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Sample records for caradoc mixed siliciclastic-carbonate

  1. The nature of matrix in mixed siliciclastic-carbonate turbidites: An example from the Oquirrh-Wood River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, J.K. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Upper Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian strata of the Oquirrh-Wood River basin (OWRB) in southern Idaho are dominated by mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediment gravity flows, including amalgamated sandy turbidites or grain flows, and silty turbidites. Previously, the petrology of the carbonate fraction of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate turbidites from the OWRB has been described as predominantly micrite. A source of micrite is present in phylloid algal mounds, which comprise a carbonate platform on the eastern basin margin. Visible micritized skeletal grains and fusulinids are uncommon in these sediments. It has been proposed that the micrite was subsequently neomorphosed to microspar or large, blocky spar. The actual volume of micrite in these deposits is enigmatic. Classic studies of turbidite hydrodynamics indicate that matrix accounts for no more than 20 percent, and commonly less, of the experimental turbidite deposits. Therefore, it is unlikely, based on hydrodynamics, that mixed siliciclastic-carbonate turbidites contain more than 20 percent micritic matrix. To resolve this enigma, multiple samples of the siliciclastic-carbonate turbidites from the OWRB were examined using a fluorescence (blue-light) microscope and the white-card technique. Under fluorescence the carbonate fraction of these samples was determined to contain micritized skeletal fragments; peloids, and micritized fusulinids. During diagenesis many of the carbonate grains were deformed and crushed to form carbonate pseudomatrix. Abundant carbonate grains indicate that mixed siliciclastic-carbonate turbidites from the OWRB adhere to established hydrodynamic principles, and contain less than 20 percent detrital matrix.

  2. Recognition of maximum flooding events in mixed siliciclastic-carbonate systems: Key to global chronostratigraphic correlation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancini, E.A.; Tew, B.H.

    1997-01-01

    The maximum flooding event within a depositional sequence is an important datum for correlation because it represents a virtually synchronous horizon. This event is typically recognized by a distinctive physical surface and/or a significant change in microfossil assemblages (relative fossil abundance peaks) in siliciclastic deposits from shoreline to continental slope environments in a passive margin setting. Recognition of maximum flooding events in mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments is more complicated because the entire section usually represents deposition in continental shelf environments with varying rates of biologic and carbonate productivity versus siliciclastic influx. Hence, this event cannot be consistently identified simply by relative fossil abundance peaks. Factors such as siliciclastic input, carbonate productivity, sediment accumulation rates, and paleoenvironmental conditions dramatically affect the relative abundances of microfossils. Failure to recognize these complications can lead to a sequence stratigraphic interpretation that substantially overestimates the number of depositional sequences of 1 to 10 m.y. duration.

  3. Carbonate buildups on a high energy, mixed siliciclastic/carbonate shelf, (Lower Pennsylvanian, Morrowan), northwest Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Biogenically stabilized buildups of carbonate mud, normally associated with low energy environments, developed on a high energy shelf during Morrowan (Early Pennsylvanian) time in northwest Arkansas. The Prairie Grove Member of the Hale Formation is a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate unit characterized by abundant cross stratification. Eight-five percent of the Prairie Grove lithosome is composed of quartzarenite (60%) and skeletal/oolitic grainstone (25%). Sand waves transported and deposited the quartz-carbonate mixture in medium to large scale sets of wedge planar, tabular planar, and trough cross strata. Abundant skeletal fragments and the existence of a bidirectional current system suggest that a strong tidal regime was the dominant depositional process on the shelf. Within the framework of migrating sand waves, crustose red algae colonized local areas of immobile sand and initiated the deposition of carbonate mud. As relief developed, a diverse marine fauna, including phylloid algae, crinoids, bryozoans, and brachiopods, flourished on the mud substrate. Buildups range from three to ten feet thick and occur in laterally coalescing complexes. Mud accumulation and active growth occurred in close association with mobile sand flats swept by strong tidal currents. Regionally derived quartz sand mixed with mound supplied skeletal debris to form the mixed skeletal-carbonate system of the Prairie Grove Member.

  4. Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian), Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadan, Mahdi; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh

    2010-05-01

    Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian), Central Iran M. Shadan & M. Hosseini-Barzi Geology Department, Faculty of Earth Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran shadangeo@gmail.com Mixing mechanisms in siliciclastic-carbonate successions of Khan Formation (Permian) have been studied in two sections (Chahroof with 197 m thick in north and Cheshmeh Bakhshi with 204 m thick in south) along basement Kalmard fault in Posht-e-Badam block, Central Iran. Siliciclastic units are characterized by well sorted, fine to medium grain quartzarenites with laterite interbeds, deposited in shoreline zone (foreshore, upper and lower shoreface) influencing wave and longshore currents. Longshore sands which have been transported along the coast made the sand bars in the shoreface. Further along the coast, returning of these currents as rip currents produced erosive channel inlets and caused to carry fine grain into the deeper regions of the basin. Based on this sedimentary model we introduced longshore currents as a probable agent for mixing, by transporting some volumes of sands into the adjacent carbonate environments. Vertically, clastic units of Khan Formation underlined by carbonate units of a tidal flat and high-energy inner ramp system. Repeating of this pattern produced 3 cycles in each section. Cyclic evolution, in studied sections, is accompanied with discrepancy in erosion and sedimentation. These factors caused to disperse local sub-aerial exposures in successions which are recognizable by laterite and conglomerate interbeds. These horizons of sub-aerial exposures are more often in Chahroof section than in Cheshmeh Bakhshi section and indicate more fluctuations of relative sea level probably due to more local tectonic activity in the northern part of the Kalmard fault than in the southern part of it. Also, thicker siliciclastic units in Chahroof section show higher rate of sediment supply and/or more accommodation space

  5. Facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the Cenomanian-Turonian mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments in west Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Tarek I.

    2014-06-01

    The unconformity bounded Cenomanian-Turonian succession in west Sinai is subdivided into three formations: the Raha, Abu Qada, and Wata. These rock units were deposited in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system on a ramp setting. The studied ramp only includes inner and mid-ramp facies, whereas the outer ramp facies occurs in northern Sinai. Four sequence boundaries (SB) were recognized in the studied formations due to the presence of subaerial exposure or flooding events in the facies stacking pattern. The first and last sequence boundaries (SB1 and SB4) might be considered as Type 1 sequence boundary attributable to the presence of widespread erosion. It is difficult to determine type of the second and third sequence boundaries (SB2 and SB3) because of their minor unconformity and minimal erosion. Determination of systems tracts within the Wata Formation is debatable owing to the action of dolomitization that has destroyed both original components and sedimentary structures. The lowstand systems tracts of the recorded sequences are characterized by sandstones, siltstones, and sandy shales, while fossiliferous shale and limestone with oysters prevailed during sea level rise. The highstand systems tracts are generally characterized by shallow intertidal and subtidal deposits that are made up of abundant oyster wackestones with benthic foraminifera and ostracods.

  6. Deep water geomorphology of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system, Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jason M.; Daniell, James J.; Droxler, André W.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Bentley, Samuel J.; Peterson, Larry C.; Opdyke, Bradley N.; Beaufort, Luc

    2008-03-01

    Trough contains a large axial submarine channel that extends almost the entire length of the intraslope basin. In addition, an extensive system of canyons lines the NE margin of Moresby Trough. Mass-transport deposits have been fed from the canyons and in one case deposited a large (˜2000 km2) mass-transport complex. Fold-and-thrust-belt ridges also extend into Moresby Trough. Here they trend perpendicular to slope and catch gravity flow deposits on their updip side. GoP carbonate platforms/atolls all display very pronounced scalloped-margin morphology, which may indicate pervasive mass-wasting processes on carbonate margins. Northwest Eastern Plateau is dominantly carbonate and displays the characteristic scalloped margin morphology; however, most of the plateau is characterized by parallel seismic reflectors. These seismic observations in conjunction with core data indicate that accumulation on Eastern Plateau is primarily mixed pelagic and hemipelagic sediment. Observations and interpretations of the bathymetry have revealed the deep water GoP to contain very diverse geomorphology and suggest it is a dynamic system influenced by a variety of sediment transport processes, particularly mass wasting and other gravity flow processes.

  7. Mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf sedimentation—Lower Devonian sequences of the SW Anti-Atlas, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubeseder, Stefan; Redfern, Jonathan; Boutib, Lahcen

    2009-03-01

    In the south-western Anti-Atlas of Morocco (Dra Plain), a continuous exposure of Lower Devonian sedimentary successions more than 400 km long provides an example of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf sequences. The carbonates were deposited adjacent and down-dip to large lobes of storm-dominated deltaic complexes during sea-level lowstands, and subsequently transgressed over the 200 m thick prograding siliciclastic wedges during sea-level rise, depositing limestone units between 5 and 20 m thick. The deltaic lobes switched through time and caused alternating siliciclastic supply along the shoreline oblique-parallel transect. Condensed limestone successions formed in clastic sediment starved areas due to delta-complex abandonment. Down-gradient, in outer ramp environments, the direct juxtaposition of carbonate and siliciclastic lithofacies associations comprising rhythmic lime mudstones/marls and massive shelf sandstones, provides the opportunity for mutual interpretation of their mode of deposition and bathymetry. This lateral relationship suggests that significant amalgamation took place in falling stage systems tracts to produce laterally extensive shelf sandstone-sheets on the outer ramp. Two types of stacking patterns are observed in prograding siliciclastic wedges. A normal progradational shoreline pattern with well developed parasequence sets in the proximal ramp, and an abrupt-regressive succession in which the amalgamated shelf sandstones rest more or less directly on offshore siltstones in the distal ramp. In the latter case, the falling stage systems tract sandstones are overlain by a relatively thick cyclic alternation with brachiopod-rich storm-beds below a marked transgressive surface at the base of the capping transgressive limestones. The cyclic alternation is interpreted as lowstand systems tract deposits. Marked flooding surfaces on parasequence sets are Fe-enriched and contain abundant articulated brachiopods, indicating breaks in sedimentation

  8. Carbonate cementation as related to the diagenesis of clay in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system: Examples from the Centerfield biostrome, east central Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.D. )

    1994-03-01

    The Middle Devonian Mahantango Formation consists of siliciclastic and mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sediment packages that pulse in and out of the stratigraphy. The formation crops out in several places throughout the folded rocks of eastern Pennsylvania and Maryland. The Centerfield Member is one of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate packages in the Mahantango Fm. This member crops out in east central Pennsylvania. The Centerfield Mbr. has been interpreted as a series of biostromes and contain abundant rugosan corals, crinoids, bryozoans, and brachiopods. The biostromes have undergone a complex diagenetic history. Illite, smectite, chlorite and muscovite have been found with the use of powder x-ray diffraction and petrographic analysis. The smectite and some of the illite are depositional clays, while, the remaining illite, chlorite and muscovite represent recrystallization of the depositional clays. There are six phases of cement in the biostrome. The paragenetic sequence of the cements is as follows: non-ferroan low magnesian calcite (LMC), intermediate ferroan LMC, ferroan LMC, non-ferroan dolomite, ferroan baroque dolomite, and quartz cement in the form of chert and blocky cement. Staining shows that the iron content of the cement changes within individual crystals and between cement phases. Preliminary data suggest that the cements may be directly related to the steady release of ions during the diagenesis of the surrounding clays in the shale.

  9. Total assemblages of benthic foraminifera from a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate inner shelf; preliminary results from the bays of Soline and Nin (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidović, J.; Ćosović, V.; Juračić, M.; Benac, Č.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Adriatic shelf is mixed siliciclastic/carbonate area with a great proportion of carbonate biogenous production. This study presents analysis and comparison of total benthic foraminiferal assemblages (their composition, diversity and distribution) in surface sediments from two Eastern Adriatic shallow water bays (Soline and Nin Bay), sampled seasonally from 2006 to 2008. In order to characterize the carbonate sediment production, 62 samples along the bathymetric profiles (from 2 to 20 m) were collected by scuba diving with short PVC corers. Granulometrical analysis was done using method of wet sieving. Statistical analyses (cluster analysis, PCA) were performed using Past program. The most abundant biogenous components in different sediments from Soline Bay (muddy sandy gravel and mud) are foraminifera, followed by fragments of mollusks, gastropods, bryozoans and sea urchins. Foraminiferal assemblages are high diversified as confirmed by Shannon-Wiener index varying from 2.14 to 3.39, Fisher α index from 5.74 to 16.30 and Equitability from 0.32 to 0.72. The shallowest part of the bay is covered with the sand, consisted of high proportion of siliciclastic component and impoverished in biogenous remnants. Foraminiferal assemblages have low diversity (Shannon-Wiener index 1.36, Fisher α index 2.31 and Equitability 0.32). Throughout Nin Bay, sediments (classified as sand, muddy sand and mud) are consisted of various biogenic remnants. Foraminiferal assemblages have high biodiversity, with Shannon-Wiener index varying from 2.51 to 3.20, α-Fisher index from 7.84 to 12.64 and Equitability from 0.37 to 0.77. Statistical analyses (cluster analysis and PCA) grouped foraminifera in two major assemblages, related to sediment type. On sandy and gravely substrates, assemblage is dominated by epifaunal genera and species: Quinqueloculina sp. (6-20%), Elphidium sp. (5-16%), Neoconorbina terquemi (6-10 %) and Asterigerinata mamilla (5-7%). Infaunal species, Ammonia

  10. Shelf morphology as an indicator of sedimentary regimes: A synthesis from a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf on the eastern Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Alex C.; Quaresma, Valéria S.; Marangoni, Mariana B.; D'Agostini, Danielle P.; Bourguignon, Silvia N.; Cetto, Paulo H.; Silva, Alex E.; Amado Filho, Gilberto M.; Moura, Rodrigo L.; Collins, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Modern shelf morphology is the result of the interplay between short and long term sedimentary processes. The relation between rates of sediment supply/carbonate growth and accommodation space creation will not only control coastal transgression and regression, but will also define the shelf sedimentary regimes acting to shape the seabed. Herein, shelf morphology and sedimentology are investigated in order to discuss how these characteristics can be representative of distinct sedimentary regimes. The study area is the eastern Brazilian shelf where coastal transgression and regression coexist with the most important coral reef system of the South Atlantic. A compilation of existing published and unpublished data was carried out in order to produce morphological and faciological maps and compare the mapped features with high-resolution seismic and sonographic data. The results show three major regions or morphological compartments: Abrolhos Shelf, Doce River Shelf and the Paleovalleys Shelf. In terms of shelf sedimentary domain, rhodolith beds predominate over the outer shelf along the entire area, coralline reefs are present along the northern Abrolhos inner shelf and a significant terrigenous mud deposit is observed associated to the Doce River adjacent inner shelf beds. The rest of the shelf is composed by bioclastic or terrigenous mud sand and gravel. Terrigenous sedimentation is always restricted to the shoreface or inner shelf shallower areas and carbonate sands and gravels are predominant elsewhere. The Abrolhos shelf shows two distinct sectors; the northern area is a typical mixed sediment environment that has a supply regime along the coast/shoreface, mainly due to longshore transport and a carbonate regime along the inner and outer shelf. The southern shelf morphology and sedimentation are controlled by the antecedent topography and is typically a accommodation regime shelf with associated rhodolith beds. The Doce river shelf is a supply regime environment

  11. Preliminary results in larger benthic foraminifera assemblage in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate platform from the Upper Cretaceous of the External Prebetic Domain (Valencia province, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Salcedo, Raquel; Vicedo, Vicent

    2016-04-01

    In the External Prebetic Domain (Betic Mountain Range, Valencia province, SE Spain) it is difficult to find good outcrops to study larger benthic foraminifera (LBF), particularly in the Upper Cretaceous deposits, because of three main reasons. During the Upper Cretaceous, the complex paleogeography in the northern Prebetic Domain developed a complex system of shallow-water platforms. This is directly linked to the complexity in the distribution of the facies observed nowadays, which may change drastically in lateral, closely related outcrops having a special negative impact in the lateral extension of stratigraphical levels containing LBF. The second reason is the nature of the shallow water environments in which the larger foraminifera lived. The local continental influence derived in the establishment of very complex mixed platforms. Thus, there is not a complete register through carbonate rocks, but an alternation of microconglomerates, sandstones, calcarenites and carbonates that can be observed in the stratigraphic series of the Upper Cretaceous. This affects negatively in observing changes in the evolutionary trends of taxa. The third reason difficulting the study of LBF in northern localities of the Prebetic Domain is diagenetic. Dolomitization affects a huge part of the Mesozoic rocks deleting all fossil microfauna in the affected rocks. Such three reasons are behind the difficulty in developing correlations and having a comprehensive understanding of the biostratigraphy and phylogeny of the taxa involved. However, after several field trips developed in the northern Prebetic area, an excellent reference section for the study of the LBF in the Prebetic Domain has been identified in the surroundings of the Pinet village (Valencia province). Here, a relatively continuous section with scarce dolomitization and good conditions of accessibility exists. The larger foraminifera assemblages appering in the Pinet section will be compared with other paleobiogeographic

  12. Trace element signature of Late Jurassic siliciclastic-carbonate sedimentary strata from western Montana, southeastern British Columbia and southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Sablock, J. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    A trace element signature, a characteristic pattern of enrichment and depletion of trace elements, was determined for a group of siliciclastic-carbonate Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian sedimentary strata, collected from outcrops in western Montana, southeastern British Columbia and southern Alberta. The average values, by petrofacies, of 10 major and 18 trace elements were measured for 40 samples. These data were normalized to Upper Continental Crust (UCC), and plotted against averaged published values of graywackes from the same facies. The rare earth elements (REEs), as well as Ti, Zr, Nb and Y are considered immobile even through diagenesis, and at least low level metamorphism. So these elements should form a reliable part of the geochemical signature. Compared to UCC and average graywacke, Jurassic samples are very depleted in Zr, Nb and Y. Oxfordian samples have slightly higher rare earth element values, i.e. La, Ce and Nd, than either other Jurassic samples or average graywacke. The most likely source of REE values are garnets and tourmaline which occur as inclusions in monocrystalline quartz grains. This pattern, and petrological study, point to a sedimentary source area, deficient in feldspar, heavy minerals and rock fragments. The consistency of the signature throughout this time may indicate slow uplift of a widespread sedimentary source area, or could be an effect of greater mixing and shorter residence time of dissolved materials in an epeiric sea.

  13. Holocene siliciclastic-carbonate facies mosaics, Northern Belize: Exploration analog to some midcontinent Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.B.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1995-09-01

    Midwinter Lagoon is a large, shallow coastal lagoon, bordered on its seaward side by a barrier, along the mainland coast of northern Belize. As much as 19 ft of Holocene sediments, deposited on karsted Tertiary limestones during the Flandrian transgression, consist of a complex mosaic of mixed siliciclastic and carbonate facies. Basal transgressive marine, intra-lagoonal facies are variously siliciclastic-rich carbonates to carbonate-rich siliciclastics, locally with layers of shoreline mangrove peat. These facies shallow-upward to either siliciclastic or carbonate-dominated sands or muds. Lagoonal facies were deposited within a broad topographic low, locally punctuated by bedrock highs, on the underlying limestone. The seaward edge of the barrier bar complex, which was deposited on a linear topographic high, consists mostly of quartz sands, whereas the lagoonal side is a mixture of quartzose and carbonate sediments (sands and muds). The barrier bar appears to have accreted southward in response to southerly longshore drift as a tidal inlet-spit complex; quartz sands are being transported into the lagoon from its seaward side. In terms of geometry, modern and buried, intra-lagoonal carbonate sands occur as lobes deposited proximal to extant and older tidal inlets. Either carbonate or siliciclastic sands variously occur as erratically distributed, anastomosing beach deposits around small mangrove islands and along the irregular mainland coast. In contrast, siliciclastic sands on the seaward side of the barrier define a narrow but areally persistent linear trend. Similar complex facies associations and geometries are typical of many Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) reservoirs in the midcontinent US.

  14. Modern cool-water siliciclastic/carbonate sediments, lacepede shelf South Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, Y.; Gostin, V. ); James, N.P. ); Von der Borch, C.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The Lacepeded Shelf is a 130 km {times} 100 km open embayment along the southern passive continental margin of Australia. The shelf includes the mouth of the River Murray - Australia's largest drainage system- the extensive arcuate Coorong strand, the 50-70 m deep and flat plateau of the shelf proper, the nonrimmed shelf break, and the upper slope to depths of 200 m. The shelf bathymetry is locally interrupted by seafloor highs, reflecting the underlying rugged terrain of deformed Precambrian and early Paleozoic bedrock in the west and Tertiary limestones and Quaternary dunes in the east. The late Pleistocene/Holocene sediment blanket is formed by discrete sedimentary facies. Quartz sands cover a significant cross-shelf zone opposite the river mouth, with current generated offsets. High-resolution seismic profiles reveal buried lowstand channels. The mid-shelf is an area of conspicuously coarse-grained, mud-free loose sediments composed of variable amounts of bryozoans and bivalves. The shelf break and upper slop bryozoan sands are similar, apart from species differences, from 40 to 100 m, with an increase in mud below 100 m. The seafloor highs are sites of prolific bryozoan, calcareous algae, sponge, and bivalve growth, the skeletons of which are shed onto the shelf. Bryozoan distribution is moderated by water depth and substrate type. Most forms are low-Mg calcite to high-Mg calcite, but two major groups are aragonitic. Distribution of these different mineralogical types is important for later diagenesis. Both terrigenous clastic and carbonate sediments are a mixture of relict and modern components, depending upon location, and reflect Holocene glacio-eustatic sea-level changes.

  15. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  16. [Mixed marriages].

    PubMed

    Harmsen, C N

    1998-08-01

    The author examines the extent and characteristics of mixed marriages in the Netherlands. "Nine out of ten married persons born in Turkey or Morocco have a partner who was born in the same country. The majority of married Surinamese also have a partner originating from the same country. Those who spend (a part of) their youth in Indonesia (the former Dutch East Indies), on the other hand, are mostly married to someone born in the Netherlands." (EXCERPT) PMID:12294179

  17. Mixed results with mixed disulfides.

    PubMed

    Brigelius-Flohé, Regina

    2016-04-01

    A period of research with Helmut Sies in the 1980s is recalled. Our experiments aimed at an in-depth understanding of metabolic changes due to oxidative challenges under near-physiological conditions, i.e. perfused organs. A major focus were alterations of the glutathione and the NADPH/NADP(+) system by different kinds of oxidants, in particular formation of glutathione mixed disulfides with proteins. To analyze mixed disulfides, a test was adapted which is widely used until today. The observations in perfused rat livers let us believe that glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), i.a. might be activated by glutathionylation. Although we did not succeed to verify this hypothesis for the special case of G6PDH, the regulation of enzyme/protein activities by glutathionylation today is an accepted posttranslational mechanism in redox biology in general. Our early experimental approaches are discussed in the context of present knowledge. PMID:27095221

  18. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  19. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  20. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  1. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  2. Foundations of chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Stephen; Ottino, Julio M

    2004-05-15

    The simplest mixing problem corresponds to the mixing of a fluid with itself; this case provides a foundation on which the subject rests. The objective here is to study mixing independently of the mechanisms used to create the motion and review elements of theory focusing mostly on mathematical foundations and minimal models. The flows under consideration will be of two types: two-dimensional (2D) 'blinking flows', or three-dimensional (3D) duct flows. Given that mixing in continuous 3D duct flows depends critically on cross-sectional mixing, and that many microfluidic applications involve continuous flows, we focus on the essential aspects of mixing in 2D flows, as they provide a foundation from which to base our understanding of more complex cases. The baker's transformation is taken as the centrepiece for describing the dynamical systems framework. In particular, a hierarchy of characterizations of mixing exist, Bernoulli --> mixing --> ergodic, ordered according to the quality of mixing (the strongest first). Most importantly for the design process, we show how the so-called linked twist maps function as a minimal picture of mixing, provide a mathematical structure for understanding the type of 2D flows that arise in many micromixers already built, and give conditions guaranteeing the best quality mixing. Extensions of these concepts lead to first-principle-based designs without resorting to lengthy computations. PMID:15306478

  3. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  4. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  5. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to ‑ π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  6. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  7. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  8. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  9. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  10. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  11. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  12. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  13. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  14. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  15. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  16. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  17. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:24359851

  18. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  19. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  20. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution. PMID:23729251

  1. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  2. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  5. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-08-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  6. MixDown

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-01-01

    MixDown is a meta-build tool that orchestrates and manages the building of multiple 3rd party libraries. It can manage the downloading, uncompressing, unpacking, patching, configuration, build, and installation of 3rd party libraries using a variety of configuration and build tools. As a meta-build tool, it relies on 3rd party tools such as GNU Autotools, make, Cmake, scons, etc. to actually confugure and build libraries. MixDown includes an extensive database of settings to be used formore » general machines and specific leadership class computing resources.« less

  7. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  8. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  9. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  10. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  11. Mixed valent metals.

    PubMed

    Riseborough, P S; Lawrence, J M

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger's theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach's diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc. PMID:27376888

  12. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  13. Progress in mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.K.

    1997-03-14

    We have identified the Cranfill multifluid turbulence model (Cranfill, 1992) as a starting point for development of subgrid models of instability, turbulent and mixing processes. We have differenced the closed system of equations in conservation form, and coded them in the object-oriented hydrodynamics code FLAG, which is to be used as a testbed for such models.

  14. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  15. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  16. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Landrum, D. Brian; Turner, Matthew; Wagner, David K.; Lambert, James

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane. Initial cold flow testing of the model is underway to determine both, the behavior of the ingested air in the duct and to validate the mixing diagnostics. During the tests, each of the two rocket nozzles ejected up to two pounds mass per second into the 13.6 square inch duct. The tests showed that the mass flow of the rockets was great enough to cause the entrained air to go sonic at the strut, which is the location of the rocket nozzles. More tests are necessary to determine whether the entrained air chokes due to the reduction in the area of the duct at the strut (a physical choke), or because of the addition of mass inside the duct at the nozzle exit (a Fabri choke). The initial tests of the mixing diagnostics are showing promise.

  17. Mixed Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Markov random fields can encode complex probabilistic relationships involving multiple variables and admit efficient procedures for probabilistic inference. However, from a knowledge engineering point of view, these models suffer from a serious limitation. The graph of a Markov field must connect all pairs of variables that are conditionally dependent even for a single choice of values of the other variables. This makes it hard to encode interactions that occur only in a certain context and are absent in all others. Furthermore, the requirement that two variables be connected unless always conditionally independent may lead to excessively dense graphs, obscuring the independencies present among the variables and leading to computationally prohibitive inference algorithms. Mumford [Mumford, D. (1996) in ICIAM 95, eds. Kirchgassner, K., Marenholtz, O. & Mennicken, R. (Akademie Verlag, Berlin), pp. 233–256] proposed an alternative modeling framework where the graph need not be rigid and completely determined a priori. Mixed Markov models contain node-valued random variables that, when instantiated, augment the graph by a set of transient edges. A single joint probability distribution relates the values of regular and node-valued variables. In this article, we study the analytical and computational properties of mixed Markov models. In particular, we show that positive mixed models have a local Markov property that is equivalent to their global factorization. We also describe a computationally efficient procedure for answering probabilistic queries in mixed Markov models. PMID:12829802

  18. Color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Steven J.

    1992-05-01

    In black-and-white printing the page image can be represented within a computer as an array of binary values indicating whether or not pixels should be inked. The Boolean operators of AND, OR, and EXCLUSIVE-OR are often used when adding new objects to the image array. For color printing the page may be represented as an array of continuous tone color values, and the generalization of these logic functions to gray-scale or full-color images is, in general, not defined or understood. When incrementally composing a page image new colors can replace old in an image buffer, or new colors and old can be combined according to some mixing function to form a composite color which is stored. This paper examines the properties of the Boolean operations and suggests full-color mixing functions which preserve the desired properties. These functions can be used to combine colored images, giving various transparency effects. The relationships between the mixing functions and physical models of color mixing are also discussed.

  19. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  20. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-07-01

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  1. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  2. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  3. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  4. Mixing by individual swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shum, Henry; Yeomans, Julia

    2012-11-01

    Despite their evolutionary and technological importance, different biomixing mechanisms, their effectiveness and universality remain poorly understood. In this talk we focus on the Lagrangian transport of the surrounding fluid by swimmers. Low Re passive tracers advected by swimmers move in loops that are, in general, almost closed. We analyze the reasons for this behavior and, as non-closedness of the loops is a natural requirement for an efficient mixing, propose a classification of possible mechanisms for biogenic mixing. Next, we discuss the universal (common to all swimmers) and the swimmer-dependent features of the resulting tracer displacements and analyze the Darwin drift, the total fluid volume displaced by a swimmer passing from and to infinity. We show that the Darwin drift is finite for force-free swimmers and can be decomposed into a universal and a swimmer-dependent part. We illustrate our consideration with examples for model swimmers and biological data.

  5. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  6. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  7. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  8. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  9. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  10. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  11. Inference of Mix from Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Models

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Haynes, D. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Mancini, R. C.; Haan, S. W.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2007-08-02

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosion cores is a topic of great interest. Mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities can affect implosion dynamics and could also go so far as to prevent ignition. We have demonstrated that it is possible to extract information on mixing directly from experimental data using spectroscopic arguments. In order to compare this data-driven analysis to a theoretical framework, two independent mix models, Youngs' phenomenological model and the Haan saturation model, have been implemented in conjunction with a series of clean hydrodynamic simulations that model the experiments. The first tests of these methods were carried out based on a set of indirect drive implosions at the OMEGA laser. We now focus on direct drive experiments, and endeavor to approach the problem from another perspective. In the current work, we use Youngs' and Haan's mix models in conjunction with hydrodynamic simulations in order to design experimental platforms that exhibit measurably different levels of mix. Once the experiments are completed based on these designs, the results of a data-driven mix analysis will be compared to the levels of mix predicted by the simulations. In this way, we aim to increase our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from the experimental data, as well as to study sensitivities and the range of validity of the mix models.

  12. Correlating lepton mixing angles and mixing maxtrix with Wolfenstein parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Inspired by a new relation θ13PMNS=θC/2 observed from the relatively large θ13PMNS, we find that the combination of this relation with the quark-lepton complementarity and the self-complementarity results in correlations of the lepton mixing angles with the quark mixing angles. We find that the three mixing angles in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix are all related to the Wolfenstein parameter λ in the quark mixing, so they are also correlated. Consequently, the PMNS matrix can be parameterized by λ, A, and a Dirac CP-violating phase δ. Such parametrizations for the PMNS matrix have the same explicitly hierarchical structure as the Wolfenstein parametrization for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix in the quark mixing, and the bimaximal mixing pattern is deduced at the leading order. We also discuss implications of these phenomenological relations in parametrizations.

