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Sample records for carbon 13 reactions

  1. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  2. In situ high pressure and temperature carbon-13 nmr for the study of carbonation reactions of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, James Andrew

    The aqueous reactions of carbon dioxide with various Mg-containing minerals [MgO, Mg(OH)2, and Mg2SiO4] at several different pressures (1-200 bar) and temperatures (25-150C) have been studied using a novel, elevated pressure and temperature 13C NMR probe. Critical observations about reaction rates, chemical exchange, and pH measurements throughout these reactions and the implications of the in situ measurements made during these reactions are discussed. A new method is used to elucidate pH under high pressure and temperature conditions which utilizes a calculation scheme wherein experimental data and a computational model are combined. Additionally, a 1D pH imaging method is employed to observe pH gradient effects across mineral samples during their reaction with CO2. Finally, other experimental details are discussed including ex situ analysis on carbonate products using pXRD, Raman, and MAS NMR. Detailed discussion outlines how to use 13C NMR to study CO2 mineralization reactions.

  3. Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects on the reaction catalyzed by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Canellas, P.F.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-09-10

    Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects have been measured on the reaction catalyzed by rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in an effort to locate the rate-limiting steps. With D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrate, hydride transfer is a major, but not the only, slow step prior to release of the first product, and the intrinsic primary deuterium and {sup 13}C isotope effects on this step are 5-5.5 and 1.034-1.040, and the sum of the commitments to catalysis is {approximately} 3. The {sup 13}C isotope effects on thiohemiacetal formation and thioester phosphorolysis are 1.005 or less. With D-glyceraldehyde as substrate, the isotope effects are similar, but the sum of commitments is {approximately} 1.5, so that hydride transfer is more, but still not solely, rate limiting for this slow substrate. The observed {sup 13}C and deuterium equilibrium isotope effects on the overall reaction from the hydrated aldehyde are 0.995 and 1.145, while the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effect for conversion of a thiohemiacetal to a thioester is 0.994, and that for conversion of a thioester to an acyl phosphate is 0.997. Somewhat uncertain values for the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effects on aldehyde dehydration and formation of a thiohemiacetal are 1.003 and 1.004.

  4. Au-containing all-carbon 1,3-dipoles: generation and [3+2] cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Zhang, Liming

    2008-09-24

    A novel approach to generate Au-containing all-carbon 1,3-dipoles is developed via an unprecedented migration-fragmentation of ketals/acetals. These in situ generated dipoles undergo rapid [3+2] cycloaddition under mild conditions with various enones/enals, electron-rich aromatic aldehydes, and N-benzylindole, leading to flexible formation of highly functionalized dihydrofurans and cyclopentenes. PMID:18754587

  5. Implications of the large carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction CH4 + Cl for the 13C/12C ratio of stratospheric CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Brühl, C.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Saueressig, G.; Crowley, J. N.; Grooß, J. U.; Fischer, H.; Crutzen, P. J.

    Recent investigations of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of the reaction CH4 + Cl yielded KIECl = 1.066±0.002 at 297 K (increasing to 1.075±0.005 at 223 K) [Saueressig et al., 1995]. In order to assess the effect of the exceptionally large KIEcl on δ13C of stratospheric CH4 we applied a two-dimensional, time dependent chemical transport model. The model results demonstrate the strong influence of the CH4 + Cl reaction on δ13CH4 in particular in the middle and upper stratosphere, where this reaction contributes several tens of percent to the total CH4 sink. The Cl sink helps to explain the relatively large overall isotope fractionation of 1.010-1.012 observed in the lower stratosphere [Brenninkmeijer et al., 1995; Brenninkmeijer et al., 1996], even though the model results predict a smaller effect than observed.

  6. Probing Metal Carbonation Reactions of CO2 in a Model System Containing Forsterite and H2O Using Si-29, C-13 Magic Angle Sample Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Ex situ solid state NMR have been used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+scCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80C and 96 bar. Si-29 NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. The surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1 (Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. Si-29 NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. C-13 MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediates as (MgCO3)4*Mg(OH)2*5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed. This research is part of a broader effort at PNNL to develop experimental tools and fundamental insights into chemical transformations affecting subsurface CO2 reactive transport. Si-29 (left) and C-13 (right) MAS NMR spectra of Mg2SiO4 under various reaction conditions. Si-29 NMR reveals that in scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is

  7. Catalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate using reduced copper-cerium oxide catalysts as low as 353 K and 1.3 MPa and the reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Seiki; Oka, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kentaro; Izumi, Yasuo

    2013-06-01

    Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from CO2 and methanol under milder reaction conditions was performed using reduced cerium oxide catalysts and reduced copper-promoted Ce oxide catalysts. Although the conversion of methanol was low (0.005-0.11%) for 2 h of reaction, DMC was synthesized as low as 353 K and at total pressure of as low as 1.3 MPa using reduced Cu-CeO2 catalyst (0.5 wt% of Cu). The apparent activation energy was 120 kJ mol-1 and the DMC synthesis rates were proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. An optimum amount of Cu addition to CeO2 was 0.1 wt% for DMC synthesis under the conditions at 393 K and total pressure of 1.3 MPa for 2 h (conversion of methanol: 0.15%) due to the compromise of two effects of Cu: the activation of H2 during reduction prior to the kinetic tests and the block (cover) of the surface active site. The reduction effects in H2 were monitored through the reduction of Ce4+ sites to Ce3+ based on the shoulder peak intensity at 5727 eV in the Ce L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The Ce3+ content was 10% for reduced CeO2 catalyst whereas it increased to 15% for reduced Cu-CeO2 catalyst (0.5wt% of Cu). Moreover, the content of reduced Ce3+ sites (10%) associated with the surface O vacancy (defect sites) decreased to 5% under CO2 at 290 K for reduced Cu-CeO2 catalyst (0.1wt% of Cu). The adsorption step of CO2 on the defect sites might be the key step in DMC synthesis and thus the DMC synthesis rate dependence on the partial pressure of CO2 was proportional. Subsequent H atom subtraction steps from methanol at the neighboring surface Lewis base sites should combine two methoxy species to the adsorbed CO2 to form DMC, water, and restore the surface O vacancy.

  8. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA. PMID:25708541

  9. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. PMID:27493209

  10. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-07-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using {sup 13}C NMR of 99.9% {sup 13}C-enriched U{sup VI}O{sub 2} ({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and Am{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 295} = 56 kJ/M, {Delta}H{sup {double_dagger}} = 38 kJ/M, and {Delta}S{sup {double_dagger}} = {minus}60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress.

  11. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  12. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  13. Chemical Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    1998-12-01

    Utilizing supercritical fluids as environmentally benign solvents for chemical synthesis is one of the new approaches in the "greening" of chemistry. Carbon dioxide is the most widely used gas for supercritical fluid studies because of its moderate critical constants, nontoxic nature, and availability in pure form. One unique property of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is its high solubility for fluorinated compounds. Thus sc-CO2 can be used to replace Freons that are conventionally used as solvents for synthesis of perfluoro-polymers. Another property of sc-CO2 is its miscibility with gases such as H2. Heterogeneous reactions involving these gases may become homogeneous reactions in sc-CO2. Reactions in sc-CO2 may offer several advantages including controlling phase behavior and products, increasing speed of reactions, and obtaining specific reaction channels. This paper describes the following nine types of chemical reactions reported in the literature utilizing sc-CO2 as a solvent to illustrate the unique properties of the supercritical fluid reaction systems: (i) hydrogenation and hydroformylation, (ii) synthesis of organometallic compounds, (iii) metal chelation and extraction, (iv) preparation of inorganic nanoparticles, (v) stereo-selectivity of lipase-catalyzed reactions, (vi) asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation, (vii) polymerization, (viii) Diels-Alder reaction, and (ix) free radical reactions.

  14. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors. PMID:27301444

  15. Synthesis of carbon-13-labeled tetradecanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, J T; Patel, K M; Morrisett, J D

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of tetradecanoic acid enriched with 13C at carbons 1, 3, or 6 is described. The label at the carbonyl carbon was introduced by treating 1-bromotridecane with K13CN (90% enriched) to form the 13C-labeled nitrile, which upon hydrolysis yielded the desired acid. The [3-13C]tetradecanoic acid was synthesized by alkylation of diethyl sodio-malonate with [1-13C]1-bromododecane; the acid was obtained upon saponification and decarboxylation. The label at the 6 position was introduced by coupling the appropriately labeled alkylcadmium chloride with the half acid chloride methyl ester of the appropriate dioic acid, giving the corresponding oxo fatty acid ester. Formation of the tosylhydrazone of the oxo-ester followed by reduction with sodium cyanoborohydride gave the labeled methyl tetradecanoate which, upon hydrolysis, yielded the desired tetradecanoic acid. All tetradecanoic acids were identical to unlabeled analogs as evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared or NMR spectroscopy. These labeled fatty acids were used subsequently to prepare the correspondingly labeled diacyl phosphatidylcholines. PMID:6631228

  16. Laser-initiated chemical reactions in carbon suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T. E.; Diebold, G. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Crowell, R. A.; Chemistry; Brown Univ.

    2002-10-31

    We report on laser-initiated chemical reactions in colloidal carbon suspensions. Irradiation of carbon particles ranging in size from 13 to 75 nm in diameter suspended in water, toluene, and benzene with high power nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond laser pulses leads to the formation of a number of gaseous hydrocarbons as well as a series of liquid-phase products. In the product gas above irradiated carbon suspensions in water, H{sub 2} and CO, the main reaction products of the carbon-steam reaction, and numerous hydrocarbons ranging from C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} were detected. Irradiation of particulate carbon in toluene and benzene gave H{sub 2} as the main gas product with small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. Bibenzyl and biphenyl were found as the main liquid products produced in toluene and benzene suspensions, respectively, but with numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smaller concentrations. The amount of products generated by pulsed laser irradiation is shown to depend on particle size and concentration, as well as the laser fluence and pulse width. The chemical reactions reported take place under conditions characterized by extremely high temperatures and pressures of short duration.

  17. In vivo Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alger, J. R.; Sillerud, L. O.; Behar, K. L.; Gillies, R. J.; Shulman, R. G.; Gordon, R. E.; Shaw, D.; Hanley, P. E.

    1981-11-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR) from human arm and rat tissues have been observed in vivo. These signals arise primarily from triglycerides in fatty tissue. Carbon-13 NMR was also used to follow, in a living rat, the conversion of C-1--labeled glucose, which was introduced into the stomach, to C-1--labeled liver glycogen. The carbon-13 sensitivity and resolution obtained shows that natural abundance carbon-13 NMR will be valuable in the study of disorders in fat metabolism, and that experiments with substrates labeled with carbon-13 can be used to study carbohydrate metabolism in vivo.

  18. Systematic analysis of reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, W.; Suzuki, Y.; Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Kohama, A.

    2007-04-15

    We systematically analyze total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N= 6-16 on a {sup 12}C target for wide range of incident energy. The intrinsic structure of the carbon isotope is described by a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, which reasonably well reproduces the ground-state properties for most of the even N isotopes. We need separate studies not only for odd nuclei but also for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C to improve their wave functions. The density of the carbon isotope is constructed by eliminating the effect of the center-of-mass motion. For the calculations of the cross sections, we take two schemes, the Glauber approximation and the eikonal model using a global optical potential. Both the reaction models successfully reproduce low and high incident energy data on the cross sections of {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 16}C on {sup 12}C. The calculated reaction cross sections of {sup 15}C are found to be considerably smaller than the empirical values observed at low energy. We find a consistent parametrization of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, differently from previous ones. Finally, we predict the total reaction cross section of {sup 22}C on {sup 12}C.

  19. High-Throughput Screening of the Asymmetric Decarboxylative Alkylation Reaction of Enolate-Stabilized Enol Carbonates.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Nolan T; Virgil, Scott C; Stoltz, Brian M

    2010-01-01

    The use of high-throughput screening allowed for the optimization of reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed asymmetric decarboxylative alkylation reaction of enolate-stabilized enol carbonates. Changing to a non-polar reaction solvent and to an electron-deficient PHOX derivative as ligand from our standard reaction conditions improved the enantioselectivity for the alkylation of a ketal-protected,1,3-diketone-derived enol carbonate from 28% ee to 84% ee. Similar improvements in enantioselectivity were seen for a β-keto-ester derived- and an α-phenyl cyclohexanone-derived enol carbonate. PMID:21072327

  20. Polymorphs calcium carbonate on temperature reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Kai-Yin; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani

    2014-09-03

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) has three different crystal polymorphs, which are calcite, aragonite and vaterite. In this study, effect of reaction temperature on polymorphs and crystallite structure of CaCO{sub 3} was investigated. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) were used to characterize the obtained CaCO{sub 3} particles. The obtained results showed that CaCO{sub 3} with different crystal and particle structures can be formed by controlling the temperature during the synthesis process.

  1. Experimental study of the 13C+12C fusion reaction at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, D.; Chilug, A. I.; Straticiuc, M.; Trache, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Toma, S.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.; Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions between light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen isotopes have been studied because of their significance for a wide variety of stellar burning scenarios. One important stellar reaction is 12C+12C, but it is difficult to measure it in the Gamow window because of very low cross sections and several resonances occurring. Hints can be obtained from the study of 13C+12C reaction. We have measured this process by an activation method for energies down to Ecm=2.5 MeV using 13C beams from the Bucharest 3 MV tandetron and gamma-ray deactivation measurements in our low and ultralow background laboratories, the latter located in a salt mine about 100 km north of Bucharest. Results obtained so far are shown and discussed in connection with the possibility to go even further down in energy and with the interpretation of the reaction mechanism at such deep sub-barrier energies.

  2. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  3. Towards understanding global variability in ocean carbon-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Bopp, Laurent

    2008-03-01

    We include a prognostic parameterization of carbon-13 into a global ocean-biogeochemistry model to investigate the spatiotemporal variability in ocean carbon-13 between 1860 and 2000. Carbon-13 was included in all 10 existing carbon pools, with dynamic fractionations occurring during photosynthesis, gas exchange and carbonate chemistry. We find that ocean distributions of δ13CDIC at any point in time are controlled by the interplay between biological fractionation, gas exchange, and ocean mixing. In particular, the deep ocean δ13CDIC is sensitive (by > 0.5‰) to the degree of ocean ventilation. On interannual timescales, although the variability in δ13CDIC is a first order function of the atmospheric δ13CO2 and overall carbon flux, the spatial distributions are controlled by the degree to which surface waters are exposed to the atmosphere. The δ13CPOC is highly sensitive to the species of inorganic carbon assimilated during photosynthesis (by 10 to 17‰), as well as the intrinsic growth rate and in situ [CO2(aq)], suggesting that phytoplankton utilize both HCO3- and CO2(aq). The relationship between Δδ13CDIC and anthropogenic carbon (Cant) varies by ±70% regionally and circulation and biotic effects can influence estimates of Cant that are based on Δδ13CDIC.

  4. Structural effects in solvolytic reactions; carbon-13 NMR studies of carbocations†: Effect of increasing electron demand on the carbon-13 NMR shifts in substituted tert-cumyl and 1-aryl-1-cyclopentyl carbocations—correlation of the data by a new set of substituent constants, σC+*†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Herbert C.; Kelly, David P.; Periasamy, Mariappan

    1980-01-01

    The cationic carbon substituent chemical shifts (ΔδC+) for nine representative meta-substituted tert-cumyl carbocations are correlated satisfactorily by the σm+ substituent constants (slope ρ+ = -18.18, correlation coefficient r = 0.990). However, the substituent chemical shifts (ΔδC+) for the corresponding para derivatives are not correlated by the σp+ substituent constants. The possibility of developing a set of substituent constants capable of correlating such 13C NMR shifts was examined. The slope of the line defined by the meta substituents (ρ+ = -18.18) was utilized to calculate σC+ constants for both meta and para substituents. The utility of these constants was then tested by their ability to correlate the 13C NMR shifts in the cations for a different system, the 1-aryl-1-cyclopentyl cations. Indeed, these σC+ values correlate very well with the ΔδC+ values, yielding ρC+ = -16.84, r = 0.999. PMID:16592926

  5. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    The research on graphite and carbon for this period is reported. Topics discussed include: effects of grinding on the Santa Marie graphites, properties and purities of coal-tar, resin-bonded graphite, carbonization of resin components, and glass-like carbon filler.

  6. Reaction of dichlorocarbene with 2-phenyl-1,3-oxathiolane

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, D.V.; Safiev, O.G.; Zorin, V.V.; Rakhmankulov, D.L.

    1987-10-20

    It was established that the reaction of 2-phenyl-1,3-oxathiolane (I) with dichlorocarbene, generated from chloroform in 50% aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide with the use of triethylbenzylammonium chloride as phase-transfer catalyst, leads to the formation of dichloromethyl thiobenzoate (II) and ethylene with yields of 24 and 38% respectively and 60% conversion in the substrate (I). The reaction was conducted at 35-40/sup 0/C for 24 h with the following amounts of the reagents; 0.5 mole of the substrate (I); 5 moles of chloroform; 600 mol of 50% aqueous sodium hydroxide solution; 1 g of triethylbenzylammonium chloride. Compound (II) was isolated by column liquid chromatography on aluminum oxide (40-250 ..mu..) with a 1:5 mixture of diethyl ether and hexane as eluant. The product was identified by means of the IR, PMR, and /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  7. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1986-11-15

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. Progress in the period November 16, 1985 to November 15, 1986 is reviewed in the following areas: (1) Recoil atom reaction studies. (2) Reactions of thermally generated free atoms.

  8. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of grinding on Santa Maria coke are considered, as well as the production of resin-bonded graphite from the coke. Kynol fibers, properties and purities of coal tar pitches, carbonization of resin components, synthesis of gamma BL (4-furfuryl 2-pentenoic acid gamma lactone), and a glass-like carbon powder for use as a filler are also discussed. The hydrogen contents of commercial cokes and graphites are tabulated, and a quantimet image-analyzing computer and its operation are described.

  9. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an aldol reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronopoulos, D. D.; Kokotos, C. G.; Karousis, N.; Kokotos, G.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2015-01-01

    The covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a proline-based derivative is reported. Initially, MWCNTs were oxidized in order to introduce a large number of carboxylic units on their tips followed by N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2,2'(ethylenedioxy)bis-(ethylamine) conjugation through an amide bond. Then, a proline derivative bearing a carboxylic terminal moiety at the 4-position was coupled furnishing proline-modified MWCNTs. This new hybrid material was fully characterized by spectroscopic and microscopy means and its catalytic activity in the asymmetric aldol reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde was evaluated for the first time, showing to proceed almost quantitatively in aqueous media. Furthermore, several amino-modified MWCNTs were prepared and examined in the particular aldol reaction. These new hybrid materials exhibited an enhanced catalytic activity in water, contrasting with the pristine MWCNTs as well as the parent organic molecule, which failed to catalyze the reaction efficiently. Furthermore, the modified MWCNTs proved to catalyze the aldol reaction even after three repetitive cycles. Overall, a green approach for the aldol reaction is presented, where water can be employed as the solvent and modified MWCNTs can be used as catalysts, which can be successfully recovered and reused, while their catalytic activity is retained.The covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a proline-based derivative is reported. Initially, MWCNTs were oxidized in order to introduce a large number of carboxylic units on their tips followed by N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2,2'(ethylenedioxy)bis-(ethylamine) conjugation through an amide bond. Then, a proline derivative bearing a carboxylic terminal moiety at the 4-position was coupled furnishing proline-modified MWCNTs. This new hybrid material was fully characterized by spectroscopic and microscopy means and its catalytic activity in the asymmetric aldol reaction

  10. A Short Set of Carbon 13-NMR Correlation Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a short set of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tables. These tables not only serve pedagogic purposes but also allow students to do calculations rapidly and with acceptable accuracy for a wide variety of compounds. (JN)

  11. Population of 13Be with a Nucleon-Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Bradon; Deyoung, Paul; Smith, Jenna; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-unbound nuclei are traditionally formed by the removal of one or more nucleons from a fast beam of ions. This method often results in a background, which is difficult to separate from the particle of interest. Nucleon-removal entrance-channels also require the ion beam to be more massive than the particle of interest, which presents the additional challenges of the beam being difficult to make. The present work was done with a nucleon-exchange entrance channel. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, a 71 MeV/u 13B beam impinged on a 47 mg/cm2 thick target of 9Be. As a result numerous reactions occurred, including the population of 13Be through the nucleon-exchange entrance-channel. The 13Be nuclei decayed to 12Be and one neutron in approximately 10-21 seconds. The resulting neutrons were detected by either the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) or the Large multi-Institution Scintillator Array (LISA), while the 12Be nuclei were directed through an array of charged particle detectors by a 4T superconducting sweeper magnet. The four-momentum vectors of the fragment nucleus and the neutron were calculated to determine the decay energy of 13Be. Monte-Carlo simulations consistent with results from previous analyses of 13Be were satisfactorily fit to the decay-energy spectrum. Additionally, the cross-section for the nucleon-exchange entrance-channel is consistent with a theoretical prediction. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1306074.

