal damage of tissues. The laser heating of the prostate at a local tissue temperature of 41 degrees Celsius in combination with the electrostimulation provided approximately a 4.5-fold increase in the blood flow. The realization of an additional mode of photovacuum therapy inside the urethra together with the electrostimulation made it possible to 'clean' the anus passages and to improve the DNA diagnosis reliability in respect of the urogenital infectious remainder. The clinical data obtained in 980 patients

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors. Technical progress report No. 1, May 1, 1990--January 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  7. Comparative assessment of single-dose and fractionated boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Fisher, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    The effects of fractionating boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were evaluated in the intracerebral rat 9L gliosarcoma and rat spinal cord models using the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) thermal neutron beam. The amino acid analog p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) was administered prior to each exposure to the thermal neutron beam. The total physical absorbed dose to the tumor during BNCT using BPA was 91% high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Two tumor doses of 5.2 Gy spaced 48 h apart (n = 14) or three tumor doses of 5.2 Gy, each separated by 48 h (n = 10), produced 50 and 60% long-term (>1 year) survivors, respectively. The outcome of neither the two nor the three fractions of radiation was statistically different from that of the corresponding single-fraction group. In the rat spinal cord, the ED{sub 50} for radiation myelopathy (as indicated by limb paralysis within 7 months) after exposure to the thermal beam alone was 13.6 {+-} 0.4 Gy. Dividing the beam-only irradiation into two or four consecutive daily fractions increased the ED{sub 50} to 14.7 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 15.5 {+-} 0.4 Gy, respectively. Thermal neutron irradiation in the presence of BPA resulted in an ED{sub 50} for myelopathy of 13.8 {+-} 0.6 Gy after a single fraction and 14.9 {+-} 0.9 Gy after two fractions. An increase in the number of fractions to four resulted in an ED{sub 50} of 14.3 {+-} 0.6 Gy. The total physical absorbed dose to the blood in the vasculature of the spinal cord during BNCT using BPA was 80% high-LET radiation. It was observed that fractionation was of minor significance in the amelioration of damage to the normal central nervous system in the rat after boron neutron capture irradiation. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Intracellular distribution of various boron compounds for use in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Brownell, G L; Holden, S A; Teicher, B A

    1993-01-01

    The neutron capture reaction in boron (10B(n, alpha)7Li) generates two short-range particles with high linear energy transfer. The effect of neutron capture therapy depends on the selective localization of 10B atoms in target cells. The determination of the distribution of boron compounds in cancer cells at the subcellular level is required for the understanding of the effect of this treatment. The monomeric sulfhydryl borane (BSH) compound has been used clinically in Japan and preclinically in the U.S.A. Recently, new compounds have been developed: a dimeric sulfhydryl borane (BSSB), a boronophenylalanine (BPA), and two porphyrin complexes (BOPP and VCDP). This study demonstrates that the porphyrin complexes (BOPP and VCDP) are more cytotoxic than the other three compounds to the rat 9L gliosarcoma cell line. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine boron content for cellular uptake studies of these agents, we found that of the five compounds tested BOPP (25 microM) exposure resulted in the greatest boron uptake averaging 305 ng B/10(6) cells. BSSB (500 microM) was second averaging 93 ng B/10(6) cells, BSH (500 microM) third averaging 62 ng B/10(6) cells, VCDP (25 microM) fourth averaging 58 ng B/10(6) cells, and BPA (500 microM) fifth averaging 7.4 ng B/10(6) cells. Data on the distribution of boron in the nuclei, mitochondria, lysosomes, microsomes, and cytosomes of 9L cells are also presented. PMID:8424808

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of epithermal and fast neutron dose in a human head model for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a very promising form of cancer therapy, consisting in irradiating a stable isotope of boron (10B) concentrated in tumor cells with a low energy neutron beam. This technique makes it possible to destroy tumor cells, leaving healthy tissues practically unaffected. In order to carry out the therapy in the proper way, the proper range of the neutron beam energy has to be chosen. In this paper we continue the earlier started calculations of the optimum energy range for BNCT, taking into account the absorbed dose from fast neutrons.

  10. A Case Study Using Child-Centered Play Therapy Approach to Treat Enuresis and Encopresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy-Casey, Maria

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates an alternative method (nondirective child-centered therapy) in treating enuresis and encopresis resulting from emotional disturbances. Examines various etiologies and approaches to treating these conditions. Provides a case study example. Claims that professionals must differentiate between primary and secondary occurrences of these…

  11. Treating Verbs in Aphasia: Exploring the Impact of Therapy at the Single Word and Sentence Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Janet; Whitworth, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background: In recent years there has been significant interest in the differential processing of nouns and verbs in people with aphasia, but more limited consideration about whether the differences have implications for therapy. It remains unclear whether verbs can be treated in a similar way to nouns or should be treated using approaches that…

  12. Postpartum catatonia treated with electroconvulsive therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Strain, Angela Katherine; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Bullard, Elizabeth; Gaynes, Bradley N

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a rare syndrome that occurs in mood and psychotic disorders, and general medical conditions. Postpartum depression affects 10%-15% of women within 6 months after delivery. Postpartum psychosis affects 0.1%-0.5% of women within weeks after delivery, though it can occur within hours; it carries risk for suicide and infanticide. There is limited evidence available to guide treatment. We review a case of postpartum psychosis that presented with catatonia and was resistant to medications, but responded to electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:22227030

  13. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  14. Insights into the use of gadolinium and gadolinium/boron-based agents in imaging-guided neutron capture therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Deagostino, Annamaria; Protti, Nicoletta; Alberti, Diego; Boggio, Paolo; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is currently under development as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. All of the clinical experience to date with NCT is done with (10)B, known as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a binary treatment combining neutron irradiation with the delivery of boron-containing compounds to tumors. Currently, the use of Gd for NCT has been getting more attention because of its highest neutron cross-section. Although Gd-NCT was first proposed many years ago, its development has suffered due to lack of appropriate tumor-selective Gd agents. This review aims to highlight the recent advances for the design, synthesis and biological testing of new Gd- and B-Gd-containing compounds with the task of finding the best systems able to improve the NCT clinical outcome. PMID:27195428

  15. Effects of a laser acupuncture therapy on treating pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wai-on; Xiao, Shaojun; Ip, Wing-Yuk; Guo, Xia

    2001-10-01

    Laser acupuncture (LA) has been utilized as a combined approach of Chinese traditional acupuncture and low-level laser therapy since its emergence in 1973. Its mechanisms are not well understood and the standardization of clinical protocols has not been established. In this study, we used a diode laser to irradiate on four acupuncture points for normal subjects to investigate the effect of LA. For each point, the irradiation lasted for three minutes. The median nerve conduction velocity was measured within a 30 minutes interval at day 1, day 5, and day 10 respectively. Patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were given LA therapy for three stages at most with a one-week interval between two stages. Treatment outcome measurements included patients' subjective feedback (McGill pain questionnaire, VAS) and objective measurements (physical examination, kinesiological properties and NCSs). It was a randomized single-blind controlled trial. For normal subjects, motor nerve fiber was sensitive to LA and the motor conduction velocity was decreased very significantly (p < 0.001). Besides, it was found that LA resulted that sensory nerve conduction velocity was decreased significantly when it was measured 30 minutes after the subject had received LA application. For CTS patients, the outcomes except pinch test indicated that LA could improve patient's conduction. These results suggested that LA could cause the change of nerve conduction.

  16. Dynamic infrared imaging for biological and medical applications in Boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; González, Sara J.; Dagrosa, Alejandra; Schwint, Amanda E.; Carpano, Marina; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Boggio, Esteban F.; Bertotti, José; Marín, Julio; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J.; Albero, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality, currently focused on the treatment of cancer, which involves a tumor selective 10B compound and a specially tuned neutron beam to produce a lethal nuclear reaction. BNCT kills target cells with microscopic selectivity while sparing normal tissues from potentially lethal doses of radiation. In the context of the Argentine clinical and research BNCT projects at the National Atomic Energy Commission and in a strong collaboration with INVAP SE, we successfully implemented Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) in the clinical setting for the observation of cutaneous melanoma patients and included DIRI as a non invasive methodology in several research protocols involving small animals. We were able to characterize melanoma lesions in terms of temperature and temperature rate-of-recovery after applying a mild cold thermal stress, distinguishing melanoma from other skin pigmented lesions. We observed a spatial and temporal correlation between skin acute reactions after irradiation, the temperature pattern and the dose distribution. We studied temperature distribution as a function of tumor growth in mouse xenografts, observing a significant correlation between tumor temperature and drug uptake; we investigated temperature evolution in the limbs of Wistar rats for a protocol of induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DIRI being especially sensitive to RA induction even before the development of clinical signs and studied surface characteristics of tumors, precancerous and normal tissues in a model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch.

  17. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  18. Induced radioactivity in the blood of cancer patients following Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiko; Kinashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Kouta; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-07-01

    Since 1990, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used for over 400 cancer patients at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). After BNCT, the patients are radioactive and their (24)Na and (38)Cl levels can be detected via a Na-I scintillation counter. This activity is predominantly due to (24)Na, which has a half-life of 14.96 h and thus remains in the body for extended time periods. Radioactive (24)Na is mainly generated from (23)Na in the target tissue that is exposed to the neutron beam in BNCT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the radioactivity of blood (24)Na following BNCT and the absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field. To assess blood (24)Na, 1 ml of peripheral blood was collected from 30 patients immediately after the exposure, and the radioactivity of blood (24)Na was determined using a germanium counter. The activity of (24)Na in the blood correlated with the absorbed gamma ray doses in the irradiated field. For the same absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field, the activity of blood (24)Na was higher in patients with neck or lung tumors than in patients with brain or skin tumors. The reasons for these findings are not readily apparent, but the difference in the blood volume and the ratio of bone to soft tissue in the irradiated field, as well as the dose that leaked through the clinical collimator, may be responsible. PMID:23392825

  19. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  20. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  1. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  2. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  3. A state-of-the-art epithermal neutron irradiation facility for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K

    2004-08-21

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the first fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam (FCB) has proven suitable for use in clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The modern facility provides a high intensity beam together with low levels of contamination that is ideally suited for use with future, more selective boron delivery agents. Prescriptions for normal tissue tolerance doses consist of 2 or 3 fields lasting less than 10 min each with the currently available beam intensity, that are administered with an automated beam monitoring and control system to help ensure safety of the patient and staff alike. A quality assurance program ensures proper functioning of all instrumentation and safety interlocks as well as constancy of beam output relative to routine calibrations. Beam line shutters and the medical room walls provide sufficient shielding to enable access and use of the facility without affecting other experiments or normal operation of the multipurpose research reactor at MIT. Medical expertise and a large population in the greater Boston area are situated conveniently close to the university, which operates the research reactor 24 h a day for approximately 300 days per year. The operational characteristics of the facility closely match those established for conventional radiotherapy, which together with a near optimum beam performance ensure that the FCB is capable of determining whether the radiobiological promise of NCT can be realized in routine practice. PMID:15446801

  4. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a {phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min} ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  5. Lithium Nitride Synthesized by in situ Lithium Deposition and Ion Implantation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitama, Shintaro; Baba, Yuji; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Imahori, Yoshio

    Li3N synthesis on Li deposition layer was conducted without H2O and O2 by in situ lithium deposition in high vacuum chamber of 10-6 Pa and ion implantation techniques and the thermo-chemical stability of the Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under laser heating and air exposure was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following conclusions were derived; (1) Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target with very low oxide and carbon contamination was synthesized by in situ lithium vacuum deposition and N2+ ion implantation without H2O and O2 additions, (2) The starting temperature of evaporation of Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target increased by 120K compared to that of the Li/Cu target and (3) Remarkable oxidation and carbon contamination were observed on the surface of Li3N/Li/Cu after air exposure and these contaminated compositions was not removed by Ar+ heavy sputtering.

  6. Whole-body dose evaluation with an adaptive treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kumada, Hiroaki; Isobe, Tomonori; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Kamizawa, Satoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Dose evaluation for out-of-field organs during radiotherapy has gained interest in recent years. A team led by University of Tsukuba is currently implementing a project for advancing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), along with a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS). In this study, the authors used the RTPS (the 'Tsukuba-Plan') to evaluate the dose to out-of-field organs during BNCT. Computed tomography images of a whole-body phantom were imported into the RTPS, and a voxel model was constructed for the Monte Carlo calculations, which used the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System. The results indicate that the thoracoabdominal organ dose during BNCT for a brain tumour and maxillary sinus tumour was 50-360 and 120-1160 mGy-Eq, respectively. These calculations required ∼29.6 h of computational time. This system can evaluate the out-of-field organ dose for BNCT irradiation during treatment planning with patient-specific irradiation conditions. PMID:25520378

  7. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, A.; Ghafoori-Fard, H.; Sadeghi, M.

    2014-05-01

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15-30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  8. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks. PMID:21459008

  9. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis: therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA–BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) ? neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA–BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks posttreatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA–BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mgfell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA–BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA–BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA– BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.

  11. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key; Sil Lee, Keum

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of depth dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM & EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  13. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu

    2006-12-11

    In order to provide a suitable device that would contain water-soluble drugs, highly water-soluble gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres (CMS-Gd-DTPA) were prepared by the emulsion method using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker and Span 80 as a surfactant for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy of cancer. The gadolinium content and the mass median diameter of CMS-Gd-DTPA were estimated. The size and morphology of the CMS-Gd-DTPA were strongly influenced by the initial applied weight ratio of Gd-DTPA:chitosan. FTIR spectra showed that the electrostatic interaction between chitosan and Gd-DTPA accelerated the formation of gadolinium-enriched chitosan microspheres. Sufficient amounts of glutaraldehyde and Span 80 were necessary for producing discrete CMS-Gd-DTPA. The CMS-Gd-DTPA having a mass median diameter 11.7microm and 11.6% of gadolinium could be used in Gd-NCT following intratumoral injection. PMID:17045253

  14. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF{sub 3}, {sup 7}LiF, and D{sub 2}O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo {ital N}-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF{sub 3} or {sup 7}LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to {approximately}50{percent} higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a {sup 7}LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  15. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  16. Pediatric Frostbite Treated by Negative Pressure Wound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Poulakidas, Stathis J; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Atty, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Frostbite injury in children can lead to abnormal growth and premature fusion of the epiphyseal cartilage with long-term sequela including, but not limited to, arthroses, deformity, and amputation of the phalanges. This was a retrospective chart review of pediatric frostbite identified in an in-house burn center registry from March 1999 to March 2014. Therapeutic management included negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Three patients (age 16-31 months) had frostbitten hands because they were outside in cold weather without gloves. They presented within 24 hours after injury, underwent 5-6 days of NPWT after excision of blisters, and did not lose the distal portion of their digits, or require amputations. On follow-up, all hands were healed well with only minimal or no effect on the growth plate of these pediatric patients. In the early period after frostbite, NPWT may be beneficial in preserving the epiphyseal cartilage in children and preventing long-term complications. PMID:26284629

  17. A man with urethral polyembolokoilamania successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Ingves, Matthew V; Lau, Timothy; Fedoroff, J Paul; Levine, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Polyembolokoilamania is the act of inserting foreign objects into bodily orifices and can be classified as a paraphilia if done for sexual pleasure. Although problematic sexual behaviors are common in dementia, the majority of case reports of urethral polyembolokoilamania in the elderly have occurred in the absence of dementia or cognitive impairment. Little empirical evidence exists for managing problematic sexual behaviors in the elderly and in dementia. Most evidence in the form of case reports demonstrates that behavioral, environmental, and pharmacological interventions can be effective. In this case report, we describe the management of sexually disinhibited behavior in the form of polyembolokoilamania in a 67-year-old man suffering from treatment-resistant depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and early signs of frontotemporal dementia. The successful treatment included a course of electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:24569921

  18. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle that gene expression occurs at the correct location and at a sufficient level. Gene-based imaging can advance cancer detection and diagnosis. By combining the cancer-targeted imaging and therapeutic strategies, the exciting prospect of a ‘one-two punch’ to find hidden, disseminated cancer cells and destroy them simultaneously can potentially be realized. PMID:14557054

  19. Studies on a suitable antibiotic therapy for treating swine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Fraile, L; de Miguel, M J; Barberán, M; Blasco, J M; Muñoz, P M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was developing effective treatments against Brucella suis biovar 2, responsible for swine brucellosis in Europe. MICs for antibiotics used classically in brucellosis and two new macrolides (tulathromycin and tildipirosin) were determined for 33 B. suis biovar 2 field and B. suis reference strains. MIC90 values ranged from 0.01 to 0.25 μg/mL. The best candidates, given alone or combined, were then evaluated in mice. Ten groups (n = 7) of BALB/c mice were inoculated (1 × 10(5) CFU/mouse) with a virulent B. suis biovar 2 field strain. All groups, excepting untreated control, were treated for 14 days with, respectively, doxycycline, dihydrostreptomycin, tulathromycin (one or two doses), or tildipirosin (one or two doses) given alone, and doxycycline combined with dihydrostreptomycin, tulathromycin, or tildipirosin. Combined tildipirosin treatment was the most effective, then selected for pig studies. Sixteen B. suis biovar 2 naturally infected sows were treated with oxytetracycline (20 mg/kg BW/daily) for 21 days. The half of these received also tildipirosin (4 mg/kg BW) in two doses with a 10-day interval. An extensive bacteriological study conducted ten days after ceasing treatments proved the efficacy of this combined oxytetracycline/tildipirosin treatment. PMID:25413993

  20. A nude rat model for neutron capture therapy of human intracerebral melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.F.; Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Staubus, A.E.; Soloway, A.H.; Moeschberger, M.L. ); Coderre, J.A. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1994-03-30

    The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for intracerebral melanoma using nude rats, the human melanoma cell line MRA 27, and boronophenylalanine as the capture agent. MRA 27 cells (2 [times] 10[sup 5]) were implanted intracerebrally, and 30 days later, 120 mg of [sup 10]B-L-BPA were injected intraperitoneally into nude rats. Thirty days following implantation, tumor bearing rats were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Six hours following administration of BPA, tumor, blood, and normal brain boron-10 levels were 23.7, 9.4, and 8.4 [mu]g/g respectively. Median survival time of untreated rats was 44 days compared to 76 days and 93 days for those receiving physical doses of 2.73 Gy and 3.64 Gy, respectively. Rats that have received both [sup 10]B-BPA and physical doses of 1.82, 2.73, or 3.64 Gy had median survival times of 170, 182, and 262 days, respectively. Forty percent of rats that had received the highest tumor dose (10.1 Gy) survived for > 300 days and in a replicate experiment 21% of the rats were longterm survivors (>220 days). Animals that received 12 Gy in a single dose or 18 Gy fractionated (2 Gy [times] 9) of gamma photons from a [sup 137]Cs source had median survival times of 86 and 79 days, respectively, compared to 47 days for untreated animals. Histopathologic examination of the brains of longterm surviving rats, euthanized at 8 or 16 months following BNCT, showed no residual tumor, but dense accumulations of melanin laden macrophages and minimal gliosis were observed. Significant prolongations in median survival time were noted in nude rats with intracerebral human melanoma that had received BNCT, thereby suggesting therapeutic efficacy. Large animal studies should be carried out to further assess BNCT of intracerebral melanoma before any human trials are contemplated. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Repurposing tromethamine as inhaled therapy to treat CF airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Launspach, Janice L.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Rivera, Jade A.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Thorne, Peter S.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel activity causes airway surface liquid (ASL) pH to become acidic, which impairs airway host defenses. One potential therapeutic approach is to correct the acidic pH in CF airways by aerosolizing HCO3− and/or nonbicarbonate pH buffers. Here, we show that raising ASL pH with inhaled HCO3− increased pH. However, the effect was transient, and pH returned to baseline values within 30 minutes. Tromethamine (Tham) is a buffer with a long serum half-life used as an i.v. formulation to treat metabolic acidosis. We found that Tham aerosols increased ASL pH in vivo for at least 2 hours and enhanced bacterial killing. Inhaled hypertonic saline (7% NaCl) is delivered to people with CF in an attempt to promote mucus clearance. Because an increased ionic strength inhibits ASL antimicrobial factors, we added Tham to hypertonic saline and applied it to CF sputum. We found that Tham alone and in combination with hypertonic saline increased pH and enhanced bacterial killing. These findings suggest that aerosolizing the HCO3−-independent buffer Tham, either alone or in combination with hypertonic saline, might be of therapeutic benefit in CF airway disease. PMID:27390778

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant melanoma with special reference to absorbed doses to the normal skin and tumor.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Hiratsuka, J; Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Yoshino, K; Karashima, H; Turu, K; Araki, K; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant melanoma were treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The estimation of absorbed dose and optimization of treatment dose based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in melanoma patients is described. The doses of gamma-rays were measured using small TLDs of Mg2SiO4 (Tb) and thermal neutron fluence was measured using gold foil and wire. The total absorbed dose to the tissue from BNCT was obtained by summing the primary and capture gamma-ray doses and the high LET radiation doses from 10B(n, alpha)7Li and 14N(n,p)14C reactions. The key point of the dose optimization is that the skin surrounding the tumour is always irradiated to 18 Gy-Eq, which is the maximum tolerable dose to the skin, regardless of the 10B-concentration in the tumor. The neutron fluence was optimized as follows. (1) The 10B concentration in the blood was measured 15-40 min after the start of neutron irradiation. (2) The 10B-concentration in the skin was estimated by multiplying the blood 10B value by a factor of 1.3. (3) The neutron fluence was calculated. Absorbed doses to the skin ranged from 15.7 to 37.1 Gy-Eq. Among the patients, 16 out of 22 patients exhibited tolerable skin damage. Although six patients showed skin damage that exceeded the tolerance level, three of them could be cured within a few months after BNCT and the remaining three developed severe skin damage requiring skin grafts. The absorbed doses to the tumor ranged from 15.7 to 68.5 Gy-Eq and the percentage of complete response was 73% (16/22). When BNCT is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma, based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA and radiobiological considerations, promising clinical results have been obtained, although many problems and issues remain to be solved. PMID:14626847

  3. Estrogen therapy to treat retinopathy in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    SHI, WENJING; ZHU, LI; WANG, YUHUAN; HU, BAOYANG; XIAO, HONGLEI; ZHOU, GUOMING; CHEN, CHAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to treat retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with estrogen (E2) so as to elucidate the role of E2 in the pathogenesis of ROP. A total of 120 postnatal 7-day-old (P7) C57BL/6J mice were selected and raised in a high-oxygen environment (75% oxygen) for 5 days, followed by 5 days in normal room air. Different doses of E2 or normal saline (NS) were injected intraperitoneally during different time-periods, and the mice were divided into 14 groups according dose of E2 injection (0.5–1.5 µg/0.05 ml) and dosing time. Blood vessel changes and hyperplasia were evaluated in flat-mounted retina and retinal slices. All mice that were exposed to room air, whether they were administered E2 or NS, showed good vascular development in the flat-mounted retina at P17. No increase in the number of endothelial cell nuclei in the new blood vessels was observed. In ascending order of E2 dose the numbers of cell nuclei were as follows: 0.18±0.129, 0.28±0.086 and 0.55±0.110. The number in the NS group was 2.12±0.373. When the results of the room-air groups were compared with those of the hyperoxia groups, a highly significant difference was found in each comparison (P<0.0001). All mice showed varying degrees of neovascularization and vascular obstruction in the flat-mounted retina at P17, and it was difficult to compare the blood vessels morphologically among these groups. The number of endothelial cell nuclei decreased following E2 injection, and the difference from the NS group exposed to hyperoxia was highly significant (P<0.0001). For all dose levels, the number of cell nuclei was the lowest when the drug was administered during P7-16, and the difference from the other two time-periods was statistically significant (P<0.05). When E2 was administered during P7-16, the number of cell nuclei was 15.5±1.993 in the 0.5-µg group, 14.23±2.49 in the 1.0-µg group and 18.05±1.62 in the 1.5-µg group. No significant difference was found among these three

  4. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy, Part I: Absorbed dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Harling, O.K.

    2005-12-15

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 {mu}g g{sup -1} that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  5. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  6. Validation of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy using cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppälä, Tiina; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Merimaa, Katja; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Kortesniemi, Mika; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the accuracy of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain and head and neck cancer was studied at the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. A cylindrical water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were applied with two beam aperture-to-surface distances (ASD). The calculations using the simulation environment for radiation application (SERA) treatment planning system were compared to neutron activation measurements with Au and Mn foils, photon dose measurements with an ionization chamber and the reference simulations with the MCNP5 code. Photon dose calculations using SERA differ from the ionization chamber measurements by 2-13% (disagreement increased along the depth in the phantom), but are in agreement with the MCNP5 calculations within 2%. The 55Mn(n,γ) and 197Au(n,γ) reaction rates calculated using SERA agree within 10% and 8%, respectively, with the measurements and within 5% with the MCNP5 calculations at depths >0.5 cm from the phantom surface. The 55Mn(n,γ) reaction rate represents the nitrogen and boron depth dose within 1%. Discrepancy in the SERA fast neutron dose calculation (of up to 37%) is corrected if the biased fast neutron dose calculation option is not applied. Reduced voxel cell size (<=0.5 cm) improves the SERA calculation accuracy on the phantom surface. Despite the slight overestimation of the epithermal neutrons and underestimation of the thermal neutrons in the beam model, neutron calculation accuracy with the SERA system is sufficient for reliable BNCT treatment planning with the two studied treatment distances. The discrepancy between measured and calculated photon dose remains unsatisfactorily high for depths >6 cm from the phantom surface. Increasing discrepancy along the phantom depth is expected to be caused by the inaccurately determined effective point of the ionization chamber.

  7. First application of dynamic infrared imaging in boron neutron capture therapy for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, G. A.; Gonzalez, S. J.; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) as a functional, noninvasive technique for evaluating the skin acute toxicity and tumor control within the framework of the Argentine boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) program for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Methods: Two patients enrolled in the Argentine phase I/II BNCT clinical trial for cutaneous malignant melanoma were studied with DIRI. An uncooled infrared camera, providing a video output signal, was employed to register the temperature evolution of the normal skin and tumor regions in patients subjected to a mild local cooling (cold stimulus). In order to study the spatial correlation between dose and acute skin reactions, three-dimensional representations of the superficial dose delivered to skin were constructed and cameralike projections of the dose distribution were coregistered with visible and infrared images. Results: The main erythematous reaction was observed clinically between the second and fifth week post-BNCT. Concurrently, with its clinical onset, a reactive increase above the basal skin temperature was observed with DIRI in the third week post-BNCT within regions that received therapeutic doses. Melanoma nodules appeared as highly localized hyperthermic regions. 2 min after stimulus, these regions reached a temperature plateau and increased in size. Temperature differences with respect to normal skin up to 10 deg. C were observed in the larger nodules. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that DIRI, enhanced by the application of cold stimuli, may provide useful functional information associated with the metabolism and vasculature of tumors and inflammatory processes related to radiation-induced changes in the skin as well. These capabilities are aimed at complementing the clinical observations and standard imaging techniques, such as CT and Doppler ultrasound.

  8. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study. PMID:16475772

  9. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  10. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  11. The combined effect of electroporation and borocaptate in boron neutron capture therapy for murine solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Kinashi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Masunaga, S I

    2000-08-01

    10 B-Enriched borocaptate (BSH) was administered intraperitoneally to SCCVII tumor-bearing C3H / He mice. Electroporation (EP) was conducted by using a tweezers-type electrode. The (10) B contents in tumors were measured by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry. The colony formation assay was applied to investigate the antitumor effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and thereby to estimate the intratumor localization of BSH. The (10) B concentrations in tumors decreased with time following BSH administration, falling to 5.4(0. 1) ppm at 3 h, whereas EP treatment (3 repetitions) 15 min after BSH injection delayed the clearance of BSH from tumors, and the (10) B level remained at 19.4(0.9) ppm at 3 h. The effect of BNCT increased with the (10) B concentration in tumors, and the combination with EP showed a remarkably large cell killing effect even at 3 h after BSH injection. The effect of BNCT, i.e., slope coefficient of the cell survival curve of tumors, without EP was proportional to tumor (10) B level (r = 0.982), and that of BSH-BNCT combined with EP lay close to the same correlation line. However, tumors subjected to EP after BSH injection did not show high radiosensitivity when irradiated after conversion to a single cell suspension by enzymatic digestion. This indicates that the increase of the BNCT effect by EP was a consequence of enclosure of BSH in the interstitial space of tumor tissue and not within tumor cells. This is different from a previous in vitro study. The combination of EP and BNCT may be clinically useful, if a procedure to limit EP to the tumor region becomes available or if an alternative similar method is employed. PMID:10965028

  12. Comparison of Snyder Head Phantom Models Used for Neutron Capture Therapy Benchmark Monte Carlo Dosimetry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; Kiger, W. S.; Zamenhof, R.