  13. Nation's water picture mixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The nation's water picture for April showed mixed trends: More than half of the index gaging stations reported normal streamflow conditions during the month, while the spring snowmelt boosted streamflow in the Northeast and Northwest to well above normal levels. Parts of the Southeast, however, from West Virginia south to the Carolinas, reported well-below normal streamflow conditions, according to a month-end check on water resources conditions by the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.After nearly 2 years of drought conditions the three major reservoirs supplying New York City reached full storage capacity and were spilling during April. Combined contents of the three reservoirs on May 1, 1982, was 272 billion gallons, 101% of their full usable capacity. The full reservoirs and the generally good surface and groundwater conditions throughout the Delaware River basin allowed the Delaware River Basin Commission to lift its drought emergency warning on April 27.

  14. Holographic mixing quantified

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Gherghetta, Tony

    2007-08-15

    We compute the precise elementary/composite field content of mass eigenstates in holographic duals of warped models in a slice of AdS{sub 5}. This is accomplished by decomposing the bulk fields not in the usual Kaluza-Klein basis, but rather into a holographic basis of 4D fields, corresponding to purely elementary source or conformal field theory (CFT) composite fields. Generically, this decomposition yields kinetic and mass mixing between the elementary and composite sectors of the holographic theory. Depending on where the bulk zero mode is localized, the elementary/composite content may differ radically, which we show explicitly for several examples including the bulk Randall-Sundrum graviton, bulk gauge boson, and Higgs boson.

  15. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  16. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  17. Mixing entropy in Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Vyhnalek, Brian; Kaufman, Miron

    2013-03-01

    We investigate mixing in Dean flows by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equation for a circular channel. Tracers of two chemical species are carried by the fluid. The centrifugal forces, experienced as the fluid travels along a curved trajectory, coupled with the fluid incompressibility induce cross-sectional rotating flows (Dean vortices). These transversal flows promote the mixing of the chemical species. We generate images for different cross sections along the trajectory. The mixing efficiency is evaluated using the Shannon entropy. Previously we have found, P. S. Fodor and M. Kaufman, Modern Physics Letters B 25, 1111 (2011), this measure to be useful in understanding mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer. The mixing entropy is determined as function of the Reynolds number, the angle of the cross section and the observation scale (number of bins). Quantitative comparison of the mixing in the Dean micromixer and in the staggered herringbone mixer is attempted.

  18. Estimating beta-mixing coefficients

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel J.; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Schervish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The literature on statistical learning for time series assumes the asymptotic independence or “mixing” of the data-generating process. These mixing assumptions are never tested, and there are no methods for estimating mixing rates from data. We give an estimator for the beta-mixing rate based on a single stationary sample path and show it is L1-risk consistent. PMID:26279742

  19. Overview of Neutrino Mixing Models and Their Mixing Angle Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Carl H.

    2009-11-01

    An overview of neutrino-mixing models is presented with emphasis on the types of horizontal flavor and vertical family symmetries that have been invoked. Distributions for the mixing angles of many models are displayed. Ways to differentiate among the models and to narrow the list of viable models are discussed.

  20. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  1. Mixed waste analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.J.; Turner, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Improved superpower relations followed by the Soviet Union`s collapse acted as catalysts for changing the mission at Rocky Flats. Now, environmental concerns command as much attention as production capability. As a result, laboratory instruments once dedicated to plutonium production have a new purpose - the analysis of mixed wastes. Waste drums destined for WIPP require headspace analysis by GS/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC). Flame AA analysis provides information on inorganic constituents. EPA guidelines for waste analysis (SW-846) overlook the obstacles of glove box manipulations. Sometimes, SW-846 guidelines conflict with the Rocky Flats waste minimization effort. However, the EPA encourages SW-846 adaptations if experimental data confirms the results. For water and soil samples, AA analysis of laboratory control samples show method capability inside a glove box. Non-radioactive drum headspace samples use a revised version of USEPA compendium method TO-14. Radioactive drum headspace samples require new instrumentation and change to SW-846 methods.

  2. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  3. Maximum mixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens

    The unique feature of MEM is that C(-1)(z) = exp(z) amplifies all scales equally. Narayan & Nityananda (1986) have shown that this leads to Gaussian deconvolved peaks. In MMM different scales are treated differently, depending on the choice of C. This gives different peak shapes, but also allows one to experiment with the degree of peak sharpening as a function of peak height. In fact, despite its strong information-theoretic background, MEM is known to redistribute flux incorrectly during deconvolution, thus making the method problematic if the goal is to get correct intensities out. MMM could remedy this problem by using an alternative to the entropy. In conclusion, some ideas connecting the physics of blurring with a proposed reconstruction scheme, dubbed Maximum Mixing Method, have been presented. It has been shown that this physically motivated, non-information theoretic, non-probabilistic, non-Bayesian approach can be turned into a powerful deconvolution technique, competitive with, and having as a special case, the Maximum Entropy Method. Further work within the proposed framework is required to fully explore the consequences of the theory. A paper including proofs and examples is in preparation.

  4. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  5. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  6. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  7. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ASPHALT HOT MIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the asphalt hot mix industry. A representative asphalt hot mix plant was defined, based on the results of an industrial survey, to assess the severity of emissions from this industry. Source severity was defined as the ratio of th...

  8. Mixed-Methods Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-Method studies have emerged from the paradigm wars between qualitative and quantitative research approaches to become a widely used mode of inquiry. Depending on choices made across four dimensions, mixed-methods can provide an investigator with many design choices which involve a range of sequential and concurrent strategies. Defining…

  9. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  10. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  11. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied Scientific Research 59,.191-204. 1998. [5] J.M. Redondo. Turbulent mixing in the Atmosphere and Ocean. Fluid Physics. 584-597. World Scientific. New York. 1994

  12. Mapping the Mixed Methods–Mixed Research Synthesis Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Leeman, Jennifer; Crandell, Jamie L.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods–mixed research synthesis is a form of systematic review in which the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies are integrated via qualitative and/or quantitative methods. Although methodological advances have been made, efforts to differentiate research synthesis methods have been too focused on methods and not focused enough on the defining logics of research synthesis—each of which may be operationalized in different ways—or on the research findings themselves that are targeted for synthesis. The conduct of mixed methods–mixed research synthesis studies may more usefully be understood in terms of the logics of aggregation and configuration. Neither logic is preferable to the other nor tied exclusively to any one method or to any one side of the qualitative/quantitative binary. PMID:23066379

  13. Fluid mixing in stratified gravity currents: the Prandtl mixing length.

    PubMed

    Odier, P; Chen, J; Rivera, M K; Ecke, R E

    2009-04-01

    Shear-induced vertical mixing in a stratified flow is a key ingredient of thermohaline circulation. We experimentally determine the vertical flux of momentum and density of a forced gravity current using high-resolution velocity and density measurements. A constant eddy-viscosity model provides a poor description of the physics of mixing, but a Prandtl mixing length model relating momentum and density fluxes to mean velocity and density gradients works well. For the average gradient Richardson number Ri(g) approximately 0.08 and a Taylor Reynolds number Re(lambda) approximately 100, the mixing lengths are fairly constant, about the same magnitude, comparable to the turbulent shear length. PMID:19392360

  14. Nanofluidic mixing via hybrid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ziran; Li, Shunbo; Zhou, Bingpu; Hui, Yu Sanna; Shen, Rong; Wen, Weijia

    2014-10-20

    We report the design and fabrication of the nanofluidic mixer comprising hybrid hydrophobic/hydrophilic micro-patterns on the top and bottom walls of the nanochannel. The unique feature of such mixer is that, without any geometric structure inside the nanochannel, the mixing can be realized solely by the hybrid surfaces. Besides, the mixing length in nanomixer has been significantly shortened comparing to micromixer. We attribute the mixing achievement to be caused by the convection and chaotic flows of two fluids along the hybrid surface due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of the nanochannel.

  15. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing). PMID:26093140

  16. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  17. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  18. Crossflow Mixing of Noncircular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of the isothermal mixing of a turbulent jet injected perpendicular to a uniform crossflow through several different types of sharp-edged orifices. Jet penetration and mixing was studied using planar Mie scattering to measure time-averaged mixture fraction distributions of circular, square, elliptical, and rectangular orifices of equal geometric area injected into a constant velocity crossflow. Hot-wire anemometry was also used to measure streamwise turbulence intensity distributions at several downstream planes. Mixing effectiveness was determined using (1) a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of the mean jet concentration distributions and (2) by direct comparison of the planar distributions of concentration and of turbulence intensity. No significant difference in mixing performance was observed for the six configurations based on comparison of the mean properties.

  19. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Mohammed; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  20. Perspectives on dilution jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer code which displays 3-D oblique and 2-D plots of the temperature distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow has been used to investigate the effects of varying the several independent flow and geometric parameters on the mixing. Temperature profiles calculated with this empirical model are presented to show the effects of orifice size and spacing, momentum flux ratio, density ratio, variable temperature mainstream, flow area convergence, orifice aspect ratio, and opposed and axially staged rows of jets.

  1. An Overview of Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarelli, G.

    2013-08-01

    We present a concise review of the recent important experimental developments on neutrino mixing (hints for sterile neutrinos, large θ13, possible non maximal θ23, approaching sensitivity on δ) and their implications on models of neutrino mixing. The new data disfavour many models but the surviving ones still span a wide range going from Anarchy (no structure, no symmetry in the lepton sector) to a maximum of symmetry, as for the models based on discrete non-abelian flavour groups.

  2. Perspectives On Dilution Jet Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.

    1990-01-01

    NASA recently completed program of measurements and modeling of mixing of transverse jets with ducted crossflow, motivated by need to design or tailor temperature pattern at combustor exit in gas turbine engines. Objectives of program to identify dominant physical mechanisms governing mixing, extend empirical models to provide near-term predictive capability, and compare numerical code calculations with data to guide future analysis improvement efforts.

  3. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, S. L.; Lyczkowski, R. W.

    1985-06-01

    The Creare 1/5-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high pressure injection (PHI) water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor (PWR) having loop flow are analyzed and found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum controlled and gravity controlled (stratification).

  4. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, S.L.; Lyckowski, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    The Creare one-fifth-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high-pressure injection water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor having loop flow, are analyzed. It is found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum and gravity controlled (stratification).

  5. On Infinite-Volume Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenci, Marco

    2010-09-01

    In the context of the long-standing issue of mixing in infinite ergodic theory, we introduce the idea of mixing for observables possessing an infinite-volume average. The idea is borrowed from statistical mechanics and appears to be relevant, at least for extended systems with a direct physical interpretation. We discuss the pros and cons of a few mathematical definitions that can be devised, testing them on a prototypical class of infinite measure-preserving dynamical systems, namely, the random walks.

  6. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. D.; Rudman, M.; Lester, D. R.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations—such as shear banding or wall slip—creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems.

  7. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media.

    PubMed

    Smith, L D; Rudman, M; Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations-such as shear banding or wall slip-creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems. PMID:26931594

  8. Allergen extracts for immunotherapy: to mix or not to mix?

    PubMed

    Nony, Emmanuel; Martelet, Armelle; Jain, Karine; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is established as a curative treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, as well as insect venom allergy. AIT is based on the administration of natural allergen extracts via the subcutaneous or sublingual routes to reorient the immune system towards tolerogenic mechanisms. In this regard, since many patients are poly-allergic, mixtures of allergen extracts are often used with a potential risk to cause allergen degradation, thereby affecting treatment efficacy. Herein, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of mixing homologous (i.e., related) or heterogeneous (i.e., unrelated) allergen extracts. We provide evidence for incompatibilities between mixes of grass pollen and house dust mite extracts containing bodies and feces, and summarize critical points to consider when mixing allergen extracts for AIT. PMID:26652799

  9. Birth of Lepton Flavor Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    The history of the lepton flavor mixing could be traced back to the early 60s, when Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata (MNS) discussed the neutrino mixing. Their work emerged in the course of the developments of the composite model of elementary particles which was initiated by Sakata. In Sakata's model, the weak interaction of the hadrons can be described by two types of transitions among the fundamental triplet baryons. This pattern of the weak interaction of the hadrons is similar to that of leptons provided that the neutrino consists of a single species. From this similarity, Maki, Nakagawa, Ohnuki and Sakata proposed the so-called Nagoya model, in which the fundamental triplet baryons are regarded as composite states of the leptons and a hypothetical object called B-matter. Although the Nagoya model did not make a remarkable success, when existence of two kinds of neutrinos was discovered in 1962, Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata precisely formulated lepton flavor mixing to associate leptons with the fundamental baryons in the framework of the Nagoya model. To recognize their contributions, the flavor mixing matrix of the lepton sector is called the MNS matrix. See also: M. Kobayashi, "Neutrino mass and mixing -- The beginning and future", Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) Vol. 235-236, (2013), pp. 4-7.

  10. Investigation of Turbulent Mixing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viktorin, K.

    1946-01-01

    With water as driving medium and delivered medium in a device similar to a simple jet apparatus, the pressure and velocity fields of the mixing zone were explored with a pitot bar; the ratio of delivered to driving volume ranged between the values 0, 1, 2, and 4. An attempt was also made to analyze the mixing flow mathematically by integration of the equation of motion, with the aid of conventional formulas for the turbulent shearing stress, but this succeeded only approximately for the very simplified case that a driving jet is introduced in an unlimited parallel flow, while the pressure over the whole mixing field is assumed to be constant. In spite of these dissimilar assumptions for the theory and the experiment, the form of the measured and the computed velocity profiles indicates a very high degree of approximation. The pressure rise, which was approximated by Flugel's formulas, disclosed good agreement with the measured values.

  11. Fluid mixing from viscous fingering.

    PubMed

    Jha, Birendra; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-05-13

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or viscous fingering, provides a powerful mechanism to increase fluid-fluid interfacial area and enhance mixing. Here we describe the dissipative structure of miscible viscous fingering, and propose a two-equation model for the scalar variance and its dissipation rate. Our analysis predicts the optimum range of viscosity contrasts that, for a given Péclet number, maximizes interfacial area and minimizes mixing time. In the spirit of turbulence modeling, the proposed two-equation model permits upscaling dissipation due to fingering at unresolved scales. PMID:21668165

  12. Mixing in magnetized turbulent media

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Pan, Liubin E-mail: evan.scannapieco@asu.edu

    2014-04-01

    Turbulent motions are essential to the mixing of entrained fluids and are also capable of amplifying weak initial magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo action. Here we perform a systematic study of turbulent mixing in magnetized media, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include a scalar concentration field. We focus on how mixing depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm, from 1 to 4 and the Mach number, M, from 0.3 to 2.4. For all subsonic flows, we find that the velocity power spectrum has a k {sup –5/3} slope in the early kinematic phase, but steepens due to magnetic back reactions as the field saturates. The scalar power spectrum, on the other hand, flattens compared to k {sup –5/3} at late times, consistent with the Obukohov-Corrsin picture of mixing as a cascade process. At higher Mach numbers, the velocity power spectrum also steepens due to the presence of shocks, and the scalar power spectrum again flattens accordingly. Scalar structures are more intermittent than velocity structures in subsonic turbulence, whereas for supersonic turbulence, velocity structures appear more intermittent than the scalars only in the kinematic phase. Independent of the Mach number of the flow, scalar structures are arranged in sheets in both the kinematic and saturated phases of the magnetic field evolution. For subsonic turbulence, scalar dissipation is hindered in the strong magnetic field regions, probably due to Lorentz forces suppressing the buildup of scalar gradients, whereas for supersonic turbulence, scalar dissipation increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field strength. At all Mach numbers, mixing is significantly slowed by the presence of dynamically important small-scale magnetic fields, implying that mixing in the interstellar medium and in galaxy clusters is less efficient than modeled in hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lin, Hyun K; Iwerks, Justin G; Gliman, James G

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic Instability, which occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical) which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale Invariant formulation, and non Ideal (i.e. experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We Interpret mathematical theories of existence and non-uniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations, in other words indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as non unique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, In the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and PrandtJ numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength Initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to playa role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing In different proportions In these two different contexts.

  14. Nonideal Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunkyung; Iwerks, Justin; Glimm, James; Sharp, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Rayleigh–Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical), which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale invariant formulation, and nonideal (i.e., experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We interpret mathematical theories of existence and nonuniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations; in other words, indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as nonunique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, in the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to play a role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing in different proportions in these two different contexts. PMID:20615983

  15. Ion mixing of semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, W.; Hsu, S.N.; Han, C.C.; Pappert, S.A.; Zhu, B.; Cozzolino, C.; Yu, P.K.L.; Lau, S.S. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Poker, D.B.; White, C.W. ); Schwarz, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Compositional disordering of III-V compound superlattice structures has received considerable attention recently due to its potential application for photonic devices. The conventional method in induce compositional disorder is to implant a moderate dose of impurity ions ({approximately} 10 {sup 15} /cm{sup 2}) into the structure at room temperature, followed by a high-temperature annealing step (this process is referred to as IA here). Ion irradiation at room temperature alone does not cause any significant intermixing of layers. The subsequent high-temperature annealing step tends to restrict device processing flexibility. Ion mixing (IM) is capable of enhancing compositional disordering of layers at a rate which increases exponentially with the ion irradiation temperature. As a processing technique to planarize devices, ion mixing appears to be an attractive technology. In this work, we investigate compositional disordering in the AlGaAs/GaAs and the InGaAs/InP systems using ion mixing. We found that the ion mixing behavior of these two systems shows a thermally activated regime as well as an athermal regime, similar to that observed for metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems. Ion mixing is observed to induce compositional disordering at significantly lower temperatures than that for the IA process. We have compared the two processes in terms of five parameters (1) irradiation temperature, (2) dose dependence (3) annealing, and (4) electrically active ions. We found that the IM process is more efficient in utilizing the defects generated by ion irradiation to cause disordering. Both the physical mechanism of ion mixing and possible device implications will be discussed. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Use and abuse of mixing models (MixSIAR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsCharacterizing trophic links in food webs is a fundamental ecological question. In our efforts to quantify energy flow through food webs, ecologists have increasingly used mixing models to analyze biological tracer data, often from stable isotopes. Whil...

  17. Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.; Dellinger, Amy B.; Brannagan, Kim B.; Tanaka, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are…

  18. Mixe de Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca (Mixe of Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Mixe, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Tlahuitoltepec, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  19. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-08-25

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  20. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  1. Analysis of stratified flow mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, S.L.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Creare 1/5-scale Phase II experiments which model fluid and thermal mixing of relatively cold high pressure injection (HPI) water into a cold leg of a full-scale pressurized water reactor (PWR) having loop flow are analyzed and found that they cannot achieve complete similarity with respect to characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers and developing hydrodynamic entry length. Several analyses show that these experiments fall into two distinct regimes of mixing: momentum controlled and gravity controlled (stratification). 18 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Scalar entrainment in the mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Mungal, M. G.; Broadwell, J. E.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    New definitions of entrainment and mixing based on the passive scalar field in the plane mixing layer are proposed. The definitions distinguish clearly between three fluid states: (1) unmixed fluid, (2) fluid engulfed in the mixing layer, trapped between two scalar contours, and (3) mixed fluid. The difference betwen (2) and (3) is the amount of fluid which has been engulfed during the pairing process, but has not yet mixed. Trends are identified from direct numerical simulations and extensions to high Reynolds number mixing layers are made in terms of the Broadwell-Breidenthal mixing model. In the limit of high Peclet number (Pe = ReSc) it is speculated that engulfed fluid rises in steps associated with pairings, introducing unmixed fluid into the large scale structures, where it is eventually mixed at the Kolmogorov scale. From this viewpoint, pairing is a prerequisite for mixing in the turbulent plane mixing layer.

  3. Turbulent Mixing Chemistry in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    A gas-grain chemical model with surface reaction and 1D/2D turbulent mixing is available for protoplanetary disks and molecular clouds. Current version is based on the updated UMIST'95 database with gas-grain interactions (accretion, desorption, photoevaporation, etc.) and modified rate equation approach to surface chemistry (see also abstract for the static chemistry code).

  4. The Mystery of Neutrino Mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarelli, Guido

    2013-07-01

    In the last years we have learnt a lot about neutrino masses and mixings. Neutrinos are not all massless but their masses are very small. Probably masses are small because neutrinos are Majorana particles with masses inversely proportional to the large scale M of lepton number (L) violation, which turns out to be compatible with the GUT scale. We have understood that there is no contradiction between large neutrino mixings and small quark mixings, even in the context of GUTs and that neutrino masses fit well in the SUSY GUT picture. Out of equilibrium decays with CP and L violation of heavy RH neutrinos can produce a B-L asymmetry, then converted near the weak scale by instantons into an amount of B asymmetry compatible with observations (baryogenesis via leptogenesis). It appears that active neutrinos are not a significant component of Dark Matter in the Universe. A long list of models have been formulated over the years to understand neutrino masses and mixings. With the continuous improvement of the data most of the models have been discarded by experiment. The surviving models still span a wide range going from a maximum of symmetry, with discrete non-abelian flavour groups, to the opposite extreme of anarchy.

  5. Racially Mixed People in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Maria P. P., Ed.

    This book offers a comprehensive look at the social and psychological adjustment of multiracial people, models for identity development, contemporary immigration and marriage patterns, and methodological issues involved in conducting research with mixed-race people, all in the context of America's multiracial past and present. The following 26…

  6. Colour Mixing Based on Daylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Colour science is based on the sensation of monochromatic light. In contrast to that, surface colours are caused by reflection of wide sections of the daylight spectrum. Non-spectral colours like magenta and purple appear homologous to colours with spectral hue, if the approach of mixing monochromatic light is abandoned. It is shown that a large…

  7. VLSI mixed signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, A.; Premkumar, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    An economical and efficient VLSI implementation of a mixed signal processing system (MSP) is presented in this paper. The MSP concept is investigated and the functional blocks of the proposed MSP are described. The requirements of each of the blocks are discussed in detail. A sample application using active acoustic cancellation technique is described to demonstrate the power of the MSP approach.

  8. [Mixed approaches in nursing science].

    PubMed

    Dupin, Cécile-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Mixed methods research uses methodologies from quantitative and qualitative approaches in a single project. Thanks to the integration of the results of the studies, complex phenomena can be explored. The designs are based on specific criteria of rigour. Strategies exist for the design of this type of research. PMID:26146330

  9. Mixing It Up with Acrylics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art activity for fifth-grade students in which they learn about basic shapes and what happens when shapes overlap, draw seven overlapping geometric shapes, review the use of acrylic paint and mixing colors, and finally paint with primary colors. (CMK)

  10. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  11. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  12. Chaotic mixing across oceanic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Jones, C.K.; Haller, G.; Pratt, L. |

    1996-06-01

    The perspective of geometric dynamical systems is used to study the transport of fluid across oceanic jets. We study the mixing associated with the simplest analytical models for jets, namely, neutral modes superimposed on a base mean flow, where the base flow and the neutral modes are approximately potential vorticity conserving. The base jet plus a single neutral mode is an integrable flow in the appropriate moving frame, and heteroclinic orbits act as impenetrable boundaries separating different regions of phase space. Superimposing more than one neutral mode results in the breakup of these heteroclinic orbits and associated chaotic mixing. Using a cusped jet model we study the case where the perturbation is periodic in time. We present numerical simulations of the Poincar{acute e} map along with calculations of the Melnikov integral which characterizes the exchange rate across such boundaries. The analytical and numerical results show that these models explain mixing along the edges of the jet, but do not appear to explain mixing across the body of the jet. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Generalized perturbations in neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-10-01

    We derive expressions for the neutrino mixing parameters that result from complex perturbations on (1) the Majorana neutrino mass matrix (in the basis of charged lepton mass eigenstates) and on (2) the charged lepton mass matrix, for arbitrary initial (unperturbed) mixing matrices. In the first case, we find that the phases of the elements of the perturbation matrix, and the initial values of the Dirac and Majorana phases, strongly impact the leading-order corrections to the neutrino mixing parameters and phases. For experimentally compatible scenarios wherein the initial neutrino mass matrix has μ -τ symmetry, we find that the Dirac phase can take any value under small perturbations. Similarly, in the second case, perturbations to the charged lepton mass matrix can generate large corrections to the mixing angles and phases of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix. As an illustration of our generalized procedure, we apply it to a situation in which nonstandard scalar and nonstandard vector interactions simultaneously affect neutrino oscillations.

  14. Mixing and transport. [Water pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.J.W.

    1982-06-01

    The mixing and transport of water pollution is the subject of this literature review with 110 references. The environmental transport of pollutants is examined in streams, rivers, reservoirs, ponds, estuaries, salt marshes and coastal waters. The dynamics of fluid flow, and the physical properties of jets, plumes, and stratified fluids are discussed. (KRM)

  15. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  16. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  17. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325829

  18. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. PMID:21749560

  19. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  20. Heterogeneous Reburning By Mixed Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson Hall

    2009-03-31

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  1. Mixed states in ferromagnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Teshima, R.; Umezawa, H.; Tachiki, M.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed study of the mixed state of the ferromagnetic rare-earth compounds RRh/sub 4/B/sub 4/, R/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, and R/sub x/Mo/sub 6/Se/sub 6/ is presented. The saturation effect of the magnetic moments is taken into account. Depending on the parameters, there are many types of phase transitions between the type-II/2, type-II/1, and type-I mixed states and the paramagnetic Meissner state, ferromagnetic Meissner state, spin-periodic Meissner state, and the self-induced vortex state. It is predicted that the magnetization can exhibit a variety of unusual modes.

  2. Mixing enhancement using axial flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for enhancing fluid mixing. The method comprises the following: (a) configuring a duct to have an effective outer wall, an effective inner wall, a cross-sectional shape, a first cross-sectional area and an exit area, the first cross-sectional area and the exit area being different in size; (b) generating a first flow at the first cross-sectional area, the first flow having a total pressure and a speed equal to or greater than a local speed of sound; and (c) generating a positive streamwise pressure gradient in a second flow in proximity of the exit area. The second flow results from the first flow. Fluid mixing is enhanced downstream from the duct exit area.

  3. HETEROGENEOUS REBURNING BY MIXED FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Yin Chen; Benson B. Gathitu

    2005-01-14

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  4. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities. PMID:27032791

  5. The evolution of mantle mixing.

    PubMed

    Allègre, Claude J

    2002-11-15

    We present a geochemical overview of the canonic model that suggests a two-layer mantle for most of the Earth's history. A change in the Rayleigh number may have modified the convection and now allows the subduction of oceanic plates into the lower mantle, which was not the case in the past. The measurement of stirring time in the source of mid-ocean-ridge basalt, together with Xe- and Pb-isotopic ratios in the mid-ocean-ridge-basalt source, suggests that the upper mantle is separated into two domains, one above the 400 km discontinuity (asthenosphere) with rapid mixing and short residence time, and another between the 400 and 670 km discontinuities with sluggish mixing and a residence time of ca. 1.5 x 10(9) yr. PMID:12460474

  6. Canine Mammary Mixed Tumours: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Cassali, Geovanni; Cavalheiro Bertagnolli, Angélica; Ferreira, Enio; Araújo Damasceno, Karine; de Oliveira Gamba, Conrado; Bonolo de Campos, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Mammary mixed tumours are the most frequent neoplasias in female dogs. In humans, mixed tumours are frequently found in the salivary glands and are known as pleomorphic adenomas. In addition to their histomorphologic similarities, mixed tumours and pleomorphic adenomas have the potential to become malignant and give rise to carcinomas in mixed tumours and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma, respectively. The factors associated with malignant transformation are still poorly known in the case of canine mixed tumours. However, this form of neoplasia tends to be associated with a better prognosis than other malignant histological types. This paper discusses the main features associated with female canine mammary mixed tumours. PMID:23193497

  7. Flavor mixing and quark decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu Wang, Ling-Lie

    1981-01-01

    Since this is an experimental conference I shall begin my talk with that spirit. We can view that the subject of my talk as a result of ''the ORY Collaboration'' with more than fifty theorists involved. The topics covered are the results of four task forces: I. The mixing Matrix Task Force, II.. The D-decay Task Force, III. the Boredom-Escaping Group and IV. the Far-and-Beyond Group.

  8. Assessing mixed waste treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.B.; Bloom, G.A.; Hart, P.W.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the management and treatment of its mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). As discussed earlier in this conference MLLW are regulated under both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and various DOE orders. During the next 5 years, DOE will manage over 1,200,000 m{sup 3} of MLLW and mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste at 50 sites in 22 states (see Table 1). The difference between MLLW and MTRU waste is in the concentration of elements that have a higher atomic weight than uranium. Nearly all of this waste will be located at 13 sites. More than 1400 individual mixed waste streams exist with different chemical and physical matrices containing a wide range of both hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Their containment and packaging vary widely (e.g., drums, bins, boxes, and buried waste). This heterogeneity in both packaging and waste stream constituents makes characterization difficult, which results in costly sampling and analytical procedures and increased risk to workers.

  9. Experiments in dilution jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Berenfeld, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results are given on the mixing of a single row of jets with an isothermal mainstream in a straight duct, to include flow and geometric variations typical of combustion chambers in gas turbine engines. The principal conclusions reached from these experiments were: at constant momentum ratio, variations in density ratio have only a second-order effect on the profiles; a first-order approximation to the mixing of jets with a variable temperature mainstream can be obtained by superimposing the jets-in-an isothermal-crossflow and mainstream profiles; flow area convergence, especially injection-wall convergence, significantly improves the mixing; for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines in-line, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is one half of the optimum value for single side injection at the same momentum ratio; and for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines staggered, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is twice the optimum value for single side injection at the same momentum ratio.

  10. Experiments in dilution jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Berenfeld, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the mixing of a single row of jets with an isothermal mainstream in a straight duct, with flow and geometric variations typical of combustion chambers in gas turbine engines included. It is found that at a constant momentum ratio, variations in the density ratio have only a second-order effect on the profiles. A first-order approximation to the mixing of jets with a variable temperature mainstream can, it is found, be obtained by superimposing the jets-in-an-isothermal-crossflow and mainstream profiles. Another finding is that the flow area convergence, especially injection-wall convergence, significantly improves the mixing. For opposed rows of jets with the orifice cone centerlines in-line, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is determined to be 1/2 of the optimum value for single injection at the same momentum ratio. For opposed rows of jets with the orifice centerlines staggered, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is found to be twice the optimum value for single side injection at the same momentum ratio.

  11. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-09-03

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

  12. 7 CFR 51.576 - Mixed blanch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.576 Mixed blanch. Mixed blanch consists of green and fairly well blanched stalks of celery in the same container....

  13. 7 CFR 51.576 - Mixed blanch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.576 Mixed blanch. Mixed blanch consists of green and fairly well blanched stalks of celery in the same container....

  14. 7 CFR 51.576 - Mixed blanch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.576 Mixed blanch. Mixed blanch consists of green and fairly...

  15. 7 CFR 51.576 - Mixed blanch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.576 Mixed blanch. Mixed blanch consists of green and fairly...