  12. CMB-13 research on carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results of the research on carbon and graphite accomplished during this report period are presented. Included are: particle characteristics of Santa Maria fillers, compositions and density data for hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, properties of hot-molded Santa Maria graphites, and properties of hot-molded anisotropic graphites. Ablation-resistant graphites are also discussed.

  13. Carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH4 with HO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Tyler, S. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effect in the CH4 + HO reaction is measured experimentally and the use of carbon isotope ratios to diagnose atmospheric methane is examined. The chemical, photolysis, and analytical experimental conditions and procedures are described. It is determined that the CH4 + HO reaction has a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.010 + or 0.007 for k(12)k(13) (rate constants ratio) at 297 + or - 3 K. This value is compared with the data of Rust and Stevens (1980). Causes for the poor correlation between the data at high methane conversions are discussed. It is supposed that the difference between the k(12) and k(13) values is due to a difference in the activation energy of the two reactions.

  14. Detection of C-13O radio emission from C-13-rich carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kahane, C.; Omont, A.

    1988-01-01

    A high ratio of C-13O radio emission in the J = 1-0 rotational line has been detected from three mass-losing carbon stars which optical data indicate have high C-13/C12 ratios. Since chemical fractionation, isotope-dependent photodissociation and opacity in the rotational and vibrational lines may not raise significantly the C-13O ratio above the actual C-13/C-12 ratio in these circumstellar envelopes, the relative abundance of C-13 in these stars might be even greater by perhaps a factor of two than previously believed. About 15 percent of all luminous carbon stars are C-13-rich, and these stars may play a significant role in the enhancement in the C-13/C12 ratio that has occurred during the past 4.6 billion years since the formation of the sun.

  15. Current and relic carbon using natural abundance carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    layse,MF; Clapp,CE; Allmaras,RR; Linden,D.R; Molina, JAE.; Copeland,SM; Dowdy,RH

    2002-05-01

    The role of agricultural practices on soil carbon (C) dynamics is critical to improved soil management. The main objective was to examine the C interactions resulting from crop changes under different tillage and residue treatments.

  16. Dissociation-excitation reactions of argon metastables with carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study showing that a metastable argon-carbon dioxide reaction results in dissociation of carbon dioxide and electronic excitation of one of the products, carbon monoxide or oxygen. A flow system using a 2450-MHz discharge was used to produce metastable argon atoms. Metastable argon in the afterglow was confirmed by adding nitrogen to the afterglow. Without addition of carbon dioxide no argon line emission, or any other emission, is observed from the reaction zone. Absence of argon line emission produced by recombination indicates the absence of charged species.

  17. Carbon-13-rich diagenetic carbonates in miocene formations of California and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Friedman, I.I.; Madsen, B.M.

    1967-01-01

    Carbon unusually rich in C13 (??C13 = +5.4 to +19.0 per mil relative to the Peedee belemnite carbonate standard of the University of Chicago) is characteristic of certain diagenetic limestones and dolomites in the Miocene Monterey Shale of California and the Nye Mudstone of Oregon. This heavy carbon may have originated through low-temperature equilibration between CO3- and CO2 in migrating carbonated waters or between CH4 and CO2 in natural gas. Light carbon (??C13 = -5.6 to -18.2 per mil) derived through nonequilibrium oxidation of organic matter also occurs in the carbonate of Monterey Shale in some localities, but at most places it is much less common than heavy carbon.

  18. The production of lipids alternately labelled with carbon-13.

    PubMed

    Boyle-Roden, Elizabeth; German, J B; Wood, B J B

    2003-07-01

    Chlorella cells were shown to have similar fatty acid profiles when grown photoautotrophically or if grown photoheterotrophically with ethanoate (acetate) as carbon source. When supplied with ethanoate labelled with carbon-13 in the methyl group, the alga incorporated it into fatty acids with retention of the sequence of labelling on alternate carbon atoms, thus providing a convenient method for synthesising lipids in a form useful for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of lipids in situ in membranes. Marine algae used in fish farming may have higher levels of very highly unsaturated fatty acids; proposals for producing these compounds labelled with carbon-13 are, therefore, presented, based on using centrally labelled glycerol. The scope for producing other substances labelled in a form suitable for NMR studies, such as carotenoids, is discussed. PMID:12919810

  19. Modeling Corrosion Reactions of Steel in a Dilute Carbonate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyan, Faysal Fayez; Alfantazi, Akram

    2016-02-01

    This research models the corrosion reactions of a high-strength steel in an aerated, dilute, carbonate solution during a single-cycle voltammetry. Based on a previous study (Eliyan et al. in J Mater Eng Perform 24(6):1-8, 2015) and a literature survey, the corrosion reactions of the cathodic reduction, anodic dissolution, and passivation, as well as the interfacial interactions and the chemistry of the corrosion products are illustrated in schematics. The paper provides a visual guide on the corrosion reactions for steel in carbonate solutions based on the available mechanistic details that were reported and are still being investigated in literature.

  20. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1989-02-01

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. The results of experiments directed toward attaining the goals of this research program are briefly presented for the period September 1, 1987 to January 31, 1989 in sections entitled: (1) The mechanism of hydrogen acquisition by high energy silicon atoms. (2) The mechanism of disilene formation in the reactions of recoiling silicon atoms with silane. (3) The contribution of ionic processes to the primary reactions of recoiling silicon atoms. (4) The role of phosphine in hydrogen acquisition by recoiling silicon atoms. (5) Mechanism of reaction of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules.

  1. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  2. Sensitive, quantitative carbon-13 NMR spectra by mechanical sample translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Allen, Mary; Martin, Rachel W.; Shaka, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Collecting a truly quantitative carbon-13 spectrum is a time-consuming chore. Very long relaxation delays, required between transients to allow the z-magnetization, M z, of the spin with the longestT1 to return to the equilibrium value, M0, must precede each transient. These long delays also reduce sensitivity, as fewer transients per unit time can be acquired. In addition, sometimes T1 is not known to within even a factor of two: a conservative guess for the relaxation delay then leads to very low sensitivity. We demonstrate a fresh method to bypass these problems and collect quantitative carbon-13 spectra by swapping the sample volume after each acquisition with a different portion where the magnetization is already equilibrated to M0. Loading larger sample volumes of 10-20 mL into an unusually long (1520 mm) 5 mm OD. NMR tube and vertically sliding the tube between acquisitions accomplishes the swap. The relaxation delay can then be skipped altogether. The spectra are thus both quantitative, and far more sensitive. We demonstrate the moving tube technique on two small molecules (thymol and butylhydroxytoluene) and show good carbon-13 quantification. The gain in sensitivity can be as much as 10-fold for slowly-relaxing 13C resonances. These experiments show that quantitative, sensitive carbon-13 spectra are possible whenever sufficient sample volumes are available. The method is applicable to any slow-relaxing nuclear spin species, such as 29Si, 15N and other low-γ nuclei.

  3. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Reactions over catalysts confined in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiulian; Bao, Xinhe

    2008-12-21

    We review a new concept for modifying the redox properties of transition metals via confinement within the channels of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and thus tuning their catalytic performance. Attention is also devoted to novel techniques for homogeneous dispersion of metal nanoparticles inside CNTs since these are essential for optimization of the catalytic activity. PMID:19048128

  5. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  6. Kinetics of the reaction between carbon dioxide and tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, J.E.; Donnellan, J.P. )

    1990-02-16

    The reaction between carbon dioxide and amines is of great technical importance and has been the subject of many investigations. The authors have shown that the reaction for secondary amines in anhydrous ethanol and in aqueous solution is exclusively second-order in amine and that the zwitterion intermediate postulated by Danckwerts is probably of negligible significance in the mechanism. The reaction with tertiary amines has also been studied, but the data are less controversial. In order to complete their studies of the reactions of carbon dioxide with amines, using their conductimetric stopped-flow apparatus, they have studied this reaction for MDEA (methyldiethanolamine, IUPAC name N-methyl-2,2{prime}-iminodiethanol) and TEA (triethanolamine, IUPAC name 2,2{prime},2{double prime}-nitrilotris(ethanol)).

  7. Reaction kinetics of hydrothermal carbonization of loblolly pine.

    PubMed

    Reza, M Toufiq; Yan, Wei; Uddin, M Helal; Lynam, Joan G; Hoekman, S Kent; Coronella, Charles J; Vásquez, Victor R

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a pretreatment process to convert diverse feedstocks to homogeneous energy-dense solid fuels. Understanding of reaction kinetics is necessary for reactor design and optimization. In this study, the reaction kinetics and effects of particle size on HTC were investigated. Experiments were conducted in a novel two-chamber reactor maintaining isothermal conditions for 15s to 30 min reaction times. Loblolly pine was treated at 200, 230, and 260°C. During the first few minutes of reaction, the solid-product mass yield decreases rapidly while the calorific value increases rapidly. A simple reaction mechanism is proposed and validated, in which both hemicellulose and cellulose degrade in parallel first-order reactions. Activation energy of hemicellulose and cellulose degradation were determined to be 30 and 73 kJ/mol, respectively. For short HTC times, both reaction and diffusion effects were observed. PMID:23651600

  8. Recent developments in enzyme promiscuity for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yufeng; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-04-01

    Numerous enzymes have been found to catalyze additional and completely different types of reactions relative to the natural activity they evolved for. This phenomenon, called catalytic promiscuity, has proven to be a fruitful guide for the development of novel biocatalysts for organic synthesis purposes. As such, enzymes have been identified with promiscuous catalytic activity for, one or more, eminent types of carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions like aldol couplings, Michael(-type) additions, Mannich reactions, Henry reactions, and Knoevenagel condensations. This review focuses on enzymes that promiscuously catalyze these reaction types and exhibit high enantioselectivities (in case chiral products are obtained). PMID:25598537

  9. Radiochemical Reactions Between Tritium Molecule and Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W.M.; O'Hira, S.; Suzuki, T.; Nishi, M. F.

    2005-07-15

    To have better understanding of radiochemical reactions among oxygen baking products in a fusion reactor, reactions in equimolar tritium molecule (T{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were examined by laser Raman spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. After mixing them at room temperature, T{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased rapidly in the first 30 minutes and then the reactions between them became much slower. As the predominant products of the reactions, carbon monoxide (CO) and tritiated water (T{sub 2}O) were found in gaseous phase and condensed phase, respectively. However, there likely existed also some solid products that were thermally decomposed into CO, CO{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, T{sub 2}O, etc. during baking up to 523 K.

  10. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  11. Oxygen electrode reaction in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, A.J.; White, R.E.

    1992-07-07

    Molten carbonate fuel cell system is a leading candidate for the utility power generation because of its high efficiency for fuel to AC power conversion, capability for an internal reforming, and a very low environmental impact. However, the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell is limited by the oxygen reduction reaction and the cell life time is limited by the stability of the cathode material. An elucidation of oxygen reduction reaction in molten alkali carbonate is essential because overpotential losses in the molten carbonate fuel cell are considerably greater at the oxygen cathode than at the fuel anode. Oxygen reduction on a fully-immersed gold electrode in a lithium carbonate melt was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry to determine electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters. The dependences of electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters on gas composition and temperature were examined to determine the reaction orders and the activation energies. The results showed that oxygen reduction in a pure lithium carbonate melt occurs via the peroxide mechanism. A mass transfer parameter, D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O}, estimated by the cyclic voltammetry concurred with that calculated by the EIS technique. The temperature dependence of the exchange current density and the product D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O} were examined and the apparent activation energies were determined to be about 122 and 175 kJ/ mol, respectively.

  12. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of carbon and oxygen during combustion of porous carbon particles in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gremyachkin, V.M.

    2006-05-15

    A model of combustion of a high-porosity carbon particle in oxygen is considered, which takes into account heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions inside the particles and radiative heat transfer. The boundaries of the domain where the burning rate depends on the particle temperature are determined. The possibility of two combustion regimes is demonstrated: regime with a high burning rate, where the carbon-oxygen reaction proceeds in a layer adjacent to the particle surface, and regime with a low burning rate, where the reaction proceeds in the entire particle volume. In the regime with a high burning rate, the main product of the reaction between carbon and oxygen is carbon monoxide, whereas both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide can be formed in the regime with a low burning rate. The kinetic equations of heterogeneous reactions C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} and 2C + O{sub 2} = 2CO are determined, which reveal the retarding effect of carbon monoxide and dioxide on the rates of these reactions.

  13. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR

  14. Carbon-13 and proton magnetic resonance of mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that roughly 4 mmol carbon atoms/g mouse muscle can give rise to a "high resolution" 13C NMR spectrum. From the 13C spectrum, it is estimated that the protons from mobile organic molecules or molecular segments amount to 6-8%of total nonrigid protons (organic plus water) in muscle. Their spin-spin relaxation times (T2) are of the order of 0.4-2 ms. At 37 degrees C, the proton spin-echo decay of mouse muscle changes rapidly with time after death, while that of mouse brain does not. PMID:890043

  15. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  16. Impacts of diffusive transport on carbonate mineral formation from magnesium silicate-CO2-water reactions.

    PubMed

    Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Fei; Guo, Bin; Surface, J Andrew; Peters, Catherine A; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2014-12-16

    Reactions of CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals to precipitate magnesium carbonates can result in stable carbon sequestration. This process can be employed in ex situ reactors or during geologic carbon sequestration in magnesium-rich formations. The reaction of aqueous CO2 with the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite was studied in systems with transport controlled by diffusion. The approach integrated bench-scale experiments, an in situ spectroscopic technique, and reactive transport modeling. Experiments were performed using a tube packed with forsterite and open at one end to a CO2-rich solution. The location and amounts of carbonate minerals that formed were determined by postexperiment characterization of the solids. Complementing this ex situ characterization, (13)C NMR spectroscopy tracked the inorganic carbon transport and speciation in situ. The data were compared with the output of reactive transport simulations that accounted for diffusive transport processes, aqueous speciation, and the forsterite dissolution rate. All three approaches found that the onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation was spatially localized about 1 cm from the opening of the forsterite bed. Magnesite was the dominant reaction product. Geochemical gradients that developed in the diffusion-limited zones led to locally supersaturated conditions at specific locations even while the volume-averaged properties of the system remained undersaturated. PMID:25420634

  17. Adverse reactions in treatment with lithium carbonate and haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, P C; Hollnagel, P; Sorensen, R; Schou, M

    1976-12-01

    Hospital records of 425 patients who had been treated simultaneously with lithium carbonate and haloperidol were examined. Adverse reactions in these patients were the same as in patients given lithium alone or haloperidol alone. None of the patients developed a syndrome resembling that described by others in patients treated with a lithium and haloperidol combination. PMID:1036539

  18. Production of carbon-13-labeled cadaverine by engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum using carbon-13-labeled methanol as co-substrate.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Carnicer, Marc; Heux, Stephanie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-12-01

    Methanol, a one-carbon compound, can be utilized by a variety of bacteria and other organisms as carbon and energy source and is regarded as a promising substrate for biotechnological production. In this study, a strain of non-methylotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum, which was able to produce the polyamide building block cadaverine as non-native product, was engineered for co-utilization of methanol. Expression of the gene encoding NAD+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) from the natural methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus increased methanol oxidation. Deletion of the endogenous aldehyde dehydrogenase genes ald and fadH prevented methanol oxidation to carbon dioxide and formaldehyde detoxification via the linear formaldehyde dissimilation pathway. Heterologous expression of genes for the key enzymes hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway in this strain restored growth in the presence of methanol or formaldehyde, which suggested efficient formaldehyde detoxification involving RuMP key enzymes. While growth with methanol as sole carbon source was not observed, the fate of 13C-methanol added as co-substrate to sugars was followed and the isotopologue distribution indicated incorporation into central metabolites and in vivo activity of the RuMP pathway. In addition, 13C-label from methanol was traced to the secreted product cadaverine. Thus, this synthetic biology approach led to a C. glutamicum strain that converted the non-natural carbon substrate methanol at least partially to the non-native product cadaverine. PMID:26276544

  19. Effects of hydrolysis and carbonization reactions on hydrochar production.

    PubMed

    Fakkaew, K; Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion process which converts wet biomass into hydrochar. In this study, a low-energy HTC process named "Two-stage HTC" comprising of hydrolysis and carbonization stages using faecal sludge as feedstock was developed and optimized. The experimental results indicated the optimum conditions of the two-stage HTC to be; hydrolysis temperature of 170 °C, hydrolysis reaction time of 155 min, carbonization temperature of 215 °C, and carbonization reaction time of 100 min. The hydrolysis reaction time and carbonization temperature had a statistically significant effect on energy content of the produced hydrochar. Energy input of the two-stage HTC was about 25% less than conventional HTC. Energy efficiency of the two-stage HTC for treating faecal sludge was higher than that of conventional HTC and other thermal conversion processes such as pyrolysis and gasification. The two-stage HTC could be considered as a potential technology for treating FS and producing hydrochar. PMID:26051497

  20. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Diborane with 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley; Allen, Harrison, Jr.

    1953-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with 1,3-butadiene was found to be 18,700+/-150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 19,075+/-150 Btu per pound. Since this value is approximately the same as the heat of combustion of butadiene, it seems certain that the material is partially oxidized.

  1. Reactions of atomic carbon with oxygenated compounds and the investigation of fullerene chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tsongming.

    1993-01-01

    The reaction of atomic carbon with oxygenated organics produces CO and an energetic fragment. Reactions involving deoxygenation of carbonyl compounds to carbenes, epoxides to alkenes, and ethers to a pair of radicals have been investigated. Carbon atom deoxygenation of cyclopentanone and cylcopentene oxide give the cleavage products, ethylene and allene, along with cyclopentene. The use of 2,2,5,5-d[sub 4]-cyclopentanone as the substrate reveals the direct cleavage of cyclopentanylidene carbene is occurring. A calculation of the energetics of this reaction at the MP4/6-31G[sup *]//6-31G[sup *] level suggests a nonconcerted cleavage via a biradical intermediate. Carbon atoms deoxygenate cyclohexene. Inert gas deactivated energetic cyclohexene. The deoxygenation of other oxygenated compounds by atomic carbon, such as 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane to cyclohexane-1,4-diyl biradical, 1,2-epoxy-5-hexane to energetic 1,S-hexadiene, allyl ether to allyl radicals, and [gamma]-butyrolactone to trimethylene-1,3-diyl biradical have also been carried out. Methylketene was deoxygenated to vinylidene carbene which rearranges to propyne via a 1,2-H shift. Dimethylketene was deoxygenated to dimethylethylidene carbene which gives 2-butyne via a 1,2-methyl shift and 1,3-butadiene via a vicinal C-H bond insertion. The addition of hydrogen donors to systems in which C[sub 60] is generated results in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose carbon skeleton might represent intermediates in fullerene formation. Based on this result, the author proposed a mechanism of fullerene formation. The use of various amounts of propene as a trap showed that the yield of fullerenes decreases as the amount of the trapped product increases. Attempts to trap intermediates in fullerene formation using halides and metals have been studied. The author has attempted metal encapsulation reactions and investigated some possible chemical reactions of fullerenes.