    As Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) clinical trials are initiated in more countries, new treatment planning software programs are being developed to calculate dose distributions in patient specific models. A reference suite of test problems, i.e., head phantom irradiations and resulting depth-dose curves, would allow quantitative comparison of the treatment planning software. This paper presents sets of central axis depth vs. dose curves calculated with the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4B for five different representations of the Snyder head phantom. The first is a multi-shell analytic ellipsoidal representation, and the remaining four are voxelized representations with cube edge lengths of 16, 10, 8 and 4 mm. For these calculations, 10 cm diameter monoenergetic and monodirectional neutron and photon beams were incident along the central axes of the models. Individual beams of 0.0253 eV, 1, 2, 10, 100 and 1000 keV neutrons, and 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 MeV photons were simulated to high statistical convergence, with statistical error less than 1% in the center of the model. A "generic" epithermal neutron beam, with 1% fast flux contamination and 10% thermal flux contamination, similar to those proposed for BNCT treatments, was also simulated with all five models. Computations for both of the smaller sized voxel models produced thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma dose rates within 4% of those from the analytical representation. It is proposed that these data sets be used by the BNCT community for the verification of existing and new BNCT treatment planning software.

  13. Cellular therapy to treat haematological and other malignancies: progress and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Phillip D; Gottlieb, David; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Hart, Derek N J

    2011-10-01

    The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a cellular therapy to treat castration resistant prostate cancer has reinforced the potential of cellular therapy to consolidate current pharmacological approaches to treating cancer. The emergence of the cell manufacturing facility to facilitate clinical translation of these new methodologies allows greater access to these novel therapies. Here we review different strategies currently being explored to treat haematological malignancies with a focus on adoptive allogeneic or autologous transfer of antigen specific T cells, NK cells or dendritic cells. These approaches all aim to generate immunological responses against overexpressed tissue antigens, mismatched minor histocompatability antigens or tumour associated antigens. Current successes and limitations of these different approaches will be discussed with an emphasis on challenges encountered in generating long term engraftment, antigen selection and implementation as well as therapeutic immune monitoring of clinical responses, with examples from recent clinical trials. PMID:21897329

  14. Tension - Type - Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi, Marzieh; Ghanbari, Ali; Rahimi Jaberi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    Tension Type Headache (T.T.H) is the most prevalent headache. Myofascial abnormalities & trigger points are important in this type of headache which can be managed by Positional Release Therapy (PRT). This is a report of a 47 years old female patient with Tension Type Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. She had a constant dull headache, which continued all the day for 9 months. A physiotherapist evaluated the patient and found active trigger points in her cervical muscles. Then, she received Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. After 3 treatment sessions, the patient's headache stopped completely. During the 8 months following the treatment she was without pain, and did not use any medication. Positional Release Therapy was effective in treating Tension Type Headache. This suggests that PRT could be an alternative treatment to medication in patients with T.T.H if the effectiveness of that can be confirmed by further studies. PMID:22561484

  15. Current Approaches of Photothermal Therapy in Treating Cancer Metastasis with Nanotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Hong; He, Bin; Zeng, Lijuan; Tan, Tao; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Guo, Shengrong; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis accounts for the high mortality of many types of cancer. Owing to the unique advantages of high specificity and minimal invasiveness, photothermal therapy (PTT) has been evidenced with great potential in treating cancer metastasis. In this review, we outline the current approaches of PTT with respect to its application in treating metastatic cancer. PTT can be used alone, guided with multimodal imaging, or combined with the current available therapies for effective treatment of cancer metastasis. Numerous types of photothermal nanotherapeutics (PTN) have been developed with encouraging therapeutic efficacy on metastatic cancer in many preclinical animal experiments. We summarize the design and performance of various PTN in PTT alone and their combinational therapy. We also point out the lacking area and the most promising approaches in this challenging field. In conclusion, PTT or their combinational therapy can provide an essential promising therapeutic modality against cancer metastasis. PMID:27162548

  16. A theranostic approach based on the use of a dual boron/Gd agent to improve the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Diego; Protti, Nicoletta; Toppino, Antonio; Deagostino, Annamaria; Lanzardo, Stefania; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Aime, Silvio

    2015-04-01

    This study aims at developing an innovative theranostic approach for lung tumor and metastases treatment, based on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It relies on to the use of low density lipoproteins (LDL) as carriers able to maximize the selective uptake of boron atoms in tumor cells and, at the same time, to quantify the in vivo boron distribution by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tumor cells uptake was initially assessed by ICP-MS and MRI on four types of tumor (TUBO, B16-F10, MCF-7, A549) and one healthy (N-MUG) cell lines. Lung metastases were generated by intravenous injection of a Her2+ breast cancer cell line (i.e. TUBO) in BALB/c mice and transgenic EML4-ALK mice were used as primary tumor model. After neutron irradiation, tumor growth was followed for 30-40 days by MRI. Tumor masses of boron treated mice increased markedly slowly than the control group. From the clinical editor: In this article, the authors described an improvement to existing boron neutron capture therapy. The dual MRI/BNCT agent, carried by LDLs, was able to maximize the selective uptake of boron in tumor cells, and, at the same time, quantify boron distribution in tumor and in other tissues using MRI. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments showed tumor cell killing after neutron irradiation. PMID:25596074

  17. Application of boronated anti-CEA immunoliposome to tumour cell growth inhibition in in vitro boron neutron capture therapy model.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagië, H.; Tomita, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujii, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Hasumi, K.; Nariuchi, H.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    An immunoliposome containing a 10B-compound has been examined as a selective drug delivery system in boron neutron-capture therapy. Liposomes, conjugated with monoclonal antibodies specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were shown to bind selectively to cells bearing CEA on their surface. The immunoliposomes attached to tumour cells suppressed growth in vitro upon thermal neutron irradiation and suppression was dependent upon the concentration of the 10B-compound in the liposomes and on the density of antibody conjugated to the liposomes. The results suggest that immunoliposomes containing the 10B-compound could act as a selective and efficient carrier of 10B atoms to target tumour cells in boron neutron-capture therapy. Images Figure 1 PMID:2021537

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  19. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials. PMID:26277052

  20. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Christine

    2001-05-29

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected from subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports.

  1. Generalized Granuloma Annulare Treated with Monthly Rifampicin, Ofloxacin, and Minocycline Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a disease characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the dermis. A variant form of the disease, generalized granuloma annulare (GGA), can be observed in 15% of affected patients. Localized GA is likely to resolve spontaneously within months or a few years, whereas GGA can persist for decades. There are various therapies for treating GGA. Monthly combination therapy of rifampicin 600 mg, ofloxacin 400 mg, and minocycline 100 mg (ROM) is used for treating paucibacillary leprosy which shares both clinical and histopathologic similarities with GA. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the possible efficacy of monthly ROM in a patient with GGA. PMID:23723470

  2. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance. PMID:27467416

  3. To treat or not to treat: On what should surgical therapy be based?

    PubMed

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2015-12-01

    Dr C. Autious has just returned from the most prestigious vascular surgery meeting in America. At the meeting, one of the most prominent complex aneurysm surgeons arose to discuss a paper concerning a procedure he had developed and popularized over the last decade. Dr L. Uminous stunned the audience with his declaration that he no longer recommends that his namesake procedure be performed. Instead, he proclaimed that a new, radically different procedure be adopted immediately. He showed slides detailing the novel proposal but did not give data concerning results obtained. The recommended procedure is technically possible but seems to require a different skill set. Dr Autious has a patient scheduled for elective surgery that he had planned to use the Uminous procedure to treat. What should he do? A. Do the recommended procedure as best you can. B. Refer the patient to Dr Uminous. C. Offer the recommended procedure with full disclosure. D. Give full disclosure and let the patient decide which procedure to use. E. Put the procedure on hold until more information becomes available. PMID:26598122

  4. Reference dosimetry calculations for neutron capture therapy with comparison of analytical and voxel models.

    PubMed

    Goorley, J T; Kiger, W S; Zamenhof, R G

    2002-02-01

    As clinical trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) are initiated in the U.S. and other countries, new treatment planning codes are being developed to calculate detailed dose distributions in patient-specific models. The thorough evaluation and comparison of treatment planning codes is a critical step toward the eventual standardization of dosimetry, which, in turn, is an essential element for the rational comparison of clinical results from different institutions. In this paper we report development of a reference suite of computational test problems for NCT dosimetry and discuss common issues encountered in these calculations to facilitate quantitative evaluations and comparisons of NCT treatment planning codes. Specifically, detailed depth-kerma rate curves were calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4B for four different representations of the modified Snyder head phantom, an analytic, multishell, ellipsoidal model, and voxel representations of this model with cubic voxel sizes of 16, 8, and 4 mm. Monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of 0.0253 eV, 1, 2, 10, 100, and 1000 keV neutrons, and 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 MeV photons were individually simulated to calculate kerma rates to a statistical uncertainty of <1% (1 std. dev.) in the center of the head model. In addition, a "generic" epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to epithermal beams currently used or proposed for NCT clinical trials, was computed for all models. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, and photon kerma rates calculated with the 4 and 8 mm voxel models were within 2% and 4%, respectively, of those calculated for the analytical model. The 16 mm voxel model produced unacceptably large discrepancies for all dose components. The effects from different kerma data sets and tissue compositions were evaluated. Updating the kerma data from ICRU 46 to ICRU 63 data produced less than 2% difference in kerma rate profiles. The depth-dose profile data

  5. The microdosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy in a randomised ellipsoidal cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T L; Miller, L F; Kabalka, G W

    2005-01-01

    Two reactions deliver the majority of local dose in boron neutron capture therapy. The ionised particles (protons, alpha particles and lithium nuclei) produced in the two reactions, 10B(n,alpha,gamma)7Li and 14N(n,p)14O, have short ranges that are less than -14 microm (which is on the order of the diameter of a typical human cell). The ionised particles are heavy and are in the 2+ charge state in the case of the boron reactions. These heavy 2+ ions will do significant damage to molecules near their tracks. Thus, the distribution of nitrogen and, in particular, of boron determines the spatial characteristics of the radiation field. Since the distribution of nitrogen is nearly homogeneous in the brain and is not easily altered for the purpose of radiotherapy, the spatial variation in the radiation dose is due mainly to the spatial distribution of boron. This implies that the spatial distribution of boron determines the microscopic energy deposition and therefore the spatial characteristics of the microscopic dose. The microscopic dose from the (n,alpha) and (n,p) reactions has been examined in detail and, as averred, the proton dose is relatively homogeneous except for statistical variability. The statistical variability in essence adds a false spatial variability that would not be seen if a large number of histories were performed. Since the majority of spatial variability occurs in the boron distribution, the (n,p) reaction can be suppressed to better understand the spatial distribution effects on the microscopic dose. Programs have been written in FORTRAN using Monte Carlo techniques to model ellipsoidal cells that are either randomly sized and located in the region of interest or are arranged in a face centred cubic array and are identical except for the location of the nuclei, which may be random. It is shown that closely packed prolate ellipsoidal cells with a large eccentricity in one dimension will receive a larger nuclear dose than cells that are more

  6. New thermal neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: melanogenesis-seeking 10B molecule-melanoma cell interaction from in vitro to first clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Hatta, S.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Nakagawa, T. )

    1989-07-01

    Human melanoma regression by single thermal neutron capture therapy (NCT) using melanoma-seeking 10B compounds has been achieved. Since 1972, the aim of my team has been to synthesize tumor-seeking 10B-compounds possessing selective affinity for specific metabolic activity of the target cancer cells. Once the melanoma takes up these 10B compounds, thermal neutrons, which cause insignificant cell damage, are easily absorbed by nonradioactive 10B, inducing the 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction and releasing the high LET particles to 14 mu melanoma cell diameter, destroying the tumor without damaging surrounding tissue. Radiobiological and preclinical studies culminated in the first successful human NCT treatment, with no recurrence of the treated melanoma since July, 1987.23 references.

  7. Phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis – an atypically severe case treated with systemic biologic immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Valério Sequeira Valadares, Joana; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Pedroso Franco, José Manuel; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report an atypically severe and refractory phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis case treated successfully with systemic biologic immunosuppressive therapy. Methods: A 10-year-old female was followed in the ophthalmology clinic for three years for a severe form of bilateral PKC. The patient was treated for blepharitis and intestinal parasitosis, and underwent topical corticosteroid therapy, followed by subconjunctival injections and systemic corticosteroids with no clinical improvement. An association of topical cyclosporine A and oral methotrexate had no clinical response either. Phlyctenae of the cornea remained evident with neovascularization, progressive peripheral corneal thinning and occasional anterior chamber reaction. Results: The patient was treated with a combination of infliximab and methotrexate and corticosteroid therapy was tapered, with a fast and sustained resolution of the symptoms and corneal signs. Eleven months past initiation of the treatment, the patient remains asymptomatic and without any recurrence of the disease. Conclusion: Phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis may present with a broad spectrum of symptoms and signs, and its severity varies significantly. In cases of severe PKC, which are refractory to conventional therapy, systemic biologic immunosuppressive therapy may be a valuable alternative.

  8. Treating Internet Addiction with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Antonius J.; Zinn, Mieke F.; Schoenmakers, Tim M.; van de Mheen, Dike

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, one of the major Dutch addiction care organizations initiated a pilot program to explore the possibility of using an existing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Interviewing based treatment program ("Lifestyle Training") to treat internet addiction. The current study evaluates this pilot treatment program by providing a…

  9. Reducing the Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Major Depressive Disorder: Revisiting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Difficult-to-treat depression (eg, depression with atypical or anxious symptoms, treatment-resistant depression, or depression with frequent recurrence) is a challenging real-world health issue. This critical review of the literature focuses on monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) therapy and difficult-to-treat forms of depression. Data Sources: A PubMed literature search was performed in November 2012 and refreshed through January 2013 with no date restrictions using key search terms including MAO inhibitor therapy or MAOI and depression and anxiety, atypical, treatment-resistant, recurrent, relapse, or refractory. Study Selection: Articles were selected to summarize the current needs in difficult-to-treat depression as well as the use of MAOI therapies in this area. Results: Two strategies have fallen out of favor in the care of patients with major depressive disorder. The first is the use of MAOI therapy and the second is the proactive recognition of difficult-to-treat depression that may not respond as well to more frequently used antidepressants. The infrequent use of MAOIs stems from the perception that other oral therapies for depression are safer and easier to use than oral MAOIs; however, transdermal delivery is one potential strategy to improve the safety of this class of agents. Although food-related interactions with transdermal delivery of MAOI therapy can be lessened, clinicians still need to be vigilant for drug-drug interactions and serotonin syndrome. Conclusions: Clinicians should consider MAOIs for patients who have had several unsuccessful trials of antidepressants. Guidelines generally reserve MAOIs as third- and fourth-line treatments due to concerns over safety and tolerability; however, transdermal delivery of an MAOI may allay some of the safety and tolerability concerns. Patients should be provided education about MAOIs and their risks. PMID:24511450

  10. Stem cell therapy emerging as the key player in treating type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L; Thakkar, Umang G

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease causing progressive destruction of pancreatic β cells, ultimately resulting in loss of insulin secretion producing hyperglycemia usually affecting children. Replacement of damaged β cells by cell therapy can treat it. Currently available strategies are insulin replacement and islet/pancreas transplantation. Unfortunately these offer rescue for variable duration due to development of autoantibodies. For pancreas/islet transplantation a deceased donor is required and various shortfalls of treatment include quantum, cumbersome technique, immune rejection and limited availability of donors. Stem cell therapy with assistance of cellular reprogramming and β-cell regeneration can open up new therapeutic modalities. The present review describes the history and current knowledge of T1DM, evolution of cell therapies and different cellular therapies to cure this condition. PMID:27424148

  11. Clinical efficiency of applying low-intensity laser therapy in treating dyscirculatory encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putilina, M. V.; Kozlov, V. I.; Vakhtin, V. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying laser therapy combined with drug preparations in treating 300 patients affected by dyscirculatory encephalopathy. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations together with electroencephalography, rheoencephalography, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the patients' states prior to and after the treatment. It was found that the combined application of laser therapy and drug preparations produced a more pronounced therapeutic effect as compared with that produced by the separate application of laser therapy and drug preparations. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the 0.89 micrometers laser infrared radiation increased patients' susceptibility to drugs. Moreover, the combined laser therapy improved the cerebral bloodflow and activated the metabolic and plastic functions of neurons. This decreased or eliminated late complications provoked by the cerebral blood circulation insufficiency.

  12. Cotard's syndrome with schizophreniform disorder can be successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Caliyurt, Okan; Vardar, Erdal; Tuglu, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Cotard's syndrome associated with psychotic symptoms. A 27-year-old man was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder. His presenting symptoms, which had started 1 month before hospital admission, were somatic delusions of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular malfunction and the absence of a stomach, which resulted in a decrease in weight from 75 kg to 63 kg in 1 month. Cranial computed tomographic images showed dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed central atrophy and lateral ventricle dilatation. Single- photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left temporal, left frontal and left parietal hypoperfusion. The patient did not respond to antipsychotic therapies, but he was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. This report emphasizes that Cotard's syndrome may be accompanied by lesions of the left hemisphere and that electroconvulsive therapy could be the first-line therapy in such patients with psychotic disorder. PMID:15069468

  13. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT. PMID:23743325

  14. A rat model for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain by means of neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Barth, R.F.; Staubus, A.E.; Adams, D.M.; Soloway, A.H.; James, S.M.; Goodman, J.H. ); Coderre, J.A.; Fairchild, R.G. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Melanoma metastatic to the brain is a serious clinical problem for which there currently is no satisfactory treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been shown by Mishima et al. to be clinically effective in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma using {sup 10}B-enriched boronophenylalaine (BPA) as the capture agent. In the present pilot study we have observed a significant prolongation in survival time of nude rats bearing intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27 following administration of BPA and neutron irradiation. These findings suggest therapeutic efficacy, but unequivocal proof depends upon confirmation in a more definitive experiment using large numbers of animals with both solitary and multiple implants of melanoma. If our preliminary results are confirmed, then this will lay the groundwork for a clinical study of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A theoretical model for the production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by neutron capture transmutation of Ra-226.

    PubMed

    Melville, G; Melville, P

    2013-02-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. We are investigating the reduction of radium by transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy neutrons from a neutron source to produce Ra-225 and hence Ac-225, which can be used as a generator to produce Bi-213 for use in 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' for cancer. This paper examines the possibility of producing Ac-225 by neutron capture using a theoretical model in which neutron energy is convoluted with the corresponding neutron cross sections of Ra-226. The total integrated yield can then be obtained. This study shows that an intense beam of high-energy neutrons could initiate neutron capture on Ra-226 to produce Ra-225 and hence practical amounts of Ac-225 and a useful reduction of Ra-226. PMID:23220026

  16. Combination of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 with boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kinash, Yuko; Ono, Koji

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 (N-acetylcochinol-O-phosphate) in the rodent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII carcinoma model, in combination with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Methods and materials: Sodium borocaptate-{sup 10}B (BSH, 125 mg/kg, i.p.) or l-p-boronophenylalanine-{sup 10}B (BPA, 250 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and 15 min later, ZD6126 (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered. Then, the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors and normal tissues were measured by prompt {gamma}-ray spectrometry. On the other hand, for the thermal neutron beam exposure experiment, SCC VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells in the tumors, followed by treatment with a {sup 10}B-carrier and ZD6126 in the same manner as the above-mentioned {sup 10}B pharmacokinetics analyses. To obtain almost similar intratumor {sup 10}B concentrations during neutron exposure, thermal neutron beam irradiation was started from the time point of 30 min after injection of BSH only, 90 min after BSH injection for combination with ZD6126, 120 min after the injection of BPA only, and 180 min after BPA injection for combination with ZD6126. Right after irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (quiescent [Q] cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, the MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. The clonogenic cell survival assay was also performed in mice given no BrdU. Results: Pharmacokinetics analyses showed that combination with ZD6126 greatly increased the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors after 60 min after BSH injection and

  17. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  18. Oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia treated with the photodynamic therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Russo, Nicola; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Del Vecchio, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aims About 60% of the oral cancer arise on a pre-existent potentially malignant disorder of oral mucosa like the oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia. The treatment with the photodynamic therapy of these lesions represents, in the last years, an innovative, non-invasive and effective therapeutic possibility to achieve the secondary prevention of oral cancer. In the last decade, case reports have described patients with similar treated through a photochemical reaction induced by laser light. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the topical 5-ALA photodynamic therapy in the treatment of a case of Oral proliferative verrucous leukoplakia. Case report A female patient of 80 years old affected by white verrucous plaques on the right buccal mucosa was recruited for our case report. The right side lesion was treated with the photodynamic therapy with topical administered 5-aminolevulinic acid using the 635 nm laser light to activate the photosensitizer. Results The lesion showed complete response after 4 sessions of photodynamic therapy and no recurrence was noticed after 12 months. Conclusions The photodynamic therapy can be considered an effective treatment in the management of oral verrucous proliferative leukoplakia, but more clinical trials, with prolonged follow-up controls, are necessary to evaluate its effectiveness in the mid and long time period. PMID:25002922

  19. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  20. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  1. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  2. Verification of nuclear data for the Tsukuba plan, a newly developed treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Takada, Kenta; Yamanashi, Koichi; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Various verifications were performed to apply JENDL-4.0 as nuclear data for a newly developed treatment planning system with a homogeneous or precise human-like phantom. The nitrogen dose calculated by JENDL-4.0 differed slightly from that calculated by ENDF/B-VII.0. However, the total weighted dose-based dose volume histogram in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment for brain tumors calculated by JENDL-4.0 was in good agreement with the results of the ENDF/B-VII.0 calculation. Therefore, calculation with JENDL-4.0 can be applied to the BNCT dose calculation. PMID:26361835

  3. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  4. Dose-response analysis for boron neutron capture therapy of the B16 murine melanoma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Slatkin, D.N.; Makar, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of a well-pigmented B16 melanoma implanted subcutaneously in the mouse thigh has been carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery agent. The response of the B16 melanoma to BNCT was compared with the response to 250 kVp x-rays using both tumor growth delay and in vivo/in vitro assay that measures clonogenic survival. These experiments allow a comparison of tumor growth delay, log cell kill and damage to normal tissues produced by BNCT or photon irradiation.

  5. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  6. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

  7. Biological activity of N(4)-boronated derivatives of 2'-deoxycytidine, potential agents for boron-neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nizioł, Joanna; Uram, Łukasz; Szuster, Magdalena; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary anticancer therapy that requires boron compound for nuclear reaction during which high energy alpha particles and lithium nuclei are formed. Unnatural, boron-containing nucleoside with hydrophobic pinacol moiety was investigated as a potential BNCT boron delivery agent. Biological properties of this compound are presented for the first time and prove that boron nucleoside has low cytotoxicity and that observed apoptotic effects suggest alteration of important functions of cancer cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of DNA from cancer cells proved that boron nucleoside is inserted into nucleic acids as a functional nucleotide derivative. NMR studies present very high degree of similarity of natural dG-dC base pair with dG-boron nucleoside system. PMID:26344594

  8. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  9. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  10. Maggot debridement therapy as primary tool to treat chronic wound of animals

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Vijayata; Choudhary, Mukesh; Pandey, Sunanda; Chauhan, Vandip D.; Hasnani, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a safe, effective, and controlled method ofhealing of chronic wounds by debridement and disinfection. In this therapy live, sterile maggots of green bottle fly, Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata are used, as they prefernecrotic tissues over healthy for feeding. Since centuries, MDT is used in humanbeings to treat chronic wounds. Lately, MDT came out as a potent medical aid in animals. In animals, although, this therapy is still limited and clinical studies are few. However, with the increasing antibiotic resistance and chronic wound infections in veterinary medicine, maggot therapy may even become the first line of treatment for some infections. This paper will present a brief discussion of MDT and its role in veterinary medicine that may add one more treatment method to utilize in non-healing wounds of animals and overcome the use of amputation and euthanasia. The objective of this review paper is to assemble relevant literature on maggot therapy to form a theoretical foundation from which further steps toward clinical use of maggot therapy in animals for chronic wounds can be taken. PMID:27182137

  11. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons, and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron Michael; Pompos, Arnold; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve; Story, Michael D.; Pistenmaa, David; Choy, Hak

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation-induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal, and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently, there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and, in addition, there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward. PMID:26793619

  12. Maggot debridement therapy as primary tool to treat chronic wound of animals.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vijayata; Choudhary, Mukesh; Pandey, Sunanda; Chauhan, Vandip D; Hasnani, J J

    2016-04-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a safe, effective, and controlled method ofhealing of chronic wounds by debridement and disinfection. In this therapy live, sterile maggots of green bottle fly, Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata are used, as they prefernecrotic tissues over healthy for feeding. Since centuries, MDT is used in humanbeings to treat chronic wounds. Lately, MDT came out as a potent medical aid in animals. In animals, although, this therapy is still limited and clinical studies are few. However, with the increasing antibiotic resistance and chronic wound infections in veterinary medicine, maggot therapy may even become the first line of treatment for some infections. This paper will present a brief discussion of MDT and its role in veterinary medicine that may add one more treatment method to utilize in non-healing wounds of animals and overcome the use of amputation and euthanasia. The objective of this review paper is to assemble relevant literature on maggot therapy to form a theoretical foundation from which further steps toward clinical use of maggot therapy in animals for chronic wounds can be taken. PMID:27182137

  13. Estrogen therapy increases BDNF expression and improves post-stroke depression in ovariectomy-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiaoer; Cheng, Yifan; Jin, Kunlin; Cheng, Jianhua; Lin, Yuanshao; Lin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of exogenous estrogen on post-stroke depression. Rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following middle cerebral artery occlusion. The occurrence of post-stroke depression was evaluated according to the changes in preference for sucrose and performance in a forced swimming test. Estrogen therapy significantly improved these neurological symptoms, indicating that estrogen is effective in treating post-stroke depression. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was reported in the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with estrogen for two weeks, suggesting that BDNF expression may be an important contributor to the improvement of post-stroke depression that is observed following estrogen therapy. PMID:27602095

  14. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Hanscom, David A; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach. PMID:26682100

  15. Defining the Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hanscom, David A.; Brox, Jens Ivar; Bunnage, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review of the literature. Objectives Determine if the term cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful in clinical care and research. What literature supports these variables being relevant to the experience of chronic pain? What effects of CBT in treating these factors have been documented? What methods and platforms are available to administer CBT? Methods Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex neurologic disorder with many components. CBT refers to a broad family of therapies that address both maladaptive thoughts and behaviors. There are several ways to deliver it. CLBP was broken into five categories that affect the perception of pain, and the literature was reviewed to see the effects of CBT on these variables. Results The term cognitive behavioral therapy has little use in future research because it covers such a wide range of therapies. CBT should always be defined by the problem it is intended to solve. The format and method of delivery should be defined because they have implications for outcomes. They are readily available even at the primary care level. The effectiveness of CBT is unquestioned regarding its effectiveness in treating each of the variables that affect CLBP. It is unclear why it is not more widely implemented. Conclusions CBT represents a family of therapies that are effective for a wide range of problems, many of which coexist with and influence CLBP. Each of the variables can be improved with focused CBT. Early, widespread adoption of CBT in treating and preventing CLBP is recommended. Future research and clinical care should focus on strategies to operationalize these well-documented treatments utilizing a public health approach. PMID:26682100

  16. Combination of internal radiation therapy and hyperthermia to treat liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, E.D.; McLaren, J.; Auda, S.P.; McGinley, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    Sixteen patients were treated for liver cancer (primary and metastatic) by a combination of internal radiation therapy with intra-arterial yttrium 90 microspheres and regional hyperthermia with electromagnetic radiation. Four patients have their liver disease apparently controlled; two had a partial regression of more than 50%; and two had a partial regression of less than 50%. The complications consisted of one case of radiation hepatitis and one of peptic ulcer.