  16. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  17. MICROEMULSION FORMATION WITH MIXED CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixing rules for water/chlorocarbon/anionic-surfactant systems have been studied. t was found that the behavior of chlorocarbons parallels the ideal mixing rules for hydrocarbons. he polarity of some chlorocarbons prevented a direct determination of electrolyte concentration and ...

  18. Paleoenvironment of the Permian rocks: a comparison between central and eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankarani, M.; Amini, A.; Mosadegh, H.

    2009-04-01

    The succession of Permian rocks in Alborz region is composed of siliciclastic and carbonate facies. All of the sediments were deposited in the Paleotethyan passive continental margin but they show different facies architecture and paleoenvironmental condition in various parts of the region. This study, as part of a wider project, has investigated sedimentary facies and paleoenvironment of the Permian rocks in central and eastern Alborz. The Permian rocks in central Alborz are dominated by siliciclastic facies (Doroud Formation) in the lower, and carbonate facies (Ruteh Formation) in the upper half. Field studies and laboratory measurements resulted in recognition of 4 terrigenous and 13 carbonate facies in the succession. A siliciclastic shallow marine system was determined as depositional environment of the terrigenous facies. A homoclinal carbonate ramp, with scattered patch reefs, was determined as depositional environment of the carbonate facies. Dasycladacean green algae, ancestral red algae, hermatypic corals and bryozoans were the major bioconstructors of the ramp. The abundance of skeletal shoals respect to ooidal shoals in the ramp margin was high. The Permian rocks in eastern Alborz are dominated by mixed siliciclastic-carbonate facies (Ruteh Formation) in the lower, and siliciclastic facies (Nesen Formation) in the upper half. The studies resulted in recognition of 5 terrigenous and 6 carbonate facies in the succession. A mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf with high sediment influx was determined as depositional environment of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate facies. Occurrence of the small patch reefs with high coral diversity in this mixed shelf indicates normal marine (hyposaline) condition. Upper terrigenous facies were deposited in fluvial-flood plain system. Difference in paleoclimate and tectonic activity of two sub-basins seems to be the major cause of the differences between the Permian facies in central and eastern Alborz.

  19. Bounding CKM Mixing with a Fourth Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2009-04-22

    CKM mixing between third family quarks and a possible fourth family is constrained by global fits to the precision electroweak data. The dominant constraint is from nondecoupling oblique corrections rather than the vertex correction to Z {yields} {bar b}b used in previous analyses. The possibility of large mixing suggested by some recent analyses of FCNC processes is excluded, but 3-4 mixing of the same order as the Cabbibo mixing of the first two families is allowed.

  20. Maximal mixing by incompressible fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seis, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We consider a model for mixing binary viscous fluids under an incompressible flow. We prove the impossibility of perfect mixing in finite time for flows with finite viscous dissipation. As measures of mixedness we consider a Monge-Kantorovich-Rubinstein transportation distance and, more classically, the H-1 norm. We derive rigorous a priori lower bounds on these mixing norms which show that mixing cannot proceed faster than exponentially in time. The rate of the exponential decay is uniform in the initial data.

  1. Mixing and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brooijmans, G.; /Columbia U.

    2008-08-01

    Measurements of meson mixing and CP violation parameters obtained by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. These include results on B{sub s} and D meson mixing, and searches for CP violation in the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, in mixing through semileptonic B{sub s} meson decays, and in the interference between mixing and decay in the process B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  2. Mixed wasted integrated program: Logic diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, J.; Stelle, S.; O`Brien, M.; Rudin, M.; Ferguson, J.; McFee, J.

    1994-11-30

    The Mixed Waste Integrated Program Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternative for mixed wastes projects for the Office of Technology Development`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Technical solutions in the areas of characterization, treatment, and disposal were matched to a select number of US Department of Energy (DOE) treatability groups represented by waste streams found in the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR).

  3. Teaching Vocabulary through Code-Mixing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    Examined code-mixing, a little-known technique used in teaching vocabulary. Found that using code-mixing to introduce new vocabulary can be an efficient and effective method. Discusses procedures and cognitive processes involved in vocabulary learning and explains the use of code mixing to introduce vocabulary. (Author/VWL)

  4. MIXING PHENOMENA IN INDUSTRIAL FUME AFTERBURNER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the physical-mixing phenomena involved in the reactions that occur in afterburners or fume incinerators. It considers mixing in after-burners from three points of view. It first covers typical designs of afterburner components that are involved in the mixing ph...

  5. Entropy of Mixing of Distinguishable Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozliak, Evguenii I.

    2014-01-01

    The molar entropy of mixing yields values that depend only on the number of mixing components rather than on their chemical nature. To explain this phenomenon using the logic of chemistry, this article considers mixing of distinguishable particles, thus complementing the well-known approach developed for nondistinguishable particles, for example,…

  6. Qualitative Approaches to Mixed Methods Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how methodological practices can shape and limit how mixed methods is practiced and makes visible the current methodological assumptions embedded in mixed methods practice that can shut down a range of social inquiry. The article argues that there is a "methodological orthodoxy" in how mixed methods is practiced that…

  7. Challenges to Teaching Mixed Research Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Leech, Nancy L.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Across the United States, many faculty members are developing new mixed re-search courses. However, before embarking on teaching these courses, it would be helpful for instructors to be aware of the challenges faced by instructors and students in mixed research courses. Thus, the purpose of this qualitative-dominant mixed research study was to…

  8. Moments, Mixed Methods, and Paradigm Dialogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzin, Norman K.

    2010-01-01

    I reread the 50-year-old history of the qualitative inquiry that calls for triangulation and mixed methods. I briefly visit the disputes within the mixed methods community asking how did we get to where we are today, the period of mixed-multiple-methods advocacy, and Teddlie and Tashakkori's third methodological moment. (Contains 10 notes.)

  9. Foam-Mixing-And-Dispensing Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, Keith Y.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Jackson, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Time-and-money-saving machine produces consistent, homogeneously mixed foam, enhancing production efficiency. Automatically mixes and dispenses polyurethane foam in quantities specified by weight. Consists of cart-mounted, air-driven proportioning unit; air-activated mechanical mixing gun; programmable timer/counter, and controller.

  10. Pragmatism, Evidence, and Mixed Methods Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jori N.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods evaluation has a long-standing history of enhancing the credibility of evaluation findings. However, using mixed methods in a utilitarian way implicitly emphasizes convenience over engaging with its philosophical underpinnings (Denscombe, 2008). Because of this, some mixed methods evaluators and social science researchers have been…

  11. The mixing of blue stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella; De Propris, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution spectroscopy for a sample of 17 blue stragglers in M67, in order to measure abundances of Beryllium, Carbon, Oxygen and the Carbon isotope (13C/12C) abundance ratio. The main aim of this project is to measure indications of deep mixing and therefore elucidate the processes responsible for the formation of these stars, whether stellar collisions, WUMa type mass transfer or Algol-like binary evolution. The data will also allow us to measure the importance of magnetic fields and search for faint companions via their effect on other spectral lines

  12. Thin film mixed potential sensors

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2007-09-04

    A mixed potential sensor for oxidizable or reducible gases and a method of making. A substrate is provided and two electrodes are formed on a first surface of the substrate, each electrode being formed of a different catalytic material selected to produce a differential voltage between the electrodes from electrochemical reactions of the gases catalyzed by the electrode materials. An electrolytic layer of an electrolyte is formed over the electrodes to cover a first portion of the electrodes from direct exposure to the gases with a second portion of the electrodes uncovered for direct exposure to the gases.

  13. Defining and Designing Mixed Research Synthesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Barroso, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Mixed research synthesis is the latest addition to the repertoires of mixed methods research and systematic review. Mixed research synthesis requires that the problems generated by the methodological diversity within and between qualitative and quantitative studies be resolved. Three basic research designs accommodate this diversity, including the segregated, integrated, and contingent designs. Much work remains to be done before mixed research synthesis can secure its place in the repertoires of mixed methods research and systematic review, but the effort is well worth it as it has the potential to enhance both the significance and utility for practice of the many qualitative and quantitative studies constituting shared domains of research. PMID:20098638

  14. Ergodicity and mixing in quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongliang; Quan, H T; Wu, Biao

    2016-08-01

    After a brief historical review of ergodicity and mixing in dynamics, particularly in quantum dynamics, we introduce definitions of quantum ergodicity and mixing using the structure of the system's energy levels and spacings. Our definitions are consistent with the usual understanding of ergodicity and mixing. Two parameters concerning the degeneracy in energy levels and spacings are introduced. They are computed for right triangular billiards and the results indicate a very close relation between quantum ergodicity (mixing) and quantum chaos. At the end, we argue that, besides ergodicity and mixing, there may exist a third class of quantum dynamics which is characterized by a maximized entropy. PMID:27627289

  15. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  16. Mixed Strategies in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intoy, Ben; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Physicists have been using evolutionary game theory to model and simulate cyclically competing species, with applications to lizard mating strategies and competing bacterial strains. However these models assume that each agent plays the same strategy, which is called a pure strategy in game theory, until they are beaten by a better strategy which they immediately adopt. We relax this constraint of an agent playing a single strategy by instead letting the agent pick its strategy randomly from a probability distribution, which is called a mixed strategy in game theory. This scheme is very similar to multiple occupancy models seen in the literature, the major difference being that interactions happen between sites rather than within them. Choosing strategies out of a distribution also has applications to economic/social systems such as the public goods game. We simulate a model of mixed strategy and cylic competition on a one-dimensional lattice with three and four strategies and find interesting spatial and stability properties depending on how discretized the choice of strategy is for the agents. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  17. Mixing stops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find that they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.

  18. [Mixed states: evolution of classifications].

    PubMed

    Pringuey, D; Cherikh, F; Giordana, B; Fakra, E; Dassa, D; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Maurel, M; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    The nosological position of mixed states has followed the course of classifying methods in psychiatry, the steps of the invention of the clinic, progress in the organization of care, including the discoveries of psychopharmacology. The clinical observation of a mixture of symptoms emerging from usually opposite clinical conditions is classical. In the 70s, a syndromic specification fixed the main symptom combinations but that incongruous assortment failed to stabilize the nosological concept. Then stricter criteriology was proposed. To be too restrictive, a consensus operates a dimensional opening that attempts to meet the pragmatic requirements of nosology validating the usefulness of the class system. This alternation between rigor of categorization and return to a more flexible criteriological option reflects the search for the right balance between nosology and diagnosis. The definition of mixed states is best determined by their clinical and prognostic severity, related to the risk of suicide, their lower therapeutic response, the importance of their psychiatric comorbidities, anxiety, emotional lability, alcohol abuse. Trying to compensate for the lack of categorical definitions and better reflecting the clinical field problems, new definitions complement criteriology with dimensional aspects, particularly taking into account temperaments. PMID:24359850

  19. Can whales mix the ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, T. J.; Roudnew, B.; Seuront, L.; Mitchell, J. G.; Middleton, J.

    2012-07-01

    Ocean mixing influences global climate and enhances primary productivity by transporting nutrient rich water into the euphotic zone. The contribution of the swimming biosphere to diapycnal mixing in the ocean has been hypothesised to occur on scales similar to that of tides or winds, however, the extent to which this contributes to nutrient transport and stimulates primary productivity has not been explored. Here, we introduce a novel method to estimate the diapycnal diffusivity that occurs as a result of a sperm whale swimming through a pycnocline. Nutrient profiles from the Hawaiian Ocean are used to further estimate the amount of nitrogen transported into the euphotic zone and the primary productivity stimulated as a result. We estimate that the 80 sperm whales that travel through an area of 104 km2 surrounding Hawaii increase diapycnal diffusivity by 10-6 m2 s-1 which results in the flux of 105 kg of nitrogen into the euphotic zone each year. This nitrogen input subsequently stimulates 6 × 105 kg of carbon per year. The nutrient input of swimming sperm whales is modest compared to dominant modes of nutrient transport such as nitrogen fixation but occurs more consistently and thus may provide the nutrients necessary to enable phytoplankton growth and survival in the absence of other seasonal and daily nutrient inputs.

  20. Mixing stops at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find thatmore » they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.« less

  1. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  2. Diffusion in mixed solvents. II - The heat of mixing parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carapellucci, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Correlation of second-order rate constants for many reactions involving electron transfer between organic molecules, solvated electron reactions, iodine diffusion coefficients, and triplet state electron transfer reactions has been made with the heat of mixing parameter (HMP) for the aqueous binary solvent systems. The aqueous binary solvents studied are those containing methanol or ethanol (type I solvent); 1-propanol or tert-butyl alcohol (type II solvent); or sucrose or glycerol (type III solvent). A plot of the HMP vs. the diffusion parameter for each reaction yields superimposable curves for these reactions in a particular solvent mixture over the entire solvent mixture range, irrespective of the value of the reaction's rate constant or diffusion coefficient in water.

  3. A Darwinian mechanism for biogenic ocean mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katija, Kakani; Dabiri, John

    2009-11-01

    Recent observations of biogenic turbulence in the ocean have led to conflicting ideas regarding the contribution of animal swimming to ocean mixing. Previous measurements indicate elevated turbulent dissipation in the vicinity of large populations of planktonic animals swimming in concert. However, elevated turbulent dissipation is by itself insufficient proof of substantial biogenic mixing. We conducted field measurements of mixing efficiency by individual Mastigias sp. (a Palauan jellyfish) using a self-contained underwater velocimetry apparatus. These measurements revealed another mechanism that contributes to animal mixing besides wake turbulence. This mechanism was first described by Sir Charles Galton Darwin and is in fact the dominant mechanism of mixing by swimming animals. The efficiency of Darwin's mechanism (or drift) is dependent on animal shape rather than fluid length scale and, unlike turbulent wake mixing, is enhanced by the fluid viscosity. Therefore, it provides a means of biogenic mixing that can be equally effective in small plankton and large mammals.

  4. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  5. Microfluidic mixing technology for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ling-Sheng

    Mixing plays a significant role in most biological analysis systems. An example that motivates this thesis is the purification or "clean-up" of sequencing reaction products prior to sequencing. Magnetic beads, DNA, and reagents must be quickly and thoroughly mixed to process samples in an automated, high-throughput system. Efficient mixing is achieved by layering and folding the fluids being mixed to decrease the characteristic length over which diffusion must act to create a locally equilibrated homogenous mixture. At the microscale this challenge is amplified by the characteristics of low Reynolds number flows present in microfluidic environments where flows are laminar and no turbulent mixing is present. Many mixing techniques have been developed to achieve thorough mixing of different fluids in Microsystems. However, mixing based on circulatory flow patterns has not been reported. We have developed a new mixing technique using circulatory flow patterns generated by PZT (lead-zirconate-titanate) vibration. A micromixer based on PZT was fabricated to demonstrate the principle of mixing using circulatory flow patterns. The circulatory flow patterns were observed at different driving frequencies using fluorescent beads. A protocol was developed to quantify the mixing performance using fluorescein. Efficient mixing was achieved by alternating between two different driving frequencies to produce two circulatory flow patterns that mix all regions in the mixing chamber. In addition, a simulation model was created to predict the mode shapes of the structure with fluid included in the model using CFD-ACE+. Empirical characterization of two-circulatory flow was performed using the confocal laser-scanning microscope to understand the underlying mechanism and generation of circulatory flow. The preliminary analysis suggests that circulatory flow is driven by fluid streaming which is believed to result from the propagation of acoustic waves induced by PZT vibration or to be

  6. Microgravity acoustic mixing for particle cloud combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of acoustic mixing procedures designed to uniformly distribute fuel particles in a combustion tube for application in the proposed Particle Cloud Combustion Experiment (PCCE) are described. Two acoustic mixing methods are investigated: mixing in a cylindrical tube using high frequency spinning modes generated by suitably phased, or quadrature speakers, and acoustic premixing in a sphere. Quadrature mixing leads to rapid circumferential circulation of the powder around the tube. Good mixing is observed in the circulating regions. However, because axial inhomogeneities are necessarily present in the acoustic field, this circulation does not extend throughout the tube. Simultaneous operation of the quadrature-speaker set and the axial-speaker was observed to produce considerably enhanced mixing compared to operation of the quadrature-speaker set alone. Mixing experiments using both types of speakers were free of the longitudinal powder drift observed using axial-speakers alone. Vigorous powder mixing was obtained in the sphere for many normal modes: however, in no case was the powder observed to fill the sphere entirely. Theoretical analysis indicated that mixing under steady conditions cannot fill more than a hemisphere except under very unusual conditions. Premixing in a hemisphere may be satisfactory; otherwise, complete mixing in microgravity might be possible by operating the speaker in short bursts. A general conclusion is that acoustic transients are more likely to produce good mixing than steady state conditions. The reason is that in steady conditions, flow structures like nodal planes are possible and often even unavoidable. These tend to separate the mixing region into cells across which powder cannot be transferred. In contrast, transients not only are free of such structures, they also have the characteristics, desirable for mixing, of randomness and disorder. This conclusion is corroborated by mixing

  7. Mediterranean Outflow Mixing and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, James F.; O'Neil Baringer, Molly; Lueck, Rolf G.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Ambar, Isabel; Parrilla, Gregorio; Cantos, Alain; Kennelly, Maureen A.; Sanford, Thomas B.

    1993-02-01

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass.

  8. Vitrification development for mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, R.; Whittington, K.; Peters, R.

    1995-02-01

    Vitrification is a promising approach to waste-form immobilization. It destroys hazardous organic compounds and produces a durable and highly stable glass. Vitrification tests were performed on three surrogate wastes during fiscal year 1994; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste from Hanford, bottom ash from the Oak Ridge TSCA incinerator, and saltcrete from Rocky Flats. Preliminary glass development involved melting trials followed by visual homogeneity examination, short-duration leach tests on glass specimens, and long-term leach tests on selected glasses. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were taken for the most durable glass formulations. Results for the saltcrete are presented in this paper and demonstrate the applicability of vitrification technology to this mixed waste.

  9. Mediterranean outflow mixing and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Price, J F; Baringer, M O; Lueck, R G; Johnson, G C; Ambar, I; Parrilla, G; Cantos, A; Kennelly, M A; Sanford, T B

    1993-02-26

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass. PMID:17732247

  10. Mixing in SRS Closure Business Unit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    POIRIER, MICHAELR.

    2004-06-23

    The following equipment is commonly used to mix fluids: mechanical agitators, jets (pumps), shrouded axial impeller mixers (Flygt mixers), spargers, pulsed jet mixers, boiling, static mixers, falling films, liquid sprays, and thermal convection. This discussion will focus on mechanical agitators, jets, shrouded axial impeller mixers, spargers, and pulsed jet mixers, as these devices are most likely to be employed in Savannah River Site (SRS) Closure Business applications. In addressing mixing problems in the SRS Tank Farm, one must distinguish between different mixing objectives. These objectives include sludge mixing (e.g., Extended Sludge Processing), sludge retrieval (e.g., sludge transfers between tanks), heel retrieval (e.g., Tanks 18F and 19F), chemical reactions (e.g., oxalic acid neutralization) and salt dissolution. For example, one should not apply sludge mixing guidelines to heel removal applications. Mixing effectiveness is a function of both the mixing device (e.g., slurry pump, agitator, air sparger) and the properties of the material to be mixed (e.g., yield stress, viscosity, density, and particle size). The objective of this document is to provide background mixing knowledge for the SRS Closure Business Unit personnel and to provide general recommendations for mixing in SRS applications.

  11. Enhanced Turbulent Mixing on Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Traffic emissions have a substantial effect on air quality and turbulence affects how these emissions mix with the surrounding air. In July and August of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada) as part of the ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways). The aim of this project was to study and parameterize the turbulent mixing of traffic emissions on highways as a function of traffic density, speed, and vehicle type. The mobile station CRUISER (Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research) was equipped with two sonic anemometers, an air flow probe (AIMMS-20), inertial motion sensing, GPS, video recording equipment, and various particle and gas measurement instrumentation. This allowed in-situ turbulence measurements while driving on the highway with traffic. These measurements differ from previous studies in that turbulence can be measured in realistic conditions, while traffic densities, vehicle types, and vehicle to measurement distances can be extracted from video recording by automated video processing software. Although the turbulent motion of air is often measured from aircraft and ship-based instrumentation, the analysis and interpretation of sonic anemometer measurements from a highway-speed vehicle, moving over uneven and often bumpy terrain presents a very different challenge. Various analytical approaches to process these measurements will be compared and the development of the video processing software to determine vehicle size and following distance will be discussed. Results will be presented which demonstrate a strong dependence of turbulent energy on vehicle type, speed, and following distance.

  12. Electrothermal blinking vortices for chaotic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loire, Sophie; Kauffmann, Paul; Gimenez, Paul; Meinhart, Carl; Mezic, Igor

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of electrothermal chaotic mixing using blinking of asymmetric 2D electrothermal vortices. Electrothermal flows are modelled with 2D finite element method using COMSOL software based on an enhanced electrothermal model. Velocities in top-view and side-view devices are measured by micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV). The experimentally reconstructed velocity profile shows a dramatic asymmetry between the two vortices, in good agreement with the FEM model. The separation line between the two vortices is shifted and tilted making the blinking vortices overlap. We use the mix-variance coefficient (MVC) on experimental particle detection data and numerical trajectory simulations to evaluate mixing at different scales including the layering of fluid interfaces by the flow, a keypoint for efficient mixing. The blinking vortices method greatly improve mixing efficiency. Theoretical, experimental and simulation results of the mixing process will be presented.

  13. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  14. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-01

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, Stable Isotope Analysis in R (SIAR), a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (δ15N and δ18O) but all methods tested are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the uncertainty in calculated

  15. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-19

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, SIAR [Parnell et al., 2010] a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (δ15N and δ18O) but all methods tested are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the

  16. 21 CFR 164.110 - Mixed nuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixed nuts. 164.110 Section 164.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION TREE NUT AND PEANUT PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Tree Nut and Peanut Products § 164.110 Mixed nuts. (a) Mixed nuts is...

  17. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-19

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, SIAR [Parnell et al., 2010] a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (δ15N and δ18O) but all methods testedmore » are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the uncertainty in calculated

  18. eta. prime -. eta. -. pi. sup 0 mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B. ); Lahiri, A. ); Niyogi, S. )

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the saturation of anomalous Ward identities by the low-lying pseudoscalars {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {eta}{prime} to determine the sizes of {eta}{prime}-{eta}, {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}, and {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}{prime} mixing angles. The {eta}{prime}-{eta} mixing angle turns out to be about {minus}20{degree} which is consistent with the recent findings. Our estimate for the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing angle shows that it could be bigger than the older value obtained from the {rho}-{omega} mixing, baryon mass splittings, and kaon mass difference.

  19. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  20. Mixed methods research for the novice researcher.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Lynne S; Grant, Barbara M

    2006-10-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming increasingly popular in the health and social science disciplines. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the varieties of mixed methods designs. We begin by situating mixed methods research in the context of a paradigmatic framework which assists a researcher in making decisions concerning the design of their study. Although the most commonly used mixed methods designs are underpinned by positivist/postpositivist assumptions, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods can be used within any research paradigm. PMID:17083315

  1. Passive Microfluidic device for Sub Millisecond Mixing

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Jay; Mohamed, Hisham; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Mannella, Carmen A.; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We report the investigation of a novel microfluidic mixing device to achieve submillisecond mixing. The micromixer combines two fluid streams of several microliters per second into a mixing compartment integrated with two T- type premixers and 4 butterfly-shaped in-channel mixing elements. We have employed three dimensional fluidic simulations to evaluate the mixing efficiency, and have constructed physical devices utilizing conventional microfabrication techniques. The simulation indicated thorough mixing at flow rate as low as 6 µL/s. The corresponding mean residence time is 0.44 ms for 90% of the particles simulated, or 0.49 ms for 95% of the particles simulated, respectively. The mixing efficiency of the physical device was also evaluated using fluorescein dye solutions and FluoSphere-red nanoparticles suspensions. The constructed micromixers achieved thorough mixing at the same flow rate of 6 µL/s, with the mixing indices of 96% ± 1%, and 98% ± 1% for the dye and the nanoparticle, respectively. The experimental results are consistent with the simulation data. The device demonstrated promising capabilities for time resolved studies for macromolecular dynamics of biological macromolecules. PMID:20161619

  2. First principles nonequilibrium plasma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticknor, C.; Herring, S. D.; Lambert, F.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed nonequilibrium classical and quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulations that follow the interpenetration of deuterium-tritium (DT) and carbon (C) components through an interface initially in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. We concentrate on the warm, dense matter regime with initial densities of 2.5-5.5 g/cm3 and temperatures from 10 to 100 eV. The classical treatment employs a Yukawa pair-potential with the parameters adjusted to the plasma conditions, and the quantum treatment rests on an orbital-free density functional theory at the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac level. For times greater than about a picosecond, the component concentrations evolve in accordance with Fick's law for a classically diffusing fluid with the motion, though, described by the mutual diffusion coefficient of the mixed system rather than the self-diffusion of the individual components. For shorter times, microscopic processes control the clearly non-Fickian dynamics and require a detailed representation of the electron probability density in space and time.

  3. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meetings the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal REstriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered {open_quotes}Best Demonstrated Available Technologies,{close_quotes} or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a mutiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  4. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meeting the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal Restriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered Best Demonstrated Available Technologies, or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a multiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  5. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  6. Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L; Haynes, D A; Mancini, R C; Cooley, J H; Tommasini, R; Golovkin, I E; Sherrill, M E; Haan, S W

    2008-04-30

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  7. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser; Haynes, Donald A; Cooley, James H; Sherrill, Manolo E; Mancini, Roberto C; Tommasini, Riccardo; Golovkin, Igor E; Haan, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  8. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  9. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  10. Toponium-Z/sup 0/ mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Franzini, P.J.

    1986-11-01

    The subject of Z/sup 0/-toponium interference is briefly reviewed. The qualitative features of the Z/sup 0/ mixing with one t anti t state are discussed. Effects of mixing with the full t anti t spectrum, of the smearing due to beam spread, and of different potentials, are then shown.

  11. Discontinuous Mixed Covolume Methods for Parabolic Problems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ailing

    2014-01-01

    We present the semidiscrete and the backward Euler fully discrete discontinuous mixed covolume schemes for parabolic problems on triangular meshes. We give the error analysis of the discontinuous mixed covolume schemes and obtain optimal order error estimates in discontinuous H(div) and first-order error estimate in L2. PMID:24983008

  12. Critical Appraisal of Mixed Methods Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyvaert, Mieke; Hannes, Karin; Maes, Bea; Onghena, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In several subdomains of the social, behavioral, health, and human sciences, research questions are increasingly answered through mixed methods studies, combining qualitative and quantitative evidence and research elements. Accordingly, the importance of including those primary mixed methods research articles in systematic reviews grows. It is…

  13. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  14. SLOCC invariants for multipartite mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Li, Ming; Li-Jost, Xianqing; Zhang, Tinggui; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2014-05-01

    We construct a nontrivial set of invariants for any multipartite mixed states under the stochastic local operations and classical communication symmetry. These invariants are given by hyperdeterminants and independent of basis change. In particular, a family of d2 invariants for arbitrary d-dimensional even partite mixed states are explicitly given.

  15. Mixed Methods, Triangulation, and Causal Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    This article distinguishes a disjunctive conception of mixed methods/triangulation, which brings different methods to bear on different questions, from a conjunctive conception, which brings different methods to bear on the same question. It then examines a more inclusive, holistic conception of mixed methods/triangulation that accommodates…

  16. Physical properties of mixed dairy food proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed food protein gels are complex systems, which changes functional behaviors such as gelling properties and viscosity depending on the miscibility of the proteins. We have noted that differences in co-solubility of mixed proteins created unique network structures and gel properties. The effects o...

  17. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  18. Transformative Paradigm: Mixed Methods and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.

    2007-01-01

    The intersection of mixed methods and social justice has implications for the role of the researcher and choices of specific paradigmatic perspectives. The transformative paradigm with its associated philosophical assumptions provides a framework for addressing inequality and injustice in society using culturally competent, mixed methods…

  19. 7 CFR 29.3532 - Mixed (M).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixed (M). 29.3532 Section 29.3532 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3532 Mixed (M). Variegated or distinctly different colors of the type mingled...

  20. "Reading" Mixed Methods Research: Contexts for Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freshwater, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Health and social care researchers, in their haste to "belong" to academia, have adopted the system of mixed methodology research, overestimating its ability to reveal the truth and occasionally imprisoning their thought in one system. In this article, some of the assumptions underpinning mixed methodology research and its discourse are subjected…

  1. Mixed Effects MANOVA Using BMD12V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Details are given for the use of the mixed effects multivariate analysis of variance table provided by the BMD12V computer program to compute raw generalized variances and hence the U and F statistics for the mixed effects model. (Author/JKS)

  2. Flowmeter determines mix ratio for viscous adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.

    1967-01-01

    Flowmeter determines mix ratio for continuous flow mixing machine used to produce an adhesive from a high viscosity resin and aliphatic amine hardener pumped through separate lines to a rotary blender. The flowmeter uses strain gages in the two flow paths and monitors their outputs with appropriate instrumentation.

  3. Mixed Methods Research Designs in Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, William E.; Creswell, John W.; Clark, Vicki L. Plano; Petska, Kelly S.; Creswell, David J.

    2005-01-01

    With the increased popularity of qualitative research, researchers in counseling psychology are expanding their methodologies to include mixed methods designs. These designs involve the collection, analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data in a single or multiphase study. This article presents an overview of mixed methods…

  4. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2014-05-02

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  5. CORNELL MIXING ZONE EXPERT SYSTEM (CORMIX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cornell mixing zone expert system (CORMIX) can be used for the analysis, prediction, and design of aqueous toxic or conventional pollutant discharges into diverse water bodies. The major emphasis is on the geometry and dilution characteristics of the initial mixing zone -- includ...

  6. Quasioptimality of some spectral mixed methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayadeep; Demkowicz, L. F. Leszek F.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we construct a sequence of projectors into certain polynomial spaces satisfying a commuting diagram property with norm bounds independent of the polynomial degree. Using the projectors, we obtain quasioptimality of some spectral mixed methods, including the Raviart-Thomas method and mixed formulations of Maxwell equations. We also prove some discrete Friedrichs type inequalities involving curl.