  2. Investigation of thermochemistry associated with the carbon-carbon coupling reactions of furan and furfural using ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Assary, Rajeev S; Curtiss, Larry A

    2014-06-26

    Upgrading furan and small oxygenates obtained from the decomposition of cellulosic materials via formation of carbon-carbon bonds is critical to effective conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels. Simulation-driven molecular level understanding of carbon-carbon bond formation is required to design efficient catalysts and processes. Accurate quantum chemical methods are utilized here to predict the reaction energetics for conversion of furan (C4H4O) to C5-C8 ethers and the transformation of furfural (C5H6O2) to C13-C26 alkanes. Furan can be coupled with various C1 to C4 low molecular weight carbohydrates obtained from the pyrolysis via Diels-Alder type reactions in the gas phase to produce C5-C8 cyclic ethers. The computed reaction barriers for these reactions (∼25 kcal/mol) are lower than the cellulose activation or decomposition reactions (∼50 kcal/mol). Cycloaddition of C5-C8 cyclo ethers with furans can also occur in the gas phase, and the computed activation energy is similar to that of the first Diels-Alder reaction. Furfural, obtained from biomass, can be coupled with aldehydes or ketones with α-hydrogen atoms to form longer chain aldol products, and these aldol products can undergo vapor phase hydrocycloaddition (activation barrier of ∼20 kcal/mol) to form the precursors of C26 cyclic hydrocarbons. These thermochemical studies provide the basis for further vapor phase catalytic studies required for upgrading of furans/furfurals to longer chain hydrocarbons. PMID:24902118

  3. Conversion of carbon dioxide to resorcylic acid under ultrasonication by Kolbe-Schmitt reaction.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, B; Palanivelu, K

    2015-11-01

    The present work focuses on a new approach for the synthesis of β-resorcylic acid based on Kolbe-Schmitt reaction using carbon dioxide under ultrasonic and mild condition. The Kolbe-Schmitt reaction is a process for the synthesis of β-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) from resorcinol in aqueous potassium hydroxide solution with gaseous CO2. The influences of carbonation time, flow rate of CO2 and the molar ratio of resorcinol/potassium hydroxide on the yield percentage of resorcylic acid were investigated. The study was assessed with the conventional thermal method (non ultrasonic method) for Kolbe-Schmitt reaction and it was observed that applying ultrasound to save more than 95% and 38.6% energy as shown by energy consumption calculations in bath type and horn type sonicator respectively. β-Resorcylic acid formed was characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The amount of CO2 utilized in the reaction was evaluated from the yield percentage of β-resorcylic acid yield. The maximum yield of resorcylic acid of 30% and 65% was obtained at the resorcinol/potassium hydroxide ratio of 1:3, carbonation time of 150 min and the CO2 flow rate of 2L/min in bath type and horn type ultrasonicator, respectively. The applicability of the research work was examined in two different positional isomers of resorcinol under optimum conditions. PMID:26186845

  4. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3805 - Formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3-benzenedimethanamine and bisphenol A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3805 Formaldehyde, reaction products... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as formaldehyde, reaction products with 1,3... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Formaldehyde, reaction products with...

  10. Determination of the astrophysical 12N(p,γ)13O reaction rate from the 2H(12N,13O)n reaction and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Su, J.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Shu, N. C.; Han, Y. L.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Liu, W. P.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; He, J. J.; Hu, J.; Xu, S. W.; Iwasa, N.; Kume, N.; Li, Z. H.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars with very low-metallicities depends critically on the amount of CNO nuclides which they produce. The 12N(p,γ)13O reaction is an important branching point in the rap processes, which are believed to be alternative paths to the slow 3α process for producing CNO seed nuclei and thus could change the fate of massive stars. In the present work, the angular distribution of the 2H(12N, 13O)n proton transfer reaction at Ec.m.=8.4 MeV has been measured for the first time. Based on the Johnson-Soper approach, the square of the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) for the virtual decay of 13Og.s. → 12N+p was extracted to be 3.92±1.47 fm-1 from the measured angular distribution and utilized to compute the direct component in the 12N(p,γ)13O reaction. The direct astrophysical S factor at zero energy was then found to be 0.39±0.15 keV b. By considering the direct capture into the ground state of 13O, the resonant capture via the first excited state of 13O and their interference, we determined the total astrophysical S factors and rates of the 12N(p,γ)13O reaction. The new rate is two orders of magnitude slower than that from the REACLIB compilation. Our reaction network calculations with the present rate imply that 12N(p,γ)13O will only compete successfully with the β+ decay of 12N at higher (˜2 orders of magnitude) densities than initially predicted.

  11. Modeling of the peritectic reaction and macro-segregation in casting of low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, M.; Fredriksson, H.

    1996-12-01

    Macro-microscopic models have been developed to describe the macrosegregation behavior associated with the peritectic reaction of low carbon steel. The macrosegregation model has been established on the basis of previously published work and experimental data. A microscopic model of a three-phase reaction L+ δ→ γ has been modeled by using Fredriksson’s approach. Four horizontal and unidirectional solidified experimental groups simulating continuous casting have been performed with a low carbon steel containing 0.13 wt pct carbon. The extent of macrosegregation of carbon was determined by wet chemical analysis of millings. It is confirmed, by comparing calculated results with experimental results, that this model successfully predicts the occurrence of macrosegregation. The results indicate that a peritectic reaction which is associated with a high cooling rate generates high thermal contraction and a high tensile strain rate at the peritectic temperature. Therefore, the macrosegregation, particularly at the ingot surface, is very sensitive to the cooling rate, where extremely high positive segregation was observed in the case of a high cooling rate. However, in the case of slow cooling rate, negative segregation was noted. The mechanism of macrosegregation with peritectic reaction is discussed in detail.

  12. Characteristics of catalyst for carbon monoxide coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.H.; Ma, X.; He, F.; Chen, H.F.

    1995-07-01

    The use of carbon monoxide to produce organic compounds is an important research area for the future. In particular the carbon monoxide coupling reaction takes place at moderate reaction conditions,with low consumption of energy, to produce oxalic acid and oxalate. The chemicals are feedstocks for ethylene glycol synthesis by hydrogenation of oxalate, as well as for products such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, polymers, and fine chemicals. The carbon monoxide coupling reaction on supported metal catalysts Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pd-Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used to study the characteristics of the catalyst under different conditions. The results indicated that the catalytic activation temperature influenced the catalytic activity and that there was an optimum activation temperature. The characteristics of effective coupling catalysts were found to be smaller surface areas and bigger pores, for example the {alpha}-phase of aluminum oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis results show that the catalytic reaction of CO coupling occurs via a redox mechanism.

  13. Towards a vibrational analysis of spheroidene. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of 13C-labelled spheroidenes in petroleum ether and in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Kok, P; Köhler, J; Groenen, E J; Gebhard, R; van der Hoef, I; Lugtenburg, J; Hoff, A F; Farhoosh, R; Frank, H A

    1994-04-28

    We report resonance Raman spectra of the carotenoid spheroidene and its 14'-13C and 15'-13C substituted analogues in petroleum ether and bound to the reaction centre of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. The spectra in petroleum ether correspond to planar all-trans spheroidene while those of the reaction centres are consistent with a nonplanar 15,15'-cis spheroidene. The effect of 13C labelling is largest in the carbon-carbon double-bond stretching region. The 15'-13C substitution of the reaction centre bound spheroidene, however, hardly changes the C=C band as compared to that for the natural abundance spheroidene apart from a new weak band at 1508 cm(-1). This observation has been interpreted as a decoupling of the C15=C15' stretch from the other double-bond stretches in combination with a small intrinsic Raman intensity of this local mode for 15,15'-cis spheroidene. PMID:8167135

  14. Conversion of alkenes to enol silyl ethers of acylsilanes by iridium-catalyzed reaction with a hydrosilane and carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, Naoto; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Ohe, Kouichi

    1992-11-18

    We wish to report that iridium complexes [IrCl(CO){sub 3}]{sub n} and Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 13} catalyze the reaction of alkenes with a hydrosilane HSiR{sub 3} and carbon monoxide (eq 1) to yield enol silyl ethers of acylsilanes. This unprecedented reaction results in regioselective introduction of carbon monoxide into the terminal carbon atom of alkenes, forming a siloxy(silyl)methylene unit(=C(SiR{sub 3})-OSiR{sub 3}). The present Ir-catalyzed reaction represents the first example of formation of acylsilane derivatives form the HSiR{sub 3}/CO combination. The new catalytic reaction can be applied to a wide variety of terminal alkenes. The acetal, cyano, and epoxide functional groups remain intact through this catalysis. The mechanism of the reaction may involve the possible intervention of a siloxycarbyne comple intermediate. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Evaluating reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis at elevated temperatures and pressures using carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the role of environmental factors on reaction pathways and corresponding carbon isotope fractionations during abiotic hydrothermal synthesis of organic compounds using piston cylinder apparatus at 750 °C and 5.5 kbars. Chemical compositions of experimental products and corresponding carbon isotopic values were obtained by a Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS system. Alkanes (methane and ethane), straight-chain saturated alcohols (ethanol and n-butanol) and monocarboxylic acids (formic and acetic acids) were generated with ethanol being the only organic compound with higher δ13C than CO2. CO was not detected in experimental products owing to the favorable water-gas shift reaction under high water pressure conditions. The pattern of δ13C values of CO2, carboxylic acids and alkanes are consistent with their equilibrium isotope relationships: CO2 > carboxylic acids > alkanes, but the magnitude of the fractionation among them is higher than predicted isotope equilibrium values. In particular, the isotopic fractionation between CO2 and CH4 remained constant at ∼31‰, indicating a kinetic effect during CO2 reduction processes. No "isotope reversal" of δ13C values for alkanes or carboxylic acids was observed, which indicates a different reaction pathway than what is typically observed during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis under gas phase conditions. Under constraints imposed in experiments, the anomalous 13C isotope enrichment in ethanol suggests that hydroxymethylene is the organic intermediate, and that the generation of other organic compounds enriched in 12C were facilitated by subsequent Rayleigh fractionation of hydroxymethylene reacting with H2 and/or H2O. Carbon isotope fractionation data obtained in this study are instrumental in assessing the controlling factors on abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems. Knowledge on how environmental conditions affect reaction pathways of abiotic synthesis of organic

  16. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-10-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact.

  17. Anion Effects in Oxidative Aliphatic Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reactions of Cu(II) Chlorodiketonate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Sushma L; Miłaczewska, Anna; Borowski, Tomasz; James, Christopher D; Tierney, David L; Popova, Marina; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2016-07-18

    Aliphatic oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions involving Cu(II) catalysts and O2 as the terminal oxidant are of significant current interest. However, little is currently known regarding how the nature of the Cu(II) catalyst, including the anions present, influence the reaction with O2. In previous work, we found that exposure of the Cu(II) chlorodiketonate complex [(6-Ph2TPA)Cu(PhC(O)CClC(O)Ph)]ClO4 (1) to O2 results in oxidative aliphatic carbon-carbon bond cleavage within the diketonate unit, leading to the formation of benzoic acid, benzoic anhydride, benzil, and 1,3-diphenylpropanedione as organic products. Kinetic studies of this reaction revealed a slow induction phase followed by a rapid decay of the absorption features of 1. Notably, the induction phase is not present when the reaction is performed in the presence of a catalytic amount of chloride anion. In the studies presented herein, a combination of spectroscopic (UV-vis, EPR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods have been used to examine the chloride and benzoate ion binding properties of 1 under anaerobic conditions. These studies provide evidence that each anion coordinates in an axial position of the Cu(II) center. DFT studies reveal that the presence of the anion in the Cu(II) coordination sphere decreases the barrier for O2 activation and the formation of a Cu(II)-peroxo species. Notably, the chloride anion more effectively lowers the barrier associated with O-O bond cleavage. Thus, the nature of the anion plays an important role in determining the rate of reaction of the diketonate complex with O2. The same type of anion effects were observed in the O2 reactivity of the simple Cu(II)-bipyridine complex [(bpy)Cu(PhC(O)C(Cl)C(O)Ph)ClO4] (3). PMID:27377103

  18. Follow the Carbon: Laboratory Studies of 13C-Labeled Early Earth Haze Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Day, D. A.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    While the Sun was still young and faint before the rise of molecular oxygen 2.4 Ga, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide in abundances greater than what is found on Earth today. It has been suggested that an atmosphere containing approximately 1000 ppmv methane and carbon dioxide could provided the needed greenhouse warming for liquid water to exist at the surface. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing methane and carbon dioxide could lead to the formation of significant amounts of organic haze due to photochemical reactions initiated by Lyman-α (121.6 nm) excitation. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain the chemistry rely on methane as the source of carbon in these hazes and treat carbon dioxide as a source of oxygen only. In the present work, we use isotopically labelled precursor gases to examine the source of carbon in photochemical haze formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. We generate haze analogs in the laboratory by far-UV irradiation of analog atmospheres containing permutations of 1,000 ppmv unlabeled and 13C-labeled methane and carbon. Products in the particle phase were analyzed by both unit mass resolution and high-resolution (m/Δm=5,000) aerosol mass spectrometry. Results indicate that carbon from carbon dioxide accounts for 20% (×5%) of the total carbon contained in the hazes. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archaean rocks on Earth, and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  19. Hydrothermal carbon from biomass: structural differences between hydrothermal and pyrolyzed carbons via 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Falco, Camillo; Perez Caballero, Fernando; Babonneau, Florence; Gervais, Christel; Laurent, Guillaume; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Baccile, Niki

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to better describe the structure of the hydrothermal carbon (HTC) process and put it in relationship with the more classical pyrolytic carbons. Indeed, despite the low energetic impact and the number of applications described so far for HTC, very little is known about the structure, reaction mechanism, and the way these materials relate to coals. Are HTC and calcination processes equivalent? Are the structures of the processed materials related to each other in any way? Which is the extent of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inside HTC? In this work, the effect of hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis are compared on glucose, a good model carbohydrate; a detailed single-quantum double-quantum (SQ-DQ) solid state (13)C NMR study of the HTC and calcined HTC is used to interpret the spectral region corresponding to the signal of furanic and arene groups. These data are compared to the spectroscopic signatures of calcined glucose, starch, and xylose. A semiquantitative analysis of the (13)C NMR spectra provides an estimation of the furanic-to-arene ratio which varies from 1:1 to 4:1 according to the processing conditions and carbohydrate employed. In addition, we formulate some hypothesis, validated by DFT (density functional theory) modeling associated with (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculations, about the possible furan-rich structural intermediates that occur in the coalification process leading to condensed polyaromatic structures. In combination with a broad parallel study on the HTC processing conditions effect on glucose, cellulose, and raw biomass (Falco, C.; Baccile, N.; Titirici, M.-M. Green Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15742F), we propose a broad reaction scheme and in which we show that, through HTC, it is possible to tune the furan-to-arene ratio composing the aromatic core of the produced HTC carbons, which is not possible if calcination is used alone, in the temperature range below 350 °C. PMID:22050004

  20. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron

  1. Diethers enriched in 13C suggest carbon-limitation at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. S.; Hayes, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    Active and inactive carbonate vent structures from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) contain up to 0.6% organic carbon including diverse lipids. Values of δ 13C for total organic carbon (TOC) range from -18.7‰ vs. VPDB at the active, high-temperature vent known as "The Beehive" (90° C), to -3.1‰ at Marker 7 (active, 70° C). Samples with relatively high levels of 13C also contained high amounts of isoprenoidal and nonisoprenoidal diethers. Samples more depleted in 13C lacked or contained low amounts of these diethers. The correlation between high 13C and abundant diethers is supported by compound-specific isotopic analyses. Archaeal and bacterial diethers are enriched in 13C relative to photosynthetically derived marine carbon. The biomarkers sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, sn-3 hydroxyarchaeol, and dihydroxyarchaeol - considered diagnostic for methane-cycling archaea - had δ values ranging from -8.5 to +4.8‰ . Phylogenetic data confirms the presence at these vents of a single group of methanogens, related to the Methanosarcinales (Schrenk et al., 2004). Diethers with non-isoprenoidal alkyl chains are also present, are of presumed bacterial origin, and may indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Values of δ for these compounds range from -7.3 to +1.0‰ . At the Beehive vent, diether lipids are absent and the TOC is depleted in 13C. Coexistence of isotopically similar hydroxyarchaeols and nonisoprenoidal glycerol diethers is typical of marine, cold-seep environments at which concentrations of H2 are low and methane is oxidized anaerobically. At the LCHF, however, concentrations of H2 in pore waters reach 15 mM (Proskurowski et al., 2003). This H2, produced by serpentinization reactions, drives production (rather than oxidation) of methane. Simultaneously, sulfate-reducing bacteria can flourish as carbon-fixing autotrophs. Under such conditions, carbon may be the limiting substrate, its nearly complete consumption accounting for the enrichment of

  2. Reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes incident on a proton

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-03-15

    We systematically study total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N=6-16 on a proton target for wide range of incident energies. An emphasis is put on the difference from the case of a carbon target. The calculations include the reaction cross sections of {sup 19,20,22}C at 40A MeV, the data of which have recently been measured at RIKEN. The Glauber theory is used to calculate the reaction cross sections. To describe the intrinsic structure of the carbon isotopes, we use a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, and construct the density distributions. To go beyond the simple mean-field model, we adopt two types of dynamical models: One is a core+n model for odd-neutron nuclei, and the other is a core+n+n model for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C. We propose empirical formulas which are useful in predicting unknown cross sections.

  3. Chemical Reactions in the Processing of Mosi2 + Carbon Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-pressing of MoSi2 powders with carbon at high temperatures reduces the siliceous grain boundary phase in the resultant compact. The chemical reactions in this process were examined using the Knudsen cell technique. A 2.3 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder and a 0.59 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder, both with additions of 2 wt pct carbon, were examined. The reduction of the siliceous grain boundary phase was examined at 1350 K and the resultant P(SiO)/P(CO) ratios interpreted in terms of the SiO(g) and CO(g) isobars on the Si-C-O predominance diagram. The MoSi2 + carbon mixtures were then heated at the hot-pressing temperature of 2100 K. Large weight losses were observed and could be correlated with the formation of a low-melting eutectic and the formation and vaporization of SiC.

  4. Electrode reaction mechanisms in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R.; Nishina, T.; Lin, Y.P.; Yeager, E.B.; Tryk, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    This report describes the results of a joint research effort at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to elucidate the reaction mechanism of oxygen reduction at the cathode of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). This research project was aimed at developing novel experimental approaches to the chemistry and electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction under MCFC conditions, and improving our fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanism as it applies to the MCFC. IIT's contribution was focused on developing and using rotating electrodes with well-defined mass-transfer properties, to characterize the electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction in molten carbonate. CWRU's contribution was focused on developing and using micro-electrodes for the same purpose, and also on developing spectroscopic cells and carrying out various types of spectroscopic measurements to characterize the oxygen species in molten carbonate under MCFC conditions. This report is divided into two main parts. Part 1 provides the technical background of the questions concerning oxygen reduction in molten carbonate as they apply to the MCFC system. The methodological approach and the objectives of the research are also presented. The second part describes the development of the rotating electrodes, micro-electrodes and spectroscopic cells and the results of measurements, as well as the interpretation of the data. Conclusions of this project, including some recommendations for further research, are also given in this part. 111 refs., 69 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Diastereoselective Ugi reaction of chiral 1,3-aminoalcohols derived from an organocatalytic Mannich reaction

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Samantha; Basso, Andrea; Moni, Lisa; Riva, Renata; Rocca, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enantiomerically pure β-aminoalcohols, produced through an organocatalytic Mannich reaction, were subjected to an Ugi multicomponent reaction under classical or Lewis acid-promoted conditions with diastereoselectivities ranging from moderate to good. This approach represents a step-economical path to enantiomerically pure, polyfunctionalized peptidomimetics endowed with three stereogenic centers, allowing the introduction of five diversity inputs. PMID:26877816

  6. Controlling Asymmetric Remote and Cascade 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions by Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Pernille H; Vergura, Stefania; Monleón, Alicia; Jørgensen, Danny Kaare Bech; Jørgensen, Karl Anker

    2016-05-25

    The regio- and stereoselective control of cycloaddition reactions to polyconjugated systems has been demonstrated by applying asymmetric organocatalysis. Reaction of 2,4-dienals with nitrones allows for a highly regio- and stereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in the presence of an aminocatalyst. The first cycloaddition on the remote olefin can be followed either by a cascade reaction or by other selective reactions of the remaining olefin. The chiral products are obtained in good to high yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. The remote selective concept has been extended to 2,4,6-trienals by means of a novel enantioselective triple cascade 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The formation of chiral poly 1,3-amino alcohols is also demonstrated. PMID:27160510

  7. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  8. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2012-04-10

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  9. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2013-04-02

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  10. Carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH4 with Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saueressig, G.; Bergamaschi, P.; Crowley, J. N.; Fischer, H.; Harris, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction between Cl and CH4 (KIE(sub Cl)) has been measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to determine (13)CH4/(12)CH4 ratios. Cl atoms were generated by the irradition of Cl2 in static mixtures of Cl2/CH4/N2 or Cl2/CH4/N2/O2. Both methods resulted in a (KIE(sub Cl)) of 1.066 +/- 0.002 at 297 K. The KIE(sub Cl) displayed a slight temperature dependence, increasing to 1.075 +/- 0.005 at 223 K. This result suggests a significant influence of the title reaction on the stratospheric CH4 isotopic composition and may help to resolve discrepancies between measurements of stratospheric (13)CH4/(12)CH4 profiles and laboratory measurements of KIE(sub OH).

  11. Effect of partial carbonation on the cyclic CaO carbonation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Grasa, G.; Abanades, J.C.; Anthony, E.J.

    2009-10-15

    CaO particles from the calcination of natural limestones can be used as regenerable solid sorbents in some CO{sub 2} capture systems. Their decay curves in terms of CO{sub 2} capture capacity have been extensively studied in the literature, always in experiments allowing particles to reach their maximum carbonation conversion for a given cycle. However, at the expected operating conditions in a CO{sub 2} capture system using the carbonation reaction, a relevant fraction of the CaO particles will not have time to fully convert in the carbonator reactor. This work investigates if there is any effect on the decay curves when CaO is only partially converted in each cycle. Experiments have been conducted in a thermobalance arranged to interrupt the carbonation reaction in each cycle before the end of the fast reaction period typical in the CaO-CO{sub 2} reaction. It is shown that, after the necessary normalization of results, the effective capacity of the sorbent to absorb CO{sub 2} during particle lifetime in the capture system slightly increases and CaO particles partially converted behave 'younger' than particles fully converted after every calcination. This has beneficial implications for the design of carbonation/calcination loops.