  17. Disseminated mucormycosis in a paediatric patient: Lichthemia corymbifera successfully treated with combination antifungal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anita; Cooper, Celia; Davis, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a severe fungal infection that largely affects immunocompromised individuals. It carries a high morbidity and mortality rate and is characterised by extensive angioinvasion and necrosis of host tissue. This case report details success in treating disseminated mucormycosis in a paediatric patient with an underlying haematological malignancy. Treatment included institution of combination antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin, aggressive surgical debridement of infected tissue and reversal of underlying immunosuppression. PMID:25379392

  18. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  19. Use of Differentiated Pluripotent Stem Cells in Replacement Therapy for Treating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ira J.; Daley, George Q.; Goldman, Steven A.; Huard, Johnny; Kamp, Timothy J.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSC) directed to various cell fates holds promise as source material for treating numerous disorders. The availability of precisely differentiated PSC-derived cells will dramatically impact blood component and hematopoietic stem cell therapies, and should facilitate treatment of diabetes, some forms of liver disease and neurologic disorders, retinal diseases, and possibly heart disease. Although an unlimited supply of specific cell types are needed, other barriers must be overcome. This review of the state of cell therapies highlights important challenges. Successful cell transplantation will require optimizing the best cell type and site for engraftment, overcoming limitations to cell migration and tissue integration, and occasionally needing to control immunologic reactivity. Collaboration among scientists, clinicians, and industry is critical for generating new stem cell-based therapies. PMID:25146295

  20. Carcinoma of penis. Review of cases treated by surgery and radiation therapy 1960-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.M.; Luk, K.H.

    1981-08-01

    Cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis treated by surgery and radiation therapy at Moffitt Hospital, University of California, and Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center are reviewed. Only cases followed for more than three years or with autopsy findings are presented. For the primary lesion, over-all surgical control rate locally was 15/17 or 88 per cent. Over-all control rate with radiation therapy alone was 9/12 (75 per cent), and with surgical salvage 11/12 (92 per cent). Radiation therapy appears to be the treatment of choice for early stage lesions, reserving surgery for salvage. Prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node dissection for N0 lesions is not warranted. The role of chemotherapy needs further investigation.

  1. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  2. A case of metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs treated with korean medicine therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-05-01

    This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  3. P13.09ADVANCES IN CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY (BNCT) IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Detta, A.; Cruickshank, G.C.; Green, S.; Lockyer, N.P.; Ngoga, D.; Ghani, Z.; Phoenix, B.

    2014-01-01

    BNCT is a biologically targeted form of enhanced cellular radiotherapy where preferential accumulation of boron in the cancerous as opposed to adjacent normal cells is able to interact with incident neutrons to cause irreversible alpha particle DNA damage. The key to the implementation of this potentially powerful and selective therapy is the delivery of at least 30ppm 10B within the tumour tissue while minimising superfluous 10B in healthy tissue. It is thus an elegant technique for treating infiltrating tumours such as diffuse gliomas. In order to assess its clinical potential we carried out a pharmacokinetic study in glioblastoma patients where we sought to determine the optimal route of delivering a new formulation of the boronated drug (p-boronophenylalanine, BPA), its pharmacokinetic behaviour, toxicity profile, and cellular uptake. Using a number of analytical techniques, including inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), boron was measured at various times in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumour-related solid tissue spanning 0.5 h pre- and up to 48 h post-BPA infusion in newly-diagnosed patients (n = 10). Blood was sampled through a central catheter whilst the ECF was sampled by parenchymal microdialysis catheters, placed remotely from the tumour site. Urine was collected over the same time period. Tumour and brain-around tumour (BAT) tissue was sampled stereotactically at 2.5 h and 3.5 h post-infusion. IHC expression levels of the BPA transporter molecule, L-amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1), were recorded as % LAT-1 positive cells, and cellular boron levels were estimated as spatially resolved pixels in normalised-to-C+ isotopic SIMS images of the biopsies. There were no toxicity-related issues with this new formulation of BPA given at 375 mg/kg as a 2 h intravenous or intracarotid infusion with or without pre-infusion mannitol-induced BBB

  4. Evaluation of the dose enhancement of combined ¹⁰B + ¹⁵⁷Gd neutron capture therapy (NCT).

    PubMed

    Protti, N; Geninatti-Crich, S; Alberti, D; Lanzardo, S; Deagostino, A; Toppino, A; Aime, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Postuma, I; Altieri, S; Nikjoo, H

    2015-09-01

    An innovative molecule, GdBLDL, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been developed and its effectiveness as a BNCT carrier is currently under evaluation using in vivo experiments on small animal tumour models. The molecule contains both (10)B (the most commonly used NCT agent) and (157)Gd nuclei. (157)Gd is the second most studied element to perform NCT, mainly thanks to its high cross section for the capture of low-energy neutrons. The main drawback of (157)Gd neutron capture reaction is the very short range and low-energy secondary charged particles (Auger electrons), which requires (157)Gd to be very close to the cellular DNA to have an appreciable biological effect. Treatment doses were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations to ensure the optimised tumour irradiation and the sparing of the healthy organs of the irradiated animals. The enhancement of the absorbed dose due to the simultaneous presence of (10)B and (157)Gd in the experimental set-up was calculated and the advantage introduced by the presence of (157)Gd was discussed. PMID:26246584

  5. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, A.J.

    1997-08-19

    An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

  6. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  7. Treating anxiety after stroke using cognitive-behaviour therapy: Two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kneebone, Ian I.; Jeffries, Fiona W.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common after stroke. However, information on how to treat them with psychotherapy in this population is highly limited. Modified cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) has the potential to assist. Two cases of individuals treated with modified CBT for anxiety after stroke are presented. The modification was required in light of deficits in executive and memory function in one individual and in the context of communication difficulties in the other. The anxiety symptoms were treated over seven and nine sessions, respectively. Both participants improved following the intervention, and these improvements were maintained at 3 month follow-ups. Further case-series and randomised controlled designs are required to support and develop modified CBT for those with anxiety after stroke. PMID:23889561

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  9. Treating cancer patients. Practical monitoring and management of therapy-related complications.

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M.; McKenzie, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review investigation and management of some common long-term complications associated with cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Databases searched using MeSH key words "cancer chemotherapy," "cancer chemotherapy complications," "radiation therapy," and "radiation therapy complications" included Ovid and CANCERLIT. Overall the literature in this area is not strong; treatment guidelines and consensus conferences generally are lacking. Recommendations in this paper are mainly based on the results of individual studies and case reports, as few randomized controlled trials have been performed. Where appropriate, recommendations incorporate results of published treatment guidelines and consensus conferences. MAIN MESSAGE: For most solid tumours, patients should be most frequently monitored during the first 3 years after completing initial treatment for cure. Follow-up monitoring usually incorporates physical examination as well as radiologic and laboratory investigations. Patients should not be lost to follow up once treatment is completed, but monitored regularly, especially while they are at highest risk for disease recurrence. Long-term complications associated with cancer therapy include postsplenectomy sepsis syndrome; central and peripheral nervous system toxicities; ocular complications; thyroid, pituitary, testicular, or ovarian dysfunction; pulmonary toxicity; vascular or lymphatic, gastrointestinal, or osseous complications; genitourinary problems; and possible secondary malignancy. CONCLUSION: Primary care physicians are key to facilitating appropriate follow up of treated cancer patients. To do this, they must be aware of practical aspects of monitoring and management of therapy-related complications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11143585

  10. Treating intrusions, promoting resilience: an overview of therapies for trauma-related psychological disorders.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of psychotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be regarded as empirically demonstrated. Overall, effect sizes appear to be higher for psychotherapy than for medication. Many well-controlled trials with a mixed variety of trauma survivors have demonstrated that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) is effective in treating PTSD. Prolonged exposure therapy (PE) is currently seen as the treatment with the strongest evidence for its efficacy. Cognitive therapy (CT) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT), with their stronger emphasis on cognitive techniques, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) seem equally effective. More recent developments include brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD (BEPP) and narrative exposure therapy (NET). Emerging evidence shows that TF-CBT can successfully be applied in PTSD patients suffering from severe comorbidities such as borderline personality disorder or substance abuse disorder (Schnyder & Cloitre, 2015). There is also a trend towards developing "mini-interventions," that is, short modules tailored to approach specific problems. Moreover, evidence-based approaches should be complemented by interventions that aim at promoting human resilience to stress. Finally, given the globalization of our societies (Schnyder, 2013), culture-sensitive psychotherapists should try to understand the cultural components of a patient's illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. PMID:25511725

  11. Successful therapy with tonsillectomy plus pulse therapy for the relapse of pediatric IgA nephropathy treated with multi-drugs combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nobuko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Waragai, Tomoko; Oikawa, Tomoko; Kaneko, Masatoshi; Sato, Tomoko; Suyama, Kazuhide; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common form of chronic glomerulonephritis worldwide. In Japan, the treatment for use as an initial therapy was established in Guidelines for the Treatment of Childhood IgA nephropathy; however, no rescue therapy for recurrent or steroid-resistant pediatric IgAN was established. We report here a 15-year-old boy with severe IgAN, who was treated with combination therapy involving prednisolone, mizoribine, warfarin, and dilazep dihydrochloride for 2 years. The response to the combination therapy was good and both proteinuria and hematuria disappeared. The pathological findings at the second renal biopsy were improved and PSL was discontinued. However, due to nonadherence to the treatment regimen and tonsillitis, macrohematuria and an increase of proteinuria were again observed and the pathological findings at the third renal biopsy showed clear deterioration. The patient was, therefore, diagnosed with recurrent IgAN. Tonsillectomy plus methylprednisolone pulse therapy (TMP) was performed as a rescue therapy for the recurrence of severe IgAN. Both the proteinuria or hematuria subsequently disappeared, and no proteinuria or hematuria has been observed and kidney function has remained normal during a 5-year follow-up. The patient experienced no severe side effects associated with the drug regimens. In conclusion, our case suggests that TMP may be an effective and useful rescue therapy for recurrent IgAN after multi-drug combination therapy. PMID:27210310

  12. Impact of NRAS mutations for patients with advanced melanoma treated with immune therapies

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Marisa; Panageas, Katherine S.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Zhao, Zhiguo; Iams, Wade T.; Colgan, Marta; DeNoble, Sarah; Terry, Charles R.; Berry, Elizabeth G.; Iafrate, A. John; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Carvajal, Richard D.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Activating NRAS mutations are found in 15-20% of melanomas. Immune therapies have become a mainstay in advanced melanoma treatment. We sought to evaluate whether tumor genotype (e.g. NRAS mutations) correlate with benefit from immune therapy in melanoma. We identified 229 melanoma patients treated with immune therapies (interleukin-2, ipilimumab, or anti-programmed cell-death-1/ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1)) at three centers, and compared clinical outcomes following immune therapy for patients with or without NRAS mutations. Of the 229 melanoma patients, 60 had NRAS mutation, 53 had BRAF mutation, and 116 had NRAS/BRAF WT. The NRAS-mutant cohort had superior or a trend to superior outcomes compared to the other cohorts in terms of response to first-line immune therapy (28% vs. 16%, p=0.04), response to any line of immune therapy (32% vs. 20%, p=0.07), clinical benefit (response + stable disease lasting ≥24 weeks; 50% vs. 31%, p<0.01), and progression-free survival (median 4.1 vs. 2.9 months, p=0.09). Benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 was particularly marked in the NRAS cohort (clinical benefit rate 73% vs. 35%). In an independent group of patient samples, NRAS-mutant melanoma had higher PD-L1 expression (although not statistically significant) compared to other genotypes (8/12 vs. 9/20 samples with ≥1% expression; 6/12 vs 6/20 samples with ≥5% expression), suggesting a potential mechanism for the clinical results. This retrospective study suggests that NRAS mutations in advanced melanoma correlate with increased benefit from immune-based therapies compared to other genetic subtypes. If confirmed by prospective studies, this may be explained in part by high rates of PD-L1 expression. PMID:25736262

  13. Use of nude mice in experimental neutron capture therapy with 10B-BPA

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaoki, N.; Ueda, M.; Tamauchi, S.; Yamamoto, K.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    Mouse B16 melanoma allografts in nude mice were successfully treated by thermal neutron irradiation after IP injection of 10B-paraboronophenylalanine hydrochloride. The tumor growth was significantly suppressed for 4 weeks after irradiation, compared with animals given neutron irradiation alone. Tumor-bearing nude mice were shown to be useful for evaluating the treatment for melanoma.

  14. Invasive aspergillosis successfully treated by combined antifungal therapy and immunosuppressive monotherapy two months following heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Żabicki, Bartłomiej; Baszyńska-Wachowiak, Hanna; Straburzyńska-Migaj, Ewa; Juszkat, Robert; Grajek, Stefan; Jemielity, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is becoming increasingly prevalent, especially following transplantation. Invasive aspergillosis is associated with mortality. Successful therapy is related to early diagnosis and proper therapy. We present the case of a 61-year-old man suffering from invasive aspergillosis 2 months following heart transplantation. He was suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and he underwent orthotropic heart transplantation. He was readmitted to the Department of Cardiology 69 days following transplantation due to symptoms of productive cough for 5 days. It was accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath, and fever up to 39°C. He was slightly cyanotic and confused on physical examination. The patient's status deteriorated within the following 2 days. On bronchoscopic specimen examinations Aspergillus mould filaments were detected and the serum galactomannan index was 12.162. His blood saturation decreased to 85%. C-reactive protein serum level increased to 273 mg/l. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and intubated due to severe respiratory insufficiency. Computed tomography revealed massive, mostly homogeneous consolidation. The patient was treated with 200 mg of voriconazole and 50 mg of caspofungin daily. Caspofungin therapy was continued for 23 days and voriconazole was administered parenterally for 62 days. Voriconazole therapy was continued orally for 9 months. During combined antifungal therapy, the galactomannan serum index constantly decreased from 12.1 to 0.33 (end-point of caspofungin therapy) and to 0.23 (end-point of voriconazole parenteral administration). His immunosuppressive therapy was limited to calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus) monotherapy. Post-treatment imaging 9 months after diagnosis confirmed the efficacy of therapy as a lack of pulmonary infiltration associated with left apical peribronchial scarring as a result of treatment. The present case proved the efficiency of combined (voriconazole and caspofungin

  15. Improved monitoring system of neutron flux during boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harasawa, S.; Nakamoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Egawa, J.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of neutron flux in the course of a boron-neutron capture operation on a brain tumor has been achieved using a new monitoring system. A silicon surface barrier diode mounted with /sup 6/LiF instead of the previously reported borax is used to sense neutrons. The pulse heights of /sup 3/H and ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 6/Li(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 2/H reaction are sufficiently high and well separated from noises due to ..gamma.. rays. The effect of pulse-height reduction due to the radiation damage of the diode thus becomes smaller, permitting continuous monitoring. The relative error of the monitoring is within 2% over 5 hr for a neutron-flux density of 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2/ sec.

  16. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. MAGIC polymer gel for dosimetric verification in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Heikkinen, Sami; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Seppälä, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2007-01-01

    Radiation sensitive polymer gels are among the most promising three-dimensional dose verification tools developed to date. Polymer gel dosimeter known by the acronym MAGIC has been tested for evaluation of its use in boron neutron capture (BNCT) dosimetry. We irradiated a large (diameter 10 cm, length 20 cm) cylindrical gel phantom in the epithermal neutron beam of the Finnish BNCT facility at the FiR 1 nuclear reactor. Neutron irradiation was simulated with a Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP. Gel samples from the same production batch were also irradiated with 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator to compare dose response in the two different types of beams. Irradiated gel phantoms were imaged using MRI to determine their relaxation rate R2 maps. The measured and normalized dose distribution in the epithermal neutron beam was compared to the dose distribution calculated by computer simulation. The results support the feasibility MAGIC gel in BNCT dosimetry. PMID:17592463

  18. Gene therapy as a potential tool for treating neuroblastoma-a focused review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M D; Dravid, A; Kumar, A; Sen, D

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor caused by rapid division of undifferentiated neuroblasts, is the most common childhood malignancy affecting children aged <5 years. Several approaches and strategies developed and tested to cure neuroblastoma have met with limited success due to different reasons. Many oncogenes are deregulated during the onset and development of neuroblastoma and thus offer an opportunity to circumvent this disease if the expression of these genes is restored to normalcy. Gene therapy is a powerful tool with the potential to inhibit the deleterious effects of oncogenes by inserting corrected/normal genes into the genome. Both viral and non-viral vector-based gene therapies have been developed and adopted to deliver the target genes into neuroblastoma cells. These attempts have given hope to bringing in a new regime of treatment against neuroblastoma. A few gene-therapy-based treatment strategies have been tested in limited clinical trials yielding some positive results. This mini review is an attempt to provide an overview of the available options of gene therapy to treat neuroblastoma. PMID:27080224

  19. Initial Experience of Sorafenib Neoadjuvant Therapy Combined with Retroperitoneoscopy in Treating T2 Large Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-hua; Yuan, He-jia; Wang, Ke; Wu, Ji-tao; Liu, Qing-zuo; Yu, Sheng-qiang; Men, Chang-ping; Gao, Zhen-li; Wang, Jiahui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the safety and feasibility of sorafenib neoadjuvant therapy combined with retroperitoneoscopic radical nephrectomy (RRN) in treating T2 large renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods. Retrospectively analyzed 5 cases (2 males and 3 females, aged 52–73 years) of T2 stage large RCC who receive preoperative sorafenib targeted treatment (400 mg bid for 1–3 months) and RRN between March, 2013, and July, 2014. Patient information, therapeutic regimen, drug adverse effect, tumor changes before and after surgery, and perioperative parameters were recorded. Results. During the sorafenib therapy adverse effects included 2 cases of hypertension (Grade I toxicity), 1 case of hand-foot syndrome (Grade I), and 1 case of diarrhea (Grade II), which were all tolerable for patients. CT scan and histopathological tests confirmed significant reduction in the longest dimension (LD) and medium density (MD) of the tumor after therapy as well as tumor hemorrhage, necrosis, and cystic degeneration. All 5 patients received RRN surgery successfully around 2 weeks after drug discontinuation with only 1 case of perioperative complication. Conclusions. Sorafenib neoadjuvant therapy could significantly reduce the size and aggressiveness of T2 large renal tumors, thus reducing the operative challenge and enabling patients who were previously disqualified for operation to receive surgical treatment. PMID:26421296

  20. A Feedback Control Model of Comprehensive Therapy for Treating Immunogenic Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Xiao, Yanni; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    Surgery is the traditional method for treating cancers, but it often fails to cure patients for complex reasons so new therapeutic approaches that include both surgery and immunotherapy have recently been proposed. These have been shown to be effective, clinically, in inhibiting cancer cells while allowing retention of immunologic memory. This comprehensive strategy is guided by whether a population of tumour cells has or has not exceeded a threshold density. Conditions for successful control of tumours in an immune tumour system were modeled and the related dynamics were addressed. A mathematical model with state-dependent impulsive interventions is formulated to describe combinations of surgery with immunotherapy. By analyzing the properties of the Poincaré map, we examine the global dynamics of the immune tumour system with state-dependent feedback control, including the existence and stability of the semi-trivial order-1 periodic solution and the positive order-k periodic solution. The main results showed that surgery alone can only control the tumour size below a certain level while there is no immunologic memory. If comprehensive therapy involving combining surgery with immunotherapy is considered, then not only can the cancers be controlled below a certain level, but the immune system can also retain its activity. The existence of positive order-k periodic solutions implies that periodical therapy is needed to control the cancers. However, choosing the treatment frequency and the strength of the therapy remains challenging, and hence a strategy of individual-based therapy is suggested.

  1. Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Richard W; Cappel, Mark; Goedjen, Brent; Gordon, Matthew; Kirsch, Brandon; Gilstrap, Cheryl; Bagaria, Sanjay; Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi

    2015-01-01

    Therapies that activate the immune system through blocking the binding of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) present on tumors and PD-1 (programmed death 1) present on activated immune cells are revolutionizing the care for patients with cancer. These therapies work by inhibiting negative regulators of the immune system, thereby decreasing a tumor's ability to evade the immune system. The side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are generally mild and as expected are related to autoimmune reactions. Two of the most common side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are rash and pruritus occurring in approximately 20% of patients. Although the rash is generally recognized to be immune mediated, the exact mechanisms of the rash remain unclear. Herein, we report three cases of lichenoid dermatitis in three patients treated with MK-3475 (anti-PD-1) that were characterized with marked T-cell infiltrates with few PD-1-positive cells. The rashes in all three patients were relatively mild, allowing treatment to continue despite the rashes. PMID:25287118

  2. Treating enuresis in a patient with ADHD: application of a novel behavioural modification therapy.

    PubMed

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Ruiz-Manrique, Gonzalo; Montañes, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old patient diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid enuresis disorder, who was treated with methylphenidate for the past 3 months and a novel behavioural modification therapy by using an application called 'Enuresis Trainer'. This therapeutic application is basically an interactive 'Bedwetting Calendar', based on traditional cognitive behavioural modification therapies and positive reinforcement systems. Enuresis is defined as the failure of voluntary control of the urethral sphincter. The prevalence of enuresis is 15-20% in the child population; however, children with ADHD had a 2.7 times higher incidence of nocturnal enuresis. Bedwetting is a common cause of isolation in children as well as loss of self-esteem and other psychological distress for the child and the family. PMID:24916977

  3. Application of laser therapy in treating inherited forms of psychoverbal retardation in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, V. Y.; Voinova, V. M.; Il'in, L. B.; Troitskaya, L. A.; Dobrynina, E. V.; Kazantseva, L. Z.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying combined laser therapy in the treatment of 619 children (422 children constituted the experimental group and 197 children composed the control group) affected by inherited forms of psychoverbal retardation. It was found that low-intensity He-Ne laser radiation with the wavelength of 632.8 nm and the output power of 2 mW made it possible to improve the children's mental development. Moreover, it effectively increased their mental activities, such as speech, communication, arbitrary behavior regulation, and locomotory functions. Laser therapy applied in treating children affected by the arrested mental development aggravated by obesity additionally decreased their body weight, increased their field of vision, and eliminated dyslipidemia. It was also found that contraindications to He-Ne laser acupuncture included phenylketonuria-related noncorrected metabolic defects, convulsive syndromes, epileptic activities, convulsive readiness, and cerebrolysine intramuscular injections.

  4. Treating enuresis in a patient with ADHD: application of a novel behavioural modification therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Ruiz-Manrique, Gonzalo; Montañes, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old patient diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid enuresis disorder, who was treated with methylphenidate for the past 3 months and a novel behavioural modification therapy by using an application called ‘Enuresis Trainer’. This therapeutic application is basically an interactive ‘Bedwetting Calendar’, based on traditional cognitive behavioural modification therapies and positive reinforcement systems. Enuresis is defined as the failure of voluntary control of the urethral sphincter. The prevalence of enuresis is 15–20% in the child population; however, children with ADHD had a 2.7 times higher incidence of nocturnal enuresis. Bedwetting is a common cause of isolation in children as well as loss of self-esteem and other psychological distress for the child and the family. PMID:24916977

  5. Chronic depression treated successfully with novel taping therapy: a new approach to the treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Hyun; Hwang, Hwa Soo; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Sang Nam; Abanes, Jane J; Lee, Bong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite improved research in the treatment, depression remains difficult to treat. Till date, successful treatment of depression using taping therapy has not been known yet. We report cases where patients with severe depressive symptoms were successfully treated by taping therapy, a new approach. Methods In case 1, a patient was taking several psychiatric medications for 10 years and admitted often to the psychiatric hospital with a leaning head, flexible legs, and nearly closed eyes; in case 2, a patient after a hysterectomy complained with heart palpitations, depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, insomnia, and gastrointestinal problems; and in case 3, a patient with complaints of adverse effects from antidepressant medications had suicidal thoughts frequently. The medical tapes were placed on acupoints, trigger points, and pain points found by finger pressing examination in the chest, sides, and upper back of the patients. Results In case 1, the patient started weeping immediately after the first treatment. He discontinued psychiatric drugs and returned to baseline functioning after 2 months. In case 2, the patient felt at ease showing decreased palpitation immediately after the first treatment, and after 1 week, she quit medications. In case 3, the patient experienced a sense of calmness following the first treatment and recovered from her symptoms after 2 weeks. Conclusion These results suggest the following key points: examination of acupoints and trigger points of chest, sides, and upper back is useful in the assessment of depression; regulating bioelectric currents on these points is helpful in the treatment of depression; and depression can be treated successfully with taping therapy. PMID:27330295

  6. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  7. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of Gd-based nanoparticles to tag boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Corti, M.; Bonora, M.; Borsa, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S.; Zonta, C.; Clerici, A. M.; Cansolino, L.; Ferrari, C.; Dionigi, P.; Porta, A.; Zanoni, G.; Vidari, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report the investigation of new organic complexes containing a magnetic moment (Gd-based molecular nanomagnets), which can serve the double purpose of acting as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents, and at the same time act as contrast agents to detect the molecule in the tissue by a proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also explore the possibility of monitoring the concentration of the BNCT agent directly via proton and boron NMR relaxation. The absorption of {sup 10}B-enriched molecules inside tumoral liver tissues has been shown by NMR measurements and confirmed by {alpha} spectroscopy. A new molecular Gd-tagged nanomagnet and BNCT agent (GdBPA) has been synthesized and characterized measuring its relaxivity R{sub 1} between 10 kHz and 66 MHz, and its use as a contrast agent in MRI has been demonstrated. The NMR-based evidence of the absorption of GdBPA into living tumoral cells is also shown.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of Gd-based nanoparticles to tag boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M.; Bonora, M.; Borsa, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S.; Zonta, C.; Clerici, A. M.; Cansolino, L.; Ferrari, C.; Dionigi, P.; Porta, A.; Zanoni, G.; Vidari, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report the investigation of new organic complexes containing a magnetic moment (Gd-based molecular nanomagnets), which can serve the double purpose of acting as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents, and at the same time act as contrast agents to detect the molecule in the tissue by a proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also explore the possibility of monitoring the concentration of the BNCT agent directly via proton and boron NMR relaxation. The absorption of 10B-enriched molecules inside tumoral liver tissues has been shown by NMR measurements and confirmed by α spectroscopy. A new molecular Gd-tagged nanomagnet and BNCT agent (GdBPA) has been synthesized and characterized measuring its relaxivity R1 between 10 kHz and 66 MHz, and its use as a contrast agent in MRI has been demonstrated. The NMR-based evidence of the absorption of GdBPA into living tumoral cells is also shown.