  7. Mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson sorption cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, Nir; Grossman, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (JT) sorption cryocooling is the most mature technology for cooling from a normal Room-Temperature (RT) down to temperatures below 100 K in the absence of moving parts. Therefore, high reliability and no vibrations are attainable, in comparison with other cryocoolers. Cooling to 80 - 100 K with JT cryocoolers is often implemented with pure nitrogen. Alternatively, mixed refrigerants have been suggested for reducing the operating pressures to enable closed cycle cryocooling. There is a variety of publications describing nitrogen sorption cryocoolers with different configurations of sorption compressors. In the present research we suggest a novel sorption JT cryocooler that operates with a mixed refrigerant. Merging of sorption cryocooling and a mixed refrigerant enables the use of a simple, single stage compressor for cooling to 80 - 100 K, lower operating temperatures of the sorption cycle, and thus - reduced power consumption. In previous studies we have analyzed sorption compressors for mixed gases and mixed refrigerants for JT cryocoolers, separately. In this paper the option of mixed refrigerant sorption JT cryocoolers is explored. The considerations for developing mixed refrigerants to be driven by sorption compressors and to be utilized with JT cryocoolers are provided. It appears that, unlike with pure nitrogen, mixed refrigerants can be suitable for JT cryocooling with a single stage sorption compressor.

  8. Thermal mixing of Al-Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Mendoza Zélis, L.; Sánchez, F. H.; Traverse, A.

    1994-12-01

    Al-Fe multilayers have been mixed by thermal treatment and their evolution followed by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The initial and final states have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The results are compared with those previously obtained in the ion beam mixing of similar systems.

  9. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  10. Mixed Methods Research in School Psychology: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Trends in the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Heather; Mihalas, Stephanie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Suldo, Shannon; Daley, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the utility of mixed methods research (i.e., combining quantitative and qualitative techniques) to the field of school psychology. First, the use of mixed methods approaches in school psychology practice is discussed. Second, the mixed methods research process is described in terms of school psychology research. Third, the…

  11. 26 CFR 1.1092(b)-4T - Mixed straddles; mixed straddle account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Assume the facts are the same as in example (1), except that A has a second mixed straddle account, which...), except that interest and carrying charges in the amount of $4,000 are allocable to the second mixed... second mixed straddle account, which has an annual account net loss of $20,000 of long-term capital...

  12. The mixed waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    During FY96, the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Project has the following major objectives: (1) Complete Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR). (2) Complete final design (Title II) of MWMF major systems. (3) Coordinate all final interfaces with the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) for facility utilities and facility integration. (4) Begin long-lead procurements. (5) Issue Project Baseline Revision 2-Preliminary Design (PB2), modifying previous baselines per DOE-requested budget profiles and cost reduction. Delete Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) as a treatment process for initial demonstration. (6) Complete submittal of, and ongoing support for, applications for air permit. (7) Begin detailed planning for start-up, activation, and operational interfaces with the Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Division (HWM). In achieving these objectives during FY96, the Project will incorporate and implement recent DOE directives to maximize the cost savings associated with the DWTF/MWMF integration (initiated in PB1.2); to reduce FY96 new Budget Authority to {approximately}$10M (reduced from FY97 Validation of $15.3M); and to keep Project fiscal year funding requirements largely uniform at {approximately}$10M/yr. A revised Project Baseline (i.e., PB2), to be issued during the second quarter of FY96, will address the implementation and impact of this guidance from an overall Project viewpoint. For FY96, the impact of this guidance is that completion of final design has been delayed relative to previous baselines (resulting from the delay in the completion of preliminary design); ramp-up in staffing has been essentially eliminated; and procurements have been balanced through the Project to help balance budget needs to funding availability.

  13. Mixing in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M. O.

    2010-05-01

    The research area of this work is located at the estuary of the Amazon River (Brazil), near the river mouth. The results of air movement analysis on the surface atmospheric circulation over the Mouth of the Amazonas River, salinity and temperature measures as well as measurements of currents, carried out along a longitudinal section in the navigation canal region of the Northern Bar of the Amazon River (Barra Norte do Rio Amazonas) in June 2006, during the river flood season in the quadrature tide. The dynamics effects affect hydrodynamic,meteorological and hydrographical parameters at the river mouth. The conclusion drawn include that: a) the saline wedge-type stratification can be detected approximately 100km away from the mouth of the Amazon River during the end of the rainy season in the quadrature tide; b) probably, at the Amazon estuary the quadrature entrainment processes are dominant and they are the ones responsible for increased salinity detected in the surface layer, whereas turbulence scattering mixing is not so important. c) The large flow of fresh water from the Amazon River at the end of the rainy season implies the displacement of the saline front position over the internal Amazon continental platform, and d) The tidal wave shows a positive asymmetry in the canal, with floods lasting less than in the ebb tide. This asymmetry decreases towards the ocean, eventually becoming reversed in the presence of a saline wedge. The speeds, however, have a negative asymmetry, with more intense ebb tides, due to the river flow and is more evident by the existence of quadrature tides.

  14. Physics of collisionless phase mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies of phase mixing of ion cyclotron (IC), Alfvenic, waves in the collisionless regime have established the generation of parallel electric field and hence acceleration of electrons in the regions of transverse density inhomogeneity. However, outstanding issues were left open. Here we use the 2.5 D, relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code and an analytic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulation, to establish the following points: (i) Using the generalized Ohm's law we find that the parallel electric field is supported mostly by the electron pressure tensor, with a smaller contribution from the electron inertia term. (ii) The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons are independent of the IC wave frequency remaining at a level of six orders of magnitude larger than the Dreicer value and approximately 20%, respectively. The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons increase with the increase of IC wave amplitude. The generated parallel electric field seems to be independent of plasma beta, while the fraction of accelerated electrons strongly increases with the decrease of plasma beta (for plasma beta of 0.0001 the fraction of accelerated electrons can be as large as 47%). (iii) In the collisionless regime IC wave dissipation length (that is defined as the distance over which the wave damps) variation with the driving frequency shows a deviation from the analytical MHD result, which we attribute to a possible frequency dependence of the effective resistivity. (iv) Effective anomalous resistivity, inferred from our numerical simulations, is at least four orders of magnitude larger than the classical Spitzer value.

  15. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  16. Dilution Jet Mixing Program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Berenfeld, A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of jet to mainstream density ratio, flow area convergence as encounted in transition sections, and nonuniform mainstream profile upstream of dilution orifices on the mixing of a row of jets with a confined cross flow was quantified. It is found that: (1) jet spreading rate in transverse direction is increased with increasing J, H/D and with decreasing S/D; (2) the density ratio has only a second order effect on the jet mixing characteristics for a constant momentum ratio; (3) the temperature distributions in the jet mixing region are strongly influenced by the undisturbed mainstream profile; (4) flow area convergence enhances mixing in radial and transverse directions. An asymmetric convergent duct with flat wall injection has the same jet mixing characteristics as a symmetric convergent duct. An asymmetric convergent duct with slant wall injection has a faster jet spreading rate in the transverse direction.

  17. Investigating Turbulent Mix in HEDLP Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Devolder, B.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Kline, J. L.; Welser-Sherrill, L.

    2016-03-01

    Mix is an important issue in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP), specifically Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. In ICF, shock waves traverse fuel capsule defects and material interfaces, and due to hydrodynamic instabilities transitioning into turbulence, these shocks can initiate mix between shell and fuel, degrading yield. To this end, a series of laser-driven mix experiments has been designed for the OMEGA and NIF laser facilities to investigate the turbulent mixing of materials proceeded by reshock and shear, which initiates Richtmyer-Meshkov and\\or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities on a tracer layer. The experiments are designed to understand if the Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn (BHR) mix model that has been implemented in LANL's RAGE hydrodynamics code has coefficients that are properly determined for an HEDLP environment.

  18. Mixed-Strategy Chance Constrained Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel chance constrained optimal control (CCOC) algorithm that chooses a control action probabilistically. A CCOC problem is to find a control input that minimizes the expected cost while guaranteeing that the probability of violating a set of constraints is below a user-specified threshold. We show that a probabilistic control approach, which we refer to as a mixed control strategy, enables us to obtain a cost that is better than what deterministic control strategies can achieve when the CCOC problem is nonconvex. The resulting mixed-strategy CCOC problem turns out to be a convexification of the original nonconvex CCOC problem. Furthermore, we also show that a mixed control strategy only needs to "mix" up to two deterministic control actions in order to achieve optimality. Building upon an iterative dual optimization, the proposed algorithm quickly converges to the optimal mixed control strategy with a user-specified tolerance.

  19. CFD simulation of mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mitsuharu; Goel, Rajeev; Komatsu, Kazuya; Yasui, Hidenari; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Li, Y Y; Noike, Tatsuya

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model incorporating the rheological properties of sludge was developed and applied to quantify mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with experimental tracer response curve. In order to predict the dynamics of mixing, a new parameter, UI (uniformity index) was defined. The visual patterns of tracer mixing in simulation were well reflected in the dynamic variation in the value of UI. The developed model and methods were applied to determine the required time for complete mixing in a full-scale digester at different solid concentrations. This information on mixing time is considered to be useful in optimizing the feeding cycles for better digester performance. PMID:19081247

  20. Line Mixing in Water Vapor and Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A. H.; Brown, L. R.; Toth, R. A.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, Chris

    2006-01-01

    A multispectrum fitting algorithm has been used to identify line mixing and determine mixing parameters for infrared transitions of H2O and CH4 in the 5-9 micrometer region. Line mixing parameters at room temperature were determined for two pairs of transitions in the v2 fundamental band of H2O-16, for self-broadening and for broadening by H2, He, CO2, N2, O2 and air. Line mixing parameters have been determined from air-broadened CH4 spectra, recorded at temperatures between 210 K and 314 K, in selected R-branch manifolds of the v4 band. For both H2O and CH4, the inclusion of line mixing was seen to have a greater effect on the retrieved values of the line shifts than on the retrieved values of other parameters

  1. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  2. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  3. Evaluation of a metering, mixing, and dispensing system for mixing polysulfide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Kurt B.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate whether a metered mixing system can mix PR-1221 polysulfide adhesive as well as or better than batch-mixed adhesive; also, to evaluate the quality of meter-mixed PR-1860 and PS-875 polysulfide adhesives. These adhesives are candidate replacements for PR-1221 which will not be manufactured in the future. The following material properties were evaluated: peel strength, specific gravity and adhesive components of mixed adhesives, Shore A hardness, tensile adhesion strength, and flow rate. Finally, a visual test called the butterfly test was performed to observe for bubbles and unmixed adhesive. The results of these tests are reported and discussed.

  4. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    The microorganisms, capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were immobilized in calcium alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with CO[sub 2]-free air at 200 ml/min. The degradation of different concentrations of hydrocarbons in the presence/absence of commercially available fertilizers by the immobilized cells of mix culture is now in progress.

  5. Mixed Waste Integrated Program: A technology assessment for mercury-containing mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Perona, J.J.; Brown, C.H.

    1993-03-01

    The treatment of mixed wastes must meet US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for chemically hazardous species and also must provide adequate control of the radioactive species. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development established the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) to develop mixed-waste treatment technology in support of the Mixed Low-Level Waste Program. Many DOE mixed-waste streams contain mercury. This report is an assessment of current state-of-the-art technologies for mercury separations from solids, liquids, and gases. A total of 19 technologies were assessed. This project is funded through the Chemical-Physical Technology Support Group of the MWIP.

  6. Fast mix table construction for material discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    An effective hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic implementation typically requires the approximation of a continuous geometry description with a discretized piecewise-constant material field. The inherent geometry discretization error can be reduced somewhat by using material mixing, where multiple materials inside a discrete mesh voxel are homogenized. Material mixing requires the construction of a 'mix table,' which stores the volume fractions in every mixture so that multiple voxels with similar compositions can reference the same mixture. Mix table construction is a potentially expensive serial operation for large problems with many materials and voxels. We formulate an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse mix table in O(number of voxels x log number of mixtures) time. The new algorithm is implemented in ADVANTG and used to discretize continuous geometries onto a structured Cartesian grid. When applied to an end-of-life MCNP model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor with 270 distinct materials, the new method improves the material mixing time by a factor of 100 compared to a naive mix table implementation. (authors)

  7. Incomplete Mixing in a Small, Urban stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R. J.; Boufadel, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Conservative solute tracer experiments were conducted in Indian Creek, a small urban stream located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Estimated flow rates were between 46 L s-1 and 81 L s-1, average stream width was 5.5 m and average stream depth was 0.2 m. Given these dimensions, most researchers would think it reasonable to assume that the stream is completely mixed vertically and horizontally. However, we found that the stream was not vertically completely mixed in a 0.95 m deep, 30 m long pool. The limited mixing was demonstrated by the vertical stratification of a tracer cloud which was completely mixed both laterally and vertically across the stream prior to entering the pool. We suggest that the cause of limited mixing is due to a balance between groundwater inflow and transverse dispersion at the cross section. We show that the unsupported assumption of complete mix may result in a wide range, and thus increased uncertainty, of the values of stream flow and longitudinal dispersion coefficient estimated from these data. We conclude that the assumption of complete mix and one-dimensional modeling must be checked against actual field conditions, even in small streams.

  8. Finishing bacterial genome assemblies with Mix

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Among challenges that hamper reaping the benefits of genome assembly are both unfinished assemblies and the ensuing experimental costs. First, numerous software solutions for genome de novo assembly are available, each having its advantages and drawbacks, without clear guidelines as to how to choose among them. Second, these solutions produce draft assemblies that often require a resource intensive finishing phase. Methods In this paper we address these two aspects by developing Mix , a tool that mixes two or more draft assemblies, without relying on a reference genome and having the goal to reduce contig fragmentation and thus speed-up genome finishing. The proposed algorithm builds an extension graph where vertices represent extremities of contigs and edges represent existing alignments between these extremities. These alignment edges are used for contig extension. The resulting output assembly corresponds to a set of paths in the extension graph that maximizes the cumulative contig length. Results We evaluate the performance of Mix on bacterial NGS data from the GAGE-B study and apply it to newly sequenced Mycoplasma genomes. Resulting final assemblies demonstrate a significant improvement in the overall assembly quality. In particular, Mix is consistent by providing better overall quality results even when the choice is guided solely by standard assembly statistics, as is the case for de novo projects. Availability Mix is implemented in Python and is available at https://github.com/cbib/MIX, novel data for our Mycoplasma study is available at http://services.cbib.u-bordeaux2.fr/mix/. PMID:24564706

  9. Mixing in microfluidic devices and enhancement methods

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kevin; Fan, Z Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Mixing in microfluidic devices presents a challenge due to laminar flows in microchannels, which result from low Reynolds numbers determined by the channel’s hydraulic diameter, flow velocity, and solution’s kinetic viscosity. To address this challenge, novel methods of mixing enhancement within microfluidic devices have been explored for a variety of applications. Passive mixing methods have been created, including those using ridges or slanted wells within the microchannels, as well as their variations with improved performance by varying geometry and patterns, by changing the properties of channel surfaces, and by optimization via simulations. In addition, active mixing methods including microstirrers, acoustic mixers, and flow pulsation have been investigated and integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance mixing in a more controllable manner. In general, passive mixers are easy to integrate, but difficult to control externally by users after fabrication. Active mixers usually take efforts to integrate within a device and they require external components (e.g. power sources) to operate. However, they can be controlled by users to a certain degree for tuned mixing. In this article, we provide a general overview of a number of passive and active mixers, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and make suggestions on choosing a mixing method for a specific need as well as advocate possible integration of key elements of passive and active mixers to harness the advantages of both types. PMID:26549938

  10. Mixing in colliding, ultrasonically levitated drops.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Edward T; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Lab-in-a-drop, using ultrasonic levitation, has been actively investigated for the last two decades. Benefits include lack of contact between solutions and an apparatus and a lack of sample cross-contamination. Understanding and controlling mixing in the levitated drop is necessary for using an acoustically levitated drop as a microreactor, particularly for studying kinetics. A pulsed electrostatic delivery system enables addition and mixing of a desired-volume droplet with the levitated drop. Measurement of mixing kinetics is obtained by high-speed video monitoring of a titration reaction. Drop heterogeneity is visualized as 370 nl of 0.25 M KOH (pH: 13.4) was added to 3.7 μL of 0.058 M HCl (pH: 1.24). Spontaneous mixing time is about 2 s. Following droplet impact, the mixed drop orbits the levitator axis at about 5 Hz during homogenization. The video's green channel (maximum response near 540 nm) shows the color change due to phenolphthalein absorption. While mixing is at least an order of magnitude faster in the levitated drop compared with three-dimensional diffusion, modulation of the acoustic waveform near the surface acoustic wave resonance frequency of the levitated drop does not substantially reduce mixing time. PMID:24460103

  11. Theoretical analysis of mixing in liquid clouds - Part 3: Inhomogeneous mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, M.; Khain, A.; Korolev, A.

    2015-11-01

    An idealized model of time-dependent mixing between cloud and non-cloud volumes is analyzed. Initial droplet size distribution (DSD) in cloud volume is assumed to be monodisperse. Both analytical investigation and parcel model investigation are used to study mixing processes and solve diffusion-evaporation equations. It is shown that the evolution of microphysical variables and the final equilibrium stage are unambiguously determined by two non-dimensional parameters. The first parameter, R, which is proportional to the ratio of the saturation deficit to the liquid water content in a cloud volume, determines whether the equilibrium stage is reached at 100 % relative humidity, or, rather, leads to a full evaporation of cloud droplets. The second parameter, Da, is the Damkölher number, which is equal to the ratio of the characteristic mixing time and phase relaxation time. This parameter (together with parameter R) determines whether mixing takes place according to a homogeneous or an inhomogeneous scenario. An analysis of the results obtained within a wide range of parameters R and Da is presented. It is shown that there is no pure homogeneous mixing, since the first stage of mixing is always inhomogeneous. Turbulent mixing between different volumes always starts as inhomogeneous and the mixing type can change during the mixing process. At any values of governing parameters, mixing leads to the formation of a tail of small droplets in the DSD and therefore to DSD broadening. The broadening depends onDa and the final DSD dispersion can be as large as 0.2 at large Da. The total duration of the mixing process varies from several to one hundred phase relaxation times, depending on R and Da. Delimitation between the types of mixing on the Da-R plane is carried out. The definitions of homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixings are reconsidered and clarified. The paper also compares the results of the current study with those obtained with classical mixing concepts.

  12. Tri-bimaximal Mixing from Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryo

    2008-11-23

    We investigate fermion mass matrices of the cascade form which lead to the tri-bimaximal mixing in the lepton sector. The cascade neutrino matrix predicts a parameter-independent relation among the observables, which are the neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences. The relation predicts that the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle is close to maximal. We also study phenomenological aspect of the cascade form in supersymmetric theory, which are lepton flavor violation and thermal leptogenesis. A dynamical realivation of the cascade mass matrix are also presented in U(1) flavor theory.

  13. Mixing enhancement in chemical lasers. II. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    A phenomenological model for reactant mixing in trip nozzle chemical lasers by means of a surface-stretching mechanism is used in conjunction with a two-level laser model to derive scaling laws for numerous features noted in the trip nozzle data. This mixing model is then employed with an aerokinetics code in order to obtain quantitative laser gain predictions. The results yielded by the code are in good agreement with small-signal data. It is determined that trip jet mixing will not increase laser efficiency at low cavity pressures, but will at high cavity pressures result in a doubling of laser power output. 12 references.

  14. Unveiling Neutrino Mixing and Leptonic CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Olga

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three-family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle θ13 and the CP-phase δ. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  15. Transportable Vitrification System Demonstration on Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Wilson, C.N.; Van Ryn, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results from the first demonstration of the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) on actual mixed waste. The TVS is a fully integrated, transportable system for the treatment of mixed and low-level radioactive wastes. The demonstration was conducted at Oak Ridge`s East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly known as the K-25 site. The purpose of the demonstration was to show that mixed wastes could be vitrified safely on a `field` scale using joule-heated melter technology and obtain information on system performance, waste form durability, air emissions, and costs.

  16. B mixing and flavor tagging at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, James S.; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2004-12-01

    The CDF Collaboration has made a preliminary measurement of B{sub d} mixing as a first step toward measuring mixing in the B{sub s} system. Flavor tagging using opposite-side jets and muons as well as same-side tagging schemes have been applied. Results agree well with precise results from the B-factories. They use these results to estimate CDF's B{sub s} mixing range using the present data set ({approx} 250 pb{sup -1}) and extrapolate to the potential from larger data sets in future running.

  17. Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

  18. Dilution jet mixing program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Myers, G.; White, C.

    1985-01-01

    The main objectives for the NASA Jet Mixing Phase 3 program were: extension of the data base on the mixing of single sided rows of jets in a confined cross flow to discrete slots, including streamlined, bluff, and angled injections; quantification of the effects of geometrical and flow parameters on penetration and mixing of multiple rows of jets into a confined flow; investigation of in-line, staggered, and dissimilar hole configurations; and development of empirical correlations for predicting temperature distributions for discrete slots and multiple rows of dilution holes.

  19. Unveiling neutrino mixing and leptonic CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the CP-phase {delta}. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  20. Mixing in thermally stratified energy stores

    SciTech Connect

    Berkle, J. van

    1996-10-01

    Two important aspects of short-term thermally stratified energy storage, thermocline mixing and thermocline thickness, are studied analytically, experimentally and numerically. The storage detrimental aspects are investigated for a simplified configuration, i.e., an adiabatic box containing a quasi-stationary thermocline. Numerical finite difference/volume simulations agree well with experiments. The dissipation-free 1D analytical model shows a large discrepancy. It appears that mixing inside thermally stratified stores is a two-state process. First fluid is withdrawn from the thermocline by viscous drag. Subsequent mixing takes place by stretching and folding of fluid particles, thereby enabling diffusion to become active. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Fermion masses, flavour mixing and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G. G.

    2008-11-23

    The pattern of neutrino masses and mixings is characteristically different from those observed in the quark sector. I discuss how this can be elegantly explaned through a combination of an underlying family symmetry and the see-saw mechanism.

  2. Harmful Interactions: Mixing Alcohol with Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interactions Print version Harmful Interactions Mixing Alcohol With Medicines You’ve probably seen this warning on medicines ... falls and serious injuries, especially among older people. Medicines may have many ingredients Some medications—including many ...

  3. CUMULUS CLOUD VENTING OF MIXED LAYER OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols (and possibly other compounds) occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments conducted in July...

  4. The Vertical Profile of Ocean Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, R. M.; Nikurashin, M.; McDougall, T. J.; Mashayek, A.

    2014-12-01

    The upwelling of bottom waters through density surfaces in the deep ocean is not possible unless the sloping nature of the sea floor is taken into account. The bottom--intensified mixing arising from interaction of internal tides and geostrophic motions with bottom topography implies that mixing is a decreasing function of height in the deep ocean. This would further imply that the diapycnal motion in the deep ocean is downward, not upwards as is required by continuity. This conundrum regarding ocean mixing and upwelling in the deep ocean will be resolved by appealing to the fact that the ocean does not have vertical side walls. Implications of the conundrum for the representation of ocean mixing in climate models will be discussed.

  5. Free surface mixing with heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, P.E.; Fadda, D.

    1997-05-23

    This study investigates the thermal mixing phenomenon as external rocking excitations are applied to a container partially filled with a thermally nonhomogeneous fluid. The aim of this work is to determine the effects of the rocking frequency on thermal mixing in free surface flows. Numerical results show that optimum mixing is achieved while rocking at the wave natural frequency of the tank where the free surface displacements are greatest. At this optimal frequency the strong mixing is observed to be highly concentrated in the area near the free surface. The interest is motivated by the desire to understand the fundamental physics as well as by the importance of current engineering applications in fields such as solar energy (collectors), environmental engineering (ponds, estuaries) aerospace (fuel tanks), electronics (thermal management), manufacturing (sand casting), and air conditioning (residential enclosures).

  6. CORRECTION FOR NONUNIFORM MIXING IN INDOOR MICROENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The modelling of the indoor concentration distribution produced by sources and sinks of pollutants is complicated by nonuniform mixing within the indoor settings. wo common approaches to predicting the concentration distribution are to either treat the indoor volume as containing...

  7. Booze, High Blood Pressure a Dangerous Mix

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158828.html Booze, High Blood Pressure a Dangerous Mix Study links moderate drinking to heart damage in people with hypertension To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  8. Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment: Program Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that insufficient mixing occurs in the pelagic ocean to maintain the large scale thermohaline circulation. Observed mixing rates fall a factor of ten short of classical indices such as Munk's "Abyssal Recipe." The growing suspicion is that most of the mixing in the sea occurs near topography. Exciting recent observations by Polzin et al., among others, fuel this speculation. If topographic mixing is indeed important, it must be acknowledged that its geographic distribution, both laterally and vertically, is presently unknown. The vertical distribution of mixing plays a critical role in the Stommel Arons model of the ocean interior circulation. In recent numerical studies, Samelson demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of flow in the abyssal ocean to the spatial distribution of mixing. We propose to study the topographic mixing problem through an integrated program of modeling and observation. We focus on tidally forced mixing as the global energetics of this process have received (and are receiving) considerable study. Also, the well defined frequency of the forcing and the unique geometry of tidal scattering serve to focus the experiment design. The Hawaiian Ridge is selected as a study site. Strong interaction between the barotropic tide and the Ridge is known to take place. The goals of the Hawaiian Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) are to quantify the rate of tidal energy loss to mixing at the Ridge and to identify the mechanisms by which energy is lost and mixing generated. We are challenged to develop a sufficiently comprehensive picture that results can be generalized from Hawaii to the global ocean. To achieve these goals, investigators from five institutions have designed HOME, a program of historic data analysis, modeling and field observation. The Analysis and Modeling efforts support the design of the field experiments. As the program progresses, a global model of the barotropic (depth independent) tide, and two models of the

  9. Laboratory studies of ocean mixing by microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2011-11-01

    Ocean mixing plays a major role in nutrient and energy transport and is an important input to climate models. Recent studies suggest that the contribution of fluid transport by swimming microorganisms to ocean mixing may be of the same order of magnitude as winds and tides. An experimental setup has been designed in order to study the mixing efficiency of vertical migration of plankton. To this end, a stratified water column is created to model the ocean's density gradient. The vertical migration of Artemia Salina (brine shrimp) within the water column is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. By fluorescently labelling portions of the water column, the stirring of the density gradient by the animals is visualized and quantified. Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms produces enhanced mixing relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present.

  10. Hardy's criterion of nonlocality for mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, GianCarlo; Marinatto, Luca

    2006-03-15

    We generalize Hardy's proof of nonlocality to the case of bipartite mixed statistical operators, and we exhibit a necessary condition which has to be satisfied by any given mixed state {sigma} in order that a local and realistic hidden variable model exists which accounts for the quantum mechanical predictions implied by {sigma}. Failure of this condition will imply both the impossibility of any local explanation of certain joint probability distributions in terms of hidden variables and the nonseparability of the considered mixed statistical operator. Our result can be also used to determine the maximum amount of noise, arising from imperfect experimental implementations of the original Hardy's proof of nonlocality, in presence of which it is still possible to put into evidence the nonlocal features of certain mixed states.

  11. Enhanced Mixing in a Rectangular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the mixing of non-reacting opposed rows of jets injected normal to a confined rectangular crossflow has been conducted. Planar Mie-scattering was used to measure the time-average concentration distribution of the jet fluid in planes perpendicular to the duct axis. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of closely spaced orifice configurations applicable to the mixing zone of an RQL combustor. Baseline studies were performed of mixing under "ideal" conditions, i.e., plenum fed jets injecting into a crossflow uniform in velocity and turbulence intensity. In addition, more practical ("non-ideal") issues encountered during hardware design were also studied. As in other studies, mixing effectiveness, determined using a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of mean jet concentration distributions, was found to be optimum when the spacing-to-duct-height ratio was inversely proportional to the square root of the jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio. This relationship is suitable for design under ideal flow conditions. Inlet flow boundary conditions of the jet and approach flow (mainstream) were found to strongly influence mixing performance, but no attempt was made to determine optimum performance under non-ideal conditions. The tests performed do offer some guidance as to expected mixing behavior for several common variables likely to be imposed by hardware constraints. Additionally, in this study it was found that for rows of orifices with opposite centerlines inline, mixing was similar for blockages up to 89 percent (previous crossflow mixing studies concerned with dilution zone configurations, blockages were typically less than 50 percent). Lower levels of unmixedness were obtained as a function of downstream location when axial injection length was minimized. Mixing may be enhanced if orifice centerlines of opposed rows are staggered, but blockage must be =50 percent in this configuration. Round hole and "square

  12. B lifetimes and mixing with the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The lifetimes of B{sup 0} and B{sup {plus_minus}} mesons have been measured with the SLD detector at the SLC using topological reconstructions of the B mesons. Studies of B{sub s} mixing, using similar techniques, show that the prospects for measuring B{sub s} mixing with an upgraded vertex detector are good if x{sub x} {le} 15.

  13. Techniques for Bs Mixing at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Salamanna, Giuseppe; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2005-12-01

    The techniques used to perform a measurement of the mixing frequency of the B{sub s} meson ({Delta}M{sub s}) with the CDF detector at the TeVatron collider are described. Particular stress is put on CDF techniques for flavor tagging, which is possibly the major issue for mixing measurements at a hadron collider. Also CDF performances on lifetime and final state reconstruction are described. The final result of the amplitude scanning presented at 2005 Winter Conferences is reported.

  14. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Zhang, Chuanlun; Roh, Yul

    2002-09-03

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  15. Compressibility of Quantum Mixed-State Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2001-07-02

    We present a formula that determines the optimal number of qubits per message that allows asymptotically faithful compression of the quantum information carried by an ensemble of mixed states. The set of mixed states determines a decomposition of the Hilbert space into the redundant part and the irreducible part. After removing the redundancy, the optimal compression rate is shown to be given by the von Neumann entropy of the reduced ensemble.

  16. Nonadditive Mixed State Phases in Neutron Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Klepp, J.; Sponar, S.; Filipp, S.; Lettner, M.; Badurek, G.; Hasegawa, Y.

    2009-03-10

    In a neutron polarimetry experiment mixed neutron spin phases are determined. We consider evolutions leading to purely geometric, purely dynamical and combined phases. It is experimentally demonstrated that the sum of the geometric and dynamical phases--both obtained in separate measurements--is not equal to the associated total phase as obtained from a third measurement, unless the system is in a pure state. In this sense, mixed state phases are not additive.

  17. Numerical investigation of Herschel Bulkley fluids mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, O. V.; Bazuev, V. P.; Venik, V. N.; Smirnova, N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Bitumen modification by means of introducing the components into bitumen swirling flows using an injector mixer has been investigated in this paper. The properties of mixing depending on geometry and operating conditions and the swirling intensity are presented herein. The results obtained have shown that the optimum mixing can be achieved within a strongly swirled flow when the injector mixer locates in close proximity to a swirler.