  12. R-Matrix Analysis of the 13C(α,n)16O Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Arthur; Rogachev, Grigory

    2015-10-01

    The 13C(α,n)16O reaction plays a crucial role in the main s-process occurring in low-mass thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars, which produces about half of all nuclei heavier than iron. However, direct measurements of this reaction cross section near the Gamow-peak energy are currently not possible due to very small reaction cross sections. Additionally, available cross-section data at higher energy have some inconsistencies, leading to significant uncertainties in low energy extrapolations. A global R-matrix fit was conducted, using all available data for the 13C(α,n)16O, 13C(α, α)13C, and 16O(n,n)16O reactions. Of particular importance was the inclusion of the fixed ANC for the 1 / 2 + state at 6 . 356 MeV in 17O, which was measured recently using the sub-Coulomb α-transfer reaction, as well as the new 13C+ α elastic-scattering data measured in the low-energy region 1 . 6 - 3 . 8 MeV. Important constraining information on various resonances was found, and the uncertainty for the astrophysical 13C(α,n)16O reaction rate was dramatically reduced. Much work on the analysis was done by A. K. Nurmukhanbetova from National Laboratory Astana in Astana, Kazakhstan.

  13. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  14. All-Carbon [3+3] Oxidative Annulations of 1,3-Enynes by Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Functionalization and 1,4-Migration.

    PubMed

    Burns, David J; Best, Daniel; Wieczysty, Martin D; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-08-17

    1,3-Enynes containing allylic hydrogens cis to the alkyne function as three-carbon components in rhodium(III)-catalyzed, all-carbon [3+3] oxidative annulations to produce spirodialins. The proposed mechanism of these reactions involves the alkenyl-to-allyl 1,4-rhodium(III) migration. PMID:26224377

  15. All-Carbon [3+3] Oxidative Annulations of 1,3-Enynes by Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalization and 1,4-Migration**

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David J; Best, Daniel; Wieczysty, Martin D; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    1,3-Enynes containing allylic hydrogens cis to the alkyne function as three-carbon components in rhodium(III)-catalyzed, all-carbon [3+3] oxidative annulations to produce spirodialins. The proposed mechanism of these reactions involves the alkenyl-to-allyl 1,4-rhodium(III) migration. PMID:26224377

  16. Interstitial Reactions in Electron Irradiated Carbon-Doped Silicon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Simon Peter

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Reactions of interstitial atoms in silicon have been investigated using a combination of infra-red (IR) absorption and deep level transient spectroscopies. The defects were introduced into samples by 2 MeV electron irradiation whilst they were maintained below 200 K; the evolution of the damage was studied during subsequent anneals. Two deep levels at Ev + 0.18 eV and Ev + 0.20 eV, observed in p-type (boron-doped) silicon, were attributed to divacancies (VV) perturbed by a nearest or next-nearest neighbour self-interstitial (I) atom. At 130 K these centres either dissociated to produce VV and I defects or they recombined to form isolated vacancies. I atoms are mobile during the irradiation and exchange sites with the substitutional carbon (C _{rm s}) atoms. The resulting interstitial carbon (C_{rm i }) atoms were selectively trapped by other C_{rm s} or oxygen (O_{rm i}) impurities during anneals near 300 K. In oxygen-free silicon, the lifetime ( tau) for the loss of C_{ rm i} atoms from solution was given by tau = 4.7 times 10^{-10}e^ {(0.88rm eV/kT)} s for both C _{rm i}^+ and C _{rm i}^0. A delay was observed between the loss of C_{ rm i} atoms and the formation of dicarbon centres, indicating the formation of an intermediate precursor defect (CC*). IR absorption lines at 860 and 966 cm ^{-1} were observed and assigned to this defect. It was established, later, that the formation of CC* centres did not lead to a modification of the previously determined value of the diffusion coefficient of C _{rm i}^0. In oxygen-rich silicon, the time constant for the loss of C_{rm i}^+ defects from solution (tau = 1 times 10^{ -13}e^{(0.99rm eV/kT) } s) was more than three times larger than that measured for C_{rm i} ^0 (tau = 1 times 10^{-12}e ^{(0.89rm eV/kT)} s). It was proposed that the high electronegativity of the O_{rm i} impurity results in positive charges on neighbouring silicon atoms which repel the

  17. Somewhere beyond the sea? The oceanic - carbon dioxide - reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In correlation to climate change and CO2 emission different campaigns highlight the importance of forests and trees to regulate the concentration of carbon dioxide in the earths' atmosphere. Seeing millions of square miles of rainforest cut down every day, this is truly a valid point. Nevertheless, we often tend to forget what scientists like Spokes try to raise awareness for: The oceans - and foremost deep sea sections - resemble the second biggest deposit of carbon dioxide. Here carbon is mainly found in form of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The carbonates are needed by corals and other sea organisms to maintain their skeletal structure and thereby to remain vital. To raise awareness for the protection of this fragile ecosystem in schools is part of our approach. Awareness is achieved best through understanding. Therefore, our approach is a hands-on activity that aims at showing students how the carbon dioxide absorption changes in relation to the water temperature - in times of global warming a truly sensitive topic. The students use standard syringes filled with water (25 ml) at different temperatures (i.e. 10°C, 20°C, 40°C). Through a connector students inject carbon dioxide (25ml) into the different samples. After a fixed period of time, students can read of the remaining amount of carbon dioxide in relation to the given water temperature. Just as with every scientific project, students need to closely monitor their experiments and alter their setups (e.g. water temperature or acidity) according to their initial planning. A digital template (Excel-based) supports the analysis of students' experiments. Overview: What: hands-on, minds -on activity using standard syringes to exemplify carbon dioxide absorption in relation to the water temperature (Le Chatelier's principle) For whom: adjustable from German form 11-13 (age: 16-19 years) Time: depending on the prior knowledge 45-60 min. Sources (extract): Spokes, L.: Wie Ozeane CO2 aufnehmen. Environmental

  18. Study of redox reactions to split water and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, Darwin

    The development of carbon-neutral, environmentally-sustainable energy carrier is a technological imperative necessary to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic carbon dioxide on earth's climate. One compelling approach rapidly gaining international attention is the conversion of solar energy into renewable fuels, such as H2 or CO, via a two-step thermochemical cycle driven by concentrated solar power. In accordance with the increased interest in this process, there is a need to better understand the gas splitting chemistry on the metal oxide intermediates encountered in such solar-driven processes. Here we measured the H2 and CO production rates during oxidation by H2O and CO2 in a stagnation flow reactor. Redox cycles were performed over various metal oxide chemistries such as hercynite and ceria based materials that are thermally reduced by laser irradiation. In addition to cycle capacity evaluation, reaction kinetics intrinsic to the materials were extracted using a model-based analytical approach to account for the effects of mixing and dispersion in the reactor. Investigation of the "hercynite chemistry" with raman spectroscopy verifies that, at the surface, the cycle proceeds by stabilizing the reduced and oxidized moieties in two different compounds, which allows the thermal reduction reaction to occur to a greater extent at a temperature 150 °C lower than a similarly prepared CoFe2O4-coated m-ZrO2. Investigation of the ceria cycle shows that the water splitting reaction, in the range of 750 - 950 °C and 20 - 40 vol.% H2O, can best be described by a first-order kinetic model with low apparent activation energy (29 kJ/mol). The carbon dioxide splitting reaction, in the range of 650 - 875 °C and 10 - 40 vol.% CO2, is a more complex surface-mediated phenomena that is controlled by a temperature-dependent surface site blocking mechanism involving adsorbed carbon. Moreover, we find that lattice substitution of ceria with zirconium can increase H2 production by

  19. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  20. The cluster and single-particle states in 13C (α,α)13C reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbayev, N. A.; Nurmukhanbetova, A. K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Koloberdin, M.; Ivanov, I.; Nauruzbayev, D. K.; Berdibek, Sh S.; Rakhymzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation functions of elastic scattering of 13C on alpha particle have been measured using the thick-target inverse kinematic method at the heavy ion DC-60 cyclotron. The helium gas was used as a target and also as a degrader to stop the beam. New data (including 180°degree) of the resonances close to the threshold in 17O have been obtained.

  1. The Reaction of Carbon Dioxide with Palladium Allyl Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianguo; Green, Jennifer C.; Hruszkewycz, Damian P.; Incarvito, Christopher D.; Schmeier, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    A family of palladium allyl complexes of the type bis(2-methylallyl)Pd(L) (L = PMe3 (1), PEt3 (2), PPh3 (3) or NHC (4); NHC = 1,3-Bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-imidazol-2-ylidene) have been prepared through the reaction of bis(2-methylallyl)Pd with the appropriate free ligand. Compounds 1–4 contain one η1 and one η3-2-methylallyl ligand and 3 was characterized by X-ray crystallography. These complexes react rapidly with CO2 at low temperature to form well defined unidentate palladium carboxylates of the type (η3-2-methylallyl)Pd(OC(O)C4H7)(L) (L = PMe3 (6), PEt3 (7), PPh3 (8) or NHC (9). The structure of 9 was elucidated using X-ray crystallography. The mechanism of the reaction of 1–4 with CO2 was probed using a combination of experimental and theoretical (density functional theory) studies. The coordination mode of the allyl ligand is crucial and whereas nucleophilic η1-allyls react rapidly with CO2, η3-allyls do not react. We propose that the reaction of η1-palladium allyls with CO2 does not proceed via direct insertion of CO2 into the Pd-C bond but through nucleophilic attack of the terminal olefin on electrophilic CO2, followed by an associative substitution at palladium. PMID:21218132

  2. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  3. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  4. Heterogeneous processing of {sup 13}NO{sub 2} at zero concentration by monodisperse carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, K.; Kalberer, M.; Parrat, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The heterogeneous chemical processing of atmospheric cases by both natural and anthropogenic aerosols plays a key role in the regional as well as global environment. The oxides of nitrogen in the presence of soot present a particularly interesting and relevant topic covering a wide range of such diverse phenomena as acid rain and stratospheric ozone depletion. Detailed investigations of such systems is difficult due to low aerosol and gas species concentrations and, to date, most studies have investigated the chemistry using bulk samples. Nitrogen dioxide is known to be the most important reactive species in this system proceeding as, NO{sub 2} + (C) {r_arrow} (NO{sub 2}{lg_bullet} C){r_arrow} NO + (O {lg_bullet} C). In our current study, we have used {sup 13}N(T{sub 1/2} = 9.96 min) radioisotope labeling techniques to investigate the uptake and chemical conversion of NO{sub 2} in the presence of monodisperse carbon aerosols under real atmospheric conditions, which represents a significant improvement over earlier studies in our lab. {sup 13}N was produced using 14 MeV protons from the PSI Philips cyclotron and a gas target of 2% O{sub 2} in He for the reaction {sup 16}O(p,{alpha}) {sup 13}N. The resulting {sup 13}NO{sub y} were reduced to {sup 13}NO over molybdenum and subsequently oxidized to {sup 13}NO{sub 2} over CrO{sub 3}. Carbon aerosol was generated by spark discharge between graphite rods in argon. Mono-disperse size cuts were selected with a differential mobility analyzer operated with synthetic air. The NO{sub 2} and aerosol streams were admixed and passed through a reaction volume for a reaction time of 10s. A series of selective traps and one filter were used to separate products and reactants: (1) triethanolamine (TEA) denuder to remove unreacted gas phase NO{sub 2}, (2) TEA impregnated class fiber filter to remove aerosol fraction and NO{sub 2} released after uptake, and (3) Co{sub x}O{sub y} trap to remove all residual NO{sub x}.

  5. Reassessing the dissolution of marine carbonates: II. Reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F. C.; Chou, L.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-08-01

    We studied dissolution kinetics of the carbonate fraction >150 μm of sediments sampled along two bathymetric transects in the eastern tropical Atlantic: the Sierra Leone Rise (SLR) and the Cape Verde Plateau (CVP). The reaction was followed by monitoring solution pH during freedrift experiments lasting between 46 and 50 h (20 °C, pCO 2≈3100 ppm and 1 atm pressure). The alkalinity reached at the end of the dissolution experiments ranged between 2.444 and 2.798 meq/kg sw. The dissolution time series was extrapolated to equilibrium by fitting an empirical relation to the data. The estimated asymptotic concentration products ([Ca 2+] ∞×[CO 32-] ∞, for t→∞ and dA/dt=0) range from 4.27×10 -7 to 6.77×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2. These asymptotic concentration products are comparable with the stoichiometric concentration product of aragonite (6.56×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2) and calcite (4.37 (±0.22)×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2) derived for the same sediment material during long-term equilibration experiments. They are indicative of the presence of trace amounts of a higher solubility carbonate phase in sediments of the shallow stations (SLR station A, 2637 m; CVP station M, 3104 m). While it is likely that this phase is aragonite, the presence of authigenic carbonate precipitated in contact with supersaturated bottom waters cannot be excluded. Calcite is the main dissolving carbonate mineral in sediments from deeper stations. The order of reaction is always greater than unity. It varies between 1.4 (SLR station C) and 2.8 (CVP station M2), with an average n=2.3±0.4. The higher order reaction is explained in terms of a multiphase system. Specific rate constants range from 0.09 to 0.53 meq/m 2/d.

  6. Hydrogen storage reactions on titanium decorated carbon nanocones theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabi, A. S.; Taha, H. O.; Soliman, K. A.; Abeld Aal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen storage reactions on Ti decorated carbon nanocones (CNC) are investigated by using the state of the art density functional theory calculations. The single Ti atom prefers to bind at the bridge site between two hexagonal rings, and can bind up to 6 hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energies of -1.73, -0.74, -0.57, -0.45, -0.42, and -0.35 eV per hydrogen molecule. No evidence for metal clustering in the ideal circumstances, and the hydrogen storage capacity is expected to be as large as 14.34 wt%. Two types of interactions are recognized. While the interaction of 2H2 with Ti-CNC is irreversible at 532 K, the interaction of 3H2 with Ti-CNC is reversible at 392 K. Further characterizations of the former two reactions are considered in terms of projected densities of states, simulated infrared and proton magnetic resonance spectra, electrophilicity, and statistical thermodynamic stability. The free energy of the highest hydrogen storage capacity reaction between 6H2 and Ti-CNC meets the ultimate targets of department of energy at (233.15 K) and (11.843 atm) with surface coverage (0.941) and (direct/inverse) rate constants ratio (1.35).

  7. SN1 reactions in supercritical carbon dioxide in the presence of alcohols: the role of preferential solvation.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Abad, Thais; Martínez-Ferrer, Jaime; Acerete, Rafael; Asensio, Gregorio; Mello, Rossella; González-Núñez, María Elena

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol () inhibits SN1 reactions of alkyl halides in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and gives no ethers as products. The unexpected behaviour of alcohols in the reaction of alkyl halides with 1,3-dimethoxybenzene () in scCO2 under different conditions is rationalised in terms of Brønsted and Lewis acid-base equilibria of reagents, intermediates, additives and products in a singular solvent characterised by: (i) the strong quadrupole and Lewis acid character of carbon dioxide, which hinders SN2 paths by strongly solvating basic solutes; (ii) the weak Lewis base character of carbon dioxide, which prevents it from behaving as a proton sink; (iii) the compressible nature of scCO2, which enhances the impact of preferential solvation on carbon dioxide availability for the solvent-demanding rate determining step. PMID:27303826

  8. Asymmetric 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions Catalyzed by Heterocycle-Based Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Hiroyuki

    Highly enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of several 1,3-dipoles, such as nitrones, nitrile oxides, nitrile imines, diazoalkanes, azomethine imines and carbonyl ylides, catalyzed by heterocyclic supramolecular type of metal complexes consisting of chiral heterocyclic compounds and metal salts were described in terms of their ability of asymmetric induction and enantioface differentiation. The scope and limitations of each cycloaddition reactions were also briefly described. Of the chiral hererocycle-based ligands, chiral bisoxazoline, 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl)pyridine, and related oxazoline ligands are shown to be quite effective in obtaining high levels of asymmtric induction. The combination of the bisoxazoline ligand derived from (1S,2R)-cis-1-amino-2-indanol and metal salts was especially efficient for asymmetric cycloaddition reactions of a number of 1,3-dipoles, such as nitrones, nitrile oxide, nitrile imines, diazoacetates and azomethine imines. The metals utilized for the heterocycle-based complexes show a crucial role for degree of asymmetric induction depending upon the 1,3-dipole used. High levels of enantioselectivity were achieved in 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of unstable carbonyl ylides with benzyloxyacetaldehyde derivatives, α-keto esters, 3-(2-alkenoyl)-2-oxazolidinones, and even vinyl ethers, which were catalyzed by Pybox-lanthanoid metal complexes.

  9. The Nature of Carbonate and Organic δ13C Covariance Through Geological Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Significant evolutionary, climatic, and oceanographic events in Earth history are often accompanied by excursions in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of marine carbonates and co-occurring sedimentary organic material. The observation of synchronous excursions in the δ13C values of marine carbonates and coeval organic matter is commonly thought to prove that the deposit has not been altered by diagenesis, and that the variations in the δ13C records are the result of a significant change in global carbon cycling. Furthermore, this model suggests that the covariance of carbonate and organic δ13C records is driven only by changes in the δ13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the surface waters of the ocean. However, recent work suggests that there may be at least two alternate models for generating covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values in the geologic record. One of the models invokes sea-level driven syndepositional mixing between isotopically distinct sources of carbonate and organic material to produce positive covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values. The second model suggests that post-depositional alteration to the carbonate δ13C values during meteoric diagenesis, in concert with concurrent contributions of terrestrial organic material during subaerial exposure, can also produce co-occurring negative excursions with tightly covariant δ13C records. In contrast to earlier interpretations of covariant δ13C values, these models suggest that both syndepositional and post-depositional factors can significantly influence the relationship between carbonate and organic δ13C values in a variety of depositional environments. The implications for reconstructions of ancient global carbon cycle events will be explored within the context of these three models, and their relative importance throughout geologic time will be discussed.

  10. 12C/13C kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH4 with OH and Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohan L.; McGrath, M. P.; Cicerone, R. J.; Rowland, F. S.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1997-11-01

    In qualitative agreement with previous MP2 level calculations of the 12C/13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for H-abstraction of CH4 by OH and Cl, higher level calculations yield KIEs at 300 K that differ from the corresponding experimental values, but in different directions. At QCISD(T)/6-311+G(2df,p), the theoretical KIE for CH4+Cl is 32‰ less than the measured value, while for CH4+OH, the theoretical KIE is greater than the measured value, but only by 5‰. Noticeable differences in atmospheric model simulation studies can occur if the measured KIEs are replaced by the analogous theoretical values. For example, the effect of carbon isotopic fractionation from the CH4 + Cl reaction on stratospheric δ13CH4 will be significantly lower than that obtained by Bergamaschi et al. [1996]. It is suggested, for the CH4+OH reaction and especially for the CH4+Cl reaction, that additional KIE measurements are needed.