  11. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  12. Optimization of the Epithermal Neutron Beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2004-05-01

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  13. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  14. Computational and experimental physics performance characterization of the neutron capture therapy research facility at Washington State Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D. W.; Sloan, P. E.; Venhuizen, J. R.; Wemple, C. A.; Tripard, G. E.; Fox, K.; Corwin, E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the final beam characterization measurements for a dual mode epithermal-thermal beam facility for neutron capture therapy research that was recently constructed at the Washington State Univ. TRIGA{sup TM} research reactor. The results show that the performance of the beam facility is consistent with the design computations and with international standards for the intended application. A useful epithermal neutron flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-s is produced at the irradiation point with the beam in epithermal mode and shaped by a 10-cm circular aperture plate. When the beam is thermalized with approximately 34 cm of heavy water, the useful thermal flux at the irradiation point is approximately 3.5 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}-s. The new WSU facility is one of only two such installations currently operating in the US. (authors)

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent oral cancer and metastasis of cervical lymph node.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ariyoshi, Y; Shimahara, M; Miyatake, S; Kawabata, S; Ono, K; Suzuki, M; Maruhashi, A

    2009-07-01

    We treated 6 patients with recurrent oral cancer and metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes after conventional treatments in 5 and non-conventional in 1 using BNCT, and herein report our results. The clinical response in our patients ranged from CR to PD. In 5 cases, spontaneous pain decreased immediately after BNCT. Three of the 6 are alive at the time of writing and we found that BNCT contributed to QOL improvement in all. PMID:19395269

  16. Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct treated with proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kota; Arai, Chiaki; Suda, Toshihito; Nagaoka, Masato; Shimura, Eiji; Yanagisawa, Sawako; Edamatsu, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the lacrimal passage, particularly of the nasolacrimal duct, are rare. We describe a 72-year-old woman who presented with lacrimation 5 years previously. She had pain and bloody and purulent lacrimation, and a mass was identified in the inferior meatus. Accordingly, she was diagnosed with primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct. She was treated with proton beam therapy and showed a favorable response. Owing to the long-term risks of recurrence and distant metastasis, adenoid cystic carcinoma requires sufficient follow-up. PMID:25998851

  17. Efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy to treat driving phobia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wald, J; Taylor, S

    2000-01-01

    An AB case design was used to examine the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) in treating driving phobia. After a one week baseline, the patient received three treatment sessions over a ten day period. Treatment included practice of four VR driving scenarios. Peak anxiety decreased within and across sessions. Ratings of anxiety and avoidance declined from pre-treatment and post-treatment, with gains maintained at seven month followup. Phobia-related interference in daily functioning similarly decreased. The results suggest that it would be useful to further evaluate the efficacy of VRET for driving phobia in controlled clinical trials. PMID:11494960

  18. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis diagnosed on clinical grounds and treated with maggot debridement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, Anna Louise; Bedlow, Alison

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a history of deep vein thrombosis presented with painful bruising and blistering on his left leg 7–10 days after warfarin treatment. A complicated 2-month treatment followed, where vasculitis was originally diagnosed from histological findings before the final diagnosis of warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) was made on clinical grounds. Warfarin was stopped, reversed and low molecular weight heparin started but, the lesions had progressed to full thickness necrosis. This was originally treated with conventional surgical debridement before introducing maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in an effort to try to salvage the limb. PMID:23362073

  19. A Bystander Effect Observed in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Study of the Induction of Mutations in the HPRT Locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kinashi, Yuko . E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Takahashi, Sentaro; Ono, Koji

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by {alpha}-particles during boron neutron capture therapy, we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, and cells that did not contain the boron compound. The BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha}-particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were affected only by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. Methods and Materials: The lethality and mutagenicity measured by the frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the resulting cell population. The molecular structures of the mutations were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: Because of the bystander effect, the frequency of mutations increased in the cells located nearby the BSH-containing cells compared with control cells. Molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were less than those induced by the original neutron irradiation. Conclusion: These results suggested that in boron neutron capture therapy, the mutations caused by the bystander effect and those caused by the original neutron irradiation are induced by different mechanisms.

  20. Boronated dipeptide borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a potential boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, M; Powell, W; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Hosmane, N S; Kirihata, M; Ono, K; Masunaga, S I; Kinashi, Y; Miyatake, S I; Hashimoto, N

    2001-07-01

    Takagaki, M., Ono, K., Masunaga, S-I., Kinashi, Y., Oda, Y., Miyatake, S-I., Hashimoto, N., Powell, W., Sood, A. and Spielvogel, B. F. Boronated Dipeptide Borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a Potential Boron Carrier in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Radiat. Res. 156, 118-122 (2001).A boronated dipeptide, borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine (BGPA), was synthesized as a possible boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. In vitro, at equal concentrations of (10)B in the extracellular medium, BGPA had the same effect in BNCT as p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Boron analysis was carried out using prompt gamma-ray spectrometry and track-etch autoradiography. The tumor:blood and tumor:normal brain (10)B concentration ratios were 8.9 +/- 2.1 and 3.0 +/- 1.2, respectively, in rats bearing intracranial C6 gliosarcomas using alpha-particle track autoradiography. The IC(50), i.e. the dose capable of inhibiting the growth of C6 gliosarcoma cells by 50% after 3 days of incubation, was 5.9 x 10(-3) M BGPA, which is similar to that of 6.4 x 10(-3) M for BPA. The amide bond of BGPA is free from enzymatic attack, since it is protected from hydrolysis by the presence of a boron atom at the alpha-carbon position of glycine. These results suggest promise for the use of this agent for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Further preclinical studies of BGPA are warranted, since BGPA has advantages over both BPA and BSH. PMID:11418080

  1. Therapies for Musculoskeletal Disease: Can we Treat Two Birds with One Stone?

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Christian M.; Mokbel, Nancy; DiGirolamo, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases are highly prevalent with staggering annual health care costs across the globe. The combined wasting of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis)— both in normal aging and pathologic states—can lead to vastly compounded risk for fracture in patients. Until now, our therapeutic approach to the prevention of such fractures has focused solely on bone, but our increasing understanding of the interconnected biology of muscle and bone has begun to shift our treatment paradigm for musculoskeletal disease. Targeting pathways that centrally regulate both bone and muscle (eg, GH/IGF-1, sex steroids, etc.) and newly emerging pathways that might facilitate communication between these 2 tissues (eg, activin/myostatin) might allow a greater therapeutic benefit and/or previously unanticipated means by which to treat these frail patients and prevent fracture. In this review, we will discuss a number of therapies currently under development that aim to treat musculoskeletal disease in precisely such a holistic fashion. PMID:24633910

  2. Possible adverse events in children treated by manual therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pediatric manual therapy is controversial within the medical community particularly with respect to adverse events. Pediatric manual therapy (Ped MT) is commonly used by a number of professions such as chiropractors, osteopaths and naturopaths for a variety of treatments in children. Ped MT interventions range from advice, light touch, massage, through to mobilisation and high velocity spinal manipulation. However, current evidence related to adverse events associated with Ped MT is not well understood. Objective To update the clinical research literature from the 2007 report by Vohra, Johnston, Cramer and Humphreys on possible adverse events in children treated by spinal manipulation. Methods A review of the clinical research literature from June 2004 until January 2010 as reported in MEDLINE, PubMed and PubMed Central for adverse events specifically related to the treatment of pediatric cases by manual therapy. Results Only three new clinical studies, one systematic review with meta-analysis and one evidence report were identified. Two clinical studies reported on chiropractic care and one on osteopathic spinal manipulation in children. The systematic review investigated all studies of adverse events and manual therapy and was not specific for pediatric patients. The evidence review focused on effectiveness of spinal manipulation in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. No serious or catastrophic adverse events were reported in the clinical studies or systematic review. However for adults, it has been estimated that between 0.003% and 0.13% of manual therapy treatments may result in a serious adverse event. Although mild to moderate adverse events are common in adults, an accurate estimate from high quality pediatric studies is currently not available. Conclusions There is currently insufficient research evidence related to adverse events and manual therapy. However, clinical studies and systematic reviews from adult patients undergoing manual

  3. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  4. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for HER2+ breast cancers: A feasibility study evaluating BNCT for potential role in breast conservation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Peter Anthony

    A novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) regimen for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancers has been proposed as an alternative to whole breast irradiation for breast conservation therapy patients. The proposed therapy regimen is based on the assumed production of boron delivery agents that would be synthesized from compounds of Trastuzumab (Herceptin ®) and oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). The combination of the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody and the high boron loading capability of OPDs has led to the assumption that boron could be delivered to the HER2+ cancer cells at Tumor to Healthy Tissue ratios (T:H) of up to 35:1 and boron concentrations above 50 μg/g. This significantly increased boron delivery efficiency has opened new BNCT possibilities. This proof of concept study examined treatment parameters derived as the results in previous efforts in the context of patient-specific geometry and compared calculated dose results to those observed during actual patient therapy. These results were based on dose calculations performed with a set of calculated Kerma coefficients derived from tissues specific to the regions of interest for breast cancer. A comparison was made of the dose to the tumor region, the patient's skin, and the peripheral organs. The results of this study demonstrated that, given the performance of the proposed boron delivery agent, the BNCT treatment regimen is feasible. The feasibility is based on the findings that the equivalent dose could be delivered to the treatment volume with less dose to the skin and peripheral organs. This is anticipated to improve the treatment outcomes by maintaining local control of tumor cells while reducing dose to healthy tissues.

  6. Baseline Serum Testosterone in Men Treated With Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Mack; Bae, Kyounghwa; Lawton, Colleen; Donnelly, B.J.; Grignon, David; Hanks, Gerald E.; Porter, Arthur; Lepor, Herbert; Venketesan, Varagur; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: It is believed that men diagnosed with prostate cancer and a low baseline serum testosterone (BST) may have more aggressive disease, and it is frequently recommended they forgo testosterone replacement therapy. We used two large Phase III trials involving androgen deprivation therapy and external beam radiation therapy to assess the significance of a BST. Methods and Materials: All patients with a BST and complete data (n = 2,478) were included in this analysis and divided into four categories: 'Very Low BST' (VLBST) {<=}16.5th percentile of BST ({<=}248 ng/dL; n = 408); 'Low BST' (LBST) >16.5th percentile and {<=}33rd percentile (>248 ng/dL but {<=}314 ng/dL; n = 415); 'Average BST' (ABST) >33rd percentile and {<=}67th percentile (314-437 ng/dL; n = 845); and 'High BST' (HBST) >67th percentile (>437 ng/dL; n = 810). Outcomes included overall survival, distant metastasis, biochemical failure, and cause-specific survival. All outcomes were adjusted for the following covariates: treatment arm, BST, age (<70 vs. {>=}70), prostate-specific antigen (PSA; <10 vs. 10 {<=} PSA <20 vs. 20 {<=}), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7 vs. 8-10); T stage (T1-T2 vs. T3-T4), and Karnofsky Performance Status (60-90 vs. 100). Results: On multivariable analysis age, Gleason score, and PSA were independently associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure, distant metastasis and a reduced cause-specific and overall survival (p < 0.05), but BST was not. Conclusions: BST does not affect outcomes in men treated with external beam radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

  7. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  9. Combination therapy with iron chelation and vancomycin in treating murine staphylococcemia.

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Spellberg, B; Gebremariam, T; Lee, H; Xiong, Y Q; French, S W; Bayer, A; Ibrahim, A S

    2014-05-01

    Iron acquisition is a virulence factor for Staphylococcus aureus. We assessed the efficacy of the iron chelator, deferasirox (Def), alone or in combination with vancomycin (Van) against two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro and in a murine bacteremia model. In vitro time-kill assays were carried out against MRSA or vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strains. The impact of Def on Van binding to the surface of S. aureus was measured by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we compared the efficacy of Def, Van, or both drugs in treating S. aureus bacteremia in a murine model. Combination therapy reduced MRSA and VISA viability in vitro versus either drug alone or untreated controls (p < 0.005); this outcome was correlated with enhanced Van surface binding to S. aureus cells. In vivo, Def + Van combination therapy significantly reduced the bacterial burden in mice kidneys (p = 0.005) and spleen (p < 0.001), and reduced the severity of infection with MRSA or VISA strains compared to placebo-treated mice. Our results show that Def enhances the in vitro and in vivo capacity of Van-mediated MRSA killing via a mechanism that appears to involve increased binding of Van to the staphylococcal surface. Iron chelation is a promising, novel adjunctive therapeutic strategy for MRSA and VISA infections. PMID:24292099

  10. Conformal Bulk Ablation And Therapy Monitoring Using Intracorporeal Image-Treat Ultrasound Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makin, I. R.; Faidi, W.; Mast, T. D.; Runk, M.; Slayton, M.; Barthe, P.

    2005-03-01

    For thermal treatment of soft tissue, an alternative to HIFU is bulk ablation using unfocused or weakly focused intense ultrasound fields. This approach offers faster ablation of large tissue volumes and can be performed in minimally invasive (e.g., laparoscopic or percutaneous) procedures. Here, methods for image-guided ablation of large tissue volumes using compact dual-modality (image and treat) ultrasound arrays are reported including tissue modification caused by the thermal therapy. The dual-modality arrays developed have 16-64 elements spanning apertures of 2-8 mm in elevation and 24-48 mm in azimuth. These devices can provide both therapeutically significant power (e.g. source intensity > 80 W/cm2 at 3.1 MHz) and broad bandwidth (e.g. 50% with a center frequency of 3.5 MHz) for imaging. Imaging challenges associated with limited probe dimensions and channel count are met using signal processing techniques that improve definition and contrast, allowing high-quality B-scan images and useful monitoring information to be obtained during therapy planning and treatment. Using linear and rotational scanning methods, large tissue volumes (20-60 cc) can be treated. The approach can be applied for ablation of other soft tissue pathologies, e.g., kidney, heart, uterus, brain, GI tract, etc.

  11. Stochastic modelling of wall stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms treated by a gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Kaci, Faïza; Ouni, Anissa Eddhahak; Dai, Jianping; Allaire, Eric; Zidi, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic mechanical model using the membrane theory was used to simulate the in vivo mechanical behaviour of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in order to compute the wall stresses after stabilisation by gene therapy. For that, both length and diameter of AAAs rats were measured during their expansion. Four groups of animals, control and treated by an endovascular gene therapy during 3 or 28 days were included. The mechanical problem was solved analytically using the geometric parameters and assuming the shape of aneurysms by a 'parabolic-exponential curve'. When compared to controls, stress variations in the wall of AAAs for treated arteries during 28 days decreased, while they were nearly constant at day 3. The measured geometric parameters of AAAs were then investigated using probability density functions (pdf) attributed to every random variable. Different trials were useful to define a reliable confidence region in which the probability to have a realisation is equal to 99%. The results demonstrated that the error in the estimation of the stresses can be greater than 28% when parameters uncertainties are not considered in the modelling. The relevance of the proposed approach for the study of AAA growth may be studied further and extended to other treatments aimed at stabilisation AAAs, using biotherapies and pharmacological approaches. PMID:21264784

  12. Experimental evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy of human breast carcinoma implanted on nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Satya Ranjan

    2000-06-01

    An in-pool small animal irradiation neutron tube (SAINT) facility was designed, constructed and installed at the University of Virginia Nuclear Research Reactor (UVAR). Thermal neutron flux profiles were measured by foil activation analysis (gold) and verified with DORT and MCNP computer code models. The gamma-ray absorbed dose in the neutron-gamma mixed field was determined from TLD measurements. The SAINT thermal neutron flux was used to investigate the well characterized human breast cancer cell line MCF-7B on both in-vitro samples and in- vivo animal subjects. Boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in 95% 10B) was used as a neutron capturing agent. The in-vitro response of MCF-7B human breast carcinoma cells to BPA in a mixed field of neutron-gamma radiation or pure 60Co gamma radiation was investigated. The best result (lowest surviving fraction) was observed in cell cultures pre-incubated with BPA and given the neutron irradiation. The least effective treatment consisted of 60Co irradiation only. Immunologically deficient nude mice were inoculated subcutaneously with human breast cancer MCF-7B cells and estradiol pellets (to support tumor growth). The tumor volume in the mouse control group increased over time, as expected. The group of mice exposed only to neutron treatment exhibited initial tumor volume reduction lasting until 35 days following the treatment, followed by renewed tumor growth. Both groups given BPA plus neutron treatment showed continuous reduction in tumor volume over the 55-day observation period. The group given the higher BPA concentration showed the best tumor reduction response. The results on both in-vitro and in-vivo studies showed increased cell killing with BPA, substantiating the incorporation of BPA into the tumor or cell line. Therefore, BNCT may be a possible choice for the treatment of human breast carcinoma. However, prior to the initiation of any clinical studies, it is necessary to determine the therapeutic efficacy in a large

  13. The acceleration of boron neutron capture therapy using multi-linked mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) fused cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kondo, Natsuko; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Bin, Feng; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Hirota, Yuki; Kawabata, Shinji; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Ohmori, Iori; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Ono, Koji; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    New anti-cancer therapy with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction of boron-10 with neutron irradiation. The median survival of BNCT patients with glioblastoma was almost twice as long as those receiving standard therapy in a Japanese BNCT clinical trial. In this clinical trial, two boron compounds, BPA (boronophenylalanine) and BSH (sodium borocaptate), were used for BNCT. BPA is taken up into cells through amino acid transporters that are expressed highly in almost all malignant cells, but BSH cannot pass through the cell membrane and remains outside the cell. We simulated the energy transfer against the nucleus at different locations of boron from outside the cell to the nuclear region with neutron irradiation and concluded that there was a marked difference between inside and outside the cell in boron localization. To overcome this disadvantage of BSH in BNCT, we used a cell-penetrating peptide system for transduction of BSH. CPP (cell-membrane penetrating peptide) is very common peptide domains that transduce many physiologically active substances into cells in vitro and in vivo. BSH-fused CPPs can penetrate the cell membrane and localize inside a cell. To increase the boron ratio in one BSH-peptide molecule, 8BSH fused to 11R with a dendritic lysine structure was synthesized and administrated to malignant glioma cells and a brain tumor mouse model. 8BSH-11R localized at the cell nucleus and showed a very high boron value in ICP results. With neutron irradiation, the 8BSH-11R administrated group showed a significant cancer killing effect compared to the 100 times higher concentration of BSH-administrated group. We concluded that BSH-fused CPPs were one of the most improved and potential boron compounds in the next-stage BNCT trial and 8BSH-11R may be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:24452095

  14. Supervised physical therapy in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer 1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Nara Fernanda Braz da Silva; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of physical therapy on the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. Methods: a total of 35 participants were randomized into two groups, with 18 in the control group (CG) and 17 in the study group (SG). Both of the groups underwent three evaluations to assess the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs, and the study group underwent supervised physical therapy for the upper limbs. Results: the CG had deficits in external rotation in evaluations 1, 2, and 3, whereas the SG had deficits in flexion, abduction, and external rotation in evaluation 1. The deficit in abduction was recovered in evaluation 2, whereas the deficits in all movements were recovered in evaluation 3. No significant differences in perimetry were observed between the groups. Conclusion: the applied supervised physical therapy was effective in recovering the deficit in abduction after radiotherapy, and the deficits in flexion and external rotation were recovered within two months after the end of radiotherapy. Registration number of the clinical trial: NCT02198118. PMID:27533265

  15. Pruritus in Patients Treated with Targeted Cancer Therapies: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ensslin, Courtney J; Rosen, Alyx C; Wu, Shenhong; Lacouture, Mario E

    2014-01-01

    Background Pruritus has been anecdotally described in association with targeted cancer therapies. The risk of pruritus has not been systematically ascertained. Objective A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature was conducted for axitinib, cetuximab, dasatinib, erlotinib, everolimus, gefitinib, imatinib, ipilimumab, lapatinib, nilotinib, panitumumab, pazopanib, rituximab, sorafenib, temsirolimus, tositumomab, vandetanib, and vemurafenib. Methods Databases from PubMed, Web of Science (01/1998–07/2012), and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstracts (2004–2012) were searched. Incidence and risk (RR) of pruritus were calculated using random or fixed effects model. Results The incidences of all-grade and high-grade pruritus were 17.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 16.0%−19.0%) and 1.4% (95% CI: 1.2%−1.6%), respectively. There was an increased risk of all-grade pruritus (RR=2.90 (95% CI: 1.76–4.77, p<0.001)); and variation among different drugs (P<0.001). Limitations The reporting of pruritus may vary, resulting from concomitant medications, comorbidities, and underlying malignancies. We found a higher incidence of pruritus in patients with solid tumors, concordant with those targeted therapies with the highest pruritus incidences. Conclusion There is a significant risk of developing pruritus in patients receiving targeted therapies. In order to prevent suboptimal dosing and decreased quality of life, patients should be counseled and treated against this untoward symptom. PMID:23981682

  16. Novel personalized therapies for cystic fibrosis: treating the basic defect in all patients.

    PubMed

    Amaral, M D

    2015-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetic life-shortening condition in Caucasians. Despite being a multi-organ disease, CF is classically diagnosed by symptoms of acute/chronic respiratory disease, with persistent pulmonary infections and mucus plugging of the airways and failure to thrive. These multiple symptoms originate from dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a channel that mediates anion transport across epithelia. Indeed, establishment of a definite CF diagnosis requires proof of CFTR dysfunction, commonly through the so-called sweat Cl(-) test. Many drug therapies, including mucolytics and antibiotics, aim to alleviate the symptoms of CF lung disease. However, new therapies to modulate defective CFTR, the basic defect underlying CF, have started to reach the clinic, and several others are in development or in clinical trials. The novelty of these therapies is that, besides targeting the basic defect underlying CF, they are mutation specific. Indeed, even this monogenic disease is influenced by a large number of different genes and biological pathways as well as by environmental factors that are difficult to assess. Accordingly, every person with CF is unique and so functional assessment of patients' tissues ex vivo is key for diagnosing and predicting the severity of this disease. Of note, such assessment will also be crucial to assess drug responses, in order to effectively treat all CF patients. It is not because it is a monogenic disorder that personalized treatment for CF is much easier than for complex disorders. PMID:25266997

  17. Design of a rotating facility for extracorporal treatment of an explanted liver with disseminated metastases by boron neutron capture therapy with an epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Nievaart, V A; Moss, R L; Kloosterman, J L; van der Hagen, T H J J; van Dam, H; Wittig, A; Malago, M; Sauerwein, W

    2006-07-01

    In 2001, at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia (Italy), a patient suffering from diffuse liver metastases from an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid was successfully treated by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The procedure involved boron infusion prior to hepatectomy, irradiation of the explanted liver at the thermal column of the reactor, and subsequent reimplantation. A complete response was observed. This encouraging outcome stimulated the Essen/Petten BNCT group to investigate whether such an extracorporal irradiation could be performed at the BNCT irradiation facility at the HFR Petten (The Netherlands), which has very different irradiation characteristics than the Pavia facility. A computational study has been carried out. A rotating PMMA container with a liver, surrounded by PMMA and graphite, is simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Due to the rotation and neutron moderation of the PMMA container, the initial epithermal neutron beam provides a nearly homogeneous thermal neutron field in the liver. The main conditions for treatment as reported from the Pavia experiment, i.e. a thermal neutron fluence of 4 x 10(12) +/- 20% cm(-2), can be closely met at the HFR in an acceptable time, which, depending on the defined conditions, is between 140 and 180 min. PMID:16808623

  18. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuaron, John J.; Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Hug, Eugen; Cahlon, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n = 28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01–3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%–30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%–5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0–65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03–3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  19. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cuaron, John J.; Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Hug, Eugen; Cahlon, Oren

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  20. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  1. Tumor Treating Field Therapy in Combination with Bevacizumab for the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ayman I.

    2014-01-01

    A novel device that employs TTF therapy has recently been developed and is currently in use for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM). It was FDA approved in April 2011 for the treatment of patients 22 years or older with rGBM. The device delivers alternating electric fields and is programmed to ensure maximal tumor cell kill1. Glioblastoma is the most common type of glioma and has an estimated incidence of approximately 10,000 new cases per year in the United States alone2. This tumor is particularly resistant to treatment and is uniformly fatal especially in the recurrent setting3-5. Prior to the approval of the TTF System, the only FDA approved treatment for rGBM was bevacizumab6. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeted against the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein that drives tumor angiogenesis7. By blocking the VEGF pathway, bevacizumab can result in a significant radiographic response (pseudoresponse), improve progression free survival and reduce corticosteroid requirements in rGBM patients8,9. Bevacizumab however failed to prolong overall survival in a recent phase III trial26. A pivotal phase III trial (EF-11) demonstrated comparable overall survival between physicians’ choice chemotherapy and TTF Therapy but better quality of life were observed in the TTF arm10. There is currently an unmet need to develop novel approaches designed to prolong overall survival and/or improve quality of life in this unfortunate patient population. One appealing approach would be to combine the two currently approved treatment modalities namely bevacizumab and TTF Therapy. These two treatments are currently approved as monotherapy11,12, but their combination has never been evaluated in a clinical trial. We have developed an approach for combining those two treatment modalities and treated 2 rGBM patients. Here we describe a detailed methodology outlining this novel treatment protocol and present representative data from one of the

  2. Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans: Long-term Outcomes of 53 Patients Treated With Conservative Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, Katherine O.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Tsai, C. Jillian; Feig, Barry W.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes of conservative surgery and radiation therapy (RT) treatment in patients with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 53 consecutive dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans patients treated with surgery and preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy between 1972 and 2010. Median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 1-25 cm). Seven patients (13%) were treated with preoperative RT (50-50.4 Gy) and 46 patients (87%) with postoperative RT (60-66 Gy). Of the 46 patients receiving postoperative radiation, 3 (7%) had gross disease, 14 (30%) positive margins, 26 (57%) negative margins, and 3 (7%) uncertain margin status. Radiation dose ranged from 50 to 66 Gy (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: At a median follow-up time of 6.5 years (range, 0.5 months-23.5 years), 2 patients (4%) had disease recurrence, and 3 patients (6%) had died. Actuarial overall survival was 98% at both 5 and 10 years. Local control was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Disease-free survival was 98% and 93% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The presence of fibrosarcomatous change was not associated with increased risk of local or distant relapse (P=.43). One of the patients with a local recurrence had gross residual disease at the time of RT and despite RT to 65 Gy developed both an in-field recurrence and a nodal and distant recurrence 3 months after RT. The other patient with local recurrence was found to have in-field recurrence 10 years after initial treatment. Thirteen percent of patients had an RT complication at 5 and 10 years, and 9% had a moderate or severe complication at 5 and 10 years. Conclusions: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a radioresponsive disease with excellent local control after conservative surgery and radiation therapy. Adjuvant RT should be considered for patients with large or recurrent tumors or when attempts at wide surgical margins would result in significant morbidity.