  18. Entrainment and mixing mechanism in monsoon clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudarsan; Prabhakaran, Thara; Pandithurai, Govindan; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Entrainment and consequent mixing impacts the cloud microphysical parameters and droplet size distribution (DSD) significantly which are very important for cloud radiative properties and the mechanism for first rain drop formation. The entrainment and mixing mechanisms are investigated in this study using in situ observations in warm cumulus clouds over monsoon region. Entrainment is discussed in the framework of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixing concepts and their effects on cloud droplet size distribution, number concentration, liquid water content and mean radius are described. The degree of homogeneity increases with droplet number concentration and adiabatic fraction, indicating homogeneous type mixing in the cloud core where dilution is less. Inhomogeneous mixing is found to be a dominating process at cloud edges where dilution is significant. Cloud droplet size distribution (DSD) is found to shift towards lower sizes during a homogeneous mixing event in the cloud core whereas spectral width of DSD decreases due to inhomogeneous mixing at cloud edges. Droplet size spectra suggests that largest droplets are mainly formed in the less diluted cloud core while diluted cloud edges have relatively smaller droplets, so that raindrop formation occurs mainly in the core of the cloud. The origin of the entrained parcels in deep cumulus clouds is investigated using conservative thermodynamical parameters. The entrained parcels originate from a level close to the observation level or slightly below through lateral edges. Cloud edges are significantly diluted due to entrainment of sub-saturated environmental air which can penetrate several hundred meters inside the cloud before it gets mixed completely with the cloud mass. Less diluted parcels inside the cloud core originates from a level much below the cloud base height. Penetrating downdraft from cloud top is seldom observed at the observation level and strong downdrafts may be attributed to in-cloud oscillation

  19. Mixing insert for foam dispensing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, W. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A device for mixing foam ingredients is described. The device comprises an arrangement of lands situated about a cylindrical elongated shaft-like member with each land having a slot. The slots of alternate lands are positioned 180 deg from each other so that as the ingredients flow through the mixing chamber they flow from adjacent one side of the housing to the other dividing as such passes around the shaft-like member.

  20. Quick-Mixing Studies Under Reacting Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The low-NO(x) emitting potential of rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn )RQL) combustion makes it an attractive option for engines of future stratospheric aircraft. Because NO(x) formation is exponentially dependent on temperature, the success of the RQL combustor depends on minimizing high temperature stoichiometric pocket formation in the quick-mixing section. An experiment was designed and built, and tests were performed to characterize reaction and mixing properties of jets issuing from round orifices into a hot, fuel-rich crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct. The reactor operates on propane and presents a uniform, non-swirling mixture to the mixing modules. Modules consisting of round orifice configurations of 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 18 holes were evaluated at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and jet-to-mainstream mass-flaw ratio of 2.5. Temperatures and concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, HC, and NO(x) were obtained upstream, down-stream, and within the orifice plane to determine jet penetration as well as reaction processes. Jet penetration was a function of the number of orifices and affected the mixing in the reacting system. Of the six configurations tested, the 14-hole module produced jet penetration close to the module half-radius and yielded the best mixing and most complete combustion at a plane one duct diameter from the orifice leading edge. The results reveal that substantial reaction and heat release occur in the jet mixing zone when the entering effluent is hot and rich, and that the experiment as designed will serve to explore satisfactorily jet mixing behavior under realistic reacting conditions in future studies.

  1. Microwave mixing with niobium variable thickness bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.-K.; Callegari, A.; Deaver, B. S., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Niobium thin-film bridges 300-A thick, 1-micron wide, and 0.5-micron long joining two bulk films 5000-A thick and having normal resistance of the order of 1 ohm have been fabricated and used for microwave mixing at 10 GHz. They exhibit Josephson, bolometric, and multiple-flux-flow mixing and have useful response at 100-200 GHz. The data show in a direct way limitations imposed by flux flow and heating.

  2. [Hadamard transform spectrometer mixed pixels' unmixing method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Hu, Bing-Liang; Liu, Xue-Bin; Sun, Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Feng, Yu-Tao; Liu, Yong-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    Hadamard transform imaging spectrometer is a multi-channel digital transform spectrometer detection technology, this paper based on digital micromirror array device (DMD) of the Hadamard transform spectrometer working principle and instrument structure, obtained by the imaging sensor mixed pixel were analyzed, theory derived the solution of pixel aliasing hybrid method, simulation results show that the method is simple and effective to improve the accuracy of mixed pixel spectrum more than 10% recovery. PMID:22250574

  3. Mixing behavior of colyophilized binary systems.

    PubMed

    Shamblin, S L; Taylor, L S; Zografi, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors which govern the mixing of amorphous sucrose with trehalose, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), dextran, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVP/VA). These materials were chosen as model systems to represent multicomponent freeze-dried pharmaceutical preparations. Mixtures were prepared by colyophilization of the components from aqueous solutions. The glass transition temperatures (Tg) of these mixtures were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and were compared to predictions based on simple mixing rules. FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to probe selected mixtures for evidence of molecular interactions between components. Colyophilized mixtures were confirmed to be amorphous by X-ray powder diffraction. The Tg values of the various mixtures generally were lower than values predicted from free volume and thermodynamic models, indicating that mixing is not ideal. The FT-Raman spectra of colyophilized sucrose-PVP and sucrose-PVP/VA mixtures provided evidence for interaction between the components through hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonds formed between components in colyophilized sucrose-additive mixtures are formed at the expense of hydrogen bonds within sucrose and in some cases within the additive. A thermodynamic analysis of these mixtures indicates that mixing is endothermic, which is consistent with a net loss in the degree of hydrogen bonding on mixing. There is also a positive excess entropy of mixing which accompanies the net loss in hydrogen bonds. Despite this gain in excess entropy, the excess free energy of mixing is positive, consistent with the observed deviations in Tg from values predicted using models which assume ideal mixing. PMID:9607945

  4. Neutrino mass and mixing with discrete symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    This is a review paper about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally, we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A4, S4 and Δ(96).

  5. Charm CP violation and mixing at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rok Ko, Byeong; Belle Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present charm CP violation and mixing measurements at Belle. They are the first observation of D0 - bar D0 mixing in e+e- collisions from D0 → K+π- decays, the most precise mixing and indirect CP violation parameters from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the timeintegrated CP asymmetries in D0 → π0π0 and D0 → K0Sπ0 decays. Our mixing measurement in D0 → K+π- decays excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at the 5.1 standard deviation level. The mixing parameters x = (0.56 ± 0.19+0.03+0.06-0.09-0.09)%, y = (0.30 ± 0.15+0.04+0.03-0.05-0.06)% and indirect CP violation parameters |q/p| = (0.90+0.16+0.05+0.06-0.15-0.04-0.05)%, arg(q/p) = (-6 ± 11 ± 3+3-4)° measured from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the time-integrated CP asymmetries AD0→π0π0CP = (-0.03 ± 0.64 ± 0.10)% and AD0→K0Sπ0CP = (-0.21 ± 0.16 ± 0.07)% are the most precisemeasurements to date. Our measurements here are consistent with predictions of the standard model.

  6. Liquid mixing in internal loop airlift reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.J.; Hwang, S.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Chang, C.M. . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-09-01

    The airlift reactor is a promising reactor for two- and three-phase reactions due to its advantages of high fluid circulation, mass and heat transfer, short mixing time, low shear stress, and energy consumption. It has been widely applied in biochemical fermentation, chemical reactions, and biological wastewater treatment processes. Liquid mixing in the riser and downcomer of two- and three-phase internal loop airlift reactors as well as the overall liquid mixing were studied. Tracer was injected into the airlift reactors, and pH sensors were employed to measure the variations of tracer concentration in the riser, downcomer, top, and bottom sections. The Bo number in individual sections of the airlift reactors were obtained by time domain analysis of these concentration variations. It was found that the degree of mixing in the riser was higher than that in the downcomer. Moreover, mixing in the two-phase system was superior to that in the three-phase system, and the degree of mixing of the calcium alginate system was lower than that of the polystyrene system. Minimum values of the overall axial dispersion coefficient existed in the relationship between the overall axial dispersion coefficient and solids loading.

  7. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  8. Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper.

  9. Effects of temporal fluctuations on mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, Maria; Dentz, Marco; Post, Vincent E. A.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-04-01

    Mixing and dispersion in coastal aquifers are strongly influenced by periodic temporal flow fluctuations on multiple time-scales ranging from days (tides), seasons (pumping and recharge) to glacial cycles (regression and transgressions). Transient forcing effects lead to a complex space- ant time-dependent flow response which induces enhanced spreading and mixing of a dissolved substance. We study effective mixing and solute transport in temporally fluctuating one-dimensional flow for a stable stratification of two fluids of different density. We derive explicit expressions for the concentration distribution and variance to identify the controls and obtain realistic predictions of the coupling between mixing and oscillatory transient flow. We find that the magnitude of transient-driven mixing is mainly controlled by the hydraulic diffusivity, the period and the initial interface location. We also find a spatial dependence of the effective dispersion coefficient which at long times causes the concentration profile to become asymmetric. Sand column experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions are presented to validate the theoretical effective model defined. The proposed formulation is found to provide very good predictions and correctly reproduces the experimental mixing dynamics.

  10. LED color mixing with diffractive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa; Baumgart, Jörg; Wendel, Simon; Neumann, Cornelius

    2013-03-01

    Lighting solutions with colored LEDs provide many opportunities for illumination. One of these opportunities is to create a color tunable light source. In this way different kinds of white light (color temperature) as well as discrete colors may be realized. This opens the field for applications as mood lighting. But there is always a spatial separation of the distinct LEDs that might get converted into an angular separation by any collimating optics. This angular separation causes such problems like color fringes and colored shadows that cannot be accepted in most applications. Conventional methods to solve these problems include e.g. mixing rods or dichroic filters. A new approach is the use of the dispersive effect of a diffractive structure to compensate the angular separation of the different colors. In this contribution the potential and limitations of diffractive structures in LED color mixing applications are discussed. Ray tracing simulations were performed to analyze such important parameters like efficiency, color performance and the cross section of the color mixing optics. New means for the estimation of color mixing performance were developed. A software tool makes it possible to detect the color distribution within ray trace data and it provides a quality factor to estimate the color mixing performance. It can be shown that the spectral band width has a large influence on the mixing process. Ray tracing simulations are compared with results of an experimental setup such that both measured as well as simulated data is presented.

  11. High scale mixing unification for Dirac neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Gauhar; Gupta, Saurabh; Rajasekaran, G.; Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-06-01

    Starting with the high scale mixing unification hypothesis, we investigate the renormalization-group evolution of mixing parameters and masses for Dirac-type neutrinos. Following this hypothesis, the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) mixing angles and phase are taken to be identical to the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) ones at a unifying high scale. Then they are evolved to a low scale using renormalization-group equations. The notable feature of this hypothesis is that renormalization-group evolution with quasidegenerate mass pattern can explain largeness of leptonic mixing angles even for Dirac neutrinos. The renormalization-group evolution "naturally" results in a nonzero and small value of leptonic mixing angle θ13. One of the important predictions of this work is that the mixing angle θ23 is nonmaximal and lies only in the second octant. We also derive constraints on the allowed parameter range for the supersymmetry breaking and unification scales for which this hypothesis works. The results are novel and can be tested by present and future experiments.

  12. Visualizing turbulent mixing of gases and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Philip J.; Jain, Sandeep

    1995-01-01

    A physical model and interactive computer graphics techniques have been developed for the visualization of the basic physical process of stochastic dispersion and mixing from steady-state CFD calculations. The mixing of massless particles and inertial particles is visualized by transforming the vector field from a traditionally Eulerian reference frame into a Lagrangian reference frame. Groups of particles are traced through the vector field for the mean path as well as their statistical dispersion about the mean position by using added scalar information about the root mean square value of the vector field and its Lagrangian time scale. In this way, clouds of particles in a turbulent environment are traced, not just mean paths. In combustion simulations of many industrial processes, good mixing is required to achieve a sufficient degree of combustion efficiency. The ability to visualize this multiphase mixing can not only help identify poor mixing but also explain the mechanism for poor mixing. The information gained from the visualization can be used to improve the overall combustion efficiency in utility boilers or propulsion devices. We have used this technique to visualize steady-state simulations of the combustion performance in several furnace designs.

  13. Management of mixed wastes from biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Linins, I.; Klein, R.C.; Gershey, E.L. )

    1991-09-01

    Mixed radioactive and chemical wastes generated by biomedical research were characterized, and various treatment methods for reducing their volume were evaluated. These wastes consist primarily of organic solvents used in the extraction and purification of radiolabeled biomolecules that are contaminated with low levels of the long-lived radionuclides, 3H and 14C. The Rockefeller University's mixed wastes fall into three broad chemical categories: phenol/chloroform, acetonitrile/water, and mixtures of miscellaneous solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and other hazardous chemicals. Currently, with the exception of liquid scintillation cocktails (deregulated in 1981), there are no commercial disposal outlets for mixed wastes nor may they be stored legally for more than 90-180 d. Most of these mixed wastes can be effectively rendered into nonradioactive chemical and aqueous radioactive waste, both of which can be disposed of in accordance with existing regulations. However, to do so requires a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit for licensure as a treatment, storage, and disposal facility. For many university research facilities, this may require financial and personnel resources disproportionate to the small amounts of waste produced. Also, such treatment, if not done properly, presents potential occupational hazards from the direct handling of waste materials. Deregulation of certain mixed wastes would be the safest, most cost-effective, and practical method for dealing with many mixed wastes of biomedical origin. In any event, a national regulatory solution must be found.

  14. Leptonic mixing, family symmetries, and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros Varzielas, I. de; Gonzalez Felipe, R.; Serodio, H.

    2011-02-01

    Tribimaximal leptonic mixing is a mass-independent mixing scheme consistent with the present solar and atmospheric neutrino data. By conveniently decomposing the effective neutrino mass matrix associated to it, we derive generic predictions in terms of the parameters governing the neutrino masses. We extend this phenomenological analysis to other mass-independent mixing schemes which are related to the tribimaximal form by a unitary transformation. We classify models that produce tribimaximal leptonic mixing through the group structure of their family symmetries in order to point out that there is often a direct connection between the group structure and the phenomenological analysis. The type of seesaw mechanism responsible for neutrino masses plays a role here, as it restricts the choices of family representations and affects the viability of leptogenesis. We also present a recipe to generalize a given tribimaximal model to an associated model with a different mass-independent mixing scheme, which preserves the connection between the group structure and phenomenology as in the original model. This procedure is explicitly illustrated by constructing toy models with the transpose tribimaximal, bimaximal, golden ratio, and hexagonal leptonic mixing patterns.

  15. Management of mixed wastes from biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Linins, I; Klein, R C; Gershey, E L

    1991-09-01

    Mixed radioactive and chemical wastes generated by biomedical research were characterized, and various treatment methods for reducing their volume were evaluated. These wastes consist primarily of organic solvents used in the extraction and purification of radiolabeled biomolecules that are contaminated with low levels of the long-lived radionuclides, 3H and 14C. The Rockefeller University's mixed wastes fall into three broad chemical categories: phenol/chloroform, acetonitrile/water, and mixtures of miscellaneous solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and other hazardous chemicals. Currently, with the exception of liquid scintillation cocktails (deregulated in 1981), there are no commercial disposal outlets for mixed wastes nor may they be stored legally for more than 90-180 d. Most of these mixed wastes can be effectively rendered into nonradioactive chemical and aqueous radioactive waste, both of which can be disposed of in accordance with existing regulations. However, to do so requires a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit for licensure as a treatment, storage, and disposal facility. For many university research facilities, this may require financial and personnel resources disproportionate to the small amounts of waste produced. Also, such treatment, if not done properly, presents potential occupational hazards from the direct handling of waste materials. Deregulation of certain mixed wastes would be the safest, most cost-effective, and practical method for dealing with many mixed wastes of biomedical origin. In any event, a national regulatory solution must be found. PMID:1880030

  16. Ion beam mixing by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, Arpad; Kotis, Laszlo; Labar, Janos L.; Osvath, Zoltan; Toth, Attila L.; Menyhard, Miklos; Zalar, Anton; Panjan, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Si amorphous (41 nm)/Cr polycrystalline (46 nm) multilayer structure was irradiated by 30 keV Ga{sup +} ions with fluences in the range of 25-820 ions/nm{sup 2} using a focused ion beam. The effect of irradiation on the concentration distribution was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The ion irradiation did not result in roughening on the free surface. On the other hand, the Ga{sup +} irradiation produced a strongly mixed region around the first Si/Cr interface. The thickness of mixed region depends on the Ga{sup +} fluence and it is joined to the pure Cr matrix with an unusual sharp interface. With increasing fluence the width of the mixed region increases but the interface between the mixed layer and pure Cr remains sharp. TRIDYN simulation failed to reproduce this behavior. Assuming that the Ga{sup +} irradiation induces asymmetric mixing, that is during the mixing process the Cr can enter the Si layer, but the Si cannot enter the Cr layer, the experimental findings can qualitatively be explained.

  17. Using Multimedia Records To Support Mixed-Method Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennington, Tammy L.; Jones, Michael L. W.; Gay, Geri

    1999-01-01

    Explores how multimedia records, especially digital video, can enhance the analysis and presentation of research findings and can facilitate mixed-method research designs. Draws analogies between mixing methods and mixing technologies. (Author/SLD)

  18. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  19. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  20. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  1. Liquid–liquid mixing studies in annular centrifugal contactors comparing stationary mixing vane options

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-09-11

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of an annular centrifugal contactor show the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported for operation of a 12.5 cm engineering-scale contactor unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixing-zone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugal contactors.

  2. Development of a simplified asphalt mix stability procedure for use in Superpave volumetric mix design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihab Hussein Fahmy

    Over the last five decades, two common test methods (Marshall and Hveem) have evolved for the design of asphaltic mixes. These design methods have been historically found to be generally reliable and reasonable for most application in design. However, premature distress in many flexible pavements suggests that these empirical methods of design do not guarantee a stable mix. Recently, many studies have been carried out in order to develop a rational mix design procedure that accounts for both the mix volumetric properties as well as fundamental engineering properties. Among those is the Superpave design procedure, which was originally divided into three, hierarchical levels termed the volumetric mix design (level I), the abbreviated mix design (level II), and the full mix design (level III). In the volumetric design, the entire mix design process is based upon the volumetric properties and does not include a test method to evaluate the stability/strength of the mix. Although both the abbreviated level and the full level of design included test methods that considered the engineering properties in a complete and a comprehensive manner; they required the purchase of very expensive equipment and a large number of samples to be tested. The objective of this research was to develop a new rational "fundamental" mix strength (stability) test for the design of dense graded mixes to overcome the limitations of the Hveem and Marshall empirical methods and to fill the gaps and major deficiencies in the current Superpave volumetric mix design. The new procedure is based upon the Superpave volumetric design (level I) but is augmented by the simple, but fundamental mix strength (stability) test. Such a test is now currently absent in the existing Superpave approach. The new procedure introduces the flow time as a fundamental engineering design criterion in the mix design. This parameter is defined as the time (in seconds) at which plastic flow in a mix occurs under creep loading

  3. Turbulent mixing in a precessing sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Susumu Shimizu, Masaki; Kawahara, Genta

    2014-11-15

    By numerically simulating turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers in a precessing sphere, we propose a method to enhance the mixing of a fluid confined within a smooth cavity by its rotational motion alone. To precisely evaluate the mixing efficiency, we extend the quantification method proposed by Danckwerts [“The definition and measurement of some characteristics of mixtures,” Appl. Sci. Res. A 3, 279–296 (1952)] to the case in which only a finite number of fluid particle trajectories can be known. Our accurate numerical tracking of fluid particles in the flow, which is controlled by the Reynolds number (an indicator of the spin rate) and the Poincaré number (the precession rate), shows the following results. First, the mixing process on the time scale normalized by the spin period is independent of the Reynolds number as long as it is high enough for the flow to be developed turbulence. Second, fastest mixing is achieved under weak precession (Poincaré number ≈0.1); in such cases, perfect mixing requires only 10–15 spins of the container. Third, the power to sustain turbulence is a weakly increasing function of the Poincaré number, and the energy efficiency of the mixing is also maximized when the Poincaré number is about 0.1. Fourth, efficient mixing driven by the weak precession arises from the effective cooperation of complex large-scale flow and small-scale turbulence, which itself is sustained by the large-scale flow.

  4. DOE regulatory reform initiative vitrified mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.J.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Flaherty, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with responsibly managing the largest volume of mixed waste in the United States. This responsibility includes managing waste in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and in a cost-effective, environmentally responsible manner. Managing certain treated mixed wastes in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage and disposal units (specifically those mixed wastes that pose low risks from the hazardous component) is unlikely to provide additional protection to human health and the environment beyond that afforded by managing these wastes in storage and disposal units subject to requirements for radiological control. In October, 1995, the DOE submitted a regulatory reform proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relating to vitrified mixed waste forms. The technical proposal supports a regulatory strategy that would allow vitrified mixed waste forms treated through a permit or other environmental compliance mechanism to be granted an exemption from RCRA hazardous waste regulation, after treatment, based upon the inherent destruction and immobilization capabilities of vitrification technology. The vitrified waste form will meet, or exceed the performance criteria of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass that has been accepted as an international standard for immobilizing radioactive waste components and the LDR treatment standards for inorganics and metals for controlling hazardous constituents. The proposal further provides that vitrified mixed waste would be responsibly managed under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) while reducing overall costs. Full regulatory authority by the EPA or a State would be maintained until an acceptable vitrified mixed waste form, protective of human health and the environment, is produced.

  5. Jet mixing long horizontal storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Perona, J.J.; Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    Large storage tanks may require mixing to achieve homogeneity of contents for several reasons: prior to sampling for mass balance purposes, for blending in reagents, for suspending settled solids for removal, or for use as a feed tank to a process. At ORNL, mixed waste evaporator concentrates are stored in 50,000-gal tanks, about 12 ft in diameter and 60 ft long. This tank configuration has the advantage of permitting transport by truck and therefore fabrication in the shop rather than in the field. Jet mixing experiments were carried out on two model tanks: a 230-gal (1/6-linear-scale) Plexiglas tank and a 25,000-gal tank (about 2/3 linear scale). Mixing times were measured using sodium chloride tracer and several conductivity probes distributed through the tanks. Several jet sizes and configurations were tested. One-directional and two-directional jets were tested in both tanks. Mixing times for each tank were correlated with the jet Reynolds number. Mixing times were correlated for the two tank sizes using the recirculation time for the developed jet. When the recirculation times were calculated using the distance from the nozzle to the end of the tank as the length of the developed jet, the correlation was only marginally successful. Data for the two tank sizes were correlated empirically using a modified effective jet length expressed as a function of the Reynolds number raised to the 1/3 power. Mixing experiments were simulated using the TEMTEST computer program. The simulations predicted trends correctly and were within the scatter of the experimental data with the lower jet Reynolds numbers. Agreement was not as good at high Reynolds numbers except for single nozzles in the 25,000-gal tank, where agreement was excellent over the entire range.

  6. A study of the thermodynamic properties of surfactant mixtures: Mixed micelle formation and mixed surfactant adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    The volumetric mixing in anionic/nonionic, cationic/nonionic, and anionic/cationic mixed micelles was determined by examining the total surfactant apparent molar volumes at total surfactant concentrations much greater than the mixture critical micelle concentration. The mixed surfactant systems investigated were: sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.15 M NaCl and with no added NaCl; cetyl pyridinium chloride and polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.03 M NaCl; and sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride, at 0.15 M NaCl. The results of this study suggest that the electrostatic interactions in the mixed micelles do no significantly effect the molar volume of the mixed micelle. Therefore, the micelle hydrophobic core dominates the volumetric mixing in mixed micelles. The adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol and well defined mixtures thereof was measured on gamma alumina. A pseudo-phase separation model to describe mixed anionic/nonionic admicelle (adsorbed surfactant aggregate) formation was developed. In this model, regular solution theory was used to describe the anionic/nonionic surfactant interactions in the mixed admicelle and a patch-wise adsorption model was used to describe surfactant adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Regular solution theory was tested on specific homogeneous surface patches by examining constant total surfactant adsorption levels. For the adsorption of binary surfactant mixtures adsorbing at total equilibrium concentrations above the mixture critical micelle concentration, simultaneous solution of the pseudo-phase separation models for mixed admicelle and mixed micelle formation predicts that the surfactant compositions in the monomer, micelle, and admicelle pseudo-phases are constant at a constant total adsorption level.

  7. Theoretical analysis of mixing in liquid clouds - Part 3: Inhomogeneous mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Mark; Khain, Alexander; Korolev, Alexei

    2016-07-01

    An idealized diffusion-evaporation model of time-dependent mixing between a cloud volume and a droplet-free volume is analyzed. The initial droplet size distribution (DSD) in the cloud volume is assumed to be monodisperse. It is shown that evolution of the microphysical variables and the final equilibrium state are unambiguously determined by two non-dimensional parameters. The first one is the potential evaporation parameter R, proportional to the ratio of the saturation deficit to the liquid water content in the cloud volume, that determines whether the equilibrium state is reached at 100 % relative humidity, or is characterized by a complete evaporation of cloud droplets. The second parameter Da is the Damkölher number equal to the ratio of the characteristic mixing time to the phase relaxation time. Parameters R and Da determine the type of mixing.The results are analyzed within a wide range of values of R and Da. It is shown that there is no pure homogeneous mixing, since the first mixing stage is always inhomogeneous. The mixing type can change during the mixing process. Any mixing type leads to formation of a tail of small droplets in DSD and, therefore, to DSD broadening that depends on Da. At large Da, the final DSD dispersion can be as large as 0.2. The total duration of mixing varies from several to 100 phase relaxation time periods, depending on R and Da.The definitions of homogeneous and inhomogeneous types of mixing are reconsidered and clarified, enabling a more precise delimitation between them. The paper also compares the results obtained with those based on the classic mixing concepts. >

  8. Mixing in suspensions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri O.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-03-01

    Microscopic active particles self-propelling in the surrounding fluid create flows that eventually lead to emergence of non-equilibrium states with long-ranged fluctuations. One of the technologically important consequences of these fluctuations is enhanced mixing of the surrounding fluid. It is also critical for understanding the ecology of a particular type of biological active systems, bacterial suspension, as the enhanced mixing strongly alters the fluxes of nutrients. We consider the theoretical foundations of fluid mixing enhancement in dilute suspensions of active force-free swimmers. We describe the impediments to fluid mixing imposed by the physical nature of fluid flows created by swimmers, and different ways of overcoming them. We show that fluid mixing in 3D suspensions of force-free (dipolar) swimmers is dominated by the effect of curvature of their trajectories, and obtain an exact analytical expression for the corresponding effective diffusion coefficient. Our results highlight limitations of alternative ``effective temperature'' approaches and may serve as a quantitative tool for designing technological applications.

  9. Mixing Enhancement in a Lobed Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Majamaki, A. J.; Lam, I. T.; Delabroy, O.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Smith, O. I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the non-reactive mixing processes associated with a lobed fuel injector in a coflowing air stream is presented. The lobed fuel injector is a device which generates streamwise vorticity, producing high strain rates which can enhance the mixing of reactants while delaying ignition in a controlled manner. The lobed injectors examined in the present study consist of two corrugated plates between which a fuel surrogate, CO2, is injected into coflowing air. Acetone is seeded in the CO2 supply as a fuel marker. Comparison of two alternative lobed injector geometries is made with a straight fuel injector to determine net differences in mixing and strain fields due to streamwise vorticity generation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the seeded acetone yields two-dimensional images of the scalar concentration field at various downstream locations, from which local mixing and scalar dissipation rates are computed. It is found that the lobed injector geometry can enhance molecular mixing and create a highly strained flowfield, and that the strain rates generated by scalar energy dissipation can potentially delay ignition in a reacting flowfield.

  10. Multipartite entangled states in particle mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Blasone, M.; Dell'Anno, F.; De Siena, S.; Di Mauro, M.; Illuminati, F.

    2008-05-01

    In the physics of flavor mixing, the flavor states are given by superpositions of mass eigenstates. By using the occupation number to define a multiqubit space, the flavor states can be interpreted as multipartite mode-entangled states. By exploiting a suitable global measure of entanglement, based on the entropies related to all possible bipartitions of the system, we analyze the correlation properties of such states in the instances of three- and four-flavor mixing. Depending on the mixing parameters, and, in particular, on the values taken by the free phases, responsible for the CP-violation, entanglement concentrates in certain bipartitions. We quantify in detail the amount and the distribution of entanglement in the physically relevant cases of flavor mixing in quark and neutrino systems. By using the wave packet description for localized particles, we use the global measure of entanglement, suitably adapted for the instance of multipartite mixed states, to analyze the decoherence, induced by the free evolution dynamics, on the quantum correlations of stationary neutrino beams. We define a decoherence length as the distance associated with the vanishing of the coherent interference effects among massive neutrino states. We investigate the role of the CP-violating phase in the decoherence process.

  11. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology. PMID:25968481

  12. Flavor mixing democracy and minimal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Jean-Marc; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2012-06-01

    We point out that there is a unique parametrization of quark flavor mixing in which every angle is close to the Cabibbo angle θC≃13° with the CP-violating phase ϕq around 1°, implying that they might all be related to the strong hierarchy among quark masses. Applying the same parametrization to lepton flavor mixing, we find that all three mixing angles are comparably large (around π/4) and the Dirac CP-violating phase ϕl is also minimal as compared with its values in the other eight possible parametrizations. In this spirit, we propose a simple neutrino mixing ansatz which is equivalent to the tri-bimaximal flavor mixing pattern in the ϕl→0 limit and predicts sin θ13=1/√{2}sin(ϕl/2) for reactor antineutrino oscillations. Hence the Jarlskog invariant of leptonic CP violation Jl=(sin ϕl)/12 can reach a few percent if θ13 lies in the range 7°⩽θ13⩽10°.

  13. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; M. Kilbourne, Brandon; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  14. Entropy and Mixing : Titan's Humidity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2003-05-01

    Determinations of the relative humidity of methane near Titan's surface range from 40-60 %. The rationale advanced by Lunine in the global ocean hypothesis was that a mixed ethane-methane ocean in thermodynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere would be unsaturated due to methane vapor pressure supression by involatile ethane (much as salt or sugar dissolved in water slows its evaporation). Here I explore a nonequilibrium explanation for the incomplete saturation - the reason why the terrestrial atmosphere is not saturated. Specifically, saturated near-surface air is mixed with downwelling dry air, a mixing driven by vertical convection. The more vigorous the mixing, the dryer the near-surface air should be. Flasar (1983) made a crude empirical evaluation of transport processes : here I adopt a more fundamental thermodynamic approach. In reality both the involatile solute and the mixing mechanisms probably play a part in regulating methane humidity, and the utility of global and annual averages must be compromised by latitudinal and seasonal dependences. Comparison with the Earth - where moist processes play a dominant role in the entropy budget - will be instructive.

  15. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  16. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

    2010-08-16

    Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining the exposure of occupants to given sources, but the zone- specific distribution of exhaust and supply air, and the mixing of ventilation air can have significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage through the building envelope, air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact that air mixing has on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. Evaluations of existing field measurements and simulations reported in the literature are combined with new analyses to provide an integrated overview of the topic. The results show that for extreme cases additional mixing can be a significant factor but for typical homes looking at average exposures mixing is not helpful and can even make exposures worse.