  11. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  12. Base-Promoted Tandem Reaction Involving Insertion into Carbon-Carbon σ-Bonds: Synthesis of Xanthone and Chromone Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingcan; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Kai; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Yanzhong

    2016-08-26

    Tandem reactions using base-promoted processes have been developed for the synthesis of xanthone and chromone derivatives. The first examples of base-promoted insertion reactions of isolated carbon-carbon triple bonds into carbon-carbon σ-bonds have been reported. Using these approaches, polycyclic structures can be prepared. This reaction has the potential to become a general synthetic protocol for the preparation of multi-substituted xanthones and chromones due to the abundance of easily accessible starting materials possessing diverse substituent groups. PMID:27460875

  13. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  14. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-01

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process. PMID:26943019

  15. Expression stability of 13 housekeeping genes during carbon starvation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Budoor; Colley, Brendan; Klebensberger, Janosch; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying mRNA levels when normalised by a stable reference gene/s. Many putative reference genes are known to be affected by physiological stresses, such as nutrient limitation and hence may not be suitable for normalisation. In this study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of 13 commonly used reference genes, rpoS, proC, recA, rpsL, rho, oprL, anr, tipA, nadB, fabD, ampC, algD and gyrA, were analysed for changes in expression under carbon starvation and nutrient replete conditions. The results showed that rpoS was the only stably expressed housekeeping gene during carbon starvation. In contrast, other commonly used housekeeping genes were shown to vary by as much as 10-100 fold under starvation conditions. This study has identified a suitable reference gene for qRT-PCR in P. aeruginosa during carbon starvation. The results presented here highlight the need to validate housekeeping genes under the chosen experimental conditions. PMID:27297333

  16. "Homeopathic" palladium nanoparticle catalysis of cross carbon-carbon coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Deraedt, Christophe; Astruc, Didier

    2014-02-18

    Catalysis by palladium derivatives is now one of the most important tools in organic synthesis. Whether researchers design palladium nanoparticles (NPs) or nanoparticles occur as palladium complexes decompose, these structures can serve as central precatalysts in common carbon-carbon bond formation. Palladium NPs are also valuable alternatives to molecular catalysts because they do not require costly and toxic ligands. In this Account, we review the role of "homeopathic" palladium catalysts in carbon-carbon coupling reactions. Seminal studies from the groups of Beletskaya, Reetz, and de Vries showed that palladium NPs can catalyze Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions with aryl iodides and, in some cases, aryl bromides at part per million levels. As a result, researchers coined the term "homeopathic" palladium catalysis. Industry has developed large-scale applications of these transformations. In addition, chemists have used Crooks' concept of dendrimer encapsulation to set up efficient nanofilters for Suzuki-Miyaura and selective Heck catalysis, although these transformations required high PdNP loading. With arene-centered, ferrocenyl-terminated dendrimers containing triazolyl ligands in the tethers, we designed several generations of dendrimers to compare their catalytic efficiencies, varied the numbers of Pd atoms in the PdNPs, and examined encapsulation vs stabilization. The catalytic efficiencies achieved "homeopathic" (TON = 540 000) behavior no matter the PdNP size and stabilization type. The TON increased with decreasing the Pd/substrate ratio, which suggested a leaching mechanism. Recently, we showed that water-soluble arene-centered dendrimers with tri(ethylene glycol) (TEG) tethers stabilized PdNPs involving supramolecular dendritic assemblies because of the interpenetration of the TEG branches. Such PdNPs are stable and retain their "homeopathic" catalytic activities for Suzuki-Miyaura reactions for months. (TONs can reach 2.7 × 10(6) at 80 °C for aryl

  17. Investigation on biological properties of tacrolimus-loaded poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ruixia; Wu, Leigang; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2010-06-01

    The drug-eluting stents have been regarded as a milestone in inhibiting the restenosis of coronary arteries. However, adverse reactions caused by bare-metal stents and non-biodegradable polymer coatings may result in some clinical problems. In this study, a new tacrolimus-eluting stent coated with biodegradable poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) is developed. The structures are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the wettability is measured by contact angle assay. The biological behaviors are evaluated by the in vitro platelets adhesion test, APTT test, the human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUCASMCs), 4',6-diamidine-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and actin immunofluorescence staining, MTT colorimetric assay. These results show that after blending tacrolimus into PTMC, the anticoagulant behavior is improved, and the adhesion and proliferation of HUCASMCs on samples are inhibited. This work aims to find one kind of surface erosion biodegradable polymers that can be applied as drug-eluting stent coatings.

  18. Reaction Mechanisms of a Photo-Induced [1,3] Sigmatropic Rearrangement via a Nonadiabatic Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Liu, Kunhui; Yang, Chunfan; Zhao, Hongmei; Wang, Huan; Yu, Youqing; Su, Hongmei

    2009-11-01

    Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy measurements and B3LYP/cc-pVDZ calculations have been conducted to characterize the reaction dynamics of a remarkable photoinduced 1,3-Cl sigmatropic rearrangement reaction upon 193 or 266 nm excitation of the model systems acryloyl chloride (CH2CHCOCl) and crotonyl chloride (CH3CHCHCOCl) in solution. The reaction is elucidated to follow nonadiabatic pathways via two rapid ISC processes, S1 → T1 and T1 → S0, and the S1/T1 and T1/S0 surface intersections are found to play significant roles leading to the nonadiabatic pathways. The S1 → T1 → S0 reaction pathway involving the key participation of the T1 state is the most favorable, corresponding to the lowest energy path. It is also suggested that the photoinduced 1,3-Cl migration reaction of RCHCHCOCl (R = H, CH3) proceeds through a stepwise mechanism involving radical dissociation-recombination, which is quite different from the generally assumed one-step concerted process for pericyclic reactions.

  19. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Actinide cross sections from the reaction of sup 13 C with sup 254 Es sup g

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, K.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Summerer, K.; Hahn, R.L.; Aarle, J.v.; Bethune, G.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for the formation of actinide transfer products in the reaction of 72-MeV {sup 13}C projectiles with {sup 254}Es{sup {ital g}} targets. The pattern of nuclide yields is similar to those observed in the reactions of heavier ions with {sup 254}Es{sup {ital g}}. We have constructed the primary element yields from these results and show that the total cross section for transfer reactions is 58 mb. The total reaction cross section is about 300 mb. Lawrencium isotopes are formed with larger cross sections than are consistent with the trends of the transfer-product distributions; we explain this in terms of massive transfer, and model the lawrencium yields with an evaporation code.

  1. Harnessing mineral carbonation reactions to seal fractured shales and sequester carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Shale oil and gas are being developed widely in the United States despite the potential for long-term climate impacts driven by burning these new hydrocarbon resources and by fugitive emissions from fractured formations. Here the carbonation of calcium-based silicates is studied as a method to re-seal fractured shale formations and to store significant amounts of CO2 after hydrocarbon extraction. Ex situ mineral carbonation has been studied extensively for trapping CO2 from power plants but the application of these reactions directly within shale matrix under in situ conditions to seal shales and sequester carbon has not been studied. The reaction requires the solid calcium-based silicates being present within the shale fracture matrix and flooded with high-pressure CO2. The pressure and temperature within most shale formations would enable this carbonation reaction to precipitate solid calcium carbonate, which would clog fractures. Silicates could be injected in the same way that proppants are injected into shale gas wells. Wollastonite was tested here but other silicate minerals such as olivine could also be used in much the same way. To prove this concept, batch experiments were carried out under reservoir conditions representative of the Marcellus Shale in the presence of ground shale particles (39-177μm) and CaSiO3 powder. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed the conversion of CaSiO3 into CaCO3 after 24 hours. Quantitative XRD analysis was used to determine that the conversion ratio of CaSiO3 was ~55% at 3100 Psi and 75oC. The reaction was sensitive to both temperature and pressure with ~58% conversion at an increased temperature of 95oC and only ~50% at lower pressure (2200psi). The morphology observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) reveals that the shale particle surfaces are covered with precipitated calcite crystals ranging in size from 1 to 5 μm. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the locations of residual CaSiO3and

  2. Template-free synthesis of porous graphitic carbon nitride/carbon composite spheres for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaorui; Hu, Xiaofei; Yan, Zhenhua; Lei, Kaixiang; Li, Fujun; Cheng, Fangyi; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-28

    Porous graphitic carbon nitride/carbon composite spheres were synthesized using melamine and cyanuric acid, and glucose as the carbon nitride and carbon precursor, respectively. The 3D hierarchical composites efficiently catalyzed the oxygen reduction reaction with an onset potential of 0.90 V and a kinetic current density of 23.92 mA cm(-2). These merit their promising applications in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26666314

  3. Preferential formation of 13C- 18O bonds in carbonate minerals, estimated using first-principles lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Eiler, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium constants for internal isotopic exchange reactions of the type: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca13C16O3↔Ca13C18O16O2+Ca12C16O3 for individual CO 32- groups in the carbonate minerals calcite (CaCO 3), aragonite (CaCO 3), dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2), magnesite (MgCO 3), witherite (BaCO 3), and nahcolite (NaHCO 3) are calculated using first-principles lattice dynamics. Calculations rely on density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with norm-conserving planewave pseudopotentials to determine the vibrational frequencies of isotopically substituted crystals. Our results predict an ˜0.4‰ excess of 13C18O16O22- groups in all studied carbonate minerals at room-temperature equilibrium, relative to what would be expected in a stochastic mixture of carbonate isotopologues with the same bulk 13C/ 12C, 18O/ 16O, and 17O/ 16O ratios. The amount of excess 13C18O16O22- decreases with increasing temperature of equilibration, from 0.5‰ at 0 °C to <0.1‰ at 300 °C, suggesting that measurements of multiply substituted isotopologues of carbonate could be used to infer temperatures of ancient carbonate mineral precipitation and alteration events, even where the δ 18O of coexisting fluids is uncertain. The predicted temperature sensitivity of the equilibrium constant is ˜0.003‰/°C at 25 °C. Estimated equilibrium constants for the formation of 13C18O16O22- are remarkably uniform for the variety of minerals studied, suggesting that temperature calibrations will also be applicable to carbonate minerals not studied here without greatly compromising accuracy. A related equilibrium constant for the reaction: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca12C17O16O2↔Ca12C18O17O16O+Ca12C16O3 in calcite indicates formation of 0.1‰ excess 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- at 25 °C. In a conventional phosphoric acid reaction of carbonate to form CO 2 for mass-spectrometric analysis, molecules derived from 13C18O16O22- dominate (˜96%) the mass 47 signal, and 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- contributes most of the remainder (3%). This suggests

  4. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  5. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  6. Carbonates in leaching reactions in context of 14C dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, Danuta; Czernik, Justyna

    2015-10-01

    Lime mortars as a mixture of binder and aggregate may contain carbon of various origins. If the mortars are made of totally burnt lime, radiocarbon dating of binder yields the real age of building construction. The presence of carbonaceous aggregate has a significant influence on the 14C measurements results and depending on the type of aggregate and fraction they may cause overaging. Another problem, especially in case of hydraulic mortars that continue to be chemically active for a very long time, is the recrystallization usually connected with rejuvenation of the results but also, depending on local geological structures, with so called reservoir effect yielding apparent ages. An attempt in separating the binder from other carbonaceous components successfully was made for samples from Israel by Nawrocka-Michalska et al. (2007). The same preparation procedure, after taking into account the petrographic composition, was used for samples coming from Poland, Nawrocka et al. (2009). To verify the procedure used previously for non-hydraulic samples determination an experimental tests on carbonaceous mortars with crushed bricks from Novae in Bulgaria were made. Additionally, to identify different carbonaceous structures and their morphology, a cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscope with electron dispersive spectrometer were applied. The crushed bricks and brick dust used in mortars production process have been interpreted as an alternative use to other pozzolanic materials. The reaction between lime and pozzolanic additives take place easily and affects the rate and course of carbonates decomposition in orthophosphric acid, during the samples pretreatment for dating. The composition of the Bulgarian samples together with influence of climate conditions on mortar carbonates do not allow for making straightforward conclusions in chronology context, but gives some new guidelines in terms of hydraulic mortars application for dating. This work has mainly

  7. 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions of Azomethine Ylides with Carbonyl Dipolarophiles Yielding Oxazolidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Adam G; Ryan, John H

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive account of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of azomethine ylides with carbonyl dipolarophiles. Many different azomethine ylides have been studied, including stabilized and non-stabilized ylides. Of the carbonyl dipolarophiles, aldehydes including formaldehyde are the most studied, although there are now examples of cycloadditions with ketones, ketenes and carboxyl systems, in particular isatoic anhydrides and phthalic anhydrides. Intramolecular cycloadditions with esters can also occur under certain circumstances. The oxazolidine cycloadducts undergo a range of reactions triggered by the ring-opening of the oxazolidine ring system. PMID:27455230

  8. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  9. A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

  10. Stereoselective α,α'-annelation reactions of 1,3-dioxan-5-ones.

    PubMed

    Casey, Tyrone C; Carlisle, Julie; Tisselli, Patrizia; Male, Louise; Spencer, Neil; Grainger, Richard S

    2010-11-01

    Pyrrolidine enamines derived from three 1,3-dioxan-5-ones undergo α,α'-annelation reactions with methyl α-(bromomethyl)acrylate to produce bridged 2,4-dioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane ring systems with complete stereocontrol. Stereochemical outcomes have been rationalized based on steric and stereoelectronic interactions in intermediate boat-like conformations of the 1,3-dioxane ring and subsequent kinetic protonation to set an axial ester group on the cyclohexanone ring. Base-mediated ester epimerization provides the stereochemical array found in the highly oxygenated cyclohexane ring of phyllaemblic acid and glochicoccins B and D. PMID:20936869

  11. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  12. Relayed 13C magnetization transfer: Detection of malate dehydrogenase reaction in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2007-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase catalyzes rapid interconversion between dilute metabolites oxaloacetate and malate. Both oxaloacetate and malate are below the detection threshold of in vivo MRS. Oxaloacetate is also in rapid exchange with aspartate catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, the latter metabolite is observable in vivo using 13C MRS. We hypothesized that the rapid turnover of oxaloacetate can effectively relay perturbation of magnetization between malate and aspartate. Here, we report indirect observation of the malate dehydrogenase reaction by saturating malate C2 resonance at 71.2 ppm and detecting a reduced aspartate C2 signal at 53.2 ppm due to relayed magnetization transfer via oxaloacetate C2 at 201.3 ppm. Using this strategy the rate of the cerebral malate dehydrogenase reaction was determined to be 9 ± 2 μmol/g wet weight/min (means ± SD, n = 5) at 11.7 Tesla in anesthetized adult rats infused with [1,6- 13C 2]glucose.

  13. Carbon dioxide sequestration via olivine carbonation: Examining the formation of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, H. E.; Plümper, O.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its abundance and natural ability to sequester CO2, olivine has been proposed as one mineral that could be used in the control of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere (Metz, 2005). Large scale peridotite deposits found in locations such as the Western Gneiss Region in Norway could provide in-situ sites for sequestration or the raw materials for ex-situ mineral carbonation. Determining the conditions under which magnesite (MgCO3) forms most efficiently is crucial to conduct a cost effective process. Understanding the development of secondary minerals is particularly important for in-situ methods as these phases can form passivating layers and affect the host rock porosity. The final solution of flow-through experiments conducted at alkaline pH have been shown to be supersaturated with respect to talc and chrysotile (Giammer et al., 2005), although these phases were not found to have precipitated the formation of a passivating, amorphous silica layer has been observed on reacted olivine surfaces (Bearat et al., 2006). By studying magnesite and other products produced during the carbonation of olivine within Teflon lined steel autoclaves we have begun to form a more comprehensive understanding of how these reactions would proceed during sequestration processes. We have performed batch experiments using carbonated saline solutions in the presence of air or gaseous CO2 from 80 to 200 ˚ C. X-ray powder diffraction was used to identify magnesite within the reaction products. Crystals of magnesite up to 20 m in diameter can be observed on olivine grain surfaces with scanning electron microscopy. Secondary reaction products formed a platy layer on olivine surfaces in reactions above 160 ˚ C and below pH 12. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the platy layer revealed an increase in Fe concentration. The macroscopically observable red colouration of the reaction products and Raman spectroscopy indicate that hematite is present in these layers. For experiments with

  14. Global-through-urban nested three-dimensional simulation of air pollution with a 13,600-reaction photochemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Ginnebaugh, Diana L.

    2010-07-01

    To date, gas photochemistry has not been simulated beyond a few hundred reactions in a three-dimensional (3-D) atmospheric model. Here, we treat 4675 gases and 13,626 tropospheric and stratospheric reactions in the 3-D GATOR-GCMOM climate-pollution model and compare results with data and with results from a condensed 152-gas/297-reaction mechanism when the model was nested at increasing resolution from the globe to California to Los Angeles. Gases included C1-C12 organic degradation products and H-, O-, N-, Cl-, Br-, Fl-, and S-containing inorganics. Organic reactions were from the Master Chemical Mechanism. Photolysis coefficients for 2644 photoprocesses and heating rates for 1909 photolyzing gases were solved with an online radiative code in each grid cell using quantum yield/cross section data over 86 UV/visible wavelengths. Spatial/temporal emissions of > 110 gases were derived from the 2005 U.S. National Emission Inventory. The condensed mechanism was a modified Carbon-Bond IV (MCBIV). Three-day simulation results indicate that the more-explicit mechanism reduced the O3 gross error against data versus the MCBIV error against data by only ˜2 percentage points (from 28.3% to 26.5%) and NO2 and HCHO by ˜6 percentage points in Los Angeles. While more-explicit photochemistry improved results, the condensed mechanism was not the main source of ozone error. The more explicit mechanism, which treated absorptive heating by more photolyzing gases, also resulted in a different magnitude of feedbacks to meteorological variables and back to gases themselves than did the less-explicit mechanism. The computer time for all processes in GATOR-GCMOM with the more explicit mechanism (solved with SMVGEAR II in all domains) was only ˜3.7 times that with the MCBIV despite the factors of 31 and 46 increases in numbers of species and reactions, respectively.

  15. Theoretical Studies on the Dynamics of the Fluorine Atom Reaction with trans-1,3-butadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui; Wang, Xiu-yan; Yang, Xue-ming

    2006-08-01

    Theoretical studies of F atom reaction with trans-1,3-butadiene were carried out at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p)/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) levels. Energies and structures for all reactants, products and transition states were determined. Two reaction pathways involving the formation of the complexes CH2CHCHFCH2 and CH2CHCHCH2F were found in this reaction. Theoretical results suggest that the H atom channel observed in previous crossed beam experiment occurs likely via these two long-lived complex formation pathways. For the complex CH2CHCHFCH2 pathway, another reaction channel (C2H3+C2H3F) is also accessible. Relative importance of the C2H3+C2H3F channel versus the H formation channel via the same reaction pathway has also been estimated, suggesting that it would be di±cult to observe the C2H3+C2H3F channel in a crossed molecular beam experiment. Theoretical analysis also shows that the HF formation proceeds via direct abstraction mechanisms, though it is likely a minor process in this reaction.

  16. The US nuclear reaction data network. Summary of the first meeting, March 13 & 14 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The first meeting of the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) was held at the Colorado School of Mines, March 13-14, 1996 chaired by F. Edward Cecil. The Agenda of the meeting is attached. The Network, its mission, products and services; related nuclear data and data networks, members, and organization are described in Attachment 1. The following progress reports from the members of the USNRDN were distributed prior to the meeting and are given as Attachment 2. (1) Measurements and Development of Analytic Techniques for Basic Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Applications; (2) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities at the National Nuclear Data Center; (3) Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies; (4) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities, Nuclear Data Group; (5) Progress in Neutron Physics at Los Alamos - Experiments; (6) Nuclear Reaction Data Activities in Group T2; (7) Progress Report for the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network Meeting; (8) Nuclear Astrophysics Research Group (ORNL); (9) Progress Report from Ohio University; (10) Exciton Model Phenomenology; and (11) Progress Report for Coordination Meeting USNRDN.

  17. Autotrophic carbon budget in coral tissue: a new 13C-based model of photosynthate translocation.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pascale; Grover, Renaud; Maguer, Jean François; Legendre, Louis; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2012-04-15

    Corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinum. These dinoflagellates translocate a large part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host, which in turn uses it for its own needs. Assessing the carbon budget in coral tissue is a central question in reef studies that still vexes ecophysiologists. The amount of carbon fixed by the symbiotic association can be determined by measuring the rate of photosynthesis, but the amount of carbon translocated by the symbionts to the host and the fate of this carbon are more difficult to assess. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to calculate the budget of autotrophic carbon in the tissue of scleractinian corals, based on a new model and measurements made with the stable isotope (13)C. Colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata were incubated in H(13)CO (-)(3)-enriched seawater, after which the fate of (13)C was followed in the symbionts, the coral tissue and the released particulate organic carbon (i.e. mucus). Results obtained showed that after 15 min, ca. 60% of the carbon fixed was already translocated to the host, and after 48 h, this value reached 78%. However, ca. 48% of the photosynthetically fixed carbon was respired by the symbiotic association, and 28% was released as dissolved organic carbon. This is different from other coral species, where <1% of the total organic carbon released is from newly fixed carbon. Only 23% of the initially fixed carbon was retained in the symbionts and coral tissue after 48 h. Results show that our (13)C-based model could successfully trace the carbon flow from the symbionts to the host, and the photosynthetically acquired carbon lost from the symbiotic association. PMID:22442377

  18. Formal Asymmetric (4+1) Annulation Reaction between Sulfur Ylides and 1,3-Dienes.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Olivier; Delaunay, Thierry; Dequirez, Geoffroy; Trieu-Van, Tran; Robeyns, Koen; Robiette, Raphaël

    2015-09-01

    A highly enantioselective synthesis of functionalized cyclopentanoids by a formal asymmetric (4+1) annulation strategy was developed. The methodology consists of a stereoselective cyclopropanation reaction between chiral sulfur ylides and 1,3-dienes followed by a, in situ, stereospecific MgI2 -catalyzed rearrangement of vinylcyclopropanes. This method is distinguished by a remarkable compatibility with functional groups and a high stereocontrol. PMID:26235566

  19. Sc3CH@C80: selective 13C enrichment of the central carbon atom†

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 45Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, −11.73 ppm in the Ih and −8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. 13C satellites in the 1H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the 13C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the 13C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage 13C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either 13CH4 or 13C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with 13C. PMID:27109443

  20. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  1. A theoretical study on the reaction pathways and the mechanism of 1,3- dipolar cycloaddition of vinyl acetylene and methyl azide.