  3. Biomarkers of evasive resistance predict disease progression in cancer patients treated with antiangiogenic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Andreas; Jöhrer, Karin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Graziadei, Ivo; Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Kremser, Christian; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Numerous antiangiogenic agents are approved for the treatment of oncological diseases. However, almost all patients develop evasive resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic therapies. Currently no predictive biomarker for therapy resistance or response has been established. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predicting the development of therapy resistance in patients with hepatocellular cancer (n = 11), renal cell cancer (n = 7) and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 2). Thereby we measured levels of angiogenic growth factors, tumor perfusion, circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and tumor endothelial markers (TEM) in patients during the course of therapy with antiangiogenic agents, and correlated them with the time to antiangiogenic progression (aTTP). Importantly, at disease progression, we observed an increase of proangiogenic factors, upregulation of CEC/CEP levels and downregulation of TEMs, such as Robo4 and endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR), reflecting the formation of torturous tumor vessels. Increased TEM expression levels tended to correlate with prolonged aTTP (ECSCR high = 275 days vs. ECSCR low = 92.5 days; p = 0.07 and for Robo4 high = 387 days vs. Robo4 low = 90.0 days; p = 0.08). This indicates that loss of vascular stabilization factors aggravates the development of antiangiogenic resistance. Thus, our observations confirm that CEP/CEC populations, proangiogenic cytokines and TEMs contribute to evasive resistance in antiangiogenic treated patients. Higher TEM expression during disease progression may have clinical and pathophysiological implications, however, validation of our results is warranted for further biomarker development. PMID:26956051

  4. Preliminary research on the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy to treat driving phobia.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jaye; Taylor, Steven

    2003-10-01

    This article presents a review of preliminary research of two studies of the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to treat driving phobia. Study 1 describes a case study of a patient who completed a 7-day baseline followed by three sessions of VRET. Her peak anxiety decreased within and across sessions. At the post-treatment assessment, her phobic-related symptoms had diminished and she no longer met diagnostic criteria for driving phobia. Clinical improvement was maintained at 1-, 3-, and 7-month follow-up. In study 2, a multiple baseline across-subjects design was used to treat five patients over eight weekly VRET sessions. Visual and statistical analyses showed clear improvement in driving anxiety and avoidance in three patients between pre- and post-treatment assessments, and they no longer met criteria for driving phobia. There was marginal improvement in one patient, and the remaining individual showed no treatment gains. There was negligible change in actual driving frequency for any of the patients. Some gains were lost at the follow-up, particularly for the two individuals with poorer treatment responses. The results from these preliminary studies suggest that VRET may be a promising intervention for treating driving phobia. Avenues for improving treatment outcome are discussed. PMID:14583121

  5. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser for Treating Bowen Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue Kyung; Park, Ji-Youn; Song, Hyo Sang; Kim, You-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been increasingly used to treat malignant skin tumors including the Bowen disease. However, patients could be displeased with the long incubation time required for conventional PDT. Objective We evaluated the efficacy and safety of PDT with a short incubation time of ablative CO2 fractional laser pretreatment for treating Bowen disease. Methods Ten patients were included. Just before applying the topical photosensitizer, all lesions were treated with ablative CO2 fractional laser, following the application of methyl aminolevulinate and irradiation with red light (Aktilite CL 128). Histological confirmation, rebiopsy, and clinical assessments were performed. Adverse events were also recorded. Results Five of the ten (50%) lesions showed a complete response (CR) within three PDT sessions. After four treatment sessions, all lesions except one penile shaft lesion (90%) achieved clinical and histological CR or clinical CR only. The average number of treatments to CR was 3.70±1.70. The treatments showed favorable cosmetic outcomes and no serious adverse events. Conclusion The results suggest that pretreatment with an ablative fractional CO2 laser before PDT has similar treatment efficacy and requires a shorter photosensitizer incubation time compared with the conventional PDT method. PMID:24003277

  6. Combining Cytotoxic and Immune-Mediated Gene Therapy to Treat Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; King, Gwendalyn D.; Candolfi, Marianela; Greeno, Remy B.; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of intracranial brain tumor, for which there is no cure. In spite of advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients die within a year of diagnosis. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop novel therapeutic approaches for this disease. Gene therapy, which is the use of genes or other nucleic acids as drugs, is a powerful new treatment strategy which can be developed to treat GBM. Several treatment modalities are amenable for gene therapy implementation, e.g. conditional cytotoxic approaches, targeted delivery of toxins into the tumor mass, immune stimulatory strategies, and these will all be the focus of this review. Both conditional cytotoxicity and targeted toxin mediated tumor death, are aimed at eliminating an established tumor mass and preventing further growth. Tumors employ several defensive strategies that suppress and inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting anti-tumor immune responses has identified promising targets for immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is designed to aid the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells in order to eliminate the tumor burden. Also, immune-therapeutic strategies have the added advantage that an activated immune system has the capability of recognizing tumor cells at distant sites from the primary tumor, therefore targeting metastasis distant from the primary tumor locale. Pre-clinical models and clinical trials have demonstrated that in spite of their location within the central nervous system (CNS), a tissue described as ‘immune privileged’, brain tumors can be effectively targeted by the activated immune system following various immunotherapeutic strategies. This review will highlight recent advances in brain tumor immunotherapy, with particular emphasis on advances made using gene therapy strategies, as well as reviewing other novel therapies that can be used in combination with immunotherapy. Another

  7. Dosimetry and radiobiology at the new RA-3 reactor boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility: application to the treatment of experimental oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, E; Nigg, D W; Miller, M; Thorp, S I; Heber, E M; Zarza, L; Estryk, G; Monti Hughes, A; Molinari, A J; Garabalino, M; Itoiz, M E; Aromando, R F; Quintana, J; Trivillin, V A; Schwint, A E

    2009-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:19380233

  8. Intracellular boron localization and uptake in cell cultures using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (ion microscopy) for neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, B D; Zha, X; Gay, I; Morrison, G H

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative ion microscopy of freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cultured cells is a technique for single cell and subcellular elemental analysis. This review describes the technique and its usefulness in determining the uptake and subcellular distribution of the boron from boron neutron capture therapy drugs. PMID:1511239

  9. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  10. Dose point kernel for boron-11 decay and the cellular S values in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yunzhi; Geng Jinpeng; Gao Song; Bao Shanglian

    2006-12-15

    The study of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy is based on the cellular level dosimetry of boron-10's thermal neutron capture reaction {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li, in which one 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion and one 0.84 MeV lithium-7 ion are spawned. Because of the chemical preference of boron-10 carrier molecules, the dose is heterogeneously distributed in cells. In the present work, the (scaled) dose point kernel of boron-11 decay, called {sup 11}B-DPK, was calculated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code. The DPK curve drops suddenly at the radius of 4.26 {mu}m, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) range of a lithium-7 ion. Then, after a slight ascending, the curve decreases to near zero when the radius goes beyond 8.20 {mu}m, which is the CSDA range of a 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion. With the DPK data, S values for nuclei and cells with the boron-10 on the cell surface are calculated for different combinations of cell and nucleus sizes. The S value for a cell radius of 10 {mu}m and a nucleus radius of 5 {mu}m is slightly larger than the value published by Tung et al. [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 61, 739-743 (2004)]. This result is potentially more accurate than the published value since it includes the contribution of a lithium-7 ion as well as the alpha particle.

  11. Dose homogeneity in boron neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Konijnenberg, M.W.; Dewit, L.G.H.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1995-06-01

    Simulation models based on the neutron and photon Monte Carlo code MCNP were used to study the therapeutic possibilities of the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. Irradiations were simulated in two types of phantoms filled with water or tissue-equivalent material for benchmark treatment planning calculations. In a cuboid phantom the influence of different field sizes on the thermal-neutron-induced dose distribution was investigated. Various shapes of collimators were studied to test their efficacy in optimizing the thermal-neutron distribution over a planning target volume and healthy tissues. Using circular collimators of 8, 12 and 15 cm diameter it was shown that with the 15-cm field a relatively larger volume within 85% of the maximum neutron-induced dose was obtained than with the 8- or 12-cm-diameter field. However, even for this large field the maximum diameter of this volume was 7.5 cm. In an ellipsoid head phantom the neutron-induced dose was calculated assuming the skull to contain 10 ppm {sup 10}B, the brain 5 ppm {sup 10}B and the tumor 30 ppm {sup 10}B. It was found that with a single 15-cm-diameter circular beam a very inhomogeneous dose distribution in a typical target volume was obtained. Applying two equally weighted opposing 15-cm-diameter fields, however, a dose homogeneity within {+-} 10% in this planning target volume was obtained. The dose in the surrounding healthy brain tissue is 30% at maximum of the dose in the center of the target volume. Contrary to the situation for the 8-cm field, combining four fields of 15 cm diameter gave no large improvement of the dose homogeneity over the target volume or a lower maximum dose in the healthy brain. Therapy with BNCT on brain tumors must be performed either with an 8-cm four-field irradiation or with two opposing 15- or 12-cm fields to obtain an optimal dose distribution. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Donepezil in Treating Young Patients With Primary Brain Tumors Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy to the Brain

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Radiation Toxicity

  13. Trivalent galactosyl-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a target-specific delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Lai, Nien-Chu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chou, Fong-In; Yang, Chia-Min; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2013-09-01

    A multi-functional mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN)-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, designated as T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN, was synthesized with hydrophobic mesopores for incorporating a large amount of o-carborane (almost 60% (w/w) boron atoms per MSN), and the amines on the external surface were conjugated with trivalent galactosyl ligands and fluorescent dyes for cell targeting and imaging, respectively. The polar and hydrophilic galactosyl ligands enhance the water dispersibility of the BNCT agent and inhibit the possible leakage of o-carborane loaded in the MSN. Confocal microscopic images showed that T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSNs were endocytosed by cells and were then released from lysosomes into the cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, in comparison with the commonly used clinical BNCT agent, sodium borocaptate (BSH), T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN provides a higher delivery efficiency (over 40-50 fold) of boron atoms and a better effect of BNCT in neutron irradiation experiments. MTT assays show a very low cytotoxicity for T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN over a 2 h incubation time. The results are promising for the design of multifunctional MSNs as potential BNCT agents for clinical use.A multi-functional mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN)-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, designated as T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN, was synthesized with hydrophobic mesopores for incorporating a large amount of o-carborane (almost 60% (w/w) boron atoms per MSN), and the amines on the external surface were conjugated with trivalent galactosyl ligands and fluorescent dyes for cell targeting and imaging, respectively. The polar and hydrophilic galactosyl ligands enhance the water dispersibility of the BNCT agent and inhibit the possible leakage of o-carborane loaded in the MSN. Confocal microscopic images showed that T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSNs were endocytosed by cells and were then released from lysosomes into the cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, in comparison with the commonly used clinical BNCT agent, sodium

  14. Long-Term Outcomes for Desmoid Tumors Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes in patients with desmoid fibromatosis treated with radiation therapy (RT), with or without surgery. Methods and Materials: Between 1965 and 2005, 115 patients with desmoid tumors were treated with RT at our institution. The median age was 29 years (range, 8-73 years). Of the patients, 41 (36%) received RT alone (median dose, 56 Gy) for gross disease, and 74 (64%) received combined-modality treatment (CMT) consisting of a combination of surgery and RT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 10.1 years. Local control (LC) rates at 5 and 10 years were 75% and 74%, respectively. On univariate analysis, LC was significantly influenced by tumor size ({<=}5 cm vs. 5-10 cm vs. >10 cm) (p = 0.02) and age ({<=} 30 vs. >30 years) (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference in LC for patients treated with RT alone for gross disease vs. CMT. For patients treated with CMT, only tumor size significantly influenced LC (p = 0.02). Patients with positive margins after surgery did not have poorer LC than those with negative margins (p = 0.38). Radiation-related complications occurred in 20 (17%) of patients and were associated with dose >56 Gy (p = 0.001), age {<=}30 years (p = 0.009), and receipt of RT alone vs. CMT (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Desmoid tumors are effectively controlled with RT administered either as an adjuvant to surgery when resection margins are positive or alone for gross disease when surgical resection is not feasible. Doses >56 Gy may not be necessary to control gross disease and are associated with high rates of radiation-related complications.

  15. Prognostic value of Diabetes in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Rui; Liu, Li-Zhi; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of diabetes remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 1489 patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated using IMRT. 81/1489 (5.4%) patients were diabetic, 168/1489 (11.3%) were prediabetic, and 1240/1489 (83.3%) were normoglycemic. The 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were 77.1% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.358), 85.8% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.123), 90.9% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.884), and 85.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.445) for diabetic vs. normoglycemic patients, and 82.4% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.993), 88.7% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.285), 90.6% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.832) and 91.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.594) for preidabetic vs. normoglycemic patients. Multivariate analysis did not established diabetes as poor prognostic factors in NPC patients treated with IMRT (P = 0.332 for DFS, P = 0.944 for OS, P = 0.977 for LRRFS, P = 0.157 for DMFS), however, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, diabetes does not appear to be a prognostic factor in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and attention should be paid to hyperglycemia-associated hyperlipaemia. PMID:26927312

  16. Prognostic value of Diabetes in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Rui; Liu, Li-Zhi; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of diabetes remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 1489 patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated using IMRT. 81/1489 (5.4%) patients were diabetic, 168/1489 (11.3%) were prediabetic, and 1240/1489 (83.3%) were normoglycemic. The 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), loco-regional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were 77.1% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.358), 85.8% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.123), 90.9% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.884), and 85.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.445) for diabetic vs. normoglycemic patients, and 82.4% vs. 82.4% (P = 0.993), 88.7% vs. 91.0% (P = 0.285), 90.6% vs. 91.7% (P = 0.832) and 91.5% vs. 89.2% (P = 0.594) for preidabetic vs. normoglycemic patients. Multivariate analysis did not established diabetes as poor prognostic factors in NPC patients treated with IMRT (P = 0.332 for DFS, P = 0.944 for OS, P = 0.977 for LRRFS, P = 0.157 for DMFS), however, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, diabetes does not appear to be a prognostic factor in NPC patients treated with IMRT, and attention should be paid to hyperglycemia-associated hyperlipaemia. PMID:26927312

  17. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  18. Treating bulimia with hypnosis and low-level light therapy: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laser, Eleanor; Sassack, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This case report describes an effort to control bulimia nervosa by combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-the application of red and near-infrared light to specific body points-and hypnosis. A 29-year old female with a 14-year history of bulimia received one session of LLLT combined with hypnosis. Two weeks later, following a measurable decrease in bulimic episodes (purging), a session of psychotherapy and hypnosis was administered. Six months post-treatment, the patient has experienced a complete cessation of purging activities without recurrence. LLLT, when used in conjunction with hypnosis and psychotherapy, was effective in managing bulimia and may prove useful in treating other eating disorders.

  19. "Treating" prejudice: an exposure-therapy approach to reducing negative reactions toward stigmatized groups.

    PubMed

    Birtel, Michèle D; Crisp, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    One of the ways in which therapists treat anxiety disorders is to expose patients to a fear-evoking stimulus within a safe environment before encouraging more positive stimulus-related thoughts. In the study reported here, we adapted these psychotherapeutic principles of exposure therapy to test the hypothesis that imagining a positive encounter with a member of a stigmatized group would be more likely to promote positive perceptions when it was preceded by an imagined negative encounter. The results of three experiments targeting a range of stigmatized groups (adults with schizophrenia, gay men, and British Muslims) supported this hypothesis. Compared with purely positive interventions, interventions in which a single negative encounter was imagined just prior to imagining a positive encounter resulted in significantly reduced prejudice. Furthermore, reduced anxiety uniquely derived from the mixed-valence imagery task statistically explained enhanced intentions to engage positively with the previously stigmatized group in the future. PMID:23019142

  20. A case of Jikoshu-Kyofu treated with cognitive behavioural therapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Leslie; Ajay, Divya

    2012-07-01

    Jikoshu-Kyofu (JKF) is a subtype of Taijin-Kyofu-Sho (TKS), a form of social anxiety first described in Japanese sufferers. Unlike the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4th edition text revised definition of social anxiety disorder, TKS is characterised by a fear of offending others, whereas in the case of JKF, it is the fear of giving off a smell, thus causing offence. We describe the symptoms of JKF in a young woman who was treated with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). After only four sessions, the patient's anxiety ratings, as measured on the Social Phobia Inventory and Brief Social Phobia Scale, dropped considerably. This case illustrates the successful treatment of a patient with JKF-like symptoms using CBT. PMID:22815029

  1. Zoon's balanitis successfully treated with photodynamic therapy: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Francesco; Vaccaro, Mario; Foti, Antonio; Giuffrida, Roberta; Cannavò, Serafinella P

    2016-03-01

    Zoon's balanitis (ZB) is an idiopathic chronic condition usually presenting as a solitary erythematous plaque on the glans of primarily uncircumcised, middle-aged to older men. The different treatment options for this condition often achieve partial results, with frequent recurrence after treatment withdrawal. Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proposed as therapeutic option with discordant results. We treated a thirty-five year-old man affected by Zoon's balanitis, resistant to conventional treatments, with 3 sessions of topical ALA-PDT at two weeks intervals. At the end of the treatment period notable improvement of clinical features was observed, with almost complete clearance at 3 months' follow-up, high safety profile and absence of durable side-effects. PMID:26321748

  2. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Karlyn; Key, Nigel S

    2016-07-14

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  3. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Karlyn

    2016-01-01

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  4. The prognostic value of molecular marker analysis in patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Harpole, D H; Moore, M B; Herndon, J E; Aloia, T; D'Amico, T A; Sporn, T; Parr, A; Linoila, I; Allegra, C

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the prognostic value of a group of molecular tumor markers in a well-staged population of patients treated with trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer. The original pretreatment paraffin-embedded endoscopic esophageal tumor biopsy material was obtained from 118 patients treated with concurrent cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + 45 Gy radiation followed by resection from 1986 until 1997 at the Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Three markers of possible platinum chemotherapy association [metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), P-glycoprotein (P-gp or multidrug resistance)] and one marker of possible 5-FU association [thymidylate synthase (TS)] were measured using immunohistochemistry. The median cancer-free survival was 25.0 months, with a significantly improved survival for the 38 patients who had a complete response (P < 0.001). High-level expression of GST-pi, P-gp, and TS were associated with a decreased survival. MT was not significant in this population. Multivariate analysis identified high-level expression in two of the platinum markers (GST-pi and P-gp) and the 5-FU marker TS as independent predictors of early recurrence and death. In conclusion, this investigation measured three possible markers associated with platinum and one possible marker associated with 5-FU in a cohort of esophageal cancer patients. Independent prognostic significance was observed, which suggests that it may be possible to predict which patients may benefit most from trimodality therapy. These data need to be reproduced in a prospective investigation. PMID:11297249

  5. Effectiveness of laser therapy and topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    He, S; Wang, Y; Li, X; Hu, D

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of laser therapy with that of topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity. A secondary objective was to determine the safety of laser application according to the relevant studies. A systematic search was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the National Research Register, the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register database to retrieve all articles that were about randomised controlled trials involving the application of laser desensitising procedures and topical desensitising agents in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. A total of eight trials that met all inclusion criteria involving 234 participants were reviewed. Based upon the 'quality' of evidence, one study was classified as A level, five as B level and two as C level. Owing to the heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. Half of the included studies compared GaALAS laser with topical desensitising agents, but the findings were conflicting. The remaining studies involved Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser and CO2 laser, and all showed that the three types of lasers were superior to topical desensitising agents, but the superiority was slight. A systematic review of the literature indicates the likelihood that laser therapy has a slight clinical advantage over topical medicaments in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. More large sample-sized, long-term, high-quality randomised controlled clinical trials are needed before definitive conclusions were made. PMID:21223353

  6. Treating Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviors With Adapted Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Julie F.; Brown, Milton Z.; Dibiasio, Paige

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one third of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have emotion dysregulation and challenging behaviors (CBs). Although research has not yet confirmed that existing treatments adequately reduce CBs in this population, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) holds promise, as it has been shown to effectively reduce CBs in other emotionally dysregulated populations. This longitudinal single-group pilot study examined whether individuals with impaired intellectual functioning would show reductions in CBs while receiving standard DBT individual therapy used in conjunction with the Skills System (DBT-SS), a DBT emotion regulation skills curriculum adapted for individuals with cognitive impairment. Forty adults with developmental disabilities (most of whom also had intellectual disabilities) and CBs, including histories of aggression, self-injury, sexual offending, or other CBs, participated in this study. Changes in their behaviors were monitored over 4 years while in DBT-SS. Large reductions in CBs were observed during the 4 years. These findings suggest that modified DBT holds promise for effectively treating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. PMID:23914278

  7. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the congenital clubfoot treated with the French functional (physical therapy) method.

    PubMed

    Richards, B Stephens; Dempsey, Molly

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes that occur in clubfeet after nonoperative treatment with the French functional method, specifically pertaining to the chondro-osseous anatomy and the joint relationships. The magnetic resonance images were obtained in 6 infants before treatment and 3 months later. The MRI protocol described previously for clubfeet which were treated by the Ponseti method (J Pediatr Orthop. 2001;21:719) was closely adhered to, except that no sedation was allowed by our institutional review board. The severity of the clubfoot deformities before treatment made assessment of the tibiotalar, talonavicular, and talocalcaneal joint relationships difficult in some feet. Despite this, improvements were noted after treatment in tibiotalar plantarflexion, the talonavicular relationship, the calcaneocuboid relationship, and the varus position of the calcaneus. The wedge shape of both the navicular and distal end of the calcaneus that occasionally was noted on the MRI before treatment improved after therapy. Although improved clinically, persistent equinus of the calcaneus on MRI was significant in 2 feet and was associated with slight dorsal displacement of the cuboid on the calcaneus (MRI evidence of rocker bottom). As noted with use of the Ponseti nonoperative treatment method, the chondro-osseous abnormalities seen on MRI studies in congenital clubfoot improve after treatment with the French functional (physical therapy) method, with the exception of equinus. PMID:17314649

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of thymidine kinase 1-targeting carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogues for boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Hitesh K.; Khalil, Ahmed; Ishita, Keisuke; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Wu, Lai-Chu; Ali, Tehane; Tiwari, Rohit; Byun, Youngjoo; Barth, Rolf F.; Tjarks, Werner

    2015-01-01

    A library of sixteen 2nd generation amino- and amido-substituted carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, designed as substrates and inhibitors of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) for potential use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer, was synthesized and evaluated in enzyme kinetic-, enzyme inhibition-, metabolomic-, and biodistribution studies. One of these 2nd generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogues (YB18A [3]), having an amino group directly attached to a meta-carborane cage tethered via ethylene spacer to the 3-position of thymidine, was approximately 3–4 times superior as a substrate and inhibitor of hTK1 than N5-2OH (2), a 1st generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogue. Both 2 and 3 appeared to be 5′-monophosphorylated in TK1(+) RG2 cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution studies in rats bearing intracerebral RG2 glioma resulted in selective tumor uptake of 3 with an intratumoral concentration that was approximately 4 times higher than that of 2. The obtained results significantly advance the understanding of the binding interactions between TK1 and carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogues and will profoundly impact future design strategies for these agents. PMID:26087030

  10. Studies on depth-dose-distribution controls by deuteration and void formation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2004-08-01

    Physical studies on (i) replacement of heavy water for body water (deuteration), and (ii) formation of a void in human body (void formation) were performed as control techniques for dose distribution in a human head under neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were performed for a human-head-size cylindrical phantom using a two-dimensional transport calculation code for mono-energetic incidences of higher-energy epi-thermal neutrons (1.2-10 keV), lower-energy epi-thermal neutrons (3.1-23 eV) and thermal neutrons (1 meV to 0.5 eV). The deuteration was confirmed to be effective both in thermal neutron incidence and in epi-thermal neutron incidence from the viewpoints of improvement of the thermal neutron flux distribution and elimination of the secondary gamma rays. For the void formation, a void was assumed to be 4 cm in diameter and 3 cm in depth at the surface part in this study. It was confirmed that the treatable depth was improved almost 2 cm for any incident neutron energy in the case of the 10 cm irradiation field diameter. It was made clear that the improvement effect was larger in isotropic incidence than in parallel incidence, in the case that an irradiation field size was delimited fitting into a void diameter. PMID:15379019

  11. Design and preparation of gadolinium-reservoir microcapsules for neutron-capture therapy by means of the Wurster process.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M; Ichikawa, H; Fukumori, Y; Akine, Y; Tokuuye, K

    1997-12-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-containing microcapsules designed for neutron-capture therapy (NCT) were prepared by a spouted bed coating process. Microcapsules were designed as a Gd-reservoir. They were prepared with the following properties: particle size was smaller than 50 microns, Gd-content was as high as possible, and release of Gd was suppressed as long as possible. Calcium carbonate (20-32 microns) was selected as a speed particle. As a Gd-source, gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) or a synthesized water-insoluble Gd-DTPA derivative, Gd-DTPA-distearylamide (Gd-DTPA-SA), was layered onto the seed particles. The release-suppressing layer was composed of aqueous acrylic latex of 9:9:4 poly(ethyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate/2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). In preliminary studies, Gd-DTPA microcapsules with 41-45 microns (mass median diameter) were prepared; they released Gd with a short lag-time and 3h-prolongation. Complete release suppression was, however, difficult to achieve because of high water-solubility of Gd-DTPA. Hence, a hydrophobic derivative, Gd-DTPA-SA, was next used as a Gd source. Gd-DTPA-SA microcapsules could be prepared with a mass median diameter of 52 microns. Gd-DTPA-SA content of the microcapsules was 38% and release of Gd was suppressed to less than 0.2% over 60 d. PMID:9433776

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of thymidine kinase 1-targeting carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs for boron neutron capture therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Hitesh K; Khalil, Ahmed; Ishita, Keisuke; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J; Wu, Lai-Chu; Ali, Tehane; Tiwari, Rohit; Byun, Youngjoo; Barth, Rolf F; Tjarks, Werner

    2015-07-15

    A library of sixteen 2nd generation amino- and amido-substituted carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs, designed as substrates and inhibitors of thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) for potential use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer, was synthesized and evaluated in enzyme kinetic-, enzyme inhibition-, metabolomic-, and biodistribution studies. One of these 2nd generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (YB18A [3]), having an amino group directly attached to a meta-carborane cage tethered via ethylene spacer to the 3-position of thymidine, was approximately 3-4 times superior as a substrate and inhibitor of hTK1 than N5-2OH (2), a 1st generation carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analog. Both 2 and 3 appeared to be 5'-monophosphorylated in TK1(+) RG2 cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution studies in rats bearing intracerebral RG2 glioma resulted in selective tumor uptake of 3 with an intratumoral concentration that was approximately 4 times higher than that of 2. The obtained results significantly advance the understanding of the binding interactions between TK1 and carboranyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogs and will profoundly impact future design strategies for these agents. PMID:26087030

  13. Experimental imaging and profiling of absorbed dose in phantoms exposed to epithermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, G.; Colombi, C.

    2003-08-26

    Absorbed-dose images and depth-dose profiles have been measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose has been measured by means of gel dosimeters, imaged with optical analysis. From differential measurements with gels having different isotopic composition, the contributions of all the components of the neutron field have been separated. This separation is important, owing to the different biological effectiveness of the various kinds of emitted radiation. The doses coming from the reactions 1H(n,{gamma})2H and 14N(n,p)14C and the fast-neutron dose have been imaged. Moreover, a volume simulating a tumour with accumulation of 10B and/or 157Gd has been incorporated in the phantom and the doses due to the reactions with such isotopes have been imaged and profiled too. The results have been compared with those obtained with other experimental techniques and the agreement is very satisfactory.

  14. The Perspectives of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy-Clinical Applications Research and Development in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhrees, I.; Alrumayan, F.; Mahube, F.

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary form of experimental radiotherapy which is based on the administration of a drug able to concentrate the isotopes in a tumor cell that later are irradiated with a neutron beam. Even though the first evidence of the success of this treatment dates back many years ago, BNCT showed successful treatment results in malignant melanoma, and Glioblastoma. In order for BNCT to be successful, a sufficient amount of Boron (10B) must be selectively delivered to the tumor cell, and then irradiated by neutrons of sufficient enough. The CS-30 cyclotron at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center is a positive-ion machine capable of accelerating protons at 26MeV, and other isotopes as well. Although the peak beam intensity from the CS-30 is low, the key to success of using it for the BNCT is by using a high average beam current at low energy. This work is aimed at testing the capability of the CS-30 Cyclotron to produce a low-energy neutron beam to be used to activate the Boron atoms injected into the tumor cell, through simulation of a compatible moderator. We are also planning to measure the overall dosimetry of the energy dose as well as that for the boron in the tumor cell.

  15. Estimation of relative biological effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy using the PHITS code coupled with a microdosimetric kinetic model

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hironori; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Kumada, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-01-01

    The absorbed doses deposited by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be categorized into four components: α and 7Li particles from the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction, 0.54-MeV protons from the 14N(n, p)14C reaction, the recoiled protons from the 1H(n, n) 1H reaction, and photons from the neutron beam and 1H(n, γ)2H reaction. For evaluating the irradiation effect in tumors and the surrounding normal tissues in BNCT, it is of great importance to estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each dose component in the same framework. We have, therefore, established a new method for estimating the RBE of all BNCT dose components on the basis of the microdosimetric kinetic model. This method employs the probability density of lineal energy, y, in a subcellular structure as the index for expressing RBE, which can be calculated using the microdosimetric function implemented in the particle transport simulation code (PHITS). The accuracy of this method was tested by comparing the calculated RBE values with corresponding measured data in a water phantom irradiated with an epithermal neutron beam. The calculation technique developed in this study will be useful for biological dose estimation in treatment planning for BNCT. PMID:25428243

  16. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate-Polymeric Micelles Incorporating Gadolinium Chelates for Imaging-Guided Gadolinium Neutron Capture Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Li, Yanmin; Aoki, Ichio; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-06-23

    Gadolinium (Gd) chelates-loaded nanocarriers have high potential for achieving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided Gd neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) of tumors. Herein, we developed calcium phosphate micelles hybridized with PEG-polyanion block copolymers, and incorporated with the clinical MRI contrast agent Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA/CaP). The Gd-DTPA/CaP were nontoxic to cancer cells at the concentration of 100 μM based on Gd-DTPA, while over 50% of the cancer cells were killed by thermal neutron irradiation at this concentration. Moreover, the Gd-DTPA/CaP showed a dramatically increased accumulation of Gd-DTPA in tumors, leading to the selective contrast enhancement of tumor tissues for precise tumor location by MRI. The enhanced tumor-to-blood distribution ratio of Gd-DTPA/CaP resulted in the effective suppression of tumor growth without loss of body weight, indicating the potential of Gd-DTPA/CaP for safe cancer treatment. PMID:26033034

  17. Design of neutron beams at the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL) for boron neutron capture therapy and neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.L.; McMichael, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    Neutron beams are designed for capture therapy based on p-Li and p-Sc reactions using the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL). The p-Li beam will provide a 2.5 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s epithermal flux with 7 {times} 10{sup 5} {gamma}/cm{sup 2}s contamination. On a human brain phantom, this beam allows an advantage depth (AD) of 10 cm, an advantage depth dose rate (ADDR) of 78 cGy/min and an advantage ratio (AR) of 3.2. The p-Sc beam offers 5.9 {times} 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s and a dose performance of AD = 8 cm and AR = 3.5, suggesting the potential of near-threshold (p,n) reactions such as the p-Li reaction at E{sub p} = 1.92 MeV. A thermal radiography beam could also be obtained from ACWL.