  17. An asymptotic analysis of mixing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, G.; Giles, M.B.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish, in a rigorous mathematical manner, a link between the dissipation of unsteadiness in a two-dimensional compressible flow and the resulting mixing loss. A novel asymptotic approach and a control-volume argument are central to the analysis. It represents the first work clearly identifying the separate contributions to the mixing loss from simultaneous linear disturbances, i.e., from unsteady entropy, vorticity, and pressure waves. The results of the analysis have important implications for numerical simulations of turbomachinery flows; the mixing loss at the stator/rotor interface in steady simulations and numerical smoothing are discussed in depth. For a transonic turbine, the entropy rise through the stage is compared for a steady and an unsteady viscous simulation. The large interface mixing loss in the steady simulation is pointed out and its physical significance is discussed. The asymptotic approach is then applied to the first detailed analysis of interface mixing loss. Contributions from different wave types and wavelengths are quantified and discussed.

  18. Transversal and longitudinal mixing in compound channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besio, G.; Stocchino, A.; Angiolani, S.; Brocchini, M.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental campaign, based on particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of free-surface velocities, forms the basis for an analysis of the mixing processes which occur in a compound-channel flow. The flow mixing is characterized in terms of Lagrangian statistics (absolute dispersion and diffusivity) and of the related mean flow characteristics. Mixing properties strongly depend on the ratiorh between the main channel flow depth (h*mc) and the floodplain depth (h*fp), and three flow classes can be identified, namely shallow, intermediate, and deep flows. In the present study the large time asymptotic behavior of the mixing characteristics is analyzed in terms of the absolute diffusivity in order to characterize typical values of longitudinal and transversal diffusivity coefficients. Various sets of experiments, which cover a wide range of the governing physical parameters, have been performed and the asymptotic values of the absolute diffusivity have been evaluated. The results are then compared with several studies of flow dispersion for both the longitudinal diffusivity coefficient and the transversal turbulent mixing coefficient. The present results highlight a stronger dependence of such coefficients with the flow-depth ratio than with the flow regime (Froude number).

  19. Profile of acute mixed organophosphorus poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thunga, Girish; Sam, Kishore Gnana; Khera, Kanav; Xavier, Vidya; Verma, Murlidhar

    2009-06-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticide self-poisoning is a major clinical and public health problem across much of rural Asia and responsible for two thirds of suicidal deaths. However, clinical reports or evidence for the management of mixed poisoning are lacking. Patients are often treated based on the type of symptoms they exhibit, and there are no specific guidelines available to treat mixed poisoning. In this case series, we report 3 acute OP poisoning cases with mixed poisons such as organochlorine, fungicide, copper sulfate, and kerosene. All 3 patients were treated successfully, with a greater focus on OP poisoning with pralidoxime and atropine infusion along with standard decontamination procedures. Because patients developed complications due to the concomitant poisons ingested, they were later treated symptomatically, and in one case, D-penicillamine was administered as antidote for copper poisoning. Mixed poisoning especially with OP compounds makes the diagnosis difficult because the clinical symptoms of OP predominate, whereas damage produced by other pesticides is late to develop and often neglected. Common treatment procedures are focused mainly on the OP poisoning ignoring the complications of other concomitant pesticides ingested. Treating physicians should be prepared and consider the possibility of mixed poisoning prevalent in that region before initiating therapy. PMID:19497478

  20. Who Moves to Mixed-Income Neighborhoods?*

    PubMed Central

    McKinnish, Terra; White, T. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses confidential Census data, specifically the 1990 and 2000 Census Long Form data, to study the income dispersion of recent cohorts of migrants to mixed-income neighborhoods. We investigate whether neighborhoods with high levels of income dispersion attract economically diverse in-migrants. If recent in-migrants to mixed-income neighborhoods exhibit high levels of income dispersion, this is consistent with stable mixed-income neighborhoods. If, however, mixed-income neighborhoods are comprised of homogenous low-income (high-income) cohorts of long-term residents combined with homogenous high-income (low-income) cohorts of recent arrivals, this is consistent with neighborhood transition. Our results indicate that neighborhoods with high levels of income dispersion do in fact attract a much more heterogeneous set of in-migrants, particularly from the tails of the income distribution. Our results also suggest that the residents of mixed-income neighborhoods may be less heterogeneous with respect to lifetime income. PMID:21479114

  1. Dynamical systems techniques for enhancing microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    Achieving rapid mixing is often desirable in microfluidic devices, for example in improving reation rates in biotechnological assays. Enhancing mixing within a particular context is often achieved by introducing problem-specific strategies such as grooved or twisted channels, ac electromagnetic fields or oscillatory microsyringe flows. Evaluating the efficiency of these methods is challenging since either experimental fabrication and sensing, or computationally expensive direct numerical simulations with complicated boundary conditions, are required. A review of how mixing can be quantified when velocity fields have been obtained from such situations is presented. A less-known alternative to these methods is offered by dynamical systems, which characterizes the motion of collective fluid parcel trajectories by studying crucial interior flow barriers which move unsteadily, but nevertheless strongly govern mixing possibilities. The methodology behind defining these barriers and quantifying the fluid transport influenced by them is explained. Their application towards several microfluidic situations (e.g. best cross-flow positioning in cross-channel micromixers, usage of channel curvature to enhance mixing within microdroplets traveling in a channel, optimum frequencies of velocity agitations to use) is discussed.

  2. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  3. MixSIAR: A Bayesian stable isotope mixing model for characterizing intrapopulation niche variation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods The science of stable isotope mixing models has tended towards the development of modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances or syntheses of the current state of the art are published in parity with software packa...

  4. Discrete symmetries and mixing of Dirac neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Arman; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We study the mixing of the Dirac neutrinos in the residual symmetries approach. The key difference from the Majorana case is that the Dirac mass matrix may have larger symmetries: Gν=Zn with n ≥3 . The symmetry group relations have been generalized to the case of Dirac neutrinos. Using them, we have found all new relations between mixing parameters and corresponding symmetry assignments, which are in agreement with the present data. The viable relations exist only for the charged lepton residual symmetry Gℓ=Z2. The relations involve elements of the rows of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix and lead to precise predictions of the 2-3 mixing angle and certain ranges of the C P violation phase. For larger symmetries Gℓ, an agreement with the data can be achieved if ˜10 % corrections related to breaking of Gℓ and Gν are included.

  5. Neutrino mixing anarchy: Alive and kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouvêa, André; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    Neutrino mixing anarchy is the hypothesis that the leptonic mixing matrix can be described as the result of a random draw from an unbiased distribution of unitary three-by-three matrices. In light of the very strong evidence for a nonzero sin2 ⁡ 2θ13, we show that the anarchy hypothesis is consistent with the choice made by the Nature - the probability of a more unusual choice is 41%. We revisit anarchy's ability to make predictions, concentrating on correlations - or lack thereof - among the different neutrino mixing parameters, especially sin2 ⁡θ13 and sin2 ⁡θ23. We also comment on anarchical expectations regarding the magnitude of CP-violation in the lepton sector, and potential connections to underlying flavor models or the landscape.

  6. Experiences with treatment of mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.; Smith, W.H.; Nuttall, E.

    1996-04-10

    During its many years of research activities involving toxic chemicals and radioactive materials, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has generated considerable amounts of waste. Much of this waste includes chemically hazardous components and radioisotopes. Los Alamos chose to use an electrochemical process for the treatment of many mixed waste components. The electro-chemical process, which the authors are developing, can treat a great variety of waste using one type of equipment built at a moderate expense. Such a process can extract heavy metals, destroy cyanides, dissolve contamination from surfaces, oxidize toxic organic compounds, separate salts into acids and bases, and reduce the nitrates. All this can be accomplished using the equipment and one crew of trained operating personnel. Results of a treatability study of chosen mixed wastes from Los Alamos Mixed Waste Inventory are presented. Using electrochemical methods cyanide and heavy metals bearing wastes were treated to below disposal limits.

  7. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  8. Scotogenic model for co-bimaximal mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P. M.; Grimus, W.; Jurčiukonis, D.; Lavoura, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present a scotogenic model, i.e. a one-loop neutrino mass model with dark right-handed neutrino gauge singlets and one inert dark scalar gauge doublet η, which has symmetries that lead to co-bimaximal mixing, i.e. to an atmospheric mixing angle θ 23 = 45° and to a CP -violating phase δ = ±π /2, while the mixing angle θ 13 remains arbitrary. The symmetries consist of softly broken lepton numbers L α ( α = e, μ, τ ), a non-standard CP symmetry, and three Z_2 symmetries. We indicate two possibilities for extending the model to the quark sector. Since the model has, besides η, three scalar gauge doublets, we perform a thorough discussion of its scalar sector. We demonstrate that it can accommodate a Standard Model-like scalar with mass 125 GeV, with all the other charged and neutral scalars having much higher masses.

  9. Lidar observation of marine mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, Susumu; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Masayuki

    1992-01-01

    Marine mixed layer is known to play an important role in the transportation of pollution exiting ship funnels. The application of a diffusion model is critically dependent upon a reliable estimate of a lid. However, the processes that form lids are not well understood, though considerable progress toward marine boundary layer has been achieved. This report describes observations of the marine mixed layer from the course Ise-wan to Nii-jima with the intention of gaining a better understanding of their structure by a shipboard lidar. These observations were made in the summer of 1991. One interesting feature of the observations was that the multiple layers of aerosols, which is rarely numerically modeled, was encountered. No attempt is yet made to present a systematic analysis of all the data collected. Instead we focus on observations that seem to be directly relevant to the structure of the mixed layer.

  10. Engineering arbitrary pure and mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Pechen, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    Controlled manipulation by atomic- and molecular-scale quantum systems has attracted a lot of research attention in recent years. A fundamental problem is to provide deterministic methods for controlled engineering of arbitrary quantum states. This work proposes a deterministic method for engineering arbitrary pure and mixed states of a wide class of quantum systems. The method exploits a special combination of incoherent and coherent controls (incoherent and coherent radiation) and has two properties which are specifically important for manipulating by quantum systems: it realizes the strongest possible degree of their state control, complete density matrix controllability, meaning the ability to steer arbitrary pure and mixed initial states into any desired pure or mixed final state, and it is all-to-one, such that each particular control transfers all initial system states into one target state.

  11. Mixed qubits cannot be universally broadcast

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lin; Chen Yixin

    2007-06-15

    We show that no universal quantum cloning machine exists that can broadcast an arbitrary mixed qubit with a constant fidelity. Based on this result, we investigate the dependent quantum cloner in the sense that some parameter of the input qubit {rho}{sub s}({theta},{omega},{lambda}) is regarded as constant in the fidelity. For the case of constant {omega}, we establish the 1{yields}2 optimal symmetric dependent cloner with a fidelity 1/2. It is also shown that the 1{yields}M optimal quantum cloning machine for pure qubits is also optimal for mixed qubits, when {lambda} is the unique parameter in the fidelity. For general N{yields}M broadcasting of mixed qubits, the situation is very different.

  12. Evidence for D0-D0 mixing.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-05-25

    We present evidence for D0-D(0) mixing in D(0)-->K(+)pi(-) decays from 384 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) colliding-beam data recorded near square root s=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find the mixing parameters x('2)=[-0.22+/-0.30(stat)+/-0.21(syst)] x 10(-3) and y(')=[9.7+/-4.4(stat)+/-3.1(syst)] x 10(-3) and a correlation between them of -0.95. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.9 standard deviations. We measure R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates, to be [0.303+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst)]%. We find no evidence for CP violation. PMID:17677764

  13. Clustering of Variables for Mixed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, J.; Chavent, M.

    2016-05-01

    This chapter presents clustering of variables which aim is to lump together strongly related variables. The proposed approach works on a mixed data set, i.e. on a data set which contains numerical variables and categorical variables. Two algorithms of clustering of variables are described: a hierarchical clustering and a k-means type clustering. A brief description of PCAmix method (that is a principal component analysis for mixed data) is provided, since the calculus of the synthetic variables summarizing the obtained clusters of variables is based on this multivariate method. Finally, the R packages ClustOfVar and PCAmixdata are illustrated on real mixed data. The PCAmix and ClustOfVar approaches are first used for dimension reduction (step 1) before applying in step 2 a standard clustering method to obtain groups of individuals.

  14. Mixed-Symmetry States in ^93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. J.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Lesher, S. R.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2003-10-01

    The neutron-proton version of the interacting boson model predicts the existence of mixed-symmetry collective excitations. In an even-even nucleus the 2^+_ms state has the distinctive signature of a strong M1 transition to the first 2^+ state and a weak E2 transiton to the ground state. Previous investigations of the N=52 isotones ^92Zr, ^94Mo and ^96Ru have have led to the identification of mixed-symmetry states. It is expected that odd-A nuclei will also display states with mixed-symmetry character. Therefore, excitation function and angular distibution measurements have been performed on ^93Nb, the lone stable odd-A N=52 isotone, using the (n,n^'γ) reaction at the University of Kentucky. Lifetimes were determined with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant No. PHY-0098813

  15. Hazardous and Mixed Waste Transportation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hohnstreiter, G. F.; Glass, R. E.; McAllaster, M. E.; Nigrey, P. J.; Trennel, A. J.; Yoshimura, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a program to address the packaging needs associated with the transport of hazardous and mixed waste during the United States' Department of Energy (DOE) remediation efforts. The program addresses the technology needs associated with the transport of materials which have components that are radioactive and chemically hazardous. The mixed waste transportation activities focus on on-site specific applications of technology to the transport of hazardous and mixed wastes. These activities were identified at a series of DOE-sponsored workshops. These activities will be composed of the following: (1) packaging concepts, (2) chemical compatibility studies, and (3) systems studies. This paper will address activities in each of these areas.

  16. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  18. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1992-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  19. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  20. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  1. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-10-19

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (pcm) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 10 figures.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  3. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  4. Chemical mixing in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Thomas H.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a simple and efficient algorithm for diffusion in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and apply it to the problem of chemical mixing. Based on the concept of turbulent diffusion, we link the diffusivity of a pollutant to the local physical conditions and can thus resolve mixing in space and time. We apply our prescription to the evolution of an idealized supernova remnant and find that we can model the distribution of heavy elements without having to explicitly resolve hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock gas. Instead, the dispersal of the pollutant is implicitly modelled through its dependence on the local velocity dispersion. Our method can thus be used in any SPH simulation that investigates chemical mixing but lacks the necessary resolution on small scales. Potential applications include the enrichment of the interstellar medium in present-day galaxies, as well as the intergalactic medium at high redshifts.

  5. On the measurement of hospital case mix.

    PubMed

    Klastorin, T D; Watts, C A

    1980-06-01

    This article discusses a number of issues related to the measurement of hospital diagnostic case mix. We initially examine a number of previous attempts to measure case mix based on surrogate measures (e.g., facilities and services) and information from predetermined discharge-classification systems. Since a number of researchers have attempted to reduce diagnostic classification data into a single-valued (i.e., scalar) case mix index, we then discuss a number of concepts and assumptions implicit in the construction of such indices. Among these assumptions is the property of functional homogeneity; this property and a methodology baed on Q-type factor analysis for testing for the presence of this property are defined. In order to illustrate the use of the methodology, it is applied to data from 153 hospitals in downstate New York. PMID:7401716

  6. NUCLEAR MIXING METERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Keegan J.; Iliadis, Christian; Downen, Lori; Champagne, Art; José, Jordi

    2013-11-10

    Classical novae are caused by mass transfer episodes from a main-sequence star onto a white dwarf via Roche lobe overflow. This material possesses angular momentum and forms an accretion disk around the white dwarf. Ultimately, a fraction of this material spirals in and piles up on the white dwarf surface under electron-degenerate conditions. The subsequently occurring thermonuclear runaway reaches hundreds of megakelvin and explosively ejects matter into the interstellar medium. The exact peak temperature strongly depends on the underlying white dwarf mass, the accreted mass and metallicity, and the initial white dwarf luminosity. Observations of elemental abundance enrichments in these classical nova events imply that the ejected matter consists not only of processed solar material from the main-sequence partner but also of material from the outer layers of the underlying white dwarf. This indicates that white dwarf and accreted matter mix prior to the thermonuclear runaway. The processes by which this mixing occurs require further investigation to be understood. In this work, we analyze elemental abundances ejected from hydrodynamic nova models in search of elemental abundance ratios that are useful indicators of the total amount of mixing. We identify the abundance ratios ΣCNO/H, Ne/H, Mg/H, Al/H, and Si/H as useful mixing meters in ONe novae. The impact of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on the mixing meters is investigated using Monte Carlo post-processing network calculations with temperature-density evolutions of all mass zones computed by the hydrodynamic models. We find that the current uncertainties in the {sup 30}P(p, γ){sup 31}S rate influence the Si/H abundance ratio, but overall the mixing meters found here are robust against nuclear physics uncertainties. A comparison of our results with observations of ONe novae provides strong constraints for classical nova models.

  7. Turbulent mixing in high-altitude explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Bell, J.B. ); Ferguson, R.E. ); White, W.W.; McCartor, T.H. )

    1992-09-01

    Numerical simulations of a high-altitude explosion were performed using a Godunov code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The code solves the two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent conservation laws of inviscid gas dynamics while AMR is used to focus the computational effort in the mixing regions. The calculations revealed that a spherical density interface embedded in this flow was unstable and rolled up into a turbulent mixing layer. The shape of the interface was qualitatively similar to experimental photographs. Initially, the mixing layer width grew as a linear function of time, but eventually it reached an asymptotically-constant value. The flow field was azimuthally-averaged to evaluate the mean-flow profiles and the R.M.S. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The mean kinetic energy rapidly approached zero as the blast wave decayed, but the fluctuating kinetic energy asymptotically approached a small constant value (a fraction of a percent of the maximum kinetic energy). This represents the rotational kinetic energy driven by the vorticity field, that continued to mix the fluid indefinitely. It was shown that the vorticity field corresponds to a function that fluctuates between plus and minus values -- with a volume-averaged mean of zero. The amplitude of the vorticity fluctuations decayed as t[sup [minus]1]. The corresponding enstrophy increased linearly with time because of a cascade process for the mean-squared vorticity. This result is in good agreement with the 2-D calculations of turbulent flow as reported by G.K. Batchelor. The problem should be recalculated in 3-D to study the decay of turbulent mixing for spherical interfaces.

  8. Turbulent mixing in high-altitude explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Ferguson, R.E.; White, W.W.; McCartor, T.H.

    1992-09-01

    Numerical simulations of a high-altitude explosion were performed using a Godunov code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The code solves the two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent conservation laws of inviscid gas dynamics while AMR is used to focus the computational effort in the mixing regions. The calculations revealed that a spherical density interface embedded in this flow was unstable and rolled up into a turbulent mixing layer. The shape of the interface was qualitatively similar to experimental photographs. Initially, the mixing layer width grew as a linear function of time, but eventually it reached an asymptotically-constant value. The flow field was azimuthally-averaged to evaluate the mean-flow profiles and the R.M.S. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The mean kinetic energy rapidly approached zero as the blast wave decayed, but the fluctuating kinetic energy asymptotically approached a small constant value (a fraction of a percent of the maximum kinetic energy). This represents the rotational kinetic energy driven by the vorticity field, that continued to mix the fluid indefinitely. It was shown that the vorticity field corresponds to a function that fluctuates between plus and minus values -- with a volume-averaged mean of zero. The amplitude of the vorticity fluctuations decayed as t{sup {minus}1}. The corresponding enstrophy increased linearly with time because of a cascade process for the mean-squared vorticity. This result is in good agreement with the 2-D calculations of turbulent flow as reported by G.K. Batchelor. The problem should be recalculated in 3-D to study the decay of turbulent mixing for spherical interfaces.

  9. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2012-02-17

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

  10. Scoping Study of Airlift Circulation Technologies for Supplemental Mixing in Pulse Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Berglin, Eric J.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2015-04-07

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a scoping study to investigate supplemental technologies for supplying vertical fluid motion and enhanced mixing in Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels designed for high solids processing. The study assumed that the pulse jet mixers adequately mix and shear the bottom portion of a vessel. Given that, the primary function of a supplemental technology should be to provide mixing and shearing in the upper region of a vessel. The objective of the study was to recommend a mixing technology and configuration that could be implemented in the 8-ft test vessel located at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE). Several mixing technologies, primarily airlift circulator (ALC) systems, were evaluated in the study. This technical report contains a review of ALC technologies, a description of the PNNL testing and accompanying results, and recommended features of an ALC system for further study.

  11. Friendship in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder: mixed and non-mixed dyads.

    PubMed

    Bauminger, Nirit; Solomon, Marjorie; Aviezer, Anat; Heung, Kelly; Brown, John; Rogers, Sally J

    2008-08-01

    Friendships containing a child with autism and a friend with typical development ("mixed" friendships, n = 26) and those of children with autism and a friend with a disability ("non-mixed," n = 16) were contrasted with friendships of typically developing subjects and their friends (n = 31). Measures included dyadic interaction samples, and interview and questionnaire data from subjects, friends, and parents. Mixed friendship interactions resembled typical friendships. Participants in mixed friendships were more responsive to one another, had stronger receptive language skills, exhibited greater positive social orientation and cohesion, and demonstrated more complex coordinated play than in the non-mixed dyads. Exposure to typical peers appears to have significant effects on friendship behaviors. PMID:18058212

  12. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  13. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  14. B^0_s mixing at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Piedra, Jonatan; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-08-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. One of the most important analyses within the B physics program of the CDF experiment is B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Since the time this school was held, several improvements in the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis have made possible the measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency, result that has been presented at the FPCP 2006 Conference.

  15. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  16. Management of pesticide mixing and loading facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dwinell, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Many pesticide applicators have decided that a Chemical Mixing Facility (CMF) is the best way to manage problems of soil and water contamination at pesticide mixing and loading sites. These facilities must be managed properly to avoid the accumulation of potentially hazardous wastes, the creation of a point source of pollution, and possible fines for violation of environmental protection laws. Proper management must include pesticide containers, equipment rinsewater, sludge and sediments that accumulate on the pad, and materials used to contain and collect spills.

  17. Global analysis of fermion mixing with exotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, Enrico; Roulet, Esteban; Tommasini, Daniele

    1991-01-01

    The limits are analyzed on deviation of the lepton and quark weak-couplings from their standard model values in a general class of models where the known fermions are allowed to mix with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets). These mixings appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory such as models with mirror fermions, E(sub 6) models, etc. The results update previous analyses and improve considerably the existing bounds.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Statsenko, V P; Yanilkin, Yu V; Zhmaylo, V A

    2013-11-28

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flows obtained by various authors are reviewed. The paper considers the turbulent mixing (TM) process caused by the development of the main types of instabilities: those due to gravitation (with either a fixed or an alternating-sign acceleration), shift and shock waves. The problem of a buoyant jet is described as an example of the mixed-type problem. Comparison is made with experimental data on the TM zone width, profiles of density, velocity and turbulent energy and degree of homogeneity. PMID:24146009

  19. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Cai, Zi; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2010-12-01

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  20. Model-Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-01-01

    New Abelimore » an vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model-independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e + e − experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by ϵ ≲ 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.« less

  1. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1995-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  3. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  4. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  5. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  6. Photochemistry and vertical mixing. [in Uranus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Sandel, B. R.; Romani, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    Earth-based observations relevant to the question of photochemistry and vertical mixing are discussed. Phytolysis of methane, the only known photochemically active volatile in the Uranian atmosphere, produces heavier hydrocarbons, the most abundant of which are ethane, acetylene, and the polyacetylenes. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, these hydrocarbon products condense at the low temperatures prevalent in the middle atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Voyager notion that the atmosphere of Uranus is remarkable clear, it is found that the aerosols are widely and extensively distributed. Despite its photodestruction, methane remains stable in the Uranian atmosphere. The vertical mixing on Uranus is found to be the least efficient of any of the planetary atmospheres.

  7. Mix experiments with the NOVA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.C.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Skokowski, P.G.

    1988-10-01

    The NOVA mix experiments are designed to study mix between two dissimilar materials subjected to strong (M/approximately/50) shocks and variable accelerations in a direction normal to their common boundary. The main purpose of the experiments is to provide a data base with which predictive models can be compared and normalized. Together with shock tube experiments, which explore a different regime, the current NOVA tests investigate the shock induced source terms in our model and the evolution of both Rayleigh-Taylor stable and unstable interfaces. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Nondestructive assay confirmatory assessment experiments: mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.

    1980-04-30

    The confirmatory assessment experiments demonstrate traceable nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of plutonium in mixed oxide powder using commercially available spontaneous-fission assay systems. The experiments illustrate two major concepts: the production of calibration materials using calorimetric assay, and the use of paired measurements for measurement assurance. Two batches of well-characterized mixed oxide powder were used to establish the random and systematic error components. The major components of an NDA measurement assurance technique to establish and maintain traceability are identified and their functions are demonstrated. 20 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Launch site integration for mixed fleet operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.

    1990-01-01

    Launch site impacts and integration planning issues are presented to support launch operations for a mixed vehicle fleet (manned and cargo). Proposed ground systems and launch site configurations are described. Prelaunch processing scenarios and schedules are developed for candidate launch vehicles. Earth-to-orbit (ETO) vehicle architectures are presented to meet future launch requirements, including the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. The significance of operational designs for future launch vehicles is shown to be a critical factor in planning for mixed fleet launch site operations.

  10. Mixed-Symmetry States in 96Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Lesher, S.R.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boukharouba, N.; Mynk, M.; McKay, C.J.; McEllistrem, M.T.; Yates, S.W.; Fransen, C.

    2004-09-13

    Mixed-symmetry states in 96Mo have been identified using the (n,n'{gamma}) reaction. From the lifetime measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method and multipole mixing ratios, B(E2) and B(M1) values were determined. The 2{sub ms}{sup +} state was found at 2095.77 keV with B(M1: 2{sub ms}{sup +} {yields} 2{sub 1}{sup +}) = 0.18{mu}{sub N}{sup 2}, while the 1{sub ms}{sup +} strength lies primarily in states at 2794.45 and 3300.23 keV.

  11. Overview of robotics for Mixed Waste Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Mixed Waste Operations Robotics program is developing robotics technology to make the handling and treatment of Department of Energy mixed waste; better, faster, safer and cheaper. This technology will provide remote operations and not require humans to be in contact with this radioactive and hazardous waste. The technology includes remote handling and opening of waste containers, remote removal of waste from the containers, remote characterization and sorting of the waste, and remote treatment and disposition of the waste. The initial technology development program culminated in an integrated demonstration in November 1993 and each aspect of this technology is described.

  12. Mixed-Mode-Bending Delamination Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Reeder, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Mixed-mode-bending delamination apparatus generates two types of delamination stress simultaneously in specimen from single externally applied point load. In technique, indivial mode I and mode II contributions to delamination in specimen analyzed by use of simple beam-theory equations, eliminating need for time-consuming, difficult numerical analysis. Allows wider range of mode I/mode II ratios than possible with many other methods. Mixed-mode delamination testing of interest in all fields utilizing composite materials, used mostly in aerospace field, but also used in automobiles, lightweight armored military vehicles, boats, and sporting equipment. Useful in general lumber, plywood, and adhesive industries, as well.

  13. Mix and match: how climate selects phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Paul G; Oliver, Matthew J

    2007-10-01

    Climate strongly influences the distribution and diversity of animals and plants, but its affect on microbial communities is poorly understood. By using resource competition theory, fundamental physical principles and the fossil record we review how climate selects marine eukaryotic phytoplankton taxa. We suggest that climate determines the equator-to-pole and continent-to-land thermal gradients that provide energy for the wind-driven turbulent mixing in the upper ocean. This mixing, in turn, controls the nutrient fluxes that determine cell size and taxa-level distributions. Understanding this chain of linked processes will allow informed predictions to be made about how phytoplankton communities will change in the future. PMID:17853908

  14. Transition mixing study empirical model report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; White, C.

    1988-01-01

    The empirical model developed in the NASA Dilution Jet Mixing Program has been extended to include the curvature effects of transition liners. This extension is based on the results of a 3-D numerical model generated under this contract. The empirical model results agree well with the numerical model results for all tests cases evaluated. The empirical model shows faster mixing rates compared to the numerical model. Both models show drift of jets toward the inner wall of a turning duct. The structure of the jets from the inner wall does not exhibit the familiar kidney-shaped structures observed for the outer wall jets or for jets injected in rectangular ducts.

  15. 24 CFR 891.815 - Mixed-finance developer's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixed-finance developer's fee. 891...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.815 Mixed-finance developer's fee. (a) Mixed-finance developer's fee....

  16. 24 CFR 891.825 - Mixed-finance closing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mixed-finance closing documents...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.825 Mixed-finance closing documents. The mixed-finance owner must...

  17. 24 CFR 891.815 - Mixed-finance developer's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mixed-finance developer's fee. 891...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.815 Mixed-finance developer's fee. (a) Mixed-finance developer's fee....

  18. 24 CFR 891.825 - Mixed-finance closing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixed-finance closing documents...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.825 Mixed-finance closing documents. The mixed-finance owner must...

  19. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  20. Mixed Methods Research: A Research Paradigm Whose Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Burke; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to position mixed methods research ("mixed research" is a synonym) as the natural complement to traditional qualitative and quantitative research, to present pragmatism as offering an attractive philosophical partner for mixed methods research, and to provide a framework for designing and conducting mixed methods…

  1. 24 CFR 891.815 - Mixed-finance developer's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mixed-finance developer's fee. 891...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.815 Mixed-finance developer's fee. (a) Mixed-finance developer's fee....

  2. 24 CFR 891.825 - Mixed-finance closing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed-finance closing documents...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.825 Mixed-finance closing documents. The mixed-finance owner must...

  3. 24 CFR 891.815 - Mixed-finance developer's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mixed-finance developer's fee. 891...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.815 Mixed-finance developer's fee. (a) Mixed-finance developer's fee....

  4. 24 CFR 891.815 - Mixed-finance developer's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed-finance developer's fee. 891...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.815 Mixed-finance developer's fee. (a) Mixed-finance developer's fee....

  5. 24 CFR 891.825 - Mixed-finance closing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mixed-finance closing documents...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.825 Mixed-finance closing documents. The mixed-finance owner must...

  6. 24 CFR 891.825 - Mixed-finance closing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mixed-finance closing documents...-Profit Limited Partnerships and Mixed-Finance Development for Supportive Housing for the Elderly or Persons with Disabilities § 891.825 Mixed-finance closing documents. The mixed-finance owner must...