    PubMed

    Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Mahboobifar, Ali; Nasiri, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    1,3-dipolar cycloaddition procedure is one of the most widely practiced methods in order to synthesize heterocyclic compounds. Although, it seems very simple, but, there are numerous precursors of heterocyclic molecules who have more than one positions to react with a 1,3-dipole species. As a result, while using a precursor with more than one position for reaction, it is probable to synthesize several products with different structures. This paper studies all possible interactions of vinyl acetylene, which has two positions for reaction, with methyl azide. This reaction could lead to the emergence of any 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition products. Our ultimate goal is to help researchers to find out how precursors containing both carbon-carbon double, and the triple bonds interact with 1,3- dipolar species. The present study used the DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,pd) level to check all probable interactions between vinyl acetylene and methyl azide, and determined Potential Energy Surface, and optimized all species. PMID:24852164

  2. Drought indicated in carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios of southwestern tree rings

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, S.W. ); Long, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Stomatal closure during periods of moisture deficiency should theoretically lead to elevated {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios as reduction of available CO{sub 2} leads to diminished photosynthetic discrimination against {sup 13}C in favor of {sup 12}C. Stable-carbon isotope ratio chronologies developed from 5-yr tree-ring groups at 17 sites in six southwestern states were tested for a drought relationship by first fitting a spline curve to each chronology to remove the long-term trend and calculating indices as the ratio of actual to spline curve value. The time series of Del Indices so developed are significantly correlated with 5-yr mean Palmer Hydrological Drought Indices and reconstructed July Palmer Drought Severity Indices from respective areas. Overall, in the period since 1790, and driest pentads were 1900-04 and 1960-64, whereas the wettest were 1980-84 and 1915-19. Maps of drought represented for two pentads seem to be reasonable representations, although spatial correlations of Del Indices with PHDI were generally not significant. These Del Index drought reconstructions may provide a useful measure of past physiological response to drought, although the present cost of analysis would prevent this from being a routine method.

  3. Electrical and morphological characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized via the Bingel reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brković, Danijela V.; Ivić, Milka L. Avramov; Rakić, Vesna M.; Valentini, Luca; Uskoković, Petar S.; Marinković, Aleksandar D.

    2015-08-01

    Covalent sidewall functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been performed using two approaches, direct and indirect cycloaddition through diethyl malonate, based on the Bingel reaction. The results revealed that functionalized MWCNTs demonstrated enhanced electrical properties and significantly lower sheet resistance, especially after electric field thermal assisted annealing at 80 °C was performed. The presence of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds caused the surface of MWCNTs to be more hydrophilic, approachable for the electrolyte and improved the capacitance performance of Au/MWCNTs electrodes. The modified MWCNTs have been incorporated into nanocomposites by using solution mixing method with polyaniline and drop-casting resulting mixture on the paper substrate. The reduction in the sheet resistance with increasing the content of MWCNTs in the prepared nanocomposite films has been achieved.

  4. Interleukin-13 Activates Distinct Cellular Pathways Leading to Ductular Reaction, Steatosis, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gieseck, Richard L; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; Vannella, Kevin M; Cantu, David A; Lu, Wei-Yu; Ferreira-González, Sofía; Forbes, Stuart J; Vallier, Ludovic; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-07-19

    Fibroproliferative diseases are driven by dysregulated tissue repair responses and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality because they affect nearly every organ system. Type 2 cytokine responses are critically involved in tissue repair; however, the mechanisms that regulate beneficial regeneration versus pathological fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we have shown that the type 2 effector cytokine interleukin-13 simultaneously, yet independently, directed hepatic fibrosis and the compensatory proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells in progressive models of liver disease induced by interleukin-13 overexpression or after infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Using transgenic mice with interleukin-13 signaling genetically disrupted in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, or resident tissue fibroblasts, we have revealed direct and distinct roles for interleukin-13 in fibrosis, steatosis, cholestasis, and ductular reaction. Together, these studies show that these mechanisms are simultaneously controlled but distinctly regulated by interleukin-13 signaling. Thus, it may be possible to promote interleukin-13-dependent hepatobiliary expansion without generating pathological fibrosis. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27421703

  5. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE.

    PubMed

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate. PMID:27102684

  6. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  7. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  8. Belowground carbon allocation in a temperate beech forest: new insight into carbon residence time using whole tree 13C labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    Belowground carbon allocation is an important component of forest carbon budget, affecting tree growth (competition between aboveground and belowground carbon sinks), acquisition of belowground resources (nutrients and water) that are often limiting forest ecosystems and soil carbon sequestration. Total belowground carbon flow can be estimated using a mass-balance approach as cumulative soil CO2 efflux minus the carbon input from aboveground litter plus the changes in the C stored in roots, in the forest floor, and in the soil, and further compared to gross annual production. While this approach is useful for understanding the whole ecosystem carbon budget, uncertainties remain about the contribution of the different belowground pools of carbon to ecosystem respiration and carbon sequestration. New insights into transfer rate and residence time of carbon in belowground compartments can be gained from in situ whole-crown 13C labelling experiments. We combined both approaches in a young temperate beech forest in north-eastern France where ecosystem carbon fluxes are recorded since a decade. Carbon allocated belowground represented less than 40% of gross primary production in this young beech forest. Autotrophic respiration assessed by comparing soil CO2 efflux measured on normal and on root exclusion plots, accounted for 60% of the total belowground carbon flow. This indicated a rather short mean residence time of carbon allocated belowground in the soil compartments. The recovery of 13C in soil CO2 efflux after pulse-labelling entire crowns of tree with 13CO2 at several occasions during the growing season was observed a few couple of hours after the labelling. That indicates a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and soil microbes. Allocation of recently assimilated carbon to soil microbial respiration was greater in

  9. Global carbon sinks and their variability inferred from atmospheric O2 and delta13C.

    PubMed

    Battle, M; Bender, M L; Tans, P P; White, J W; Ellis, J T; Conway, T; Francey, R J

    2000-03-31

    Recent time-series measurements of atmospheric O2 show that the land biosphere and world oceans annually sequestered 1.4 +/- 0.8 and 2.0 +/- 0.6 gigatons of carbon, respectively, between mid-1991 and mid-1997. The rapid storage of carbon by the land biosphere from 1991 to 1997 contrasts with the 1980s, when the land biosphere was approximately neutral. Comparison with measurements of delta13CO2 implies an isotopic flux of 89 +/- 21 gigatons of carbon per mil per year, in agreement with model- and inventory-based estimates of this flux. Both the delta13C and the O2 data show significant interannual variability in carbon storage over the period of record. The general agreement of the independent estimates from O2 and delta13C is a robust signal of variable carbon uptake by both the land biosphere and the oceans. PMID:10741962

  10. Natural abundance measurements of 13C indicate increased deep soil carbon mineralization after forest disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Northern forest soils represent globally important stores of carbon (C), yet there is no consensus about how they are altered by the widespread practice of harvesting that dominates many forested landscapes. Here we present the first study to systematically investigate the utility of δ 13C and C content depth profiles to infer temporal changes in belowground carbon cycling processes following disturbance in a pure C3 ecosystem. We document carbon concentration and δ 13C depth profile enrichment trends consistent with a kinetic fractionation arising from soil organic carbon (SOC) humification across a northern forest chronosequence (1, 15, 45, 80 and 125+ yrs). Reduced soil C storage that coincided with observed soil profile δ 13C-enrichment patterns which intensified following clearcut harvesting, pointed to losses of SOC in the deeper (>20 cm) mineral soil. This study suggests the δ 13C approach may assist in identifying mechanisms responsible for soil C storage changes in disturbed C3 forest ecosystems.

  11. The 13Carbon footprint of B[e] supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, A.; Kraus, M.; Schnurr, O.; Fernandes, M. Borges

    2010-10-01

    We report on the first detection of 13C enhancement in two B[e] supergiants (B[e]SGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Stellar evolution models predict the surface abundance in 13C to strongly increase during main-sequence and post-main-sequence evolution of massive stars. However, direct identification of chemically processed material on the surface of B[e]SGs is hampered by their dense, disc-forming winds, hiding the stars. Recent theoretical computations predict the detectability of enhanced 13C via the molecular emission in 13CO arising in the circumstellar discs of B[e]SGs. To test this potential method and to unambiguously identify a post-main-sequence B[e] SG by its 13CO emission, we have obtained high-quality K-band spectra of two known B[e] SGs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using the Very Large Telescope's Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). Both stars clearly show the 13CO band emission, whose strength implies a strong enhancement of 13C, in agreement with theoretical predictions. This first ever direct confirmation of the evolved nature of B[e]SGs thus paves the way to the first identification of a Galactic B[e]SG. Based on observations collected with the ESO VLT Paranal Observatory under programme 384.D-1078(A). E-mail: liermann@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de (AL); kraus@sunstel.asu.cas.cz (MK); oschnurr@aip.de (OS); borges@on.br (MBF)

  12. Carbon catalysis of reactions in the lithium SOCl2 and SO2 systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilroy, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    Certain hazards associated with lithium batteries have delayed widespread acceptance of these power sources. The reactivity of ground lithium carbon mixtures was examined. The effect of carbon types on this reactivity was determined. The basic reaction involved mixtures of lithium and carbon with battery electrolyte. The various parameters that influenced this reactivity included: the nature and freshness of the carbon; the freshness, the purity, and the conductive salt of the electrolyte; and the effect of Teflon or moisture.

  13. Computational design of organometallic oligomers featuring 1,3-metal-carbon bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Feng; Yuan, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiang; Li, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-01-15

    Density functional theory computations (B3LYP) have been used to explore the chemistry of titanium-aromatic carbon "edge complexes" with 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between Ti and planar tetracoordinate Cβ . The titanium-coordinated, end-capping chlorides are replaced with OH or SH groups to afford two series of difunctional monomers that can undergo condensation to form oxide- and sulfide-bridged oligomers. The sulfide-linked oligomers have less molecular strain and are more exergonic than the corresponding oxide-linked oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the oligomers varies with their composition and decreases with growing oligomer chain. This theoretical study is intended to enrich 1,3-MC bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon chemistry and provide interesting ideas to experimentalists. Organometallic complexes with the TiE2 (E = OH and SH) decoration on the edge of aromatic hydrocarbons have been computationally designed, which feature 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between titanium and planar tetracoordinate β-carbon. Condensation of these difunctional monomers by eliminating small molecules (H2O and H2S) produce chain-like oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of the oligomers decreases with growing oligomer chain, a trend that suggests possible semiconductor properties for oligomers with longer chains. PMID:26399226

  14. The first observation of Carbon-13 spin noise spectra

    PubMed Central

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Müller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the first 13C NMR spin noise spectra obtained without any pulse excitation by direct detection of the randomly fluctuating noise from samples in a cryogenically cooled probe. Noise power spectra were obtained from 13C enriched methanol and glycerol samples at 176 MHz without and with 1H decoupling, which increases the sensitivity without introducing radio frequency interference with the weak spin noise. The multiplet amplitude ratios in 1H coupled spectra indicate that, although pure spin noise prevails in these spectra, the influence of absorbed circuit noise is still significant at the high concentrations used. In accordance with the theory heteronuclear Overhauser enhancements are absent from the 1H-decoupled 13C spin noise spectra. PMID:23041799

  15. Theoretical study of dehydration-carbonation reaction on brucite surface based on ab initio quantum mechanic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S. V.; Parrinello, M.

    2003-04-01

    The carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) has been considered as a potential technology for cleaning industrial carbon dioxide waste. The kinetics of the reaction Mg(OH)2 + CO2 -> MgCO3 + H2O have been studied experimentally at 573°C by Bearat at al. [1]. Their experiments suggest that the carbonation of magnesium hydroxide proceeds by the reaction Mg(OH)2 -> MgO + H2O followed by the adsorption of CO2 molecules on the dehydrated brucite surface. Due to the large difference in volumes between Mg(OH)2 and MgO, dehydration causes the formation of dislocations and cracks, allowing water molecules to leave the brucite surface and facilitating the advance of the carbonation front in the bulk solid. The detailed mechanism of this process is however unknown. We used the Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics method to study the structure and dynamics of the (0001), (1-100) and (11-20) surfaces of brucit and calculated the enthalpy and activation barrier of H2O nucleation and dehydration on different surfaces. The results obtained are in agreement with previous studies of brucite dehydration by Masini and Bernasconi [2]. The reactive Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method [3] has been applied to investigate the detailed mechanism of the dehydration-carbonation reaction at the (1-100) interface of brucite with the gas phase. Based on the results of our MD simulations and the calculated enthalpy of CO2 adsorption on the dehydrated brucite surfaces we propose a mechanism for the dehydration/carbonation reaction. [1] Bearat H, McKelvy MJ, Chizmeshya AVG, Sharma R, Carpenter RW (2002) J. Amer. Ceram. Soc. 85(4):742 [2] Masini P and Bernasconi M (2001) J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 13: 1-12 [3] Iannuzzi M, Laio A and Parrinello M (2003) Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted)

  16. Base-promoted reactions of bridged ketones and 1,3- and 1,4-haloalkyl azides: competitive alkylation vs azidation reactions of ketone enolates.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Smith, Brenton T; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2004-03-01

    The reactions of 1,3- and 1,4-haloalkyl azides with enolates of 2-norbornanone (and a ring-expanded analog) afford polycyclic 1,2,3-triazolines in good yields. The reaction occurs by the initial azidation of the ketone enolate, followed in order by triazoline formation and O-alkylation. An interesting element of this process is the preferential reaction of the alkyl azide with an enolate anion as opposed to the more familiar reaction of the alkyl halide (including Cl and I derivatives). Reactions of acyclic or monocyclic enolates generally lead to 1,2,3-triazoles but none of the alternative C-alkylation product. PMID:14987033

  17. A large metabolic carbon contribution to the δ 13C record in marine aragonitic bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Meng, Li; Dehairs, Frank

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (C M) significantly affects the stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. This can obscure the record of δ 13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C DIC) potentially archived in the shell carbonate. To assess the C M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ 13C DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ 13C. All shells showed an ontogenic decrease in shell δ 13C, with as much as a 4‰ decrease over the lifespan of the clam. There was no apparent ontogenic change in food source indicated by soft tissue δ 13C values, therefore a change in the respired δ 13C value cannot be the cause of this decrease. Hemolymph δ 13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with shell height indicating that respired CO 2 does influence the δ 13C value of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO 2 is related to the size or age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%C M) was significantly higher (up to 37%, with a range from 5% to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10%C M. Interestingly, the hemolymph did contain less than 10%C M, suggesting that complex fractionation might occur between hemolymph and calcifying fluids. Simple shell biometrics explained nearly 60% of the observed variability in %C M, however, this is not robust enough to predict %C M for fossil shells. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ 13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ 13C DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %C M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  18. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  19. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  20. Medium effects on reactions of the carbonate radical with thiocyanate, iodide, and ferrocyanide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymar, Sergei V.; Schwarz, Harold A.; Czapski, Gidon

    2000-10-01

    Results are presented which show that there is no pH dependence of the carbonate radical reactivity toward SCN -, I -, and Fe(CN) 64- above pH 8.5. It is demonstrated that observations in the literature on these reactions which have been interpreted to show a p Ka of 9.5 for the carbonate radical, in disagreement with other reports that the radical is not protonated in this pH region, can be explained by the medium effects. It is also shown that previous studies of the reaction between carbonate radical and thiocyanate are in error, and the mechanism of this reaction is elucidated.

  1. Carbon partitioning into cell wall structural carbohydrates by following 13C label in Switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon isotope ratio analyses of stover tissue from both the lowland (Kanlow) and the upland (Summer) cultivars of switchgrass indicated that the value of Kanlow was less negative (-12.7 per mil.) than the upland variety Summer (-13.1). Preliminary observations on the carbon isotope ratio of cellulo...

  2. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  3. Coupling and higher-order effects in the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunay, F.; Nunes, F.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.

    2005-07-01

    Coupled-channel calculations are performed for the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C reactions between 7 and 60 MeV to study the effect of inelastic couplings in transfer reactions. The effect of treating transfer beyond Born approximation is also addressed. The coupling to the {sup 12}C 2{sup +} state is found to change the peak cross section by up to 15%. Effects beyond Born approximation lead to a significant renormalization of the cross sections, between 5% and 10% for deuteron energies above 10 MeV and larger than 10% for lower energies. We also performed calculations including the remnant term in the transfer operator, which has a small impact on the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C(g.s.) and {sup 13}C(p,d){sup 12}C(g.s.) reactions (where g.s. indicates ground state). Above 30-MeV deuteron energy, the effect of the remnant term is larger than 10% for the {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C(1/2{sup +}, 3.09 MeV) reaction and is found to increase with decreasing neutron separation energy for the 3.09-MeV state of {sup 13}C. This is of importance for transfer reactions with weakly bound nuclei.

  4. Amidation reaction of eugenyl oxyacetate ethyl ester with 1,3 diaminopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, V.; Wibowo, F. R.; Kusumaningsih, T.; Wibowo, A. H.; Khumaidah, S. A.; Wijayanti, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Eugenol having various substituents on the aromatic ring (hydroxy, methoxy and allyl) are useful for starting material in synthesizing of its derivatives. Eugenol derivatives have shown wide future potential applications in many areas, especially as future drugs against many diseases. The aim of this work was to synthesize an amide of eugenol derivative. The starting material used was eugenol from clove oil and the reaction was conducted in 3 step reactions to give the final product. Firstly, eugenol was converted into eugenyl oxyacetate [2-(4-allyl-2-methoxyphenoxy) acetic acid] as a white crystal with 70.5% yield, which was then esterified with ethanol to have eugenyl oxyacetate ethyl ester [ethyl 2-(4-allyl-2-methoxyphenoxy) acetate] as brown liquid in 75.7%. The last step was the reaction between eugenyl oxyacetate ethyl ester and 1,3 diaminopropane to give 2-(4-allyl-2-methoxyphenoxy)-N-(3-aminopropyl) acetamide as a brown powder with 71.6% yield, where the amidation reaction was occurred.

  5. Elastic scattering and neutron transfer of the 26Mg + 13C reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, Matthew; Alharby, A.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    Direct proton capture on 26Si is of interest for its role in the destruction of 26Si that would otherwise be available to β+ decay into 26mAl. This is part of the network of reactions that influence the production and destruction of the important astrophysical observable 26Al. The 13C(26Mg,27Mg)12C reaction at 12 MeV/nucleon has been measured at Texas A &M University Cyclotron Institute with the aim to determine ANC for 27P <--> p + 26Si via mirror symmetry. Details of the experiment as well as preliminary results will be presented. Present address: Faculty of Sciences, Physics Department, Princess Nora University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  6. Studies of reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds from Pt(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Williams, B S; Goldberg, K I

    2001-03-21

    The platinum(IV) complexes fac-L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) (L(2) = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, o-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene, R = carboxyl, aryl; L = PMe(3), R = aryl) undergo reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds and/or carbon-carbon bonds. The carbon-oxygen reductive elimination reaction produces either methyl esters or methyl aryl ethers (anisoles) and L(2)PtMe(2), while the carbon-carbon reductive elimination reaction affords ethane and L(2)PtMe(OR). Choice of reaction conditions allows the selection of either type of coupling over the other. A detailed mechanistic study of the reductive elimination reactions supports dissociation of the OR(-) ligand as the initial step for the C-O bond formation reaction. This is followed by a nucleophilic attack of OR(-) upon a methyl group bound to the Pt(IV) cation to produce the products MeOR and L(2)PtMe(2). C-C reductive elimination proceeds from L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) by initial L (L = PMe(3)) or OR(-) (L(2) = dppe, dppbz) dissociation, followed by C-C coupling from the resulting five-coordinate intermediate. Our studies demonstrate that both C-C and C-O reductive elimination reactions from Pt(IV) are more facile in polar solvents, in the presence of Lewis acids, and for OR(-) groups that contain electron withdrawing substituents. PMID:11456927

  7. Formation of 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene in the reaction of the p-tolyl radical with 1,3-butadiene under single-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dorian S N; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Ryazantsev, Mikhail; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Crossed molecular beam reactions of p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6), p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene-d6 (C4D6), and p-tolyl-d7 (C7D7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6) were carried out under single-collision conditions at collision energies of about 55 kJ mol(-1). 6-Methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene was identified as the major reaction product formed at fractions of about 94% with the monocyclic isomer (trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene) contributing only about 6%. The reaction is initiated by barrierless addition of the p-tolyl radical to the terminal carbon atom of the 1,3-butadiene via a van der Waals complex. The collision complex isomerizes via cyclization to a bicyclic intermediate, which then ejects a hydrogen atom from the bridging carbon to form 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene through a tight exit transition state located about 27 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products. This is the dominant channel under the present experimental conditions. Alternatively, the collision complex can also undergo hydrogen ejection to form trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene; this is a minor contributor to the present experiment. The de facto barrierless formation of a methyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons by dehydrogenation via a single event represents an important step in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their partially hydrogenated analogues in combustion flames and the interstellar medium. PMID:25407848

  8. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs. PMID:27465519

  9. An unusual carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicchillo, Robert M; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K; van derDonk, Wilfred A; Metcalf, William W

    2010-01-12

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

  10. An Unusual Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reaction During Phosphinothricin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicchillo, Robert M.; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T.; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture1. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide (PTT), contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin (PT) attached to two alanine residues (Fig. 1). Synthetic PT (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta® and Liberty®), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during PTT biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP) (Fig. 1)2. Reported here are the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp3)-C(sp3) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-heme iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalyzed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-heme iron family of enzymes. PMID:19516340

  11. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IX. Photosynthesis, Photoreduction, and the Hydrogen-Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Dark Reaction

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Badin, E. J.; Calvin, M.