  18. Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and the Development of a Dedicated Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Di Paolo, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Valda, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Somacal, H. R.; Minsky, D. M.; Kesque, J. M.; Giboudot, Y.; Levinas, P.; Fraiman, M.; Romeo, V.

    2007-10-26

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Progress on an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. A 30 mA proton beam of 2.5 MeV are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. The first design and construction of an ESQ module is discussed and its electrostatic fields are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Also new beam transport calculations through the accelerator are presented.

  19. Improved treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme using fluorine-18 labeled boronophenylalanine and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Trent L; Kabalka, George W; Miller, Laurence F; Khan, Mohammad K; Smith, Gary T

    2002-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer brachytherapy based upon the thermal neutron reaction: 10B(n,alpha)7Li. The efficacy of the treatment depends primarily upon two conditions being met: (a) the preferential concentration of a boronated compound in the neoplasm and (b) an adequate fluence of thermal neutrons delivered to the neoplasm. The boronated amino acid, para-boronophenylalanine (BPA), is the agent widely used in clinical trials to deliver 10B to the malignancy. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to generate in vivo boron distribution maps by labeling BPA with the positron emitting nuclide fluorine-18. The incorporation of the PET-derived boron distribution maps into current treatment planning protocols is shown to provide improved treatment plans. Using previously established protocols, six patients with glioblastoma had 18BPA PET scans. The PET distribution maps obtained were used in the conventional BNCT treatment codes. The isodose curves derived from the PET data are shown to differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from the conventional isodose curves that were derived from calculations based upon the assumption of uniform uptake of the pharmaceutical in tumor and normal brain regions. The clinical course of each of the patients who eventually received BNCT (five of the six patients) was compared using both sets of isodose calculations. The isodose contours based upon PET derived distribution data appear to be more consistent with the patients' clinical course. PMID:12408309

  20. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  1. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  2. Advantage and limitations of weighting factors and weighted dose quantities and their units in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Rassow, J; Sauerwein, W; Wittig, A; Bourhis-Martin, E; Hideghéty, K; Moss, R

    2004-05-01

    Defining the parameters influencing the biological reaction due to absorbed dose is a continuous topic of research. The main goal of radiobiological research is to translate the measurable dose of ionizing radiation to a quantitative expression of biological effect. Mathematical models based on different biological approaches (e.g., skin reaction, cell culture) provide some estimations that are often misleading and, to some extent, dangerous. Conventional radiotherapy is the simplest case because the primary radiation and secondary radiation are both low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and have about the same relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Nevertheless, for this one-dose-component case, the dose-effect curves are not linear. In fact, the total absorbed dose and the absorbed dose per fraction as well as the time schedule of the fractionation scheme influence the biological effects. Mathematical models such as the linear-quadratic model can only approximate biological effects. With regard to biological effects, fast neutron therapy is more complex than conventional radiotherapy. Fast neutron beams are always contaminated by gamma rays. As a consequence, biological effects are due to two components, a high-LET component (neutrons) and a low-LET component (photons). A straight transfer of knowledge from conventional radiotherapy to fast neutron therapy is, therefore, not possible: RBE depends on the delivered dose and several other parameters. For dose reporting, the European protocol for fast neutron dosimetry recommends that the total absorbed dose with gamma-ray absorbed dose in brackets is stated. However, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an even more complex case, because the total absorbed dose is due to four dose components with different LET and RBE. In addition, the terminology and units used by the different BNCT groups is confusing: absorbed dose and weighted dose are both to be stated in grays and are never "photon equivalent." The

  3. Stem cell-based therapy for treating limbal stem cells deficiency: A review of different strategies

    PubMed Central

    He, Hong; Yiu, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    The self renewal capability of limbal epithelial stem (LEST) cells is fundamental to the maintenance and healing of corneal epithelium. Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), due to dysfunction or loss of LEST cells, therefore presents as persistent epithelial defects, corneal vascularization, conjunctivalization etc. Stem cell-based therapy, in its simplest form – limbal autograft, has been used successfully for more than a decade. For bilateral LSCD, similar approaches with limbal allografts have been unsuccessful largely due to strong immune rejection. Therefore, as an alternate strategy for treating bilateral LSCD, ex vivo expansion of the remaining LEST cells or autologous stem cells sourced from other potential sites is being explored. Different culture systems (with and without xenobiotic supplements) using substrates like amniotic membrane or fibrin gels have been used successfully for ex vivo LEST cell maintenance and reproduction by imitating the stem cell niche. This paper is organized into sections reviewing the LEST cells, LSCD and various stem cell-based approaches for treating LSCD and discussing future direction and challenges. PMID:25278795

  4. Low-intensity laser therapy to treat dentin hypersensitivity: comparative clinical study using different light doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Mazzetto, Marcello O.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2001-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is the most common patient's complain related to pain. In fact, this is a challenge to treat specially if conventional techniques are used. The possibility to treat pain through a low intensity laser gives us an opportunity to solve this important clinical problem without promote a discomfort to patient. The main point here is not if this kind of treatment is anti- inflammatory to pulp and/or biostimulatory to production of irregular secondary dentin. The most important point here is to understand how much energy is necessary to reach conditions where to tooth become insensible to external stimulus. Our double-blinded study compared a group without laser (Placebo) with five other groups where different doses at 660 nm low intensity laser were employed. The final conclusion is that for 660 nm laser therapy, the doses from 0.13 to 2.0 J/cm2 were more efficiency than the others. The follow up care in this study was of 45 days.

  5. Treating histologically mild chronic hepatitis C: monotherapy, combination therapy, or tincture of time?

    PubMed

    Levine, R A

    1998-08-15

    The recent National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference on hepatitis C solidified the justification for a selective approach to treatment. Nevertheless, the high profile of chronic hepatitis C has led to a sense of urgency about treating "all-comers" and thus has caused the variable natural history of this disease to be overlooked. The debate about whom to treat has failed to focus attention on the alternative approach of waiting for better emerging therapies for the subset of patients with histologically mild chronic hepatitis C. Practitioners should be more confident about postponing treatment in less symptomatic patients if liver biopsy specimens show no more than grade 1 necroinflammatory activity or stage 1 fibrosis. Patients with these lesions, in the absence of clinical signs of advancing disease, are much less likely than patients with higher grades or stages to progress to cirrhosis. A "cure" for chronic hepatitis C remains elusive. End points of treatment depend on the achievement of sustained clearance of serum hepatitis C virus RNA, which is influenced, in turn, by the patient's viral replication and immune balance. Treatment of histologically mild chronic hepatitis C may ultimately mimic that of HIV infection. PMID:9729187

  6. Protein C deficiency related obscure gastrointestinal bleeding treated by enteroscopy and anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommonly encountered and difficult-to-treat clinical problem in gastroenterology, but advancements in endoscopic and radiologic imaging modalities allow for greater accuracy in diagnosing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Ectopic varices account for less than 5% of all variceal bleeding cases, and jejunal variceal bleeding due to extrahepatic portal hypertension is rare. We present a 47-year-old man suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple vascular tufts around the proximal jejunum but no evidence of cirrhosis, and a visible hypodense filling defect suggestive of thrombus was visible in the superior mesenteric vein. Enteroscopy revealed several serpiginous varices in the proximal jejunum. Serologic data disclosed protein C deficiency (33.6%). The patient was successfully treated by therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy and long-term anticoagulant therapy, which is normally contraindicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic modalities for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, such as capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and enteroscopy, were also reviewed in this article. PMID:25624741

  7. Long-term outcome of patients treated by radiation therapy alone for salivary gland carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: achen@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Bucci, M. Kara; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Garcia, Joaquin; Eisele, David W.; Fu, Karen K.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To review a single-institution experience with the management of salivary gland cancers treated by radiation alone. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 45 patients with newly diagnosed salivary gland carcinomas were treated with definitive radiation to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 57-74 Gy). Distribution of T-stage was: 24% T1, 18% T2, 31% T3, and 27% T4. Histology was: 14 mucoepidermoid (31%), 10 adenocarcinoma (22%), 8 adenoid cystic (18%), 4 undifferentiated (9%), 4 acinic (9%), 2 malignant mixed (4%), 2 squamous (4%), and 1 salivary duct carcinoma (2%). No patient had clinical or pathologic evidence of lymph node disease. Median follow-up was 101 months (range, 3-285 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year rate estimates of local control were 70% and 57%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazard model identified T3-4 disease (p = 0.004) and radiation dose lower than 66 Gy (p = 0.001) as independent predictors of local recurrence. The 10-year overall survival and distant metastasis-free rates were 46% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiation therapy alone is a reasonable alternative to surgery in the definitive management of salivary gland cancers and results in long-term survival in a significant proportion of patients. Radiation dose in excess of 66 Gy is recommended.

  8. Influence of low-level laser therapy on wound healing in nicotine-treated animals.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valdir Gouveia; Macarini, Valmir Campos; de Almeida, Juliano Milanezi; Bosco, Alvaro Francisco; Nagata, Maria José Hitomi; Okamoto, Tetuo; Longo, Mariéllen; Theodoro, Letícia Helena

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been shown to have several biological effects that favor the healing process, and nicotine has been shown to delay the healing process. In this study we investigated the healing of open wounds created on the back of rats treated with nicotine with or without LLLT. Of 115 animals, 59 received subcutaneous injections of saline solution, and the others received subcutaneous injections of nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight), twice a day throughout the study period. After 30 days, skin wounds were created on the back of the animals. The animals receiving saline injections were divided into two groups: group 1 (G1, n = 29), in which the wounds were left untreated, and group 2 (G2, n = 30), in which the wounds were treated with LLLT (GaAlAs, 660 nm, 30 mW, 5.57 J/cm(2) per point, 0.39 J, 13 s per point, 0.42 W/cm(2)). The animals receiving nicotine injections were also divided into two groups: group 3 (G3, n = 29), in which the wounds were left untreated, and group 4 (G4, n = 27), in which the wounds were treated with LLLT. The animals were killed 3, 7 or 14 days after surgery. Wound healing was evaluated histologically both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Wounds of G2 showed a delay in epithelial migration and connective tissue organization compared to those of G1. Wounds of G2 showed faster healing than those of G1; similarly, wounds of G4 showed more advanced healing than those of G3. LLLT acted as a biostimulatory coadjuvant agent balancing the undesirable effects of nicotine on wound tissue healing. PMID:21750957

  9. Outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy without cytoreductive nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Richey, S. L.; Culp, S. H.; Jonasch, E.; Corn, P. G.; Pagliaro, L. C.; Tamboli, P.; Patel, K. K.; Matin, S. F.; Wood, C. G.; Tannir, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) became a standard procedure in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. Historically, median overall survival (OS) of patients treated with interferon alpha (IFN-α) without CN was 7.8 months. Median OS in patients treated with targeted therapy (TT) without CN is unknown. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with mRCC who received TT without CN. Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox regression analysis were used to estimate median OS and identify poor prognostic factors. Results: One hundred and eighty-eight patients were identified. Most patients had intermediate-risk (54.8%) or poor-risk (44.1%) disease. Median OS for all patients was 10.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.1–12.5]. By multivariable analysis, elevated baseline lactate dehydrogenase and corrected calcium, performance status of two or more, retroperitoneal nodal metastasis, thrombocytosis, current smoking, two or more metastatic sites, and lymphopenia were independent risk factors for inferior OS. Patients with four or more factors had increased risk of death (hazard ratio 8.83, 95% CI 5.02–15.5, P < 0.001) and 5.5-month median OS. Nineteen patients (10.0%) survived for 2+ years. Conclusions: These data highlight the improved OS of patients with mRCC treated with TT without CN, compared with historical IFN-α treatment, and may guide the design of trials investigating the role of CN in the TT era. PMID:21115604

  10. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  11. Risk Factors for Pericardial Effusion in Inoperable Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen Tucker, Susan L.; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing the risk of pericardial effusion (PCE) in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Data for 101 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and RT from 2000 to 2003 at our institution were analyzed. The PCE was confirmed from follow-up chest computed tomography scans and radiologic reports, with freedom from PCE computed from the end of RT. Log-rank tests were used to identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing freedom from PCE. Dosimetric factors were calculated from the dose-volume histogram for the whole heart and pericardium. Results: The crude rate of PCE was 27.7% (28 of 101). Median time to onset of PCE was 5.3 months (range, 1.0-16.7 months) after RT. None of the clinical factors investigated was found to significantly influence the risk of PCE. In univariate analysis, a wide range of dose-volume histogram parameters of the pericardium and heart were associated with risk of PCE, including mean dose to the pericardium, volume of pericardium receiving a dose greater than 3 Gy (V3) to greater than 50 Gy (V50), and heart volume treated to greater than 32-38 Gy. Multivariate analysis selected V30 as the only parameter significantly associated with risk of PCE. Conclusions: High-dose radiation to the pericardium may strongly increase the risk of PCE. Such a risk may be reduced by minimizing the dose-volume of the irradiated pericardium and heart.

  12. Myofunctional Therapy to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Certal, Victor; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Ruoff, Chad M.; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2015-01-01

    , Capasso R, Kushida CA. Myofunctional therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis. SLEEP 2015;38(5):669–675. PMID:25348130

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.5 ATA) in treating sports related TBI/CTE: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Kenneth P

    2011-01-01

    Despite adequate evidence, including randomized controlled trials; hyperbaric oxygen is not yet recognized as efficacious for treating various forms of brain injury, specifically traumatic brain injury. Political-economic issues have kept this benign therapy from being widely adopted despite the lack of viable alternatives. Two football players with TBI/CTE are herewith shown to benefit from being treated with hyperbaric oxygen as documented by neurocognitive examinations and functional brain imaging, in one case treatment commenced decades after the brain injury. Perhaps the interest in HBOT by those participating in high-risk sports will help expand this orphan therapy into mainstream medicine. PMID:22146303

  14. Current status of boron neutron capture therapy of high grade gliomas and recurrent head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Clinical interest in BNCT has focused primarily on the treatment of high grade gliomas, recurrent cancers of the head and neck region and either primary or metastatic melanoma. Neutron sources for BNCT currently have been limited to specially modified nuclear reactors, which are or until the recent Japanese natural disaster, were available in Japan, the United States, Finland and several other European countries, Argentina and Taiwan. Accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams also could be used for BNCT and these are being developed in several countries. It is anticipated that the first Japanese accelerator will be available for therapeutic use in 2013. The major hurdle for the design and synthesis of boron delivery agents has been the requirement for selective tumor targeting to achieve boron concentrations in the range of 20 μg/g. This would be sufficient to deliver therapeutic doses of radiation with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Two boron drugs have been used clinically, a dihydroxyboryl derivative of phenylalanine, referred to as boronophenylalanine or “BPA”, and sodium borocaptate or “BSH” (Na2B12H11SH). In this report we will provide an overview of other boron delivery agents that currently are under evaluation, neutron sources in use or under development for BNCT, clinical dosimetry, treatment planning, and finally a summary of previous and on-going clinical studies for high grade gliomas and recurrent tumors of the head and neck region. Promising results have been obtained with both groups of patients but these outcomes must be more rigorously evaluated in larger, possibly randomized

  15. Carbon capture and biogas enhancement by carbon dioxide enrichment of anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge or food waste.

    PubMed

    Bajón Fernández, Y; Soares, A; Villa, R; Vale, P; Cartmell, E

    2014-05-01

    The increasing concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and the stringent greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction targets, require the development of CO2 sequestration technologies applicable for the waste and wastewater sector. This study addressed the reduction of CO2 emissions and enhancement of biogas production associated with CO2 enrichment of anaerobic digesters (ADs). The benefits of CO2 enrichment were examined by injecting CO2 at 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 M fractions into batch ADs treating food waste or sewage sludge. Daily specific methane (CH4) production increased 11-16% for food waste and 96-138% for sewage sludge over the first 24h. Potential CO2 reductions of 8-34% for sewage sludge and 3-11% for food waste were estimated. The capacity of ADs to utilise additional CO2 was demonstrated, which could provide a potential solution for onsite sequestration of CO2 streams while enhancing renewable energy production. PMID:24632434

  16. Impact of intra-arterial administration of boron compounds on dose-volume histograms in boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head-and-neck tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Minoru . E-mail: msuzuki@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kato, Ituro; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imahori, Yoshio

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head-and-neck tumors treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and to determine the advantage of the intra-arterial (IA) route over the intravenous (IV) route as a drug delivery system for BNCT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen BNCTs for 12 patients with recurrent head-and-neck tumors were included in the present study. Eight irradiations were done after IV administration of boronophenylalanine and seven after IA administration. The maximal, mean, and minimal doses given to the gross tumor volume were assessed using a BNCT planning system. Results: The results are reported as median values with the interquartile range. In the IA group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 68.7 Gy-Eq (range, 38.8-79.9), 45.0 Gy-Eq (range, 25.1-51.0), and 13.8 Gy-Eq (range, 4.8-25.3), respectively. In the IV group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 24.2 Gy-Eq (range, 21.5-29.9), 16.4 Gy-Eq (range, 14.5-20.2), and 7.8 Gy-Eq (range, 6.8-9.5), respectively. Within 1-3 months after BNCT, the responses were assessed. Of the 6 patients in the IV group, 2 had a partial response, 3 no change, and 1 had progressive disease. Of 4 patients in the IA group, 1 achieved a complete response and 3 a partial response. Conclusion: Intra-arterial administration of boronophenylalanine is a promising drug delivery system for head-and-neck BNCT.

  17. Treating Traumatized Offenders and Veterans by Means of Narrative Exposure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Tobias; Hermenau, Katharin; Crombach, Anselm; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Violent offenders and soldiers are at high risk of developing appetitive aggression and trauma-related disorders, which reduce successful integration into societies. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) for forensic offender rehabilitation (FORNET) aims at reducing symptoms of traumatic stress (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and controlling readiness for aggressive behavior. It follows the logic of the evidence-based trauma-focused NET with special emphasis on violent acts in past and future behavior. In NET, the therapist guides the client by means of exposure through his traumatic experiences in chronological order linking the negative emotions, such as fear, shame, and disgust, to the past context and integrating the traumatic experiences into the autobiographical memory. During FORNET, we also encourage verbalization of any positive emotions and experiences linked to past violent and aggressive behaviors. This recall of positive emotions (linked to the there and then) is contrasted with feelings that emerge during the narration process (here and now). In this way, the therapist helps the client to anchor the whole range of sensory and bodily experiences, cognitions, and emotions to the contextual cues. Over the process of the therapy, we support the client to begin the role change from a violent offender to a citizen, who is capable of living a non-violent and socially adjusted life. Finally, the client develops visions and wishes for the future to support a successful integration into society. Several studies with veterans and violent youths have proven the feasibility of FORNET, found evidence of a positive outcome (recovered mental health, fewer offenses committed, less drug intake, and improved integration into civil society), and highlighted the importance of addressing the whole range of experiences while treating violent offenders or veterans. PMID:26157395

  18. Treating Traumatized Offenders and Veterans by Means of Narrative Exposure Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Tobias; Hermenau, Katharin; Crombach, Anselm; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Violent offenders and soldiers are at high risk of developing appetitive aggression and trauma-related disorders, which reduce successful integration into societies. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) for forensic offender rehabilitation (FORNET) aims at reducing symptoms of traumatic stress (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and controlling readiness for aggressive behavior. It follows the logic of the evidence-based trauma-focused NET with special emphasis on violent acts in past and future behavior. In NET, the therapist guides the client by means of exposure through his traumatic experiences in chronological order linking the negative emotions, such as fear, shame, and disgust, to the past context and integrating the traumatic experiences into the autobiographical memory. During FORNET, we also encourage verbalization of any positive emotions and experiences linked to past violent and aggressive behaviors. This recall of positive emotions (linked to the there and then) is contrasted with feelings that emerge during the narration process (here and now). In this way, the therapist helps the client to anchor the whole range of sensory and bodily experiences, cognitions, and emotions to the contextual cues. Over the process of the therapy, we support the client to begin the role change from a violent offender to a citizen, who is capable of living a non-violent and socially adjusted life. Finally, the client develops visions and wishes for the future to support a successful integration into society. Several studies with veterans and violent youths have proven the feasibility of FORNET, found evidence of a positive outcome (recovered mental health, fewer offenses committed, less drug intake, and improved integration into civil society), and highlighted the importance of addressing the whole range of experiences while treating violent offenders or veterans. PMID:26157395

  19. Prognostic factors affecting local control of hepatic tumors treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with real-time tumor tracking has shown encouraging results for hepatic tumors with good efficacy and low toxicity. We studied the factors associated with local control of primary or secondary hepatic lesions post-SBRT. Methods and materials Since 2007, 153 stereotactic liver treatments were administered to 120 patients using the CyberKnife® System. Ninety-nine liver metastases (72 patients), 48 hepatocellular carcinomas (42 patients), and six cholangiocarcinomas were treated. On average, three to four sessions were delivered over 12 days. Twenty-seven to 45 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Margins consisted of 5 to 10 mm for clinical target volume (CTV) and 3 mm for planning target volume (PTV). Results Median size was 33 mm (range, 5–112 mm). Median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 32.38 cm3 (range, 0.2–499.5 cm3). Median total dose was 45 Gy in three fractions. Median minimum dose was 27 Gy in three fractions. With a median follow-up of 15.0 months, local control rates at one and two years were 84% and 74.6%, respectively. The factors associated with better local control were lesion size < 50 mm (p = 0.019), GTV volume (p < 0.05), PTV volume (p < 0.01) and two treatment factors: a total dose of 45 Gy and a dose–per-fraction of 15 Gy (p = 0.019). Conclusions Dose, tumor diameter and volume are prognostic factors for local control when a stereotactic radiation therapy for hepatic lesions is considered. These results should be considered in order to obtain a maximum therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23050794

  20. Ultrasound aspects in therapy-naive CIDP compared to long-term treated CIDP.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Vittore, Debora; Schubert, Victoria; Rasenack, Maria; Décard, Bernhard F; Heiling, Bianka; Hammer, Nadin; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the use of nerve ultrasound (NUS) along with the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines and clinical scores in untreated, recently diagnosed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) vs. long-lasting treated CIDP. NUS and nerve conduction studies (NCS) of predefined nerves/cervical roots were performed in CIDP on diagnostic onset and "chronic-CIDP" (diagnosis and therapy >6 months), compared to controls. Nerve morphology was quantified using the modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS, which is the sum of 3 ultrasound scores derived at 12 predefined measurement points and the homogeneity score (HS) in ulnar, median, and tibial nerve. 21 onset-CIDP, 21 "chronic-CIDP", and 21 age-matched controls were included. No differences in clinical scores or in the number of electrophysiologically affected nerves existed between the groups. Significantly enlarged cross-sectional areas of the nerves and diameters of the roots ensued already in onset-CIDP; however, with proximal predominance, whilst in chronic-CIDP, nerve enlargement was more prominent and ubiquitous. Increased UPS scores were shown in both patient groups compared to the controls. Significant differences between the patient groups were found particularly in the peripheral nerve score UPSA. Evaluation by means of HS revealed that the nerves in onset-CIDP were mostly regionally enlarged (often sparing distal segments) whereas in chronic-CIDP, nerves were more generalized enlarged. Onset- and chronic-CIDP show enlarged nerves and therefore increased mUPSS, however, nerve enlargement shows a more generalized pattern in chronic-CIDP compared to disease onset and correlates with disease duration and delayed therapy start, but not with disability. PMID:27017343

  1. Thrombotic Microangiopathy In Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Adoptive Cell Therapy and Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Jennifer; Citrin, Deborah E.; Waldman, Meryl; White, Donald E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thrombotic microangioapathy (TMA) is a complication that developed in some patients receiving 12 Gy total body irradiation in addition to lymphodepleting preparative chemotherapy prior to infusion of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) with high-dose aldesleukin (IL-2). This paper describes the incidence, presentation and course of radiation-associated TMA. Methods The data for patients with metastatic melanoma who received ACT with TIL plus aldesleukin following myeloablative chemotherapy and 12 Gy total body irradiation was examined, looking at patient characteristics and the natural history of TMA. Results The median time to presentation was approximately 8 months after completing TBI. The estimated cumulative incidence of TMA was 31.2% (median follow-up of 24 months). Noninvasive criteria for diagnosis included newly elevated creatinine levels, new-onset hypertension, new-onset anemia, microscopic hematuria, thrombocytopenia, low haptoglobin and elevated lactate dehydrogenase values. Once diagnosed, patients were managed with control of their hypertension with multiple agents and supportive red blood cell transfusions. TMA typically stabilized or improved and no patient progressed to dialysis. TMA was associated with a higher probability of an anti-tumor response. Conclusions Thrombotic microangiopathy occurs in approximately a third of patients treated with a lymphodepleting preparative chemotherapy regimen with total body irradiation prior to autologous T-cell therapy. The disease has a variable natural history, however no patient developed end-stage renal failure. Successful management with supportive care and aggressive hypertension control is vital to the safe application of a systemic therapy that has shown curative potential for patients with disseminated melanoma. PMID:24474396

  2. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations. PMID:25479433

  3. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  4. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h-1. These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  5. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field. PMID:17440252

  6. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  7. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  8. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BCNT) for the Treatment of Liver Metastases: Biodistribution Studies of Boron Compounds in an Experimental Model

    SciTech Connect

    Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Ana J. Molinari; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Maria E. Itoiz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint; Jorge E. Cardoso; Lucas L. Colombo; Susana Nievas; David W. Nigg; Romina F. Aromando

    2011-03-01

    Abstract We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. BNCT is based on the selective accumulation of 10B carriers in a tumor followed by neutron irradiation. Within the context of exploring the potential therapeutic efficacy of BNCT for the treatment of liver metastases, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Different boron compounds and administration conditions were assayed to determine which administration protocols would potentially be therapeutically useful in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 nuclear reactor. A total of 70 BDIX rats were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb to induce the development of subcapsular tumor nodules. Fourteen days post-inoculation, the animals were used for biodistribution studies. We evaluated a total of 11 administration protocols for the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na210B10H10), alone or combined at different dose levels and employing different administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue, and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by atomic emission spectroscopy. Six protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue. Boron concentration values in tumor and normal tissues in the liver metastases model show it would be feasible to reach therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.

  9. Characteristics comparison between a cyclotron-based neutron source and KUR-HWNIF for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.; Kinashi, Y.; Kashino, G.; Liu, Y.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Maruhashi, A.; Ono, K.

    2009-06-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), 275 clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been performed as of March 2006, and the effectiveness of BNCT has been revealed. In order to further develop BNCT, it is desirable to supply accelerator-based epithermal-neutron sources that can be installed near the hospital. We proposed the method of filtering and moderating fast neutrons, which are emitted from the reaction between a beryllium target and 30-MeV protons accelerated by a cyclotron accelerator, using an optimum moderator system composed of iron, lead, aluminum and calcium fluoride. At present, an epithermal-neutron source is under construction from June 2008. This system consists of a cyclotron accelerator, beam transport system, neutron-yielding target, filter, moderator and irradiation bed. In this article, an overview of this system and the properties of the treatment neutron beam optimized by the MCNPX Monte Carlo neutron transport code are presented. The distribution of biological effect weighted dose in a head phantom compared with that of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is shown. It is confirmed that for the accelerator, the biological effect weighted dose for a deeply situated tumor in the phantom is 18% larger than that for KUR, when the limit dose of the normal brain is 10 Gy-eq. The therapeutic time of the cyclotron-based neutron sources are nearly one-quarter of that of KUR. The cyclotron-based epithermal-neutron source is a promising alternative to reactor-based neutron sources for treatments by BNCT.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kueffer, Peter J.; Maitz, Charles A.; Khan, Aslam A.; Schuster, Seth A.; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Brockman, John D.; Nigg, David W.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2′-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h—with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)—following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 1012 neutrons per cm2 (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study. PMID:23536304

  11. Feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Minoru . E-mail: msuzuki@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) from a viewpoint of dose distribution analysis using Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA), a currently available BNCT treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: The BNCT treatment plans were constructed for 3 patients with MPM using the SERA system, with 2 opposed anterior-posterior beams. The {sup 1}B concentrations in the tumor and normal lung in this study were assumed to be 84 and 24 ppm, respectively, and were derived from data observed in clinical trials. The maximum, mean, and minimum doses to the tumors and the normal lung were assessed for each plan. The doses delivered to 5% and 95% of the tumor volume, D{sub 05} and D{sub 95}, were adopted as the representative dose for the maximum and minimum dose, respectively. Results: When the D{sub 05} to the normal ipsilateral lung was 5 Gy-Eq, the D{sub 95} and mean doses delivered to the normal lung were 2.2-3.6 and 3.5-4.2 Gy-Eq, respectively. The mean doses delivered to the tumors were 22.4-27.2 Gy-Eq. The D{sub 05} and D{sub 95} doses to the tumors were 9.6-15.0 and 31.5-39.5 Gy-Eq, respectively. Conclusions: From a viewpoint of the dose-distribution analysis, BNCT has the possibility to be a promising treatment for MPM patients who are inoperable because of age and other medical illnesses.