  7. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall

  8. Microbiology: Mixing Wine, Chocolate, and Coffee.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    Yeasts associated with cocoa and coffee beans are genetically distinct. These populations have been created through the migration and mixing of populations associated with vineyards, trees in America, and the ancestral seat of this species in Far East Asia. PMID:27046811

  9. TECHNIQUES FOR MIXING DISPERSANTS WITH SPILLED OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effective use of some oil spill dispersants requires the addition of mixing energy to the dispersant-treated slick. Various methods of energy application have included the use of fire hose streams directed to the water surface, outboard motors mounted on work boats, and the f...

  10. Control of Jet Noise Through Mixing Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark; Brown, Cliff

    2003-01-01

    The idea of using mixing enhancement to reduce jet noise is not new. Lobed mixers have been around since shortly after jet noise became a problem. However, these designs were often a post-design fix that rarely was worth its weight and thrust loss from a system perspective. Recent advances in CFD and some inspired concepts involving chevrons have shown how mixing enhancement can be successfully employed in noise reduction by subtle manipulation of the nozzle geometry. At NASA Glenn Research Center, this recent success has provided an opportunity to explore our paradigms of jet noise understanding, prediction, and reduction. Recent advances in turbulence measurement technology for hot jets have also greatly aided our ability to explore the cause and effect relationships of nozzle geometry, plume turbulence, and acoustic far field. By studying the flow and sound fields of jets with various degrees of mixing enhancement and subsequent noise manipulation, we are able to explore our intuition regarding how jets make noise, test our prediction codes, and pursue advanced noise reduction concepts. The paper will cover some of the existing paradigms of jet noise as they relate to mixing enhancement for jet noise reduction, and present experimental and analytical observations that support these paradigms.

  11. Mixed Methodology Research Design in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Muthu

    2007-01-01

    In recent times many educational researchers have moved away from the traditional purist approach of strictly adopting either a qualitative or quantitative approach to conducting research. Instead they have attempted an eclectic mix of both methods in their research inquiry, combining aspects of both the traditions at various stages of their…

  12. Noncommuting mixed states cannot be broadcast

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, H.; Caves, C.M.; Fuchs, C.A.; Jozsa, R.; Schumacher, B.

    1996-04-01

    We show that, given a general mixed state for a quantum system, there are no physical means for {ital broadcasting} that state onto two separate quantum systems, even when the state need only be reproduced marginally on the separate systems. This result extends the standard no-cloning theorem for pure states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Mixed film lubrication with biobased oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most tribological processes (e.g. metalworking), occur in the mixed film regime where the boundary and hydrodynamic properties of the oils play critical roles. In the work described here, the boundary and hydrodynamic properties of various biobased oils were evaluated. The oils were then investiga...

  14. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  15. Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) Startup Report

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Park

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the work accomplished to date to design, procure, assemble, authorize, and startup the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the reasons for establishing this capability, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, initial success, and plans for completing the initial 1,000 hour test.

  16. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  17. 27 CFR 31.204 - Mixed cocktails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixed cocktails. 31.204 Section 31.204 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Reuse and Possession of Used Liquor Bottles §...

  18. 27 CFR 31.204 - Mixed cocktails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mixed cocktails. 31.204 Section 31.204 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Reuse and Possession of Used Liquor Bottles §...

  19. 27 CFR 31.204 - Mixed cocktails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mixed cocktails. 31.204 Section 31.204 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Reuse and Possession of Used Liquor Bottles §...

  20. A Mixed Learning Approach in Mechatronics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, O.; Tuncalp, K.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of a Web-based mixed learning approach model on mechatronics education. The model combines different perception methods such as reading, listening, and speaking and practice methods developed in accordance with the vocational background of students enrolled in the course Electromechanical Systems in…

  1. Instructor Technology Use: A Mixed Methods Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becking, Suzanne K.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods concurrent triangulation study was designed to examine instructional leaders' descriptions of their experience with integrating technology into their teaching. Seminal studies from the 1990s were found to remain true today--that teachers are not ready to incorporate technology into their teaching (Becker, 1999; Ertmer, 1999). In…

  2. Mixing and scaling of accelerated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, A.; Rozanov, V.; Redondo, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs when a layer of dense fluid is placed on top of a less dense layer in a gravitational field or are accelerated. The instability forms a turbulent front between the two layers, but some patterns seem to have a persistent memory of the initial conditions as turbulence develops. The advance of this front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991), and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time. The width of the growing region of instability is proportional to the Atwood number but the distribution of fractal interfaces between the miscible fluids allow to distinguish the dominant mixing regions located at the sides of the RT blobs, where accelerated shear is greatest. A Large Eddy Simulation numerical model is used to predict some of the features of the experiments, different models on the interaction of the bubble generated buoyancy flux and on the boundary conditions are compared with the experiments. The aspect ratios of the bubble induced convective cells and some mixing descriptors are also seen to depend on the boundary conditions applied to the enclosure. The influence of the initial conditions on the structure of the flow and its mixing ability are investigated by means of image analysis, PIV and scaling analysis to determine the regions of the front which contribute most to molecular mixing.

  3. MIXING QUANTIFICATION BY VISUAL IMAGING ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on development of a method for quantifying two measures of mixing, the scale and intensity of segregation, through flow visualization, video recording, and software analysis. his non-intrusive method analyzes a planar cross section of a flowing system from an in...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3532 - Mixed (M).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixed (M). 29.3532 Section 29.3532 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  5. 7 CFR 51.2112 - Mixed varieties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixed varieties. 51.2112 Section 51.2112 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  6. Quantum evaporation of flavor-mixed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2014-03-01

    Particles whose propagation (mass) and interaction (flavor) bases are misaligned are mixed, e.g., neutrinos, quarks, Kaons, etc. We show that interactions (elastic scattering) of individual mass-eigenstates can result in their inter-conversions. Most intriguing and counter-intuitive implication of this process is a new process, which we refer to as the ``quantum evaporation.'' Consider a mixed particle trapped in a gravitational potential. If such a particle scatters off something (e.g., from another mixed particle) elastically from time to time, this particle (or both particles, respectively) can eventually escape to infinity with no extra energy supplied. That is as if a ``flavor-mixed satellite'' hauled along a bumpy road puts itself in space without a rocket, fuel, etc. Of course, the process at hand is entirely quantum and has no counterpart in classical mechanics. It also has nothing to do with tunneling or other known processes. We discuss some implications to the dark matter physics, cosmology and cosmic neutrino background. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  7. 40 CFR 227.29 - Initial mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS Definitions § 227.29 Initial mixing. (a... phases of a waste which occurs within four hours after dumping. The limiting permissible...

  8. Introduction to Studies in Granular Mixing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llusa, Marcos; Muzzio, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on educational activity designed to introduce students (or industrial employees) in the pharmaceutical arena to some of the most common problems in the mixing of solids: Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and lubricant (i.e. magnesium stearate) homogenization, characterization of segregation tendencies, and…

  9. A New Model for Mix It Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holladay, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Since 2002, Teaching Tolerance's Mix It Up at Lunch Day program has helped millions of students cross social boundaries and create more inclusive school communities. Its goal is to create a safe, purposeful opportunity for students to break down the patterns of social self-segregation that too often plague schools. Research conducted in 2006 by…

  10. Payload flight assignments: NASA mixed fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, Norman

    1993-01-01

    This mixed fleet manifest, which serves as the baseline for planning purposes, includes payload flight assignments for the Space Shuttle through FY 1995 and NASA expendable launch vehicle (EVL) missions through FY 1999. The FY 1996-1999 Shuttle manifest planning is omitted pending Space Station redesign. Also included in this document are a list of previous flights, payload requests, and payload/acronyms.

  11. VISUAL PLUMES MIXING ZONE MODELING SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a long history of both supporting plume model development and providing mixing zone modeling software. The Visual Plumes model is the most recent addition to the suite of public-domain models available through the EPA-Athens Center f...

  12. Mixed Languages: A Functional-Communicative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matras, Yaron

    2000-01-01

    Argues that the compartmentalism of structures observed in mixed languages is the result of the cumulative effect of different contact mechanisms. These mechanisms are defined in terms of the cognitive and communicative motivations that lead speakers to model certain functions of language on an alternative linguistic system: lexical…

  13. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  14. Mixed Method Research in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A.

    This paper addresses the conditions under which quantitative and qualitative research methods could be combined in special education. The paper asserts that qualitative designs have not had a significant effect on special education research and speculates that mixed-method research might be more acceptable to special education researchers or…

  15. PERMIT ROADMAP DEVELOPMENT FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA and DOE established a multi-year Interagency Agreement (IAG) in1991. he main objective of the IAG (and of the second IAG that was added in 1993) is to conduct a research program on thermal technologies for treating mixed waste and to establish permit procedures for these tech...

  16. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinde, J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; McFarquhar, Greg; Yannuzzi, V. T.; Avramov, Alexander; Greenburg, S.; Johnson, N.; Zhang, G.; Poellot, Michael; Mather, Jim H.; Turner, David D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Zak, Bernard D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Daniel, J. S.; Kok, G. L.; Tobin, D. C.; Holz, R. E.; Sassen, Kenneth; Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, Patrick; Tooman, Tim P.; Ivey, Mark D.; Richardson, S. J.; Bahrmann, C. P.; Shupe, Matthew D.; DeMott, Paul J.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Schofield, R.

    2007-02-01

    In order to help bridge the gaps in our understanding of mixed-phase Arctic clouds, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (DOE-ARM) funded an integrated, systematic observational study. The major objective of the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted September 27–October 22, 2004 during the autumnal transition season, was to collect a focused set of observations needed to advance our understanding of the cloud microphysics, cloud dynamics, thermodynamics, radiative properties, and evolution of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. These data would then be used to improve to both detailed models of Arctic clouds and large-scale climate models. M-PACE successfully documented the microphysical structure of arctic mixed-phase clouds, with multiple in situ profiles in both single-layer and multi-layer clouds, over the two ground-based remote sensing sites at Barrow and Oliktok Point. Liquid was found in clouds with temperatures down to -30C, the coldest cloud top temperature below -40C sampled by the aircraft. The remote sensing instruments suggest that ice was present in low concentrations, mostly concentrated in precipitation shafts, although there are indications of light ice precipitation present below the optically thick single-layer clouds. Flights into arctic cirrus clouds revealed microphysics properties very similar to their mid-latitude in situ formed cousins, with dominant ice crystal habit bullet rosettes.

  17. Transitivity, weakly mixing property and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidong; Liang, Jianhua; Wang, Yiyi; Sun, Xuelian

    2016-01-01

    Let X be a compact metric space without isolated points and let f : X → X be a continuous map. In this paper, if (X,f) is a transitive dynamical system with a repelling periodic point, then f is chaotic in the sense of Kato. In addition, if f is weakly topologically mixing, then f is chaotic in the strong sense of Kato.

  18. Mixed Methods Sampling: A Typology with Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teddlie, Charles; Yu, Fen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of mixed methods (MM) sampling techniques. MM sampling involves combining well-established qualitative and quantitative techniques in creative ways to answer research questions posed by MM research designs. Several issues germane to MM sampling are presented including the differences between probability and…

  19. Terahertz homodyne self-mixing transmission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Till Breuer, Stefan; Blömer, Dominik; Patel, Sanketkumar; Schlosser, Malte; Birkl, Gerhard; Elsäßer, Wolfgang; Simonetta, Marcello; Deninger, Anselm; Giuliani, Guido

    2015-02-09

    A compact homodyne self-mixing terahertz spectroscopy concept is experimentally investigated and confirmed by calculations. This method provides amplitude and phase information of the terahertz radiation emitted by a photoconductive antenna in a transmission experiment where a rotating chopper wheel serves as a feedback mirror. As a proof-of-principle experiment the frequency-dependent refractive index of Teflon is measured.

  20. Mixed glioma of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Millen, S J; Campbell, B H; Meyer, G A; Ho, K C

    1985-11-01

    A rare case of mixed ependymoma and astrocytoma of the cerebellopontine angle is reported. Its clinical presentation, characteristics on evaluation, and prognosis are compared with those of the acoustic neuroma and glioma. The central form of von Recklinghausen's disease and familial multiple lipomatosis as it applies to the patient is also discussed. PMID:3878094

  1. Rotation induced mixing in stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    The standard model of stellar structure is unable to account for various observational facts, such as anomalies in the surface composition, and there is now a broad consensus that some extra mixing must occur in the radiation zones, in addition to the always present convective overshoot or penetration. The search for the causes of this extra mixing started in the late seventies, and it was quickly realized - in particular by Sylvie Vauclair and her co-workers - that some mild turbulence must be present to counteract the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. What could be responsible for this turbulence? One suggestion was the internal gravity waves emitted at the boundary of convection zones, but it is still not established whether these waves will lead to true mixing. However they transport angular momentum, and therefore they generate differential rotation, which may be shear-unstable and thus lead to turbulence. Another way to transport angular momentum and produce an unstable rotation profile is through the large-scale circulation which is induced by the structural adjustments as the star evolves, or by the torques applied to it (due to stellar wind, accretion, tides). These processes participate in what is called the "rotational mixing"; their implementation in stellar evolution codes - again under Sylvie's impulse - has given birth to a new generation of stellar models, which agree much better with the observational constraints, although there is still room for improvement.

  2. Rational choice, neuroeconomy and mixed emotions.

    PubMed

    Livet, Pierre

    2010-01-27

    Experimental psychology has shown differences between predictions of theory of decision and human choices. Emotions like regret can partly explain these differences. Neuroimagery used in combination with behavioural economics (neuroeconomics) has been used in order to try to disentangle the different emotional and rational factors (regret, rejoicing, reward, costs, uncertainty, trade-off between positive and negative aspects of different options). Emotions then appear as much more complex and mixed affective states than usually assumed. Not only might we feel a positive affect in punishing unfair partners, but mixed emotions can, for example, combine transmutation of previous anxiety into relief and elation by comparison with another less exciting option (elating relief). At the level of complexity of these mixed emotions--which we formally represent by comparisons between 'unexpected utilities' and expected ones--the main biases that Kahnemann and Tversky have shown can be explained. In spite of the complexity of these mixed emotions, some of these hypotheses might be partially tested by brain imagery. PMID:20026464

  3. 7 CFR 51.576 - Mixed blanch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixed blanch. 51.576 Section 51.576 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND...

  4. Methodology to remediate a mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to the complex issue of mixed waste management, a generalized methodology for remediation of a mixed waste site has been developed. The methodology is based on requirements set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and incorporates ``lessons learned`` from process design, remediation methodologies, and remediation projects. The methodology is applied to the treatment of 32,000 drums of mixed waste sludge at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Process technology options are developed and evaluated, first with regard to meeting system requirements and then with regard to CERCLA performance criteria. The following process technology options are investigated: (1) no action, (2) separation of hazardous and radioactive species, (3) dewatering, (4) drying, and (5) solidification/stabilization. The first two options were eliminated from detailed consideration because they did not meet the system requirements. A quantitative evaluation clearly showed that, based on system constraints and project objectives, either dewatering or drying the mixed waste sludge was superior to the solidification/stabilization process option. The ultimate choice between the drying and the dewatering options will be made on the basis of a technical evaluation of the relative merits of proposals submitted by potential subcontractors.

  5. Silicon photomultiplier-based optoelectronic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yishuo, Song; Xiaoping, Du; Zhaoyang, Zeng; Shengjun, Wang

    2013-09-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based optoelectronic mixing (OEM) is studied for the first time. The validity of SiPM-based OEM is experimentally verified. Compared with the avalanche photodiodes-based OEM, the SiPM-based OEM is less noisy and easy to realize for its low voltage operation and high responsivity.

  6. Make It Active and Mix It up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    The author believes that "learning is doing," especially in science. The best way she can describe what she did, and the piece of advice she wants to pass on, is "make it active and mix it up". By describing how she went about teaching this lesson, she hopes she has conveyed how doing one's research (online for a start) and using a "variety" of…

  7. Transient Mixing Driven by Buoyancy Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Batur, C.; Zhong, H.

    2002-01-01

    Mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows is of particular interest to microgravity processes, as the body force that governs the intensity of flow fields can be directly controlled. We consider a model experimental system to explore the dynamics of mixing which employs two miscible liquids inside a cavity separated initially by a divider. The two liquids are oriented vertically inside a rectangular cavity with constant width and height, and varying depths to span the range of a Hele-Shaw cell to a 3-D configuration. The two miscible liquids can be sufficiently diluted and died, for example water and deuterium oxide, such that a distinct interface exists across the divider. The transient mixing characteristic of the two fluids is addressed by following the Lagrangian history of the interface for various aspect ratios in the z-plane (depth variation) as well as a range of pulling velocities of the divider. The mixing characteristics of the two fluids are quantified from measurement of the length stretch of the interface and its flow field using respectively image processing techniques and Particle Imaging Velocimetry. Scaling analysis shows that the length stretch depends on four governing parameters, namely the Grashof number (Gr), Schmidt number (Sc), aspect ratio (Ar), and Reynolds number (Re). Variation of the Schmidt number is taken into account through thermophysical property variation. Thus our problem reduces to a codimension three bifurcation in parametric space for Gr, Ar, and Re.

  8. Mixed ionic and electronic conductivity in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, D.F.

    1991-06-01

    New polymer films were synthesized that are mixed ionic-electronic conductors. Preliminary ion transport measurements have been made on these materials in the reduced state where electronic conductivity is negligible. We also have made preliminary measurements of switching times for these materials. Theoretical studies have been performed ion pairing in insulating and electronically conducting films.

  9. Germinated wheat: Phytochemical composition and mixing characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germinated grain recently attracts interest due to its beneficial effect on human health. In this research, whole wheat flour samples obtained after three days and five days of germination were analyzed for biochemical components, mixing quality, and effects on human breast cancer cells. Germinati...

  10. Mix and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John D.; Batteux, Jan D.; Garza, Raul G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Souers, P. Clark; Energetic Materials Center Team

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced turbulent mix resulting from pre-emplaced interface features in a cylindrical geometry. In this research a solid cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave that is driven through a cylindrical interface. Pre-emplaced surface features in plastic and aluminum were studied. Time sequence radiographic imaging was utilized to observe the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to onset of mix and turbulence. Different types of pre-emplaced structures at the interface resulted in a range of mix and instability conditions, with some much more effective at creating a well-mixed region. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Radiographic image data will be compared with numerical simulations of the experiments. Partial support for this research was obtained from the Advanced Energetics Program, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. 40 CFR 227.29 - Initial mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Initial mixing is defined to be that dispersion or diffusion of liquid, suspended particulate, and solid... adequate to predict initial dispersion and diffusion of the waste, these shall be used, if necessary, in.... (2) When field data on the dispersion and diffusion of a waste of characteristics similar to...

  12. 40 CFR 227.29 - Initial mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Initial mixing is defined to be that dispersion or diffusion of liquid, suspended particulate, and solid... adequate to predict initial dispersion and diffusion of the waste, these shall be used, if necessary, in.... (2) When field data on the dispersion and diffusion of a waste of characteristics similar to...

  13. 40 CFR 227.29 - Initial mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Initial mixing is defined to be that dispersion or diffusion of liquid, suspended particulate, and solid... adequate to predict initial dispersion and diffusion of the waste, these shall be used, if necessary, in.... (2) When field data on the dispersion and diffusion of a waste of characteristics similar to...

  14. 40 CFR 227.29 - Initial mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Initial mixing is defined to be that dispersion or diffusion of liquid, suspended particulate, and solid... adequate to predict initial dispersion and diffusion of the waste, these shall be used, if necessary, in.... (2) When field data on the dispersion and diffusion of a waste of characteristics similar to...

  15. Global constraints on heavy neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Hernandez-Garcia, Josu; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2016-08-01

    We derive general constraints on the mixing of heavy Seesaw neutrinos with the SM fields from a global fit to present flavour and electroweak precision data. We explore and compare both a completely general scenario, where the heavy neutrinos are integrated out without any further assumption, and the more constrained case were only 3 additional heavy states are considered. The latter assumption implies non-trivial correlations in order to reproduce the correct neutrino masses and mixings as observed by oscillation data and thus some qualitative differences can be found with the more general scenario. The relevant processes analyzed in the global fit include searches for Lepton Flavour Violating (LFV) decays, probes of the universality of weak interactions, CKM unitarity bounds and electroweak precision data. In particular, a comparative and detailed study of the present and future sensitivity of the different LFV experiments is performed. We find a mild 1-2σ preference for non-zero heavy neutrino mixing of order 0.03-0.04 in the electron and tau sectors. At the 2σ level we derive bounds on all mixings ranging from 0.1 to 0.01 with the notable exception of the e - μ sector with a more stringent bound of 0.005 from the μ → eγ process.

  16. The Mixed Effects Trend Vector Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Rooij, Mark; Schouteden, Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimation of mixed effect baseline category logit models for multinomial longitudinal data can be prohibitive due to the integral dimension of the random effects distribution. We propose to use multidimensional unfolding methodology to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. As a by-product, readily interpretable graphical…

  17. The Mixed Political Blessing of Campus Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Sheryl D.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of sustainability rhetoric, curriculum, infrastructure, and marketing on college campuses is a mixed blessing. On the one hand, college presidents are pledging to eliminate their campuses' global warming emissions; colleges and universities are building wind turbines, composters, and green buildings; and sustainability coordinators are…

  18. MIXING QUANTIFICATION BY VISUAL IMAGING ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on development of a method for quantifying two measures of mixing, the scale and intensity of segregation, through flow visualization, video recording, and software analysis. This non-intrusive method analyzes a planar cross section of a flowing system from an ...

  19. How fast can a galaxy ``mix''?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandrup, Henry E.

    1990-11-01

    Time-dependent solutions to the gravitational N-body problem are unstable in the sense that small initial perturbations tend to be amplified exponentially. This fact, well known from numerical simulations, was ``explained'' by Gurzadyan and Savvidy, who argued that this instability implies that an N-body system will tend to ``mix'' on a time scale τGS ~ N1/3tD, where tD is a typical crossing time. It is shown here that the prediction of Gurzadyan and Savvidy of a ``mixing'' is right, but that, allowing correctly for the large scale bulk forces present in a self-gravitating system, one anticipates that the effects of this ``mixing'' should be manifest already on a much shorter time scale ~tD. It is argued that the result of this ``coarse-grained'' mixing on a time scale ~tD should be consistent, at least broadly, with the expected outcome of an epoch of ``violent relaxation''. It is also emphasized that this time scale τ must be interpreted in an appropriate ``average'' sense since, as has been observed, e.g., by R.H. Miller, there exist (admittedly special) perturbations which can be amplified on time scales as short as N-1/2tD.

  20. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations. PMID:26607320

  1. Incorporating multiple mixed stocks in mixed stock analysis: 'many-to-many' analyses.

    PubMed

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Okuyama, Toshinori; Bjorndal, Karen A; Bolten, Alan B

    2007-02-01

    Traditional mixed stock analyses use morphological, chemical, or genetic markers measured in several source populations and in a single mixed population to estimate the proportional contribution of each source to the mixed population. In many systems, however, different individuals from a particular source population may go to a variety of mixed populations. Now that data are becoming available from (meta)populations with multiple mixed stocks, the need arises to estimate contributions in this 'many-to-many' scenario. We suggest a Bayesian hierarchical approach, an extension of previous Bayesian mixed stock analysis algorithms, that can estimate contributions in this case. Applying the method to mitochondrial DNA data from green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Atlantic gives results that are largely consistent with previous results but makes some novel points, e.g. that the Florida, Bahamas and Corisco Bay foraging grounds have greater contributions than previously thought from distant foraging grounds. More generally, the 'many-to-many' approach gives a more complete understanding of the spatial ecology of organisms, which is especially important in species such as the green turtle that exhibit weak migratory connectivity (several distinct subpopulations at one end of the migration that mix in unknown ways at the other end). PMID:17284204

  2. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Bailey, Sharon A.; Bower, John C.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Michael D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Loveland, Jesse S.; Mullen, O Dennis; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Peters, Timothy J.; Robinson, Peter J.; Russcher, Michael S.; Sande, Susan; Santoso, Christian; Shoemaker, Steven V.; Silva, Steve M.; Smith, Devin E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Toth, James J.; Wiberg, John D.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-05-11

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants. The test data were used to independently develop mixing models that can be used to predict full-scale WTP vessel performance and to rate current WTP mixing system designs against two specific performance requirements. One requirement is to ensure that all solids have been disturbed during the mixing action, which is important to release gas from the solids. The second requirement is to maintain a suspended solids concentration below 20 weight percent at the pump inlet. The models predict the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action, and the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate we can calculate the concentration of solids at the pump inlet. The velocity needed to lift the solids is slightly more demanding than "disturbing" the solids, and is used as a surrogate for this metric. We applied the models to assess WTP mixing vessel performance with respect to the two perform¬ance requirements. Each mixing vessel was evaluated against these two criteria for two defined waste conditions. One of the wastes was defined by design limits and one was derived from Hanford waste characterization reports. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy

  3. Electrohydrodynamic flow and chaotic mixing inside drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiumei

    Electrohyodynamics, proposed by G. I. Taylor (1966), is the study of fluid motion under the influence of electric fields. In this work, we investigate theoretically and experimentally the electrohydrodynamic flow field inside a dielectric liquid drop and its application in driving chaotic mixing. Previous works on the electrohydrodynamic flows are mainly restricted to neutrally buoyant drops. Since settling drops are expected to occur more commonly in applications, in the first part of this thesis we extend Taylor's theory to deal with translating drops. Both shape distortion and charge convection, when coupled with an asymmetric velocity profile, will produce a net drag and a shift in the settling speed. Corrections to the settling velocity from both contributions are calculated to the first order. Experiments are performed using a PMM/castor oil system, and are in qualitative agreement with the theory: the deformations and the change in settling velocity are all proportional to E2, as predicted, and the settling speed shows the correct trends with drop size. In the second part of this thesis, we investigate three dimensional chaotic mixing driven by the electrohydrodynamic flows. A spatially uniform electric field is periodically switched through an angle, which is equivalent to switching the symmetry axis of the Taylor circulation back and forth, chaotic mixing is therefore generated inside a drop. Mixing efficiency is studied numerically by tracing trajectories of Lagrangian particles. Our calculations of the mixed volume fraction and Lyapunov exponents give optimal mixing conditions. Mixing experiments for a switching angle of 0.5pi are performed using a silicone oil/castor oil system, and show excellent agreement with the theory. In the third part of this thesis, we discuss effects of finite charge relaxation and charge convection on the flow field in both DC and AC electric fields. A pole-to-equator convection, acting together with a slow charge relaxation

  4. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1995-05-24

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  5. Mixing from below in hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Markl, Gregor; Walter, Bejamin

    2014-05-01

    Unconformity-related hydrothermal ore deposits typically show indications of mixing of two end-member fluids: (a) hot, deep, rock-buffered basement brines and (b) colder fluids derived from the surface or overlying sediments. The hydromechanics of bringing these fluids together from above and below remain unclear. Classical percolative Darcy-flow models are inconsistent with (1) fluid overpressure indicated by fracturing and brecciation, (2) fast fluid flow indicated by thermal disequilibrium, and (3) strong fluid composition variations on the mm-scale, indicated by fluid inclusion analyses (Bons et al. 2012; Fusswinkel et al. 2013). We propose that fluids first descend, sucked down by desiccation reactions in exhumed basement. Oldest fluids reach greatest depths, where long residence times and elevated temperatures allow them the extensively equilibrate with their host rock, reach high salinity and scavenge metals, if present. Youngest fluids can only penetrate to shallower depths and can (partially) retain signatures from their origin, for example high Cl/Br ratios from the dissolution of evaporitic halite horizons. When fluids are released from all levels of the crustal column, these fluids mix during rapid ascent to form hydrothermal ore deposits. Mixing from below provides a viable hydromechanical mechanism to explain the common phenomenon of mixed shallow and deep fluids in hydrothermal ore deposits. Bons, P.D., Elburg, M.A., Gomez-Rivas, E. 2012. A review of the formation of tectonic veins and their microstructures. J. Struct. Geol. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2012.07.005 Fusswinkel, T., Wagner, T., Wälle, M., Wenzel, T., Heinrich, C.A., Markl, M. 2013. Fluid mixing forms basement-hosted Pb-Zn deposits: Insight from metal and halogen geochemistry of individual fluid inclusions. Geology. doi:10.1130/G34092.1

  6. Mixed integer evolution strategies for parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Emmerich, Michael T M; Eggermont, Jeroen; Bäck, Thomas; Schütz, M; Dijkstra, J; Reiber, J H C

    2013-01-01

    Evolution strategies (ESs) are powerful probabilistic search and optimization algorithms gleaned from biological evolution theory. They have been successfully applied to a wide range of real world applications. The modern ESs are mainly designed for solving continuous parameter optimization problems. Their ability to adapt the parameters of the multivariate normal distribution used for mutation during the optimization run makes them well suited for this domain. In this article we describe and study mixed integer evolution strategies (MIES), which are natural extensions of ES for mixed integer optimization problems. MIES can deal with parameter vectors consisting not only of continuous variables but also with nominal discrete and integer variables. Following the design principles of the canonical evolution strategies, they use specialized mutation operators tailored for the aforementioned mixed parameter classes. For each type of variable, the choice of mutation operators is governed by a natural metric for this variable type, maximal entropy, and symmetry considerations. All distributions used for mutation can be controlled in their shape by means of scaling parameters, allowing self-adaptation to be implemented. After introducing and motivating the conceptual design of the MIES, we study the optimality of the self-adaptation of step sizes and mutation rates on a generalized (weighted) sphere model. Moreover, we prove global convergence of the MIES on a very general class of problems. The remainder of the article is devoted to performance studies on artificial landscapes (barrier functions and mixed integer NK landscapes), and a case study in the optimization of medical image analysis systems. In addition, we show that with proper constraint handling techniques, MIES can also be applied to classical mixed integer nonlinear programming problems. PMID:22122384

  7. Mixed Barrier Model for the Mixed Glass Former Effect in Ion Conducting Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Michael; Müller, Christian R.; Maass, Philipp; Martin, Steve W.

    2009-04-01

    Mixing two types of glass formers in ion conducting glasses can be exploited to lower conductivity activation energy and thereby increasing the ionic conductivity, a phenomenon known as the mixed glass former effect (MGFE). We develop a model for this MGFE, where activation barriers for individual ion jumps get lowered in inhomogeneous environments containing both types of network forming units. Fits of the model to experimental data allow one to estimate the strength of the barrier reduction, and they indicate a spatial clustering of the two types of network formers. The model predicts a time-temperature superposition of conductivity spectra onto a common master curve independent of the mixing ratio.