    1950-02-01

    A comparison of the rates of fixation of Carbon 14 dioxide in algae for the processes of photosynthesis, photoreduction and the hydrogen-oxygen-carbon dioxide dark reaction has been made. For the same series of experiments, rates of incorporation of tracer carbon into the separate soluble components using the radiogram method have been determined. The mechanism of carbon dioxide uptake has been shown to occur via two distinct paths. In all cases studied, essentially the same compounds appear radioactive. The distribution with time, however, differs markedly.

  12. Investigating 13C +12C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneanu, Daniela; Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the 12C +13C reaction at beam energies Elab= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C +12C over a wide energy range. A 13C beam with intensities 0.5-2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with 24Na from the 12C (13C ,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from 24Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for Elab = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1-3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure 12C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β-γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  13. Overcoming Barriers to the Remediation of Carbon Tetrachloride Through Manipulation of Competing Reaction Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Amonette, James E.; Bylaska, Eric J.

    2004-03-29

    Most approaches that have been proposed for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride produce chloroform as the major product and methylene chloride as a minor product. Both of these products are nearly as persistent and problematic as the parent compound, but competing reaction pathways produce the more desirable products carbon monoxide and/or formate. Branching between these reaction pathways is highly variable, but the controlling factors have not been identified. To improve the applicability of reductive remediation technologies to the large plumes of carbon tetrachloride at several DOE sites, we are pursuing the complete characterization of the mechanisms and kinetics of competing degradation reactions of carbon tetrachloride through laboratory experiments closely coordinated with theoretical modeling studies. The results are beginning to suggest strategies for maximizing the yield of desirable products from carbon tetrachloride degradation, which will be tested in column model systems using real site waters and matrix materials.

  14. The carbon kinetic isotope effects of ozone-alkene reactions in the gas-phase and the impact of ozone reactions on the stable carbon isotope ratios of alkenes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R.; Anderson, R. S.; Rudolph, J.; Huang, L.; Ernst, D.

    2003-07-01

    The kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for several ozone-alkene reactions in the gas phase were studied in a 30 L PTFE reaction chamber. The time dependence of the stable carbon isotope ratios and the concentrations were determined using a gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) system. The following average KIE values were obtained: 18.9 +/- 2.8 (ethene), 9.5 +/- 2.5 (propene), 8.7 +/- 1 (1-butene), 8.1 +/- 0.4 (E-2-butene), 7.9 +/- 0.4 (1,3-butadiene), 6.7 +/- 0.9 (1-pentene), 7.3 +/- 0.2 (Z-2-pentene), 6.7 +/- 0.7 (cyclopentene), 6.1 +/- 1 (isoprene), 5.0 +/- 0.7 (1-hexene), 5.6 +/- 0.5 (cyclohexene), and 4.3 +/- 0.7 (1-heptene). These data are the first of their kind to be reported in the literature. The ozone-alkene KIE values show a systematic inverse dependence from alkene carbon number. Based on the observed KIEs, the contribution of ozone-alkene reactions to the isotopic fractionation of alkenes in the atmosphere can be estimated. On average this contribution is generally small compared to the impact of reaction with OH radicals. However, when OH-concentrations are very low, e.g. during nighttime and at high latitudes in winter, the contribution of the ozone reaction dominates and under these conditions the ozone-alkene reaction will have a clearly visible impact on the stable carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric alkenes.

  15. Cryogenic abnormal thermal expansion properties of carbon-doped La(Fe,Si)13 compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Wang, Wei; Li, Laifeng

    2015-12-14

    Recently, La(Fe,Si)13-based compounds have attracted much attention due to their isotropic and tunable abnormal thermal expansion (ATE) properties as well as bright prospects for practical applications. In this research, we have prepared cubic NaZn13-type carbon-doped La(Fe,Si)13 compounds by the arc-melting method, and their ATE and magnetic properties were investigated by means of variable-temperature X-ray diffraction, strain gauge and the physical property measurement system (PPMS). The experimental results indicate that both micro and macro negative thermal expansion (NTE) behaviors gradually weaken with the increase of interstitial carbon atoms. Moreover, the temperature region with the most remarkable NTE properties has been broadened and near zero thermal expansion (NZTE) behavior occurs in the bulk carbon-doped La(Fe,Si)13 compounds. PMID:26549525

  16. Elementary reactions of nitrogen and oxygen with boron and carbon at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Cynn, H.; Nicol, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    The direct elementary reactions among the first and second row elements often yield novel super hard, high energy density, and wide band-gap optical materials. The reactions of oxygen and nitrogen with boron and carbon have been investigated at high pressures and temperatures by using an integrated technique of diamond-anvil cell, laser-heating, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy. A wide range of products has been synthesized and characterized in-situ at high pressures, including {alpha}-CO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}0{sub 3}-I,B{sub 2}0{sub 3}-II, c-BN, h-BN, h{sup `}-B, amorphous carbon nitrides. The elementary reactions occur exothermically and result in highly polycrystallized products with an exception in carbon-nitrogen reactions. The implication of the elementary reactions to energetic materials applications is discussed.

  17. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  18. Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of histone and DNA dynamics in nucleosome cores.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, P R; Smith, R M; Rill, R L

    1986-05-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (67.9 MHz) were obtained for native nucleosome cores: cores dissociated in 2 M NaCl and 2 M NaCl, 6 M urea; and cores degraded with DNase I plus proteinase K. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of native and dissociated cores and core length DNA were also obtained at 60.7 MHz. The 31P resonance and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of DNA were only slightly affected by packaging in nucleosome cores, in agreement with other reports, but 13C resonances of DNA were essentially unobservable. The loss of DNA spectral intensity suggests that rapid internal motions of DNA sugar carbons in protein-free DNA previously demonstrated by 13C NMR methods are partly restricted in nucleosomes. The 13C spectrum of native cores contains many narrow intense resonances assigned to lysine side chain and alpha-carbons, glycine alpha-carbons, alanine alpha- and beta- carbons, and arginine side chain carbons. Several weaker resonances were also assigned. The narrow line widths, short T1 values, and non-minimal nuclear Overhauser enhancements of these resonances, including alpha- and beta-carbons, show that some terminal chain segments of histones in nucleosomes are as mobile as small random coil polypeptides. The mobile segments include about 9% of all histone residues and 25% of all lysines, but only 10% of all arginines. The compositions of these segments indicate that mobile regions are located in amino- or carboxyl-terminal sequences of two or more histones. In addition, high mobility was observed for side chain carbons of 45-50% of all lysines (delta and epsilon carbons) and about 25% of all arginines (zeta carbon) in histones (including those in mobile segments), suggesting that basic residues in terminal histone sequences are not strongly involved in nucleosome structure and may instead help stabilize higher order chromatin structure. PMID:3700380

  19. Stereoselective entry to beta-linked C-disaccharides using a carbon-Ferrier reaction.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, Natasha; Meo, Paul; Osborn, Helen M I

    2003-05-15

    [structure: see text] The synthesis of unsaturated beta-linked C-disaccharides by the Lewis acid-mediated reaction of 3-O-acetylated glycals with monosaccharide-derived alkenes is described. Deprotection and selective hydrogenation of an exocyclic carbon-carbon double, in the presence of an endocyclic double bond, for representative targets is also illustrated. PMID:12735743

  20. Synthesis and carbon-13 NMR studies of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong

    2000-08-01

    The orientation of different segments of 4'-cyanophenyl 4-heptylbenzoate (7CPB) has been investigated using 13C NMR. The method of proton encoded local field (PELF) spectroscopy was used in combination with off-magic-angle spinning (OMAS) of the sample. High-resolution 2D spectra were obtained and the order parameters were calculated from the spectra. Linear relationships between the obtained order parameters and anisotropic chemical shifts determined by 1D 13C NMR were established and semi-empirical parameters were obtained. A 1:2 mixture of 7CPB and its chain-perfluorinated analog (7PFCPB) shows interesting phase behavior with changing of temperature. The mixture was studied by the use of 13C NMR and polarizing optical microscopy. The order parameters of 7CPB in the smectic A phase of the mixture were calculated using the semi-empirical parameters obtained by the 2D NMR method. Eight series of liquid crystals containing an electron- donating group at one end of a conjugated system and an electron-withdrawing group at the other end have been synthesized. The electron-donating group is 4- n-alkylpiperazinyl group, the electron- withdrawing group is nitro group and the conjugated system is diphenyldiazene with zero, one or two substituents on the phenyl rings. The substituents are -F, -Cl, and -CH3. Two series of compounds with cyano group as electron-withdrawing group were also synthesized. Most of the compounds synthesized are nematogenic and exhibit rather broad liquid crystalline ranges. The effects of the lateral substituents on the optical absorption and phase transition temperatures are correlated with their nature and position of substitution. Birefringence, dielectric anisotropy, elastic constant ratio and rise time of the liquid crystals were carried out using 10 wt% LC mixtures in E7. It has been found that lateral substituents have subtle effects on the properties. The presence of lateral substituents depresses melting points and clearing points of the

  1. Investigating {sup 13}C+{sup 12}C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chesneanu, Daniela Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-24

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the “Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the {sup 12}C+{sup 13}C reaction at beam energies E{sub lab}= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C over a wide energy range. A {sup 13}C beam with intensities 0.5–2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with {sup 24}Na from the {sup 12}C({sup 13}C,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from {sup 24}Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for E{sub lab} = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1–3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure {sup 12}C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β–γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  2. Simulation of soil organic carbon in different soil size fractions using 13Carbon measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, P.; Bellarby, J.; Chenu, C.; Foereid, B.; Wattenbach, M.; Zingore, S.; Smith, J.

    2009-04-01

    We simulate the soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics at a chronoseqeunce site in France, using the Rothamsted Carbon model. The site exhibits a transition from C3 plants, dominated by pine forest, to a conventional C4 maize rotation. The different 13C signatures of the forest plants and maize are used to distinguish between the woodland derived carbon (C) and the maize derived C. The model is evaluated against total SOC and C derived from forest and maize, respectively. The SOC dynamics of the five SOC pools of the model, decomposable plant material (DPM), resistant plant material (RPM), biomass, humus and inert C, are also compared to the SOC dynamics measured in different soil size fractions. These fractions are > 50 μm (particulate organic matter), 2-50 μm (silt associated SOC) and <2 μm (clay associated SOC). Other authors had shown that the RPM pool of the model corresponds well to SOC measured in the soil size fraction > 50 μm and the sum of the other pools corresponds well to the SOC measured in the soil size fraction < 50 μm. Default model applications show that the model underestimates the fast drop in forest C stocks in the first 20 years after land-use change and overestimates the C accumulation of maize C. Several hypotheses were tested to evaluate the simulations. Input data and internal model parameter uncertainties had minor effects on the simulations results. Accounting for erosion and implementing a simple tillage routine did not improve the simulation fit to the data. We therefore hypothesize that a generic process that is not yet explicitly accounted for in the ROTHC model could explain the loss in soil C after land use change. Such a process could be the loss of the physical protection of soil organic matter as would be observed following cultivation of a previously uncultivated soil. Under native conditions a fraction of organic matter is protected in stable soil aggregates. These aggregates are physically disrupted by continuous and

  3. Analysis of the carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules.

    PubMed

    Sharp, R R; Richards, E P

    1977-03-29

    Natural abundance carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules have been obtained and analyzed using computer simulation techniques. High resolution spectra show the presence of a fluid aqueous phase containing epinephrine, ATP and a random coil protein. The protein spectrum contains unusually intense resonances due to glutamic acid and proline and has been simulated satisfactorily using the known amino acid composition of chromogranin A. The lipid phase of chromaffin granules gives rise to intense, but very broad, resonances in the carbon-13 spectrum. Protons in the lipid phase are also observable as a very rapid component of the proton-free induction decay (T2 approximately equal to 15 microns). Linewidths of the carbon-13 spectra have been used to set upper limits on rotational correlation times and on the motional anisotropy in the aqueous phase. These limits show that the aqueous phase is a simple solution (not a gel) that is isotropic over regions much larger than solute dimensions. No gel transition is observed between -3 and 25 degrees C. The carbon-13 spectra are definitely inconsistent with a lipoprotein matrix model and chromaffin granules previously proposed by Helle and Serck-Hanssen ((1975) Mol. Cell, Biochem. 6, 127-146). Relative carbon-13 intensities of ATP and epinephrine are not consistent with the known 1 : 4 mol ratio of these components. This fact suggests that epinephrine and ATP are not directly complexed in intact chromaffin granules. PMID:849474

  4. Reactions of heteroatom and carbon nucleophiles with the cationic bridging methylidyne complex

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.; Crocker, M.; Vosejpka, P.C.; Fagan, P.J.; Marder, S.R.; Gohdes, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    The reaction of the ..mu..-methylidyne complex /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (1) with NMe/sub 3/ and (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C=NH gave the cationic 1:1 adducts /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHNMe/sub 3/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (3) and /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CHNH=C(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (9), respectively, arising from attack of nitrogen on the methylidyne carbon. The reaction of 1 with KOC(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ gave the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHOC(CH/sub 3/)P/sub 3/) (4). Reaction of 1 with water afforded a 1:1 mixture of ..mu..methylene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH/sub 2/) (2) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)/sub 2/; these products are proposed to arise from disproportionation of an initially formed hydroxy carbene species. Reaction of 1 with Et/sub 4/N/sup +/Br/sup -/ gave the unstable /sup +/-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHBr) (6). Reaction of 1 with the carbon nucleophiles CH/sub 3/Li and Li(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CuCN) gave the ..mu..-carbene complexes ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 3/) (11) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHC/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (12), while reaction of 1 with HFe(CO)/sub 4//sup -/ afforded 2. 1 reacted with acetone via nucleophilic addition of the enol affording the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex (C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)-(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 2/COCH/sub 3/)) (13). 1 also reacted with cyclohexanone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2,4-pentanedione, 5,5-dimethyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione, ethyl acetoacetate, and the sodium salt of diethyl malonate to give similar ..mu..-carbene products.

  5. Effects of water-gas shift reaction on simulated performance of a molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Park, Hong-Kyu; Chung, Gui-Yung; Lim, Hee-Chun; Nam, Suk-Woo; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Hong, Seong-Ahn

    A molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is simulated. In order to determine the effects of the water-gas shift reaction, the calculated results such as temperature distribution, voltage distribution, conversion and performance, are compared with those calculated excluding the shift reaction. Uniformity in the temperature profile is deteriorated due to the shift reaction. At the entrance, hydrogen is consumed rapidly in order to reach the equilibrium state of the shift reaction. The conversion of hydrogen decreases along the direction of gas flow because of hydrogen generated by the shift reaction. Therefore, when the shift reaction is excluded, the conversion of hydrogen is higher than that in a practical cell. Additionally, at the same current density, the voltage calculated without the shift reaction would be higher than the real value. The effect of the shift reaction on the voltage distribution and cell performances is quite small.

  6. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Laboratory-Scale Carbon–Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vaneet; Stokes, Benjamin J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene, the simplest alkene, is the most abundantly synthesized organic molecule by volume. It is readily incorporated into transitionmetal–catalyzed carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions through migratory insertions into alkylmetal intermediates. Because of its D2h symmetry, only one insertion outcome is possible. This limits byproduct formation and greatly simplifies analysis. As described within this Minireview, many carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions incorporate a molecule (or more) of ethylene at ambient pressure and temperature. In many cases, a useful substituted alkene is incorporated into the product. PMID:24105881

  7. 40 CFR 721.10472 - 1,3-Benzenedimethanamine, polymers with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10472 1,3-Benzenedimethanamine, polymers with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products. (a) Chemical substance and... with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products. 721.10472 Section 721.10472 Protection...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10472 - 1,3-Benzenedimethanamine, polymers with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10472 1,3-Benzenedimethanamine, polymers with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products. (a) Chemical substance and... with epichlorohydrin-polyethylene glycol reaction products. 721.10472 Section 721.10472 Protection...

  9. Systematic R -matrix analysis of the 13C(p ,γ )14N capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suprita; deBoer, Richard; Mukherjee, Avijit; Roy, Subinit

    2015-04-01

    Background: The proton capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N is an important reaction in the CNO cycle during hydrogen burning in stars with mass greater than the mass of the Sun. It also occurs in astrophysical sites such as red giant stars: the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The low energy astrophysical S factor of this reaction is dominated by a resonance state at an excitation energy of around 8.06 MeV (Jπ=1-,T =1 ) in 14N. The other significant contributions come from the low energy tail of the broad resonance with Jπ=0-,T =1 at an excitation of 8.78 MeV and the direct capture process. Purpose: Measurements of the low energy astrophysical S factor of the radiative capture reaction 13C(p ,γ )14N reported extrapolated values of S (0 ) that differ by about 30 % . Subsequent R -matrix analysis and potential model calculations also yielded significantly different values for S (0 ) . The present work intends to look into the discrepancy through a detailed R -matrix analysis with emphasis on the associated uncertainties. Method: A systematic reanalysis of the available decay data following the capture to the Jπ=1-,T =1 resonance state of 14N around 8.06 MeV excitation had been performed within the framework of the R -matrix method. A simultaneous analysis of the 13C(p ,p0 ) data, measured over a similar energy range, was carried out with the capture data. The data for the ground state decay of the broad resonance state (Jπ=0-,T =1 ) around 8.78 MeV excitations was included as well. The external capture model along with the background poles to simulate the internal capture contribution were used to estimate the direct capture contribution. The asymptotic normalization constants (ANCs) for all states were extracted from the capture data. The multichannel, multilevel R -matrix code azure2 was used for the calculation. Results: The values of the astrophysical S factor at zero relative energy, resulting from the present analysis, are found to be consistent within the

  10. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that the newly discovered correlated isotopic anomalies for heavy elements in the Allende meteorite were synthesized in the secondary neutron capture episode during the explosive carbon burning, the possible source of the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies, is examined. Explosive carbon burning calculations under typical conditions were first performed to generate time profiles of temperature, density, and free particle concentrations. These quantities were inputted into a general neutron capture code which calculates the resulting isotopic pattern from exposing the preexisting heavy seed nuclei to these free particles during the explosive carbon burning conditions. The interpretation avoids the problem of the Sr isotopic data and may resolve the conflict between the time scales inferred from 1-129, Pu-244, and Al-26.

  11. Silicate or Carbonate Weathering: Fingerprinting Sources of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Using δ13C in a Tropical River, Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers are an inherently vital resource for the development of any region and their importance is highlighted by the presence of many ancient human civilizations adjacent to river systems. δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics has been applied to large south Indian rivers which drain the Deccan basaltic traps in order to quantify their relative contributions from silicate and carbonate weathering. This study investigates δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics of the Cauvery River basin which flows through silicate lithology in the higher reaches and carbonate lithology with pedogenic and marine carbonates dominating the terrain in the lower reaches of the basin. The samples for the present study were collected at locations within the watershed during Pre-Monsoon and Monsoon Season 2014. The measurements of stable isotope ratios of δ13CDIC and were accomplished through a Thermo Scientific GasBench II interface connected to a MAT 253 IRMS. We captured a large spatial variation in δ13C and Si/HCO3 values during both seasons; Pre-Monsoon δ13C values ranges between -17.57‰ to -4.02‰ and during Monsoon it varies between -9.19‰ to +0.61‰. These results indicate a two end-member mixing component i.e. a silicate and a carbonate end member; governing the weathering interactions of the Cauvery River. Within the drainage basin, we identified silicate and carbonate dominating sources by using contributions of DIC and δ13C. Si/HCO3 values for Pre-Monsoon ranges between 0.028 - 0.67 and for Monsoon it varies between 0.073 - 0.80. Lighter δ13C composition was observed at sampling sites at higher altitude in contrast to sampling sites at flood plain which show relatively enriched δ13C which indicate mixing of soil derived CO2 with C4 plants. Result suggests dominance of carbonate weathering during the Monsoon Period, while silicate weathering is pronounced during Pre- Monsoon period.