  12. Design of neutron beams for neutron capture therapy using a 300-kW slab TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.

    1995-03-01

    A design for a slab reactor to produce an epithermal neutron beam and a thermal neutron beam for use in neutron capture therapy (NCT) is described. A thin reactor with two large-area faces, a ``slab`` reactor, was planned using eighty-six 20% enriched TRIGA fuel elements and four B{sub 4}C control rods. Two neutron beams were designed: an epithermal neutron beam from one face and a thermal neutron beam from the other. The planned facility, based on this slab-reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300 kW, will provide an epithermal neutron beam of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays and a thermal neutron beam of 9.0 {times} 10{sup 9}n{sub th}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low fast-neutron dose and gamma dose. Both neutron beams will be forward directed. Each beam can be turned on and off independently through its individual shutter. A complete NCT treatment using the designed epithermal or thermal neutron beam would take 30 or 20 min, respectively, under the condition of assuming 10{mu}g {sup 10}B/g in the blood. Such exposure times should be sufficiently short to maintain near-optimal target (e.g., {sup 10}B, {sup 157}Gd, and {sup 235}U) distribution in tumor versus normal tissues throughout the irradiation. With a low operating power of 300 kW, the heat generated in the core can be removed by natural convection through a pool of light water. The proposed design in this study could be constructed for a dedicated clinical NCT facility that would operate very safely.

  13. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui; Guo, How-Ran; Lee, Wen-Ying; Su, Wu-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  14. Morphological study of rat skin flaps treated with subcutaneous dimethyl sulfoxide combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, K G; Oliveira, R J; Dourado, D M; Filho, E A; Fernandes, W S; Souza, A S; Araújo, F H S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in tissue necrosis, genotoxicity, and cell apoptosis. Random skin flaps were made in 50 male Wistar rats, randomly divided into the following groups. Control group (CT), wherein a rectangular skin section (2 x 8 cm) was dissected from the dorsal muscle layer, preserving the cranial vessels, lifted, and refixed to the bed; distilled water (DW) group, in which DW was injected into the distal half of the skin flap; DMSO group, wherein 5% DMSO was injected; HBOT group, comprising animals treated only with HBOT; and HBOT + DMSO group, comprising animals treated with 100% oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute for 1 h, 2 h after the experiment, daily for 10 consecutive days. A skinflap specimen investigated by microscopy. The percentage of necrosis was not significantly different between groups. The cell viability index was significantly different between groups (P < 0.001): 87.40% (CT), 86.20% (DW), 84.60% (DMSO), 86.60% (DMSO + HBO), and 91% (HBO) (P < 0.001), as was the cell apoptosis index of 12.60 (CT), 12.00 (DW), 15.40 (DMSO), 9.00 (HBO), and 12.00 (DMSO + HBO) (P < 0.001). The genotoxicity test revealed the percentage of cells with DNA damage to be 22.80 (CT), 22.60 (DW), 26.00 (DMSO), 8.80 (DMSO + HBO), and 7.20 (HBO) (P < 0.001). Although the necrotic area was not different between groups, there was a significant reduction in the cellular DNA damage and apoptosis index in the HBOT group. PMID:26782463

  15. Beneficial effects of combined resveratrol and metformin therapy in treating diet-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Frendo-Cumbo, Scott; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Wright, David C

    2016-08-01

    The polyphenol compound resveratrol (RSV) has attracted attention due to its reputed beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. Our lab has previously identified protective effects of RSV against the development of type 2 diabetes in rats. These effects occurred in a manner similar to thiazolidinedione's (TZDs), a class of insulin sensitizing drugs. TZDs are commonly prescribed in combination with metformin (MET) and thus we sought to examine the combined effects of RSV and MET in treating insulin resistance. Male C57BL6 mice were fed a low- (LFD; 10% Kcal from fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% Kcal from fat) for 9 weeks to induce glucose and insulin intolerance. HFD mice were then assigned to control (HFD), MET (231.28 ± 12.24 mg/kg/day), RSV (93.68 ± 3.51 mg/kg/day), or combined (COM; MET 232.01 ± 17.12 mg/kg/day and RSV 92.77 ± 6.92 mg/kg/day) treatment groups. Changes in glucose and insulin tolerance and tissue-specific insulin signaling were measured 4 weeks post-treatment. RSV or MET alone did not have beneficial effects on glucose tolerance, although MET significantly improved insulin tolerance compared to HFD Glucose and insulin tolerance were significantly improved in COM compared to HFD and this was mirrored by enhanced insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in triceps muscle and inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue in COM compared to HFD mice. Improvements with COM treatment were not explained by differences in body weight, adiposity, or markers of adipose tissue inflammation. In summary, this study provides evidence of beneficial effects of combined RSV and MET therapy in treating impairments in glucose homeostasis. PMID:27482073

  16. Elements of lentiviral vector design toward gene therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Przybilla, Michael J; Koniar, Brenda L; Whitley, Chester B

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal disease caused by α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency and accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Lentiviral vector encoding correct IDUA cDNA could be used for treating MPS I. To optimize the lentiviral vector design, 9 constructs were designed by combinations of various promoters, enhancers, and codon optimization. After in vitro transfection into 293FT cells, 5 constructs achieved the highest IDUA activities (5613 to 7358 nmol/h/mg protein). These 5 candidate vectors were then tested by injection (1 × 10(7) TU/g) into neonatal MPS I mice. After 30 days, one vector, CCEoIDW, achieved the highest IDUA levels: 2.6% of wildtype levels in the brain, 9.9% in the heart, 200% in the liver and 257% in the spleen. CCEoIDW achieved the most significant GAG reduction: down 49% in the brain, 98% in the heart, 100% in the liver and 95% in the spleen. Further, CCEoIDW had the lowest transgene frequency, especially in the gonads (0.03 ± 0.01 copies/100 cells), reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis and germ-line transmission. Therefore, CCEoIDW is selected as the optimal lentiviral vector for treating MPS I disease and will be applied in large animal preclinical studies. Further, taken both in vitro and in vivo comparisons together, codon optimization, use of EF-1α promoter and woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional response element (WPRE) could enhance transgene expression. These results provided a better understanding of factors contributing efficient transgene expression in lentiviral gene therapies. PMID:27556013

  17. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion The TOPSHOCK study is the

  18. [Procedure for daylight methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy to treat actinic keratoses].

    PubMed

    Girard, C; Adamski, H; Basset-Séguin, N; Beaulieu, P; Dreno, B; Riboulet, J-L; Lacour, J-P

    2016-04-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK), also known as solar keratosis or pre-cancerous keratosis, is frequently observed in areas of skin exposed to sunlight, particularly in light-skinned patients. In France, photodynamic therapy using red light (conventional PDT) and methylamino 5-levulinate (MAL) is indicated in the treatment of thin or non-hyperkeratotic and non-pigmented multiple AK lesions or large zones covered with AK lesions. It is well-known for its efficacy but also for its side effects, especially pain during illumination, which can limit its use. An alternative to PDT using natural daylight has recently been proposed to treat actinic keratosis lesions, and results in greater flexibility as well as significant reduction in pain. The lesions are prepared as for conventional PDT, with MAL cream being applied by the physician or the patient, after which they are exposed to natural daylight for 2hours. The lesions are then gently cleansed and protected from natural light for 24hours. This paper seeks to provide a precise description of the daylight PDT procedure for the treatment of AK. PMID:27016200

  19. Iatrogenic perforation of esophagus successfully treated with Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy (EVT)

    PubMed Central

    Loske, Gunnar; Schorsch, Tobias; Dahm, Christian; Martens, Eckhard; Müller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy (EVT) has been reported as a novel treatment option for esophageal leakage. We present our results in the treatment of iatrogenic perforation with EVT in a case series of 10 patients. Patients and methods: An open pore polyurethane drainage was placed either intracavitary through the perforation defect or intraluminal covering the defect zone. Application of vacuum suction with an electronic device (continuous negative pressure, –125 mmHg) resulted in defect closure and internal drainage. Results: Esophageal perforations were located from the cricopharyngeus (4/10) to the esophagogastric junction (2/10). EVT was feasible in all patients. Eight patients were treated with intraluminal EVT, one with intracavitary EVT, and one with both types of treatments. All perforations (100 %) were healed in within a median of (3 – 7) days. No stenosis occurred, no complications were observed, and no additional operative treatment was necessary. Conclusions: Our study suggests that intraluminal EVT will play an important role in endoscopic management of esophageal perforation. PMID:26716109

  20. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat a chronic skin wound in a dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Raduan; Plapler, Hélio; Bitar, Renata A.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising therapeutic modality for treatment of a wide variety of malignant and nononcologic tumors, as well as in the treatment of infected skin ulcers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the PDT to treat a chronic skin wound that had been already subjected to several clinical and surgical type treatments in a dog. The animal with an infected chronic skin wound with 8 cm diameter in the left leg received an injection of an aqueous solution of 1% methylene blue (MB) with 2% lidocaine into the lesion. After MB injection the wound was irradiated using a LED (LED-VET MMOptics(r)) with a wavelength between 600 and 700 nm, 2 cm diameter circular light beam, of 150 mW of power, light dose of 50 J/cm2. After 3 and 6 weeks PDT was repeated and the wound was re-evaluated. Complete healing was achieved 10 weeks after the first procedure.

  1. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on Candida albicans pre-treated by fluconazole delayed yeast inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luis Rodolfo; Sousa, Aline Silva; Alvarenga, Letícia Heineck; Deana, Alessandro Melo; de Santi, Maria Eugênia Onofre Simões; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Leal, Cintia Raquel Lima; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Prates, Renato Araujo

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDI) has been used to treat localized infection and the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of APDI combined with fluconazole in suspension of Candida albicans. C. albicans ATCC90028 was subcultured onto Sabouraud agar and inocula were prepared at yeast density of 1×10(6)CFU/mL. Methylene blue (MB) was used with concentration of 100mM. Yeast cells were incubated for 30min in 24-well plate and then irradiated by LED (660nm; 690mW; A=2.7cm(2); I=250mW/cm(2)) with radiant exposure of 30, 60, and 120J/cm(2). The same APDI setup was used with 2h fluconazole (0.5μg/mL) incubation. A UV-vis optical absorption spectroscopy was achieved following fractionated irradiation up to 960s. There were substantial differences in the killing effect following MB-mediated APDI and C. albicans was eradicated in the both APDI groups. The fluconazole combined to APDI delayed the complete inactivation of the yeast (p<0.05). Spectroscopy showed a decrease in absorption following irradiation for all absorption peaks. APDI presented an antagonist effect in the presence of fluconazole. PMID:27179711

  2. Heat shock protein-based therapy as a potential candidate for treating the sphingolipidoses.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Gray, James; Priestman, David A; Wallom, Kerri-Lee; Atkins, Jennifer; Olsen, Ole Dines; Klein, Alexander; Drndarski, Svetlana; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Ingemann, Linda; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Bornæs, Claus; Jørgensen, Signe Humle; Williams, Ian; Hinsby, Anders; Arenz, Christoph; Begley, David; Jäättelä, Marja; Platt, Frances M

    2016-09-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) often manifest with severe systemic and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms. The existing treatment options are limited and have no or only modest efficacy against neurological manifestations of disease. We demonstrate that recombinant human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) improves the binding of several sphingolipid-degrading enzymes to their essential cofactor bis(monoacyl)glycerophosphate in vitro. HSP70 treatment reversed lysosomal pathology in primary fibroblasts from 14 patients with eight different LSDs. HSP70 penetrated effectively into murine tissues including the CNS and inhibited glycosphingolipid accumulation in murine models of Fabry disease (Gla(-/-)), Sandhoff disease (Hexb(-/-)), and Niemann-Pick disease type C (Npc1(-/-)) and attenuated a wide spectrum of disease-associated neurological symptoms in Hexb(-/-) and Npc1(-/-) mice. Oral administration of arimoclomol, a small-molecule coinducer of HSPs that is currently in clinical trials for Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), recapitulated the effects of recombinant human HSP70, suggesting that heat shock protein-based therapies merit clinical evaluation for treating LSDs. PMID:27605553

  3. Setup errors in patients treated with intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy for gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, Joshua J.; Lujan, Anthony E.; Mundt, Arno J.; Bonta, Dacian V.; Roeske, John C. . E-mail: Roeske@rover.uchicago.edu

    2005-03-31

    Intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy (IM-WPRT) has decreased the incidence of gastrointestinal complications by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated in gynecologic patients. However, IM-WPRT plans result in steep dose gradients around the target volume, and thus accurate patient setup is essential. To quantify the accuracy of our patient positioning, we examined the weekly portal films of 46 women treated with IM-WPRT at our institution. All patients were positioned using a customized immobilization device that was indexed to the treatment table. Setup errors were evaluated by comparing portal images to simulation images using an algorithm that registers user-defined open curve segments drawn on both sets of film. The setup errors, which were separated into systematic and random components, ranged from 1.9 to 3.7 mm for the translations and 1.3 deg to 4.4 deg for the 2 in-plane translations. The systematic errors were all less than the respective random errors, with the largest error in the anterior/posterior direction. In addition, there was no correlation between the magnitude of these errors and patient-specific factors (age, weight, height). In the future, we will investigate the effect of these setup errors on the delivered dose distribution.

  4. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  5. Coexistence of normal and clonal haemopoiesis in aplastic anaemia patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, G; Podestà, M; Pitto, A; Sessarego, M; Figari, O; Fugazza, G; Benvenuto, F; Bruno, B; Van Lint, M T; Truini, M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A

    1999-12-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities and paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) phenotype are frequent findings in aplastic anaemia patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy (IST). In this study we investigated whether the appearance of clonal haemopoiesis influences patient outcome and survival. 97 patients entered this study and were followed from the onset of the disease for a median follow-up (FU) of 53 months. 93% are alive, 56% achieved complete remission, 30% partial remission, both transfusion independent, and 14% did not respond. Three groups were identified: (A) patients without evidence of emerging clones (71/97); (B) patients who acquired chromosomal abnormalities (13/97); (C) patients who showed low expression of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GPI-AP) (PNH phenotype) at presentation or later (16/97). Three patients showed both PIG-AP deficiency and chromosomal abnormalities. The actuarial survival of patients without clonal haemopoiesis (n = 71) at 6 years was 95%, for patients with chromosomal abnormalities (n = 13), 88%, and for patients with PIG-AP deficiency (n = 16), 89%. There was no difference in the probability of becoming transfusion independent in the three groups (93%, 92% and 88% respectively). This study confirmed that a proportion of severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) patients exhibit clonal markers during the time after IST, often coexisting with cytogenetically or phenotypically normal haemopoiesis. There was no significant clinical impact of these abnormalities on transfusion independence and survival at the median follow-up of 4 years. PMID:10583249

  6. Refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia successfully treated with combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and tamibarotene: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Minoru; Ogiya, Daisuke; Ichiki, Akifumi; Hara, Ryujiro; Amaki, Jun; Kawai, Hidetsugu; Numata, Hiroki; Sato, Ai; Miyamoto, Mitsuki; Suzuki, Rikio; Machida, Shinichiro; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old male developed refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after various treatments including all-trans retinoic acid, tamibarotene, arsenic trioxide (As2O3), conventional chemotherapy, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. We attempted to use both tamibarotene and As2O3 as a combination therapy, and he achieved molecular complete remission. Grade 2 prolongation of the QTc interval on the electrocardiogram was observed during the therapy. The combination therapy of As2O3 and tamibarotene may be effective and tolerable for treating refractory APL cases who have no treatment options, even when they have previously been treated with tamibarotene and As2O3as a single agent. PMID:27144119

  7. Refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia successfully treated with combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and tamibarotene: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Minoru; Ogiya, Daisuke; Ichiki, Akifumi; Hara, Ryujiro; Amaki, Jun; Kawai, Hidetsugu; Numata, Hiroki; Sato, Ai; Miyamoto, Mitsuki; Suzuki, Rikio; Machida, Shinichiro; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old male developed refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after various treatments including all-trans retinoic acid, tamibarotene, arsenic trioxide (As2O3), conventional chemotherapy, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. We attempted to use both tamibarotene and As2O3 as a combination therapy, and he achieved molecular complete remission. Grade 2 prolongation of the QTc interval on the electrocardiogram was observed during the therapy. The combination therapy of As2O3 and tamibarotene may be effective and tolerable for treating refractory APL cases who have no treatment options, even when they have previously been treated with tamibarotene and As2O3 as a single agent. PMID:27144119

  8. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  9. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marilia A R Q; Ferraz, Julianny B; Junior, Miguel A A; Moura, Andrew D; da Costa, Maria E S M; Costa, Fagner J M D; Neto, Valter F A; Neto, Renato M; Gama, Renata A

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design. PMID:25963495

  10. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marilia A.R.Q.; Ferraz, Julianny B.; Junior, Miguel A.A.; Moura, Andrew D.; da Costa, Maria E.S.M.; Costa, Fagner J.M.D.; Neto, Valter F.A.; Neto, Renato M.; Gama, Renata A.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm2 in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design. PMID:25963495

  11. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  12. Radiation injury of boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Nagahiro, S; Mizobuchi, Y; Toi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Kumada, H

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the radiation injury in acute or delayed stage after boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma. Eighteen patients with malignant glioma underwent mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beam and sodium borocaptate between 1998 and 2004. The radiation dose (i.e. physical dose of boron n-alpha reaction) in the protocol used between 1998 and 2000 (Protocol A, n = 8) prescribed a maximum tumor volume dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a new dose-escalated protocol was introduced (Protocol B, n = 4); it prescribes a minimum tumor volume dose of 18 Gy or, alternatively, a minimum target volume dose of 15 Gy. Since 2002, the radiation dose was reduced to 80-90% dose of Protocol B because of acute radiation injury. A new Protocol was applied to 6 glioblastoma patients (Protocol C, n = 6). The average values of the maximum vascular dose of brain surface in Protocol A, B and C were 11.4+/-4.2 Gy, 15.7+/-1.2 and 13.9+/-3.6 Gy, respectively. Acute radiation injury such as a generalized convulsion within 1 week after BNCT was recognized in three patients of Protocol B. Delayed radiation injury such as a neurological deterioration appeared 3-6 months after BNCT, and it was recognized in 1 patient in Protocol A, 5 patients in Protocol B. According to acute radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 15.8+/-1.3 Gy in positive and was 12.6+/-4.3 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. According to the delayed radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 13.8+/-3.8 Gy in positive and was 13.6+/-4.9 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. The dose escalation is limited because most patients in Protocol B suffered from acute radiation injury. We conclude that the maximum vascular dose does not exceed over 12 Gy to avoid the delayed radiation injury, especially, it should be limited under 10 Gy in the case that tumor

  13. The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Khidhir, Karzan G.; Woodward, David F.; Farjo, Nilofer P.; Farjo, Bessam K.; Tang, Elaine S.; Wang, Jenny W.; Picksley, Steven M.; Randall, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    Balding causes widespread psychological distress but is poorly controlled. The commonest treatment, minoxidil, was originally an antihypertensive drug that promoted unwanted hair. We hypothesized that another serendipitous discovery, increased eyelash growth side-effects of prostamide F2α-related eyedrops for glaucoma, may be relevant for scalp alopecias. Eyelash hairs and follicles are highly specialized and remain unaffected by androgens that inhibit scalp follicles and stimulate many others. Therefore, we investigated whether non-eyelash follicles could respond to bimatoprost, a prostamide F2α analog recently licensed for eyelash hypotrichosis. Bimatoprost, at pharmacologically selective concentrations, increased hair synthesis in scalp follicle organ culture and advanced mouse pelage hair regrowth in vivo compared to vehicle alone. A prostamide receptor antagonist blocked isolated follicle growth, confirming a direct, receptor-mediated mechanism within follicles; RT-PCR analysis identified 3 relevant receptor genes in scalp follicles in vivo. Receptors were located in the key follicle regulator, the dermal papilla, by analyzing individual follicular structures and immunohistochemistry. Thus, bimatoprost stimulates human scalp follicles in culture and rodent pelage follicles in vivo, mirroring eyelash behavior, and scalp follicles contain bimatoprost-sensitive prostamide receptors in vivo. This highlights a new follicular signaling system and confirms that bimatoprost offers a novel, low-risk therapeutic approach for scalp alopecias.—Khidhir, K. G., Woodward, D. F., Farjo, N. P., Farjo, B. K., Tang, E. S., Wang, J. W., Picksley, S. M., and Randall, V. A. The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias. PMID:23104985

  14. Outcomes in Black Patients With Early Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Michael A.; Mell, Loren K.; Hasselle, Michael D.; Karrison, Theodore G.; MacDermed, Dhara; Meriwether, Amber; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2011-02-01

    Background: The race-specific impact of prognostic variables for early breast cancer is unknown for black patients undergoing breast conservation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 1,231 consecutive patients {>=}40 years of age with Stage I-II invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy at the University of Chicago Hospitals and affiliates between 1986 and 2004. Patients were classified as either black or nonblack. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the effects of known prognostic factors and interactions with race. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 82 months. Thirty-four percent of patients were black, and 66% were nonblack (Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian). Black patients had a poorer 10-year overall survival (64.6% vs. 80.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.06) and 10-year disease-free survival (58.1% vs. 75.4%; HR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.89) compared with nonblack patients. Tumor sizes were similar between nonblack and black patients with mammographically detected tumors (1.29 cm vs. 1.20 cm, p = 0.20, respectively). Tumor size was significantly associated with overall survival (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.96) in black patients with mammographically detected tumors but not in nonblack patients (HR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.78-1.53), suggesting that survival in black patients depends more strongly on tumor size in this subgroup. Tests for race-size method of detection interactions were statistically significant for overall survival (p = 0.049), locoregional control (p = 0.036), and distant control (p = 0.032) and borderline significant for disease-free survival (p = 0.067). Conclusion: Despite detection at comparable sizes, the prognostic effect of tumor size in patients with mammographically detected tumors is greater for black than in nonblack patients.

  15. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae J.; Jeong, Yeon S.; Park, Young S.; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M.; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5–21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3–84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13–128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17–366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  16. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae J; Jeong, Yeon S; Park, Young S; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5-21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3-84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13-128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17-366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Sofosbuvir-Based Antiviral Therapy to Treat Hepatitis C Virus Infection After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kamar, N; Marion, O; Rostaing, L; Cointault, O; Ribes, D; Lavayssière, L; Esposito, L; Del Bello, A; Métivier, S; Barange, K; Izopet, J; Alric, L

    2016-05-01

    There is no approved therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after kidney transplantation, and no data regarding the use of new-generation direct antiviral agents (DAAs) have been published so far. The aims of this pilot study were to assess the efficacy and safety of an interferon-free sofosbuvir-based regimen to treat chronic HCV infection in kidney transplant recipients. Twenty-five kidney transplant recipients with chronic HCV infection were given, for 12 (n = 19) or 24 weeks (n = 6), sofosbuvir plus ribavirin (n = 3); sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir (n = 4); sofosbuvir plus simeprevir, with (n = 1) or without ribavirin (n = 6); sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir, with (n = 1) or without ribavirin (n = 9); and sofosbuvir plus pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin (n = 1). A rapid virological response, defined by undetectable viremia at week 4 after starting DAA therapy, was observed in 22 of the 25 patients (88%). At the end of therapy, HCV RNA was undetectable in all patients. At 4 and 12 weeks after completing DAA therapy, all had a sustained virological response. The tolerance to anti-HCV therapy was excellent and no adverse event was observed. A significant decrease in calcineurin inhibitor levels was observed after HCV clearance. New-generation oral DAAs are efficient and safe to treat HCV infection after kidney transplantation. PMID:26587971

  18. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra; Haberer, Thomas; Jaekel, Oliver; Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  19. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the squamous part of temporal bone in a young girl treated with adjuvant volumetric arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Goswami, Suchanda; Goswami, Chanchal

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors usually arise in the long bones of children and young adults. Primary ES of the cranium is unusual. Treatment involves multi-modality therapy incorporating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; outcomes are similar to those arising from long bones. We report a case of Primary ES of the squamous part of temporal bone with intracranial extension in a 9-year-old girl who was treated with surgery, chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy by volumetric arc therapy. Post 1-year of treatment the girl is performing well in her classes. PMID:26881573

  20. Treating Depressive Symptoms in Psychosis: A Network Meta-Analysis on the Effects of Non-Verbal Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Steenhuis, Laura A.; Nauta, Maaike H.; Bocking, Claudi L. H.; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to examine whether non-verbal therapies are effective in treating depressive symptoms in psychotic disorders. Material and Methods A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Psychinfo, Picarta, Embase and ISI Web of Science, up to January 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-verbal intervention to a control condition in patients with psychotic disorders, whilst measuring depressive symptoms as a primary or secondary outcome, were included. The quality of studies was assessed using the ‘Clinical Trials Assessment Measure for psychological treatments’ (CTAM) scale. Cohen’s d was calculated as a measure of effect size. Using a Network Meta-analysis, both direct and indirect evidence was investigated. Results 10 RCTs were included, of which three were of high quality according to the CTAM. The direct evidence demonstrated a significant effect on the reduction in depressive symptoms relative to treatment as usual (TAU), in favor of overall non-verbal therapy (ES: -0.66, 95% C.I. = -0.88, -0.44) and music therapy (ES: -0.59, 95% C.I. = -0.85, -0.33). Combining both direct and indirect evidence, yoga therapy (ES: -0.79, 95% C.I. = -1.24, -0.35) had a significant effect on depressive symptoms, and occupational therapy (ES: 1.81, 95% C.I. = 0.81, 2.81) was less effective, relative to TAU. Exercise therapy did not show a significant effect on depressive symptoms in comparison to TAU (ES: -0.02 95% C.I. = -0.67, 0.62). Due to inconsistency of study evidence, the indirect effects should be interpreted cautiously. Conclusions Non-verbal therapies appear to be effective in reducing depressive symptomatology in psychotic disorders, in particular music therapy and yoga therapy. PMID:26485401

  1. Constraint-induced movement therapy: a method for harnessing neuroplasticity to treat motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy is an approach to physical rehabilitation elaborated from basic neuroscience and behavioral research with primates. The application of the CI therapy protocol to humans began with the upper extremity after stroke and was then modified and extended to cerebral palsy in young children, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. A form of CI therapy was developed for the lower extremities and has been used effectively after stroke, spinal cord injury, fractured hip, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. Adaptations of the CI therapy paradigm have also been developed for aphasia, focal hand dystonia in musicians, and phantom limb pain. Human and animal studies using a variety of methods provide evidence that CI therapy produces marked neuroplastic changes in the structure and function of the CNS. Moreover, these changes appear to be important for the intervention's therapeutic effect. PMID:24309263

  2. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-hyun; Seong, Shin; Kim, Sung-su; Han, Jae-bok

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT). A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis pharmacopuncture and Trichosanthes kirilowii pharmacopuncture. The oral herbal medicine used was soramdan, made of cultivated wild ginseng. The effectiveness of this therapy was evaluated with computed tomography and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale. The size of the tumor mass was markedly decreased and the ECOG performance scale was also improved. These results suggest that KMT alone can be an effective method to treat NSCLC. PMID:24348396

  3. Misdiagnosed zoophile tinea faciei and tinea corporis effectively treated with isoconazole nitrate and diflucortolone valerate combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Czaika, Viktor A

    2013-05-01

    There have been few published reports on the human transmission of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, a zoophilic fungus frequently occurring in pets. Here we report on 2 girls, living with a pet dwarf rabbit, who presented with inflammatory skin lesions positive for T. mentagrophytes and subsequently diagnosed as zoophile tinea faciei and tinea corporis. The patients were successfully treated with systemic terbinafine and 2-week therapy with Travocort cream containing isoconazole nitrate 1% and diflucortolone valerate 0.1%. PMID:23574022

  4. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  5. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2009-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of 10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly- l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors.