  8. Performance of a mixed filter to identify relevant studies for mixed studies reviews

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, Reem; Pluye, Pierre; Gore, Genevieve; Granikov, Vera; Hong, Quan Nha

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mixed studies reviews include empirical studies with diverse designs. Given that identifying relevant studies for such reviews is time consuming, a mixed filter was developed. Methods The filter was used for six journals from three disciplines. For each journal, database records were coded “empirical” (relevant) when they mentioned a research question or objective, data collection, analysis, and results. We measured precision (proportion of retrieved documents being relevant), sensitivity (proportion of relevant documents retrieved), and specificity (proportion of nonrelevant documents not retrieved). Results Records were coded with and without the filter, and descriptive statistics were performed, suggesting the mixed filter has high sensitivity. PMID:26807052

  9. Liquid–Liquid Mixing Studies in Annular Centrifugal Contactors Comparing Stationary Mixing Vane Options

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-11-10

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of annular centrifugal contactors showing the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported with selected measurements in a lab-scale 5 cm contactor and 12.5 cm engineering-scale unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixingzone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugal contactors.

  10. Angular and spatial color mixing using mixing rods with the geometry of a chaotic-dispersive billiard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa S.; Baumgart, Jörg; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    For mixing light from different colored LEDs, an optical color mixing system is required to avoid colored shadows and color fringes. Concerning the different color mixing systems, mixing rods are widespread as they provide very good spatial color mixing with high efficiency. The essential disadvantage of mixing rods, so far, is the lack of angular color mixing. The solution presented in this publication is the application of a chaotic-dispersive billiard's geometry on the cross section of the mixing rod. To show both the spatial and the angular mixing properties of a square and a chaotic-dispersive mixing rod, simulations generated by the raytracing software ASAP are provided. All results are validated with prototype measurements.

  11. Lithofacies and cyclicity of the Yates Formation, Permian basin: Implications for reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Borer, J.M.; Harris, P.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Siliciclastics of the Yates Formation (Permian, upper Guadalupian) are significant hydrocarbon reservoirs in the US Permian basin. Subsurface and outcrop data show that the most porous lithofacies occur in a clastic-dominated middle shelf and that evaporitic inner shelf and carbonate outer shelf equivalents are mostly nonporous. Lithofacies relations and much of the heterogeneity in Yates reservoirs are related to the stacking of depositional sequences (i.e., siliciclastic-carbonate alternations and sandstone-argillaceous siltstone alternations) in response to three orders of orbitally forced, low-amplitude, eustatic variation. In general, siliciclastics dominated the Yates shelf during lowstand parts of asymmetric, 400-k.y. sea level fluctuations, whereas carbonates were deposited during sea level highstands. The character and position of sand depocenters on the Yates shelf during these lowstands were controlled by a longer duration third-order sea level variation. Shorter duration cycles controlled the heterogeneity within the 400-k.y. depositional sequences. The variation in cycle packaging, lithology, and reservoir quality between the Central Basin platform and Northwest shelf may be a response of eustatic variation on parts of the shelf with different slopes or subsidence profiles. The lithofacies described from the Yates Formation and the deposition model proposed to explain the stratigraphy may be valuable as analogs in other basins containing mixed siliciclastic-carbonate settings.

  12. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wold, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported on: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  13. Liquid–liquid mixing studies in annular centrifugal contactors comparing stationary mixing vane options

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-09-11

    Comparative studies of multiphase operation of an annular centrifugal contactor show the impact of housing stationary mixing vane configuration. A number of experimental results for several different mixing vane options are reported for operation of a 12.5 cm engineering-scale contactor unit. Fewer straight vanes give greater mixing-zone hold-up compared to curved vanes. Quantitative comparison of droplet size distribution also showed a significant decrease in mean diameter for four straight vanes versus eight curved vanes. This set of measurements gives a compelling case for careful consideration of mixing vane geometry when evaluating hydraulic operation and extraction process efficiency of annular centrifugalmore » contactors.« less

  14. Meeting Report: Hackathon-Workshop on Darwin Core and MIxS Standards Alignment (February 2012)

    PubMed Central

    Tuama, Éamonn Ó; Deck, John; Dröge, Gabriel; Döring, Markus; Field, Dawn; Kottmann, Renzo; Ma, Juncai; Mori, Hiroshi; Morrison, Norman; Sterk, Peter; Sugawara, Hideaki; Wieczorek, John; Wu, Linhuan; Yilmaz, Pelin

    2012-01-01

    The Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Genomic Standards Consortium convened a joint workshop at the University of Oxford, 27-29 February 2012, with a small group of experts from Europe, USA, China and Japan, to continue the alignment of the Darwin Core with the MIxS and related genomics standards. Several reference mappings were produced as well as test expressions of MIxS in RDF. The use and management of controlled vocabulary terms was considered in relation to both GBIF and the GSC, and tools for working with terms were reviewed. Extensions for publishing genomic biodiversity data to the GBIF network via a Darwin Core Archive were prototyped and work begun on preparing translations of the Darwin Core to Japanese and Chinese. Five genomic repositories were identified for engagement to begin the process of testing the publishing of genomic data to the GBIF network commencing with the SILVA rRNA database. PMID:23451295

  15. Mixing and diffusion in intermittent overturning turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Mahjoub, Otman B.; Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar L.; Lawry, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing front. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2-7]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Atwood number and compare both the scaling and the multifractal and the maximum local fractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the front. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overal turbulent process evaluated [6-7]. An interesting approach, relating the Multi-Fractal dimension spectra, the intermittency and the spectral exponent is to find relationships that may be used to parameterise the sub-grid turbulence in terms of generalized diffusivities [4 ] that take into account the topology and the self-similarity of the Mixing RT and RM flows. As an example, a relationship between the diffusivity, the exponent β, the intermittency μ, and D(i), may be found for the volume fraction or the concentration, at the same time other locally measured parameters such as the enstrophy or the gradient alignment as well as their multi-fractal structures may turn out to be physically relevant indicators of the local turbulence and the mixing. Several methods of deriving local eddy diffusivity and local entrainment should give more realistic estimates of the spatial/temporal non-homogeneities (and intermittencies in the Kolmogorov 62 sense obtained as spatial correlations of the turbulent dissipation, or from structure functions) and these values may be used to parameterise turbulence at a variety

  16. Mixing noise reduction for rectangular supersonic jets by nozzle shaping and induced screech mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Raman, Ganesh

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of mixing noise modification were studied for supersonic jets flowing from rectangular nozzles with an aspect ratio of about five and a small dimension of about 1.4 cm. The first involves nozzle geometry variation using either single (unsymmetrical) or double bevelled (symmetrical) thirty degree cutbacks of the nozzle exit. Both converging (C) and converging-diverging (C-D) versions were tested. The double bevelled C-D nozzle produced a jet mixing noise reduction of about 4 dB compared to a standard rectangular C-D nozzle. In addition all bevelled nozzles produced an upstream shift in peak mixing noise which is conducive to improved attenuation when the nozzle is used in an acoustically treated duct. A large increase in high frequency noise also occurred near the plane of the nozzle exit. Because of near normal incidence, this noise can be easily attenuated with wall treatment. The second approach uses paddles inserted on the edge of the two sides of the jet to induce screech and greatly enhance the jet mixing. Although screech and mixing noise levels are increased, the enhanced mixing moves the source locations upstream and may make an enclosed system more amenable to noise reduction using wall acoustic treatment.

  17. Mixed and Complex Mixed Migration during Armed Conflict: Multidimensional Empirical Evidence from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nathalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, legal, policy, and academic communities largely ascribed to a dichotomy between forced and voluntary migration, creating a black and white vision that was convenient for legal and policy purposes. More recently, discussions have begun addressing the possibility of mixed migration, acknowledging that there is likely a wide continuum between forced and voluntary, and most migrants likely move with some amount of compulsion and some volition, even during armed conflict. While the mixed migration hypothesis is well-received, empirical evidence is disparate and somewhat blunt at this point. In this article, I contribute a direct theoretical and causal pathway discussion of mixed migration. I also propose the complex mixed migration hypothesis, which argues that not only do non-conflict related factors influence migration during conflict, but they do so differently than during periods of relative peace. I empirically test both hypotheses in the context of the recent armed conflict in Nepal. Using detailed survey data and event history models, results provide strong evidence for both mixed migration and complex mixed migration during conflict hypotheses. These hypotheses and evidence suggest that armed conflict might have substantial impacts on long-term population growth and change, with significant relevance in both academic and policy spheres. PMID:26366007

  18. Theoretical investigation of mixing in warm clouds - Part 2: Homogeneous mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Mark; Khain, Alexander; Korolev, Alexei; Magaritz-Ronen, Leehi

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of monodisperse and polydisperse droplet size distributions (DSD) during homogeneous mixing is analyzed. Time-dependent universal analytical expressions for supersaturation and liquid water content are derived. For an initial monodisperse DSD, these quantities are shown to depend on a sole non-dimensional parameter. The evolution of moments and moment-related functions in the course of homogeneous evaporation of polydisperse DSD is analyzed using a parcel model.It is shown that the classic conceptual scheme, according to which homogeneous mixing leads to a decrease in droplet mass at constant droplet concentration, is valid only in cases of monodisperse or initially very narrow polydisperse DSD. In cases of wide polydisperse DSD, mixing and successive evaporation lead to a decrease of both mass and concentration, so the characteristic droplet sizes remain nearly constant. As this feature is typically associated with inhomogeneous mixing, we conclude that in cases of an initially wide DSD at cloud top, homogeneous mixing is nearly indistinguishable from inhomogeneous mixing.

  19. Mixed-initiative control of intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchardt, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed-initiative user interfaces provide a means by which a human operator and an intelligent system may collectively share the task of deciding what to do next. Such interfaces are important to the effective utilization of real-time expert systems as assistants in the execution of critical tasks. Presented here is the Incremental Inference algorithm, a symbolic reasoning mechanism based on propositional logic and suited to the construction of mixed-initiative interfaces. The algorithm is similar in some respects to the Truth Maintenance System, but replaces the notion of 'justifications' with a notion of recency, allowing newer values to override older values yet permitting various interested parties to refresh these values as they become older and thus more vulnerable to change. A simple example is given of the use of the Incremental Inference algorithm plus an overview of the integration of this mechanism within the SPECTRUM expert system for geological interpretation of imaging spectrometer data.

  20. Three-neutrino mixing: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, A.; Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Montanino, D.; Palazzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the present knowledge of the neutrino oscillation parameters. In a three-neutrino scenario, neutrino oscillations depend on six parameters, two squared mass differences (Δm2, δm2), three mixing angles (θ 12, θ13 , θ 23) and one phase δ. While five out of these six parameters have been measured, the CP-violating phase δ remains unknown. Moreover, the octant of the mixing angle θ23 and the neutrino mass hierarchy are still undetermined. We update our previous analysis, by adding to the global fit the recent results of the antineutrino running of T2K, the first results of the NOvA experiment, the latest SuperKamiokande and IceCube atmospheric neutrino data.

  1. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Losby, J E; Fani Sani, F; Grandmont, D T; Diao, Z; Belov, M; Burgess, J A J; Compton, S R; Hiebert, W K; Vick, D; Mohammad, K; Salimi, E; Bridges, G E; Thomson, D J; Freeman, M R

    2015-11-13

    A universal, torque-mixing method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by magnetic induction, the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured in sensitive broadband spectroscopy, here using a resonant mechanical torque sensor. Unlike induction, the torque amplitude allows equilibrium magnetic properties to be monitored simultaneously with the spin dynamics. Comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature reveal assisted switching between magnetization states and mode-dependent spin resonance interactions with nanoscale surface imperfections. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex three-dimensional spin textures. The flexibility of microelectromechanical and optomechanical devices combined with broad generality and capabilities of torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers great opportunities for development of integrated devices. PMID:26564851

  2. A mixed choroid plexus papilloma and ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Seong Ik; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, In One; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-04-01

    We report a novel case of a mixed choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) and ependymoma with cartilaginous differentiation. This kind of mixed tumor has not been previously reported in the English literature. The patient was a 5-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-week history of fever and numbness of the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the occipital horn of the left lateral ventricle. Histologically, the tumor showed an intermixed CPP area and a low-grade papillary ependymoma-like area, which was studded with cartilage islands and psammoma bodies. In many foci, direct transition of CPP and ependymoma was observed, but there were no high-grade features. We report this novel case, describe the unique microscopic and immunohistochemical features, and speculate on the pathogenesis. PMID:26670168

  3. Summertime Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, P.

    2005-12-01

    3 mixed-phase clouds observed during July of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic experiment are discussed. The analysis relies on a combination of surface-based remote sensing measurements and aircraft data. The clouds were multi-layered ice clouds with liquid layers either embedded within the ice phase (July 8) or overlying the ice phase (July 15 and 23). The liquid layers have temperatures ranging between -20 to -5 Celsius. Thin boundary layer clouds or fog underlie the mixed-phase clouds. The boundary layer clouds are liquid but possess temperatures close to the surface temperature of near zero Celsius. The 3 cases all coincide with meltpond-ice surfaces with albedos of approximately 0.5. The cloud microphysical characteristics, radiative impact, and lifecycles will be discussed.

  4. Democratic neutrino mixing and radiative corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-Zhong

    2001-03-01

    The renormalization effect on a specific ansatz of lepton mass matrices, arising naturally from the breaking of flavor democracy for charged leptons and that of mass degeneracy for light neutrinos, is studied from a superhigh energy scale M0~1013 GeV to the electroweak scale in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We find that the democratic neutrino mixing pattern obtained from this ansatz may in general be unstable against radiative corrections. With the help of similar flavor symmetries we prescribe a slightly different scheme of lepton mass matrices at the scale M0, from which the democratic mixing pattern of lepton flavors can be achieved, after radiative corrections, at the experimentally accessible scales.

  5. Impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Isoprene, a volatile organic compound that is mainly emitted from trees, rapidly reacts with hydroxyl radical (OH) during daytime and subsequently forms ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. The isoprene-OH reaction can be affected by the interplay between chemistry and mixing because the two processes occur at a similar time scale. We investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene-OH reactivity with large eddy simulations (LES) coupled with comprehensive chemistry. Our results show that the covariance of isoprene and OH causes ~20% decrease to ~10% increase of the horizontal average reaction rate, depending on nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) abundances, compared to the rate that neglects the covariance. This wide range of effects on reaction rates is caused by the primary production and loss reactions of OH in each NOx regime. Our research promotes the use of LES for better understanding the role of turbulence in isoprene-OH reaction and parameterizations in large-scale models.

  6. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  7. Scalar mixing in the supersonic shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.; Paul, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a two-stream planar mixing layer facility at convective Mach numbers of 0.28 and 0.62. Mie scattering from condensed alcohol droplets and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide were used for flow visualization in both the side and plan views. The PLIF signals were approximately proportional to mixture fraction and were used to generate statistical quantities. Visualizations using both the Mie scattering and PLIF indicate the structure is essentially two-dimensional at Mc = 0.28 and three-dimensional at Mc = 0.62. Perspective renderings of side view images show the structures are streamwise ramped at Mc = 0.28 and cross-stream ramped at Mc = 0.62. This difference appears to be associated with decreasing streamwise structure spacings at the higher Mc condition. The statistical analysis suggests that with increasing compressibility, the scalar fluctuations are smaller, and the fraction of mixed fluid is higher.

  8. Storage of mixed waste at nuclear plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bodine, D.

    1995-05-01

    The problems posed by waste that is both radioactive and classified as hazardous by 40CFR261 include storage, proper treatment and disposal. An Enforcement Action issued by the State of Tennessee required that Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) either find a means to remove its mixed waste from onsite storage or obtain Part B Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility by March 1, 1994. Generators of hazardous waste cannot store the material for longer than 90 days without obtaining a Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF) permit. To complicate this regulation, there are very few permitted TSDFs that can receive radioactive waste. Those facilities that can receive the waste have only one year to store it before treatment. Limited treatment is available for mixed waste that will meet the Land Ban requirements.

  9. Photochemistry and Eddy Mixing in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Y. L.; Wong, M. L.; Summers, M. E.; Gladstone, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a photochemical model of Pluto's atmosphere that includes complete chemistry of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and apply this model to the interpretation of Alice ultraviolet observations during the New Horizons flyby in July 2015. This model self-consistently calculates the production, transport, and condensation of hydrocarbons from the surface to the exosphere. New features of the model include the condensation of molecules and their sublimation back into the gas. The Alice observations of C2H2 and C2H4 provide strong constraints on the rate of eddy mixing in the altitude region 100-600 km altitude region. Inferred mixing rates are low, consistent with slow downward transport of long-lived photochemical products to Pluto's lower atmosphere where loss by condensation occurs. We present an interpretation of the observed hydrocarbons as a test of our understanding of Pluto's atmosphere photochemistry.

  10. Liquid-phase mixing of bipropellant doublets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.; Rupe, J. H.; Sotter, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental results of unlike doublet mixing are correlated with an analytically derived equation predicting fluid cavitation. The correlation relates the minimum orifice pressure drop required to initiate cavitation, with the system back pressure, cold flow simulant vapor pressure, and the orifice flow discharge and contraction coefficients. Stream flow instabilities are also visually correlated with the onset of cavitation and orifice discharge coefficient measurements. The influence of cavitation on the characteristic phenomenon of hydraulic flip is observed for both circular and noncircular shaped orifices. For certain intermediate orifice lengths, some noncircular shapes are shown to produce more fully developed flows (shorter recovery lengths) and therefore a more cohesive jet, which in turn yields slightly higher cold flow mixing uniformities than circular shaped orifices of equal absolute length. The particular noncircular shaped elements evaluated are shown to be more sensitive to liquid stream misimpingement than the corresponding circular orifices.

  11. Vitrification of hazardous and mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B. ); Ramsey, W.G. . Dept. of Ceramic Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site. The first hazardous/mixed wastes glassified at SRS have been (1) incinerator and (2) nickel plating line (F006) wastes. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and incinerator bottom kiln ash have been achieved in Soda (Na[sub 2]O) - Lime (CaO) - Silica (SiO[sub 2]) glass (SLS) at waste loadings of up to 50 wt%. Solidification of nickel-plating line waste sludges containing depleted uranium have also been achieved in both SLS and borosilicate glasses at waste loadings of 75 wt%. This corresponds to volume reductions of 97% and 81%, respectively. Further studies will examine glassification of: ion exchange zeolites, inorganic filter media, asbestos, glass fiber filters, contaminated soil, cementitious, or other materials in need of remediation.

  12. Vitrification of hazardous and mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site. The first hazardous/mixed wastes glassified at SRS have been (1) incinerator and (2) nickel plating line (F006) wastes. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and incinerator bottom kiln ash have been achieved in Soda (Na{sub 2}O) - Lime (CaO) - Silica (SiO{sub 2}) glass (SLS) at waste loadings of up to 50 wt%. Solidification of nickel-plating line waste sludges containing depleted uranium have also been achieved in both SLS and borosilicate glasses at waste loadings of 75 wt%. This corresponds to volume reductions of 97% and 81%, respectively. Further studies will examine glassification of: ion exchange zeolites, inorganic filter media, asbestos, glass fiber filters, contaminated soil, cementitious, or other materials in need of remediation.

  13. Mixed Norm Regularized Discrimination for Image Steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoming; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Dong

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of image steganalysis is to detect the presence of hidden messages in cover images. Steganalysis can be considered as a pattern recognition process to decide which class a test image belongs to: the innocent photographic image or the stego-image. This paper presents a definition of mixed L_{p,q} matrix norm as an extension of L_{2,1} matrix norm. We incorporate discriminative mixed L_{p,q} matrix norm analysis to select the features which best preserve the data distribution, e.g., manifold structure, of the whole feature sets. Experiments on different data sets verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the selected features are more discriminate.

  14. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  15. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, DH; Sadoway, DR

    2014-05-01

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized as a promising and economically viable technology for large-scale energy storage on worldwide electrical grids. But because these batteries are entirely liquid, fluid flow and instabilities may affect battery robustness and performance. Here we present estimates of flow magnitude and ultrasound measurements of the flow in a realistic liquid metal electrode. We find that flow does substantially affect mass transport by altering the electrode mixing time. Above a critical electrical current density, the convective flow organizes and gains speed, which promotes transport and would yield improved battery efficiency. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  16. Mixed biopolymer systems based on starch.

    PubMed

    Abd Elgadir, M; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque; Ferdosh, Sahena; Mehrnoush, Amid; Karim, Alias A; Noda, Takahiro; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam

    2012-01-01

    A binary mixture of starch-starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influence of their interaction on physicochemical and rheological properties of the starch-based foods. It is evident that the physicochemical and rheological characteristics of the biopolymers mixture are highly dependent on the type of starch and other biopolymers that make them up mixing ratios, mixing procedure and presence of other food ingredients in the mixture. Understanding these properties will lead to improve the formulation of starch-based foods and minimize the need to resort to chemically modified starch. PMID:22231495

  17. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  18. Mixed formulation for frictionless contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Kyun O.

    1989-01-01

    Simple mixed finite element models and a computational precedure are presented for the solution of frictionless contact problems. The analytical formulation is based on a form of Reissner's large rotation theory of the structure with the effects of transverse shear deformation included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the internal forces (stress resultants), the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The element characteristic array are obtained by using a modified form of the two-field Hellinger-Reissner mixed variational principle. The internal forces and the Lagrange multipliers are allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries. The Newton-Raphson iterative scheme is used for the solution of the nonlinear algebraic equations, and the determination of the contact area and the contact pressures.

  19. Estimating Mixing Heights Using Microwave Temperature Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson-Gammon, John; Powell, Christina; Mahoney, Michael; Angevine, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    A paper describes the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) for making measurements of the planetary boundary layer thermal structure data necessary for air quality forecasting as the Mixing Layer (ML) height determines the volume in which daytime pollution is primarily concentrated. This is the first time that an airborne temperature profiler has been used to measure the mixing layer height. Normally, this is done using a radar wind profiler, which is both noisy and large. The MTP was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000). An objective technique was developed and tested for estimating the ML height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, estimates from a variety of measurements during the TexAQS-2000 were compared. Estimates of ML height were used from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in-situ aircraft measurements in addition to those from the MTP.

  20. Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55–71). Four Chebyshev–Fourier–Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  1. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  2. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor Mix experiment on Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, M.G.; Atchison, W.L.; Anderson, W.E.

    1997-09-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor Mix project will attempt to diagnose and understand the growth of a mixing layer at the interface between an imploding metal liner and a polystyrene foam core in a series of pulsed power experiments on the Pegasus capacitor bank. Understanding the effects of material strength will be an important part of the study. During the initial phase of the implosion, the linear/foam interface is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) stable; however, as the foam is compressed, it decelerates the liner, causing it to bound and to go RT unstable. This paper reports 1D and 2D MHD simulations of the first experiment in the series and preliminary results.

  4. Mixing Dynamics Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructural and compositional homogeneity in metals and alloys can only be achieved if the initial melt is homogeneous prior to the onset of solidification processing. Naturally induced convection may initially facilitate this requirement but upon the onset of solidification significant compositional variations generally arise leading to undesired segregation. Application of alternating magnetic fields to promote a uniform bulk liquid concentration during solidification processing has been suggested. To investigate such possibilities an initial study of using traveling magnetic fields (TMF) to promote melt homogenization is reported in this work. Theoretically, the effect of TMF-induced convection on mixing phenomena is studied in the laminar regime of flow. Experimentally, with and without applied fields, both 1) mixing dynamics by optically monitoring the spreading of an initially localized dye in transparent fluids and, 2) compositional variations in metal alloys have been investigated.

  5. Mixing Dynamics Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Microstructural and compositional homogeneity in metals and alloys can only be achieved if the initial melt is homogeneous prior to the onset of solidification processing. Naturally induced convection may initially facilitate this requirement but upon the onset of solidification significant compositional variations generally arise leading to undesired segregation. Application of alternating magnetic fields to promote a uniform bulk liquid concentration during solidification processing has been suggested. To investigate such possibilities an initial study of using traveling magnetic fields (TMF) to promote melt homogenization is reported in this work. Theoretically, the effect of TMF-induced convection on mixing phenomena is studied in the laminar regime of flow. Experimentally, with and without applied fields, both: mixing dynamics by optically monitoring the spreading of an initially localized dye in transparent fluids and, compositional variations in metal alloys have been investigated.

  6. Simplified models of mixed dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Sanford, David E-mail: dsanford@caltech.edu

    2014-02-01

    We explore simplified models of mixed dark matter (DM), defined here to be a stable relic composed of a singlet and an electroweak charged state. Our setup describes a broad spectrum of thermal DM candidates that can naturally accommodate the observed DM abundance but are subject to substantial constraints from current and upcoming direct detection experiments. We identify ''blind spots'' at which the DM-Higgs coupling is identically zero, thus nullifying direct detection constraints on spin independent scattering. Furthermore, we characterize the fine-tuning in mixing angles, i.e. well-tempering, required for thermal freeze-out to accommodate the observed abundance. Present and projected limits from LUX and XENON1T force many thermal relic models into blind spot tuning, well-tempering, or both. This simplified model framework generalizes bino-Higgsino DM in the MSSM, singlino-Higgsino DM in the NMSSM, and scalar DM candidates that appear in models of extended Higgs sectors.

  7. High temperature behavior of simulated mixed nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. G.; Lunev, A. V.; Mikhalchik, V. V.; Tenishev, A. V.; Shornikov, D. P.

    2016-04-01

    Specimen of uranium-based mixed nitrides were synthesized by high-temperature nitriding of metal powder. To investigate thermal stability, samples were annealed at high temperature in a helium atmosphere. During these experiments, the effect of increasing the exposure temperature is studied. Raising the exposure temperature results in a multifold increase of mass loss. A comparison with data on pure uranium nitride shows that increasing the complexity of the nitride systems also results in higher mass loss. Later microscopic investigation of test samples revealed that metal precipitates may be found only on the surface of test samples. Electron probe micro-analysis indicates these precipitates to be uranium metal. Nevertheless, compared to pure uranium nitride, uranium-based mixed nitrides exhibit active evaporation at lower temperatures

  8. Linear Mixed Models: Gum and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendacká, Barbora; Täubner, Angelika; Eichstädt, Sascha; Bruns, Thomas; Elster, Clemens

    2014-04-01

    In Annex H.5, the Guide to the Evaluation of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) [1] recognizes the necessity to analyze certain types of experiments by applying random effects ANOVA models. These belong to the more general family of linear mixed models that we focus on in the current paper. Extending the short introduction provided by the GUM, our aim is to show that the more general, linear mixed models cover a wider range of situations occurring in practice and can be beneficial when employed in data analysis of long-term repeated experiments. Namely, we point out their potential as an aid in establishing an uncertainty budget and as means for gaining more insight into the measurement process. We also comment on computational issues and to make the explanations less abstract, we illustrate all the concepts with the help of a measurement campaign conducted in order to challenge the uncertainty budget in calibration of accelerometers.

  9. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  10. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.

    1994-08-16

    An auger-tube pump mixing device is disclosed for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided. 2 figs.

  11. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, David W.

    1994-01-01

    An auger-tube pump mixing device for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided.

  12. Convective mixing in formations with horizontal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenius, Maria T.; Gasda, Sarah E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that convective mixing in porous media flow is important for applications such as saltwater intrusion and geological storage of carbon dioxide. In the latter case, dissolution from the injected phase to the resident brine is assisted by convective mixing, which leads to enhanced storage security through reduced buoyancy. Here, we focus on the effect of horizontal barriers on the efficiency of convective mixing. Previous investigations of the effect of heterogeneity on mixing efficiency have focused on random permeability fields or barriers of small extent compared to the intrinsic finger wavelength. The effect of horizontal barriers of larger extent, such as mudstone inclusions or thin shale deposits, has not been given sufficient attention. We perform detailed numerical investigations to represent the continuous solution of this problem in semi-infinite domains with barriers arranged in a periodic manner. The results show that mass flux into the domain, which is a measure of the efficiency of redistribution of the solute, is inversely proportional to the barrier length and proportional to the horizontal and vertical aperture between the barriers, for the cases studied. The flow structure is complex, and it depends not only on the total area of barriers but also largely on the distribution of barriers. Therefore, neither simple analytical models nor simple upscaling methods that lack information about the flow paths, can be used to predict the behavior. However, we compute the effective vertical permeability by flow-based upscaling and show that it can be used to directly obtain a first-order approximation to the mass flux into the domain.

  13. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  14. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Ching-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma is a rare condition comprising at least 30%percnt; of each component of exocrine and endocrine tumors. The denominations were defined in the 2000 WHO classification of endocrine tumors. We report an 83-year-old male with a polypoid gastric tumor in the gastric high body who received total gastrectomy and died 8 months after the diagnosis from local recurrence and distal metastases. A review of the literature for this infrequent condition is presented. PMID:26351411

  15. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  16. New directions for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    PubMed

    Glimm, James; Sharp, David H; Kaman, Tulin; Lim, Hyunkyung

    2013-11-28

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing layer, presenting simulations in agreement with experimental data. This problem is an idealized subproblem of important scientific and engineering problems, such as gravitationally induced mixing in oceanography and performance assessment for inertial confinement fusion. Engineering codes commonly achieve correct simulations through the calibration of adjustable parameters. In this sense, they are interpolative and not predictive. As computational science moves from the interpolative to the predictive and reduces the reliance on experiment, the quality of decision making improves. The diagnosis of errors in a multi-parameter, multi-physics setting is daunting, so we address this issue in the proposed idealized setting. The validation tests presented are thus a test for engineering codes, when used for complex problems containing RT features. The RT growth rate, characterized by a dimensionless but non-universal parameter α, describes the outer edge of the mixing zone. Increasingly accurate front tracking/large eddy simulations reveal the non-universality of the growth rate and agreement with experimental data. Increased mesh resolution allows reduction in the role of key subgrid models. We study the effect of long-wavelength perturbations on the mixing growth rate. A self-similar power law for the initial perturbation amplitudes is here inferred from experimental data. We show a maximum ±5% effect on the growth rate. Large (factors of 2) effects, as predicted in some models and many simulations, are inconsistent with the experimental data of Youngs and co-authors. The inconsistency of the model lies in the treatment of the dynamics of bubbles, which are the shortest-wavelength modes for this problem. An alternative theory for this shortest wavelength, based on the bubble merger model, was previously shown to be consistent with experimental data. PMID:24146006

  17. A mixed formulation for elastic multilayer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Amâncio

    2003-05-01

    A new approach based on a mixed formulation is proposed. The main advantage of such a formulation is that the transverse shear stress continuity is automatically satisfied in a natural way. In order to validate the model, comparisons of the proposed theory to Pagano's exact elasticity solutions are made for a bi-layer and a sandwich plate. To cite this article: A. Fernandes, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  18. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  19. RCRA closure of mixed waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, F.J.; Greengard, T.C.; Arndt, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    A case study of a RCRA closure action at the Rocky Flats Plant is presented. Closure of the solar evaporation ponds involves removal and immobilization of a mixed hazardous/radioactive sludge, treatment of impounded water, groundwater monitoring, plume delineation, and collection and treatment of contaminated groundwater. The site closure is described within the context of regulatory negotiations, project schedules, risk assessment, clean versus dirty closure, cleanup levels, and approval of closure plans and reports. Lessons learned at Rocky Flats are summarized.

  20. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.