  6. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of (10)B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  7. Complementary and alternative therapies for treating multiple sclerosis symptoms: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huntley, A; Ernst, E

    2000-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system without a known cure. Thus the role of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) for the management of symptoms lies in palliative care and this is borne out by the popularity of these treatments amongst MS sufferers. This review is aimed at determining whether this use is supported by evidence of effectiveness from rigorous clinical trials. Database literature searches were performed and papers were extracted in a pre-defined manner. Twelve randomized controlled trials were located that investigated a CAT for MS: nutritional therapy (4), massage (1), Feldenkrais bodywork (1), reflexology (1), magnetic field therapy (2), neural therapy (1) and psychological counselling (2). The evidence is not compelling for any of these therapies, with many trials suffering from significant methodological flaws. There is evidence to suggest some benefit of nutritional therapy for the physical symptoms of MS. Magnetic field therapy and neural therapy appear to have a short-term beneficial effect on the physical symptoms of MS. Massage/bodywork and psychological counselling seem to improve depression, anxiety and self-esteem. The effectiveness for other CATs is unproven at this time. In all the CATs examined further investigations are needed in the form of rigorous large-scale trials. PMID:10859602

  8. Socio-Psychological Aspects of Animal Therapy in Treating Children Suffering from Forms of Dysontogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolskaya, Anastasia V.

    2012-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of animal therapy using are discussed. Research of 30 case studies is displayed that pet therapy is a good therapeutic tool in approximately 60% of cases. To diagnose possible problems in families which have got a dog as a "therapist" for the child suffering from some or other form of dysontogenesis, the author…

  9. Initial Study Using Fixed Role and Rational Emotive Therapy in Treating Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karst, Thomas O.; Trexler, Larry D.

    1970-01-01

    College students reporting high levels of public speaking anxiety received fixed role, or rational emotive group therapy, or no therapy. Support for the hypothesis that treatment would reduce anxiety more than no treatment was secured. Results lend support to the assumption that psychotherapy is effective in reducing emotional disorders, and that…

  10. Irinotecan and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-15

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Poor Performance Status; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ({sup 10}BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. Methods and Materials: The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10{sup 6} MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. Results: The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (P<.001 for MEL-J and A375 vs M8 cells). The in vivo studies showed a maximum average boron concentration of 25.9 ± 2.6 μg/g in tumor, with individual values ranging between 11.7 and 52.0 μg/g of {sup 10}B 2 hours after the injection of BPA. Tumor temperature always decreased as the tumors increased in size, with values ranging between 37°C and 23°C. A significant correlation between tumor temperature and tumor-to-blood boron concentration ratio was found (R{sup 2} = 0.7, rational function fit). The immunohistochemical studies revealed, in tumors with extensive areas of viability, a high number of positive cells for Ki-67, blood vessels of large diameter evidenced by the marker CD31, and a direct logistic correlation between proliferative status and boron concentration difference between tumor and blood (R{sup 2} = 0.81, logistic function fit). Conclusion: We propose that these methods could be suitable for designing new screening protocols applied before melanoma BNCT

  12. SU-E-J-100: Reconstruction of Prompt Gamma Ray Three Dimensional SPECT Image From Boron Neutron Capture Therapy(BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, D; Jung, J; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: In case of simulation, the pixelated SPECT detector, collimator and phantom were simulated using Monte Carlo n particle extended (MCNPX) simulation tool. A thermal neutron source (<1 eV) was used to react with the boron uptake region (BUR) in the phantom. Each geometry had a spherical pattern, and three different BURs (A, B and C region, density: 2.08 g/cm3) were located in the middle of the brain phantom. The data from 128 projections for each sorting process were used to achieve image reconstruction. The ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain a tomographic image with eight subsets and five iterations. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the geometric accuracy of reconstructed image. Results: The OSEM image was compared with the original phantom pattern image. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated as the gross area under each ROC curve. The three calculated AUC values were 0.738 (A region), 0.623 (B region), and 0.817 (C region). The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm and 1.4 cm. Conclusion: The possibility of extracting a 3D BNCT SPECT image was confirmed using the Monte Carlo simulation and OSEM algorithm. The prospects for obtaining an actual BNCT SPECT image were estimated from the quality of the simulated image and the simulation conditions. When multiple tumor region should be treated using the BNCT, a reasonable model to determine how many useful images can be obtained from the SPECT could be provided to the BNCT facilities. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research

  13. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  14. Prognostic Utility of Apoptosis Index, Ki-67 and Survivin Expression in Dogs with Nasal Carcinoma Treated with Orthovoltage Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    FU, Dah-Renn; KATO, Daiki; WATABE, Ai; ENDO, Yoshifumi; KADOSAWA, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apoptosis, Ki-67 and survivin expression have been reported as prognostic values in human cancer treated with radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the outcome of canine nasal carcinomas treated with radiation therapy and these cancer markers. The apoptotic index (AI) was evaluated with TUNEL assays, and an immunohistochemical evaluation was performed on Ki-67 and survivin in 33 biopsy samples taken before treatment. Median survival times were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank method. The AI ranged from 0 to 0.7%, and the percentage of Ki-67-positive cells defined as the proliferative index (PI) ranged from 0.8 to 77% in all samples. Neither the AI nor the PI had a significant relationship with survival time (P=0.056 and 0.211). Survivin expression was detected in 84.9% of samples of canine nasal carcinoma. Dogs with high survivin expression were associated with poorer response to treatment and had shorter survival times (P=0.017 and 0.031). Advanced-stage tumors were also significantly associated with a high level of survivin (P=0.026). Overexpression of survivin was shown to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in dogs with nasal carcinomas treated with radiation therapy. PMID:25452259

  15. The Effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy to Treat Symptoms Following Trauma in Timor Leste.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Sarah J; Lee, Christopher W; de Araujo, Guilhermina; Butler, Susan R; Taylor, Graham; Drummond, Peter D

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy for treating trauma symptoms was examined in a postwar/conflict, developing nation, Timor Leste. Participants were 21 Timorese adults with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), assessed as those who scored ≥2 on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Participants were treated with EMDR therapy. Depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Symptom changes post-EMDR treatment were compared to a stabilization control intervention period in which participants served as their own waitlist control. Sessions were 60-90 mins. The average number of sessions was 4.15 (SD = 2.06). Despite difficulties providing treatment cross-culturally (i.e., language barriers), EMDR therapy was followed by significant and large reductions in trauma symptoms (Cohen's d = 2.48), depression (d = 2.09), and anxiety (d = 1.77). At posttreatment, 20 (95.2%) participants scored below the HTQ PTSD cutoff of 2. Reliable reductions in trauma symptoms were reported by 18 participants (85.7%) posttreatment and 16 (76.2%) at 3-month follow-up. Symptoms did not improve during the control period. Findings support the use of EMDR therapy for treatment of adults with PTSD in a cross-cultural, postwar/conflict setting, and suggest that structured trauma treatments can be applied in Timor Leste. PMID:26934487

  16. Metabolic syndrome-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated by volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Dawson, L A; Tran, T H; Adeyi, O; Purdie, T; Sherman, M; Brade, A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (hcc) is a leading cause of cancer mortality, and its incidence is increasing in developed countries. Risk factors include cirrhosis from viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Metabolic syndrome is a newly recognized, but important, risk factor that is likely contributing to the increased incidence of hcc. Surgery is the therapy of choice for hcc, but local therapies are often contraindicated, usually because of advanced disease or comorbid conditions such as cardiac disease (which is associated with metabolic syndrome). Current radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiotherapy allow for treatment plans that highly conform to the target and provide excellent sparing of normal structures. Radiation therapy is emerging as a viable option in patients not eligible for surgery or other locoregional therapies. Here, we report a case of a large hcc presenting in a patient with metabolic syndrome without significant alcohol history or biochemical liver dysfunction. The patient was not a candidate for locoregional therapies because of cardiac and renal comorbidities typical of patients experiencing the long-term sequelae of metabolic syndrome. Treatment using an arc-based volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique allowed for the highest dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumour while the peripheral radiation dose was minimized. A complete local response was confirmed by computed tomography imaging 21 months after treatment completion. PMID:24764717

  17. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carozzo, Simone; Schardt, Dieter; Narici, Livio; Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen; Sannita, Walter G.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  18. Refractory lung metastasis from breast cancer treated with multidisciplinary therapy including an immunological approach.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masahiro; Terunuma, Hiroshi; Deng, Xuewen; Dewan, Md Zahidunnabi; Saji, Shigehira; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Yamamoto, Naoki; Toi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    A suggestive case of metastatic disease from breast cancer is reported. The HER-2-positive tumor was refractory to several agents, including anti-HER-2 therapy, trastuzumab, and lapatinib. After re-induction of trastuzumab in combination with activated natural killer (NK) cell injection therapy, tumor markers decreased, and finally a synergistic effect of taxane and capecitabine led to treatment response. This case suggests that multidisciplinary therapy including an immunological approach might be a breakthrough in the treatment of refractory disease. PMID:20354831

  19. Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Treat Insomnia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Lagisetty, Pooja; Landgraf, Jessica; Chopra, Vineet; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Conte, Marisa L.; Rogers, Mary A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Insomnia is of major public health importance. While cognitive behavioral therapy is beneficial, in-person treatment is often unavailable. We assessed the effectiveness of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Objectives The primary objectives were to determine whether online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia could improve sleep efficiency and reduce the severity of insomnia in adults. Secondary outcomes included sleep quality, total sleep time, time in bed, sleep onset latency, wake time after sleep onset, and number of nocturnal awakenings. Data Sources We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library, Embase, and the Web of Science for randomized trials. Methods Studies were eligible if they were randomized controlled trials in adults that reported application of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia via internet delivery. Mean differences in improvement in sleep measures were calculated using the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method for random effects meta-analysis. Results We found 15 trials, all utilizing a pretest-posttest randomized control group design. Sleep efficiency was 72% at baseline and improved by 7.2% (95% CI: 5.1%, 9.3%; p<0.001) with internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy versus control. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy resulted in a decrease in the insomnia severity index by 4.3 points (95% CI: -7.1, -1.5; p = 0.017) compared to control. Total sleep time averaged 5.7 hours at baseline and increased by 20 minutes with internet-delivered therapy versus control (95% CI: 9, 31; p = 0.004). The severity of depression decreased by 2.3 points (95% CI: -2.9, -1.7; p = 0.013) in individuals who received internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy compared to control. Improvements in sleep efficiency, the insomnia severity index and depression scores with internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy were

  20. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W Gregory; Trubey, Charles M; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4(+) T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: Enhanced survival following intracarotid injection of sodium borocaptate with or without blood-brain barrier disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Barth, R.F.; Rotaru, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    Sodium borocaptate (Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 11}SH or BSH) has been used clinically for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of patients with primary brain tumors. The purpose of the present study was to determine if tumor uptake of BSH and efficacy of BNCT could be enhanced in F98 glioma-bearing rats by intracarotid (i.c.) injection of the compound with or without blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D). 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed. PMID:26235186

  3. Combined use of sodium borocaptate and buthionine sulfoximine in boron neutron capture therapy enhanced tissue boron uptake and delayed tumor growth in a rat subcutaneous tumor model.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Fumiyo; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nakai, Kei; Kumada, Hiroaki; Shibata, Yasushi; Tsuruta, Wataro; Endo, Kiyoshi; Tsurubuchi, Takao; Matsumura, Akira

    2008-05-18

    We have previously reported that buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) enhances sodium borocaptate (BSH) uptake by down regulating glutathione (GSH) synthesis in cultured cells. This study investigated the influence of BSO on tissue BSH uptake in vivo and the efficacy of BSH-BSO-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on tumor growth using a Fisher-344 rat subcutaneous tumor model. With BSO supplementation, boron uptake in subcutaneous tumor, blood, skin, muscle, liver, and kidney was significantly enhanced and maintained for 12h. Tumor growth was significantly delayed by using BSO. With further improvement in experimental conditions, radiation exposure time, together with radiation damage to normal tissues, could be reduced. PMID:18272285

  4. Toward prompt gamma spectrometry for monitoring boron distributions during extra corporal treatment of liver metastases by boron neutron capture therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Khelifi, R; Nievaart, V A; Bode, P; Moss, R L; Krijger, G C

    2009-07-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of extra corporal liver phantom. The present paper describes the basis for a subsequent clinical application of the prompt gamma spectroscopy set-up aimed at in vivo monitoring of boron distribution. MCNP code was used first to validate the homogeneity in thermal neutron field in the liver phantom and simulate the gamma ray detection system (collimator and detector) in the treatment room. The gamma ray of 478 keV emitted by boron in small specific region can be detected and a mathematical formalism was used for the tomography image reconstruction. PMID:19394243

  5. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  6. [Hepatitis B virus reactivation after cessation of prophylactic lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab combined CHOP therapy].

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Tsujimura, Hideki; Ise, Mikiko; Sakai, Chikara; Kojima, Hiroshige; Fukai, Kenichi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Kyoya

    2009-12-01

    Here we report three cases of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation after cessation of preemptive lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). Two patients received eight cycles of R-CHOP, and one received two cycles of R-CHOP followed by two courses of rituximab. As all the patients were HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, lamivudine was administered simultaneously with R-CHOP to prevent virus reactivation. All the patients developed hepatitis due to HBV reactivation 6, 8 and 13 months after completion of chemotherapy, and 4, 2 and 2 months after cessation of lamivudine, respectively. They were treated with either lamivudine or entecavir and all achieved full recovery. When HBV carriers undergo immunosuppressive anticancer treatment, prophylactic antiviral therapy is well recognized as effective. However, the optimal method of prophylaxis has not yet been established. Since the introduction of rituximab, new problems such as delayed HBV reactivation from HBsAg positive patients and de novo hepatitis B from HBsAg negative patients have emerged. Guidelines for prophylactic antiviral therapy in the era of rituximab need to be established. PMID:20068280

  7. Fractionated Grid Therapy in Treating Cervical Cancers: Conventional Fractionation or Hypofractionation?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hualin Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina; Kong Xiang; Yuan Jiankui; Gupta, Nilendu; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John; Montebello, Joseph; Martin, Douglas; Yuh, William

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated grid therapy in debulking cervical cancers using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods and Materials: A Monte Carlo technique was used to calculate the dose distribution of a commercially available grid in a 6-MV photon beam. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of both the conventionally fractionated (2 Gy/fraction) and hypofractionated (15 Gy/fraction) grid therapy regimens to debulk cervical cancers with different LQ parameters. The equivalent open-field dose (EOD) to the cancer cells and therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from 114 patients were used to verify our theoretical model. Results: The cervical cancer and normal tissue cell survival statistics for grid therapy in two regimens were calculated. The EODs and TRs were derived. The EOD was only a fraction of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and the LQ parameters of both the tumor and normal tissue cells. The grid therapy favors the acutely responding tumors inside radiosensitive normal tissues. Theoretical model predictions were consistent with the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy provided a pronounced therapeutic advantage in both the hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated regimens compared with that seen with single fraction, open debulking field regimens, but the true therapeutic advantage exists only in the hypofractionated grid therapy. The clinical outcomes and our study indicated that a course of open-field radiotherapy is necessary to control tumor growth fully after a grid therapy.

  8. Statin therapy and thromboxane generation in patients with coronary artery disease treated with high-dose aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bliden, K P; Singla, A; Gesheff, M G; Toth, P P; Tabrizchi, A; Ens, G; Guyer, K; Singh, M; Franzese, C J; Stapleton, D; Tantry, U S; Gurbel, P A

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin and statin therapy are mainstay treatments in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The relation between statin therapy, in vivo thromboxane (Tx) generation; a marker of inflammation, and blood thrombogenicity has never been explored. Urinary 11-dehydro (dh) TxB2 was determined in patients with suspected CAD on 325 mg daily aspirin therapy prior to undergoing cardiac catheterisation (n=281). Thrombogenicity was estimated by thrombelastographic measurement of thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (TIP-FCS) and lipids/lipoproteins were determined by vertical density gradient ultracentrifugation/ELISA. The influence of statin therapy and dose was analysed by the atorvastatin equivalent dose (5-10 mg, 20-40 mg, or 80 mg daily). Statin therapy (n=186) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in urinary 11-dh TxB2 (p=0.046) that was independent of LDL and apo B100 levels but was strongly related to TIP-FCS (p=0.006). By multivariate analysis, no statin therapy (n=95) and female gender were independently associated with high urinary 11-dh TxB2 [OR=2.95 (0.1.57-5.50, p=0.0007); OR=2.25 (1.24-4.05, p=0.007)], respectively. In aspirin-treated patients, statin therapy was independently and inversely associated with inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated 11-dh TxB2 was associated with a prothrombotic state indicated by high TIP-FCS. Our data suggest that measurement of urinary 11-dTxB2 may be a useful method to optimise statin dosing in order to reduce thrombotic risk. PMID:24763965

  9. Effect of long-term music therapy intervention on autonomic function in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Han, Wei-Ru; Li, Pei-Chun; Song, Mi-Yun; Young, Shuenn-Tsong

    2011-12-01

    Anthracyclines are potent antineoplastic agents associated with cardiotoxicity, which may lead to congestive heart failure, causing impairment of autonomic cardiovascular function as assessed by heart rate variability (HRV). This decreases survival rates. This study aimed to determine whether music therapy intervention improves autonomic function in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients, and if so, whether such improvements persist after cessation of the intervention. Participants were 12 women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy or breast-conserving treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy; they attended 8 weekly music therapy sessions, each lasting 2 hours. Electrocardiogram traces (5 minutes) for HRV analysis were recorded 4 times: prior to the first music session, T1; after the fourth music session, T2; after the eighth music session, T3; and 4 weeks after the completion of music therapy, T4. HRV parameters were subjected to a nonparametric Friedman test on the differences between T1 and T2, T3, and T4. The standard deviation of normal intervals and the total power of HRV parameters, related to global autonomic function, were significantly higher at T3 than at T1. The root-mean-square differences of successive normal R-R intervals and high-frequency (HF) HRV parameters, related to parasympathetic activity, were significantly increased, but no change was seen in the LF/HF ratio of HRV parameters (which is related to sympathetic activity) during the music therapy. Global autonomic function and parasympathetic activity had not changed significantly at T4 relative to T1. The authors provide preliminary evidence of the benefits of music therapy for anthracycline-treated breast cancer survivors. PMID:21382955

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kageji, Teruyoshi . E-mail: kageji@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively.

  11. Properties of a Cold-Neutron Irradiation Facility for In Vitro Research on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Luedemann, L.; Kampmann, R.; Sosaat, W.; Staron, P.; Wille, P.

    2000-05-15

    A new irradiation facility, GBET (basic research on boron neutron capture therapy), especially designed for in vitro experiments on boron neutron capture therapy was put into operation at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility of the GKSS Research Center. Its location at a cold-neutron guide without direct view of the reactor core has two advantages: First, contamination of the primary beam with fast neutrons or photons is negligible. Second, GBET yields a high cold-neutron flux of 1.4 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s) over an area of 3 x 4 cm. As a result of the energy dependence of the neutron absorption cross section of boron, this corresponds to a higher effective thermal flux of 4.7 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s). This effect is used to reduce the irradiation times by a factor of 3.32.The effective flux is sufficient for irradiation of thin samples like cell monolayers in conventional culture flasks. For such in vitro irradiations, a survival fraction of 1% is achieved at a homogeneous boron concentration of 100 ppm {sup 10}B within {approx}20 min. Furthermore, the beam can be used for boron radiography. The respective experimental conditions are discussed, especially the neutron flux distribution, available for these different types of samples.

  12. Laser-based strategies to treat diabetic macular edema: history and new promising therapies.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  13. Laser-Based Strategies to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema: History and New Promising Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  14. CD34+ therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savooji, John; Shakil, Fouzia; Islam, Humayun; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a long term complication of chemotherapy for a variety of cancers. In most cases, the marrow demonstrates high risk cytogenetics and the prognosis is poor. In a minority of patients “good risk” cytogenetics, including t(15;17)(q22;q12), are seen and the patient’s prognosis is similar to those who have de novo disease. Currently we present a patient who developed therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after chemoradiotherapy for breast cancer. This case was especially atypical because the leukemic cells were CD34+, which is an unusual immunophenotype for APL. Recognition that this patient had APL, rather than the more common therapy-related MDS or AML, was imperative to initiate chemotherapy in a timely manner. PMID:27358899

  15. Evaluation of Gene Therapy as an Intervention Strategy to Treat Brain Injury from Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Amanda J.; Housley, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, with a lack of treatments available to prevent cell death, regenerate damaged cells and pathways, or promote neurogenesis. The extended period of hours to weeks over which tissue damage continues to occur makes this disorder a candidate for gene therapy. This review highlights the development of gene therapy in the area of stroke, with the evolution of viral administration, in experimental stroke models, from pre-injury to clinically relevant timeframes of hours to days post-stroke. The putative therapeutic proteins being examined include anti-apoptotic, pro-survival, anti-inflammatory, and guidance proteins, targeting multiple pathways within the complex pathology, with promising results. The balance of findings from animal models suggests that gene therapy provides a viable translational platform for treatment of ischemic brain injury arising from stroke. PMID:27252622

  16. Spa therapy: can be a valid option for treating knee osteoarthritis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be one of the leading causes of `years lived with disability' worldwide. Symptomatic knee OA is highly prevalent among people aged 50 years and over and is destined to become an ever more important healthcare problem. Current management of knee OA includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA in many European countries, as well as in Japan and Israel. Despite its long history and popularity, spa treatment is still the subject of debate and its role in modern medicine continues to be unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanisms of action of spa therapy in knee OA. Various randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of balneotherapy and mud-pack therapy in patients with knee OA. Data from these clinical trials support a beneficial effect of spa therapy on pain, function and quality of life in knee OA that lasts over time, until 6-9 months after the treatment. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviate suffering in OA are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, among which the mechanical, thermal and chemical effects are most prominent. In conclusion, spa therapy seems to have a role in the treatment of knee OA. Additional RCTs and further studies of mechanisms of action with high methodological quality are necessary to prove the effects of spa therapy.

  17. [Two long-term survival cases of unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma treated with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hisateru; Kanazawa, Akishige; Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Mori, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Takayoshi; Ohira, Go; Kodai, Shintaro; Morimoto, Junya; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Inoue, Toru; Yamashita, Yoshito; Nishiguchi, Yukio; Ikehara, Teruyuki; Taira, Koichi; Horii, Katsuhiko; Yamazaki, Osamu

    2012-11-01

    The prognosis for patients with unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma(ICC) is extremely poor. Case 1 was a 65- year-old woman who had an ICC of 9 cm in diameter (mass-forming type) in the right lobe with portal trunk invasion. She was treated with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy[cisplatin(CDDP)/5-fluorouracil(5-FU)/l-leucovorin(l-LV)] and radiation therapy (total dose, 50 Gy). After 6 months, abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed that the tumor had regressed. She survived for 7 years without recurrence of the ICC; subsequently, she died of peritoneal cancer. Case 2 was a 59-year-old woman who had an ICC of 8 cm in diameter (mass-forming type) in the left lobe with lymph node metastasis in the hepatoduodenal ligament; the right hepatic artery was involved by the metastatic lymph nodes. She was treated with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy(CDDP/5-FU/l-LV) and radiation therapy(total dose, 30 Gy). After 10 months, abdominal CT revealed that the tumor had disappeared, but paraaortic and mediastinal lymph node metastases were detected. She was therefore treated with systemic chemotherapy. Treatment with systematic chemotherapy enabled her to survive for over 5 years with a good performance status. PMID:23267958

  18. Comparative Metabolomic Profiling of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Treated with Sorafenib Monotherapy vs. Sorafenib-Everolimus Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian-feng; Lu, Juan; Wang, Xiao-zhong; Guo, Wu-hua; Zhang, Ji-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy may be more effective than sorafenib monotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To better understand this effect, we comparatively profiled the metabolite composition of HepG2 cells treated with sorafenib, everolimus, and sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy. Material/Methods A 2D HRMAS 1H-NMR metabolomic approach was applied to identify the key differential metabolites in 3 experimental groups: sorafenib (5 μM), everolimus (5 μM), and combination therapy (5 μM sorafenib +5 μM everolimus). MetaboAnalyst 3.0 was used to perform pathway analysis. Results All OPLS-DA models displayed good separation between experimental groups, high-quality goodness of fit (R2), and high-quality goodness of predication (Q2). Sorafenib and everolimus have differential effects with respect to amino acid, methane, pyruvate, pyrimidine, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, and glycerophospholipid metabolism. The addition of everolimus to sorafenib resulted in differential effects with respect to pyruvate, amino acid, methane, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate, glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, glycerophospholipid, and purine metabolism. Conclusions Sorafenib and everolimus have differential effects on HepG2 cells. Sorafenib preferentially affects glycerophospholipid and purine metabolism, while the addition of everolimus preferentially affects pyruvate, amino acid, and glucose metabolism. This phenomenon may explain (in part) the synergistic effects of sorafenib-everolimus combination therapy observed in vivo. PMID:26092946

  19. [Breast Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine Monotherapy after Failure of Combination Therapy Comprising Bevacizumab and Paclitaxel].

    PubMed

    Ooe, Asako; Suganuma, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of breast cancer with multiple liver metastases successfully treated with capecitabine monotherapy after failure of combination therapy comprising bevacizumab (Bev) and paclitaxel (PTX). In March 2012, a 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with Stage IV breast cancer with massive pleural effusion. Histological examination showed invasive ductal carcinoma (scirrhous carcinoma) that was positive for hormonal receptor but negative for HER2 expression, and the nuclear grade was 1. She first received chemotherapy to decrease the tumor volume followed by hormonal therapy. After progression, imaging studies showed increased multiple lung and liver metastases and pleural effusion. Subsequently, treatment with combination of Bev and PTX was started from July 2014. After 4 courses of the combination therapy, multiple liver metastases were unchanged, but her liver function was impaired. Hence, she received capecitabine monotherapy (1,800 mg bis in die [BID]; 2-week administration followed by a week of rest). Her liver function improved early, and a partial response (PR) in the multiple liver metastases was achieved 3 months after initiation of therapy. Furthermore, the metastatic lesions were well controlled 4 months later. These findings suggest that the sensitivity to an anticancer agent greatly varies among patients. PMID:27067853

  20. Recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland: Long-term outcome of patients treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: achen@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Garcia, Joaquin; Bucci, M. Kara; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Eisele, David W.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiation therapy in the management of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 34 patients were treated with postoperative radiation therapy for recurrent pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland to a median dose of 5000 cGy (range, 4,500-6,000 cGy). Median age was 48 years (range, 24-72 years). Gross total resection at the time of surgery before radiation was achieved in 30 patients (88%), and histologic analysis demonstrated multifocal disease in 16 patients (47%). Radiation was delivered for a first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth local recurrence in 24%, 21%, 24%, 24%, 6%, and 3% of patients, respectively. Results: With a median follow-up of 17.4 years (range, 2.3-28.9 years), 2 patients had local recurrences at a median of 3.4 years after completion of radiation. The 20-year actuarial local control rate was 94%. One patient developed a second malignancy at approximately 14 years after completion of therapy. Conclusion: The use of postoperative radiation therapy leads to excellent long-term local control for the treatment of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma with acceptable late toxicity. Although the incidence of second malignancy was low in this population, continued follow-up is warranted.