  12. REACTION MECHANISMS OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE IN MICROWAVE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    William B. White; Michael R. Silsbee; B. Joe Kearns

    2004-02-18

    The objective of the investigation was to determine whether microwave fields would enhance the reactions of CO{sub 2} with silicates that are relevant to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. Three sets of experiments were conducted. (1) Serpentine and CO{sub 2} were reacted directly at one atmosphere pressure in a microwave furnace. Little reaction was observed. (2) Serpentine was dehydroxylated in a microwave furnace. The reaction was rapid, reaching completion in less than 30 minutes. A detailed investigation of this reaction produced an S-shaped kinetics curve, similar to the kinetics from dehydroxylating serpentine in a resistance furnace, but offset to 100 C lower temperature. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the effect of microwaves for enhancing reaction kinetics. (3) Reactions of serpentine with alkaline carbonates and in acid solution were carried out in a microwave hydrothermal apparatus. There was a greatly enhanced decomposition of the serpentine in acid solution but, at the temperature and pressure of the reaction chamber (15 bars; 200 C) the carbonates did not react. Overall, microwave fields, as expected, enhance silicate reaction kinetics, but higher CO{sub 2} pressures are needed to accomplish the desired sequestration reactions.

  13. Bovine Serum Albumin-Catalyzed Deprotonation of [1-13C]-Glycolaldehyde: Protein Reactivity Toward Deprotonation of α–Hydroxy α–Carbonyl Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Go, Maybelle K.; Malabanan, M. Merced; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) in D2O at 25 °C and pD 7.0 was found to catalyze the deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-glycolaldehyde ([1-13C]-GA) to form [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The formation of [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA in a total yield of 51 ± 3% was observed at early reaction times, and at latter times [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA was observed to undergo BSA-catalyzed conversion to [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The overall second-order rate constant for these deuterium exchange reactions is (kE)P = 0.25 M−1 s−1. By comparison, values of (kE)P = 0.04 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2009), Biochemistry 48, 5769–5778) and 0.06 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Koudelka, A., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2010), Biochemistry 49, 5377–5389) have been determined, respectively, for the wildtype- and K12G mutant TIM-catalyzed deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-GA to form [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. These data show that TIM and BSA exhibit a modest catalytic activity towards deprotonation of α-hydroxy α-carbonyl carbon. It is suggested that this activity is intrinsic to many globular proteins, and that it must be enhanced to demonstrate successful de novo design of protein catalysts of reactions through enamine intermediates. PMID:20687575

  14. Determination of site-specific carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Caer, V; Trierweiler, M; Martin, G J; Martin, M L

    1991-10-15

    Site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by deuterium NMR (SNIF-NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful source of information on hydrogen pathways occurring in biosyntheses in natural conditions. The potential of the carbon counterpart of this method has been investigated and compared. Three typical molecular species, ethanol, acetic acid, and vanillin, have been considered. Taking into account the requirements of quantitative 13C NMR, appropriate experimental procedures have been defined and the repeatability and reproducibility of the isotope ratio determinations have been checked in different conditions. It is shown that the carbon version of the SNIF-NMR method is capable of detecting small differences in the carbon-13 content of the ethyl fragment of ethanols from different botanical or synthetic origins. These results are in agreement with mass spectrometry determinations of the overall carbon isotope ratios. Deviations with respect to a statistical distribution of 13C have been detected in the case of acetic acid and vanillin. However, since the method is very sensitive to several kinds of systematic error, only a relative significance can be attached at present to the internal parameters directly accessible. Isotope dilution experiments have also been carried out in order to check the consistency of the results. In the present state of experimental accuracy, the 13C NMR method is of more limited potential than 2H SNIF-NMR spectroscopy. However it may provide complementary information. Moreover it is particularly efficient for detecting and quantifying adulterations that aim to mimic the overall carbon-13 content of a natural compound by adding a selectivity enriched species to a less expensive substrate from a different origin. PMID:1759714

  15. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Fischer-Tropsch Type Reactions and Relevance to Meteorite Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Natasha M; Elsila, Jamie E.; Kopstein, Mickey; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch-Type (FTT) reactions have been hypothesized to contribute to the formation of organic compounds in the early solar system, but it has been difficult to identify a signature of such reactions in meteoritic organics. The work reported here examined whether temperature-dependent carbon isotopic fractionation of FTT reactions might provide such a signature. Analyses of bulk organic deposits resulting from FTT experiments show a slight trend towards lighter carbon isotopic ratios with increasing temperature. It is unlikely, however, that these carbon isotopic signatures could provide definitive provenance for organic compounds in solar system materials produced through FTT reactions, because of the small scale of the observed fractionations and the possibility that signatures from many different temperatures may be present in any specific grain.

  16. Ultra-low-temperature Reactions of Carbon Atoms with Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnokutski, S. A.; Kuhn, M.; Renzler, M.; Jäger, C.; Henning, Th.; Scheier, P.

    2016-02-01

    The reactions of carbon atoms with dihydrogen have been investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K. A calorimetric technique was applied to monitor the energy released in the reaction. The barrierless reaction between a single carbon atom and a single dihydrogen molecule was detected. Reactions between dihydrogen clusters and carbon atoms have been studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The formation of hydrocarbon cations of the type {{{C}}}m{{{{H}}}n}+ with m = 1-4 and n = 1-15 was observed. With enhanced concentration of dihydrogen, the mass spectra demonstrated the main “magic” peak assigned to the {{{CH}}5}+ cation. A simple formation pathway and the high stability of this cation suggest its high abundance in the interstellar medium.

  17. 13C-MFA delineates the photomixotrophic metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under light- and carbon-sufficient conditions.

    PubMed

    You, Le; Berla, Bert; He, Lian; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-05-01

    The central carbon metabolism of cyanobacteria is under debate. For over 50 years, the lack of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase has led to the belief that cyanobacteria have an incomplete TCA cycle. Recent in vitro enzymatic experiments suggest that this cycle may in fact be closed. The current study employed (13) C isotopomers to delineate pathways in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By tracing the incorporation of supplemented glutamate into the downstream metabolites in the TCA cycle, we observed a direct in vivo transformation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate. Additionally, isotopic tracing of glyoxylate did not show a functional glyoxylate shunt and glyoxylate was used for glycine synthesis. The photomixotrophic carbon metabolism was then profiled with (13) C-MFA under light and carbon-sufficient conditions. We observed that: (i) the in vivo flux through the TCA cycle reactions (α-ketoglutarate → succinate) was minimal (<2%); (ii) the flux ratio of CO2 fixation was six times higher than that of glucose utilization; (iii) the relative flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was low (<2%); (iv) high flux through malic enzyme served as a main route for pyruvate synthesis. Our results improve the understanding of the versatile metabolism in cyanobacteria and shed light on their application for photo-biorefineries. PMID:24659531

  18. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  19. Intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions in the synthesis of complex annelated quinolines, α-carbolines and coumarins.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Swarup; Borah, Pallabi; Bhuyan, Pulak J

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of several novel dihydroisoxazole-, tetrahydroisoxazole- and dihydropyrazole-fused pyrido[2,3-b]quinolines, α-carbolines, and pyrido[2,3-c]coumarins, respectively, from simple precursors and by exploring intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions involving nitrile oxides, nitrones, and nitrile imines as 1,3-dipoles. PMID:22374452

  20. Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Malyarenko, D. I.; Kraft, O.; Hoatson, G. L.; Reilly, A. C.; Holloway, B. C.

    2002-10-01

    The chemical bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. This combination of low modulus and high strength means the material can be regarded as hard and elastic; the material gives when pressed on and recovers its shape when the load is released. The 13C NMR results conclusively demonstrate that hard and elastic a-CNx has an sp2 carbon bonded structure and that sp3 hybridized carbons are absent. Our results stand in contrast with earlier work that proposed that the interesting mechanical properties of hard and elastic a-CNx were due, in part, to sp3 bonded carbon.

  1. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  2. Catalytic Enantioselective Desymmetrization Reactions to All-Carbon Quaternary Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing-Ping; Cao, Zhong-Yan; Wang, Yu-Hui; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-06-22

    This Review summarizes the advances in the construction of all-carbon quaternary stereocenters via catalytic enantioselective desymmetrization of prochiral and meso-compounds, highlights the power and potential of this strategy in the total synthesis of natural products and biologically active compounds, and outlines the synthetic opportunities still available. PMID:27251100

  3. Removable well in reaction flask facilitates carbon dioxide collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Removable plastic well with a flange that seats on the rim of an Erlenmeyer screwcap flask aids quantitative collection of carbon dioxide liberated in the flask. The well can be removed without danger of cross-contamination. It can collect other gases using appropriate absorbents.

  4. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05). PMID:24679745

  5. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2000-08-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation before and/or during carbonation may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for cost optimization of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process.

  6. Synthesis of spiro[dihydropyridine-oxindoles] via three-component reaction of arylamine, isatin and cyclopentane-1,3-dione

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Sun, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Summary A fast and convenient protocol for the synthesis of novel spiro[dihydropyridine-oxindole] derivatives in satisfactory yields was developed by the three-component reactions of arylamine, isatin and cyclopentane-1,3-dione in acetic acid at room temperature. On the other hand the condensation of isatin with two equivalents of cyclopentane-1,3-dione gave 3,3-bis(2-hydroxy-5-oxo-cyclopent-1-enyl)oxindole in high yields. The reaction mechanism and substrate scope of this novel reaction is briefly discussed. PMID:23399791

  7. Uranyl triazolate formation via an in situ Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2010-08-27

    A two dimensional UO22+ coordination polymer, (UO2)3(C10H5N3O4)2(OH)2(H2O)2, has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The triazolate ligand, 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid (CPTAZ) has been generated via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of 4-azidobenzoic acid and propiolic acid. Reactions of the UO22+ cation with both the in situ generated triazolate ligand and the presynthesized ligand have been explored. The structure, fluorescent and thermal behaviour of this material are presented, as is a discussion of the utility of in situ ligand formation versus direct assembly.

  8. Tracing photosynthetic carbon in leaves with nanoSIMS after 13CO2 labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, Masako; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Kominami, Yuji; Takanashi, Satoru; Kenichi, Yoshimura; Ataka, Mioko

    2015-04-01

    To understand the carbon allocation of the tree and forest ecosystem, it is important to consider the residence time of carbon in different pools at suitable time scales. For example the carbon used for respiration will stay a few minutes to a few days in the tree, the carbon used for storage or structure of leaves will stay months to years, and the carbon used for wood structure, it will stay over the whole lifespan of the tree. The leaves are the entrance of carbon in trees where it can be used for foliage growth and maintenance or exported to the other organs or the other forest ecosystem compartments. Tracing carbon isotope using NanoSIMS technique is one of useful methods to estimate where and how long the carbon stay in the tree organs. In this study, 13CO2 pulse labelling were conducted and 13C was measured by IRMS to see the amount of C remaining in the leaves with time.NanoSIMS was used to localize where the labelled C remained within the leaf tissue. Twice labelling were done on branches of Quercus serrata at FFPRI(Forest and Forest Products research Institute) in Kyoto, Japan. The first labelling was in 30 April 2012 when the leaves start flushing and the second one was in 29 May 2012 when the leaves were completely deployed. For both labelling experiment, one branch was selected and covered with transparent plastic bag. CO2 concentration was recorded with IRGA and air temperature inside the chamber was monitored. Then 13CO2 was injected into the bag, and after 1 hour, the bag was removed and the branch was again exposed to ambient air. Leaves were collected before and 10-12 times after labelling and their isotope compositions were measured by IRMS. The leaf collected just after labelling and 6 days after labelling were used for NanoSIMS observation. Samples for nanoSIMS were preserved in glutaraldehyde and then embed in epoxy resin. The sliced sample were placed on the silicon wafer and observed by NanoSIMS 50L(Cameca, France). The 13C was highest just

  9. Cyanobacterial production of 1,3-propanediol directly from carbon dioxide using a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Maki, Yuki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2016-03-01

    Production of chemicals directly from carbon dioxide using light energy is an attractive option for a sustainable future. The 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) production directly from carbon dioxide was achieved by engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 with a synthetic metabolic pathway. Glycerol dehydratase catalyzing the conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde in a coenzyme B12-dependent manner worked in S. elongatus PCC 7942 without addition of vitamin B12, suggesting that the intrinsic pseudovitamin B12 served as a substitute of coenzyme B12. The highest titers of 1,3-PDO (3.79±0.23 mM; 288±17.7 mg/L) and glycerol (12.62±1.55 mM; 1.16±0.14 g/L), precursor of 1,3-PDO, were reached after 14 days of culture under optimized conditions in this study. PMID:26769097

  10. Ab initio Study of Ultrafast Photochemical Ring-Opening Reaction of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takao; Murakami, Akinori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2007-12-26

    The mechanism of ultrafast photochemical ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD), which has been inferred based on CASPT2//CASSCF(6,6) calculations of potential energy surfaces (PESs) by Garavelli et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A, 105, 4458-4469 (2001)), has not been fully understood. The unsolved problem is that within the framework of the CASPT2//CASSCF(6,6) method the S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} conical intersection (CI) is located too far from a pericyclic minimum of the S{sub 1} state (S{sub 1} pmin) for the photochemical ring-opening reaction of CHD to proceed to produce cZc-1,3,5-hexatriene (cZc-HT) on a ultrafast time scale of around 200 fs. In this study, it has been shown that the PESs obtained by the CASPT2//CASPT2 calculations give a reasonable explanation to why the photochemical ring-opening reation of CHD proceeds on the ultrafast time scale. The most important and remarkable feature of the CASPT2//CASPT2 PESs is that both energetic and structural distances between the S{sub 1} pmin and the S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} CI, both of which have structures largely breaking from C{sub 2} symmetry, are small enough for a nonadiabatic transition to occur in the vicinity of the S{sub 1} pmin.

  11. Determination of carbon by the oxidation reduction reaction with chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashkovich, L.; Kuteynikov, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Free carbon was determined in silicon and boron carbides in ash, oxides, and other materials by oxidation to carbon dioxide with a mixture of K2Cr2O7 + H2SO4. The determination was made from the amount of CR(6) consumed, by adding excess Mohr's salt and titrating with a standard solution of KMnO4. The amount of Cr(6) self reduced was determined in a blank test. Optimum oxidation and conditions were achieved when the volumes of 5% k2Cr2Oz and H2SO4 were equal. The mixture was boiled for 1-2 hours using a reflex condenser. The volume should not be reduced, in order to avoid an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration. The relative error was 4-7% for 0.005-0.04 g C and less than or equal to 3.5% for 0.1 g C.

  12. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.I.; Yoon, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) has been measured at (30, 40, and 60) C and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide ranging from (0.5 to 3065) kPa. The concentrations of the aqueous solutions were (10 and 30) mass % AMPD. The tendency of the solubility of carbon dioxide in 30 mass % AMPD aqueous solution at 40 C was found to be similar to that in 30 mass % N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solution.

  13. Multiphase fluid-rock reactions among supercritical carbon dioxide, brine, aquifer, and caprock: relevance to geologic sequestration of carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Janecky, D. R.; Snow, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    The reactive behavior of a multiphase fluid (supercritical CO{sub 2} and brine) under physical-chemical conditions relevant to geologic storage and sequestration in a carbon repository is largely unknown. Experiments were conducted in a flexible cell hydrothermal apparatus to evaluate multiphase fluid-rock (aquifer plus caprock) reactions that may impact repository integrity.

  14. Model of cathode reaction resistance in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, H.; Mugikura, Y.; Izaki, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Abe, T.

    1998-05-01

    A model of the performance of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is required to estimate the efficiency of an MCFC power plant or to simulate the internal state of a stack. The model should provide an accurate representation of the performance under various operating conditions. However, the performance estimated by previous models has been found to deviate from the measured performance under low oxygen and carbon dioxide cathode partial pressures. To solve this problem, the authors carried out a systematic analysis of the performance of several bench-scale cells operated under various cathode gas conditions and investigated a model of cathode polarization according to the oxygen reduction mechanism in molten carbonate. As a result, it has been clarified that the behavior of cathode polarization under various conditions is described well by the dependence of mixed diffusion of superoxide ion O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and CO{sub 2} in the melt on the assumed partial pressures at each total operating pressure.

  15. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  16. Reduction of nitroaromatics sorbed to black carbon by direct reaction with sorbed sulfides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2015-03-17

    Sorption to black carbons is an important sink for organic contaminants in sediments. Previous research has suggested that black carbons (graphite, activated carbon, and biochar) mediate the degradation of nitrated compounds by sulfides by at least two different pathways: reduction involving electron transfer from sulfides through conductive carbon regions to the target contaminant (nitroglycerin) and degradation by sulfur-based intermediates formed by sulfide oxidation (RDX). In this study, we evaluated the applicability of black carbon-mediated reactions to a wider variety of contaminant structures, including nitrated and halogenated aromatic compounds, halogenated heterocyclic aromatic compounds, and halogenated alkanes. Among these compounds, black carbon-mediated transformation by sulfides over a 3-day time scale was limited to nitroaromatic compounds. The reaction for a series of substituted nitroaromatics proceeded by reduction, as indicated by formation of 3-bromoaniline from 3-bromonitrobenzene, and inverse correlation of log kobs with energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO). The log kobs was correlated with sorbed sulfide concentration, but no reduction of 3-bromonitrobenzene was observed in the presence of graphite and sulfite, thiosulfate, or polysulfides. Whereas nitroglycerin reduction occurred in an electrochemical cell containing sheet graphite electrodes in which the reagents were placed in separate compartments, nitroaromatic reduction only occurred when sulfides were present in the same compartment. The results suggest that black carbon-mediated reduction of sorbed nitroaromatics by sulfides involves electron transfer directly from sorbed sulfides rather than transfer of electrons through conductive carbon regions. The existence of three different reaction pathways suggests a complexity to the sulfide-carbon system compared to the iron-carbon system, where contaminants are reduced by electron transfer through conductive carbon

  17. Brown carbon formation by aqueous-phase carbonyl compound reactions with amines and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Powelson, Michelle H; Espelien, Brenna M; Hawkins, Lelia N; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O

    2014-01-21

    Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyl compounds, ammonium sulfate (AS), and/or amines were evaluated for their ability to form light-absorbing species in aqueous aerosol. Aerosol chemistry was simulated with bulk phase reactions at pH 4, 275 K, initial concentrations of 0.05 to 0.25 M, and UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring. Glycolaldehyde-glycine mixtures produced the most intense absorbance. In carbonyl compound reactions with AS, methylamine, or AS/glycine mixtures, product absorbance followed the order methylglyoxal > glyoxal > glycolaldehyde > hydroxyacetone. Absorbance extended into the visible, with a wavelength dependence fit by absorption Ångstrom coefficients (Å(abs)) of 2 to 11, overlapping the Å(abs) range of atmospheric, water-soluble brown carbon. Many reaction products absorbing between 300 and 400 nm were strongly fluorescent. On a per mole basis, amines are much more effective than AS at producing brown carbon. In addition, methylglyoxal and glyoxal produced more light-absorbing products in reactions with a 5:1 AS-glycine mixture than with AS or glycine alone, illustrating the importance of both organic and inorganic nitrogen in brown carbon formation. Through comparison to biomass burning aerosol, we place an upper limit on the contribution of these aqueous carbonyl-AS-amine reactions of ≤ 10% of global light absorption by brown carbon. PMID:24351110

  18. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  19. On the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of indenone with N-N-C dipoles: density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Z.; Abou-Rachid, H.; Najat Benkaddour, N.

    2004-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G ∗ theoretical level have been performed to study the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (1,3-DC) reactions between indenone ( 1) and different 1,3-dipoles (diazomethane and N-methyl C-methoxy carbonyl nitrilimine, compounds 2 and 3, respectively). The geometrical and energetic properties were analysed for the different reactives, transition states and cycloadducts formed (compounds 4- 11). The reactions proceed in the gas-phase by an asynchronous concerted mechanism, yielding different regiochemistry dependent on the 1,3-dipole chosen, although with dipole 3 some degree of synchrony was found in the formation of cycloadduct 5. The 1,3-DC between 1 and 3 was regioselective, being the cycloadduct 11 favoured against 9. The NMR chemical shift parameters (GIAO method) were also calculated for the reactives and cycloadducts.

  20. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  1. Evaluation of 1,3-butadiene dimerization and secondary reactions in the presence and absence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Aldeeb, A A; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2004-11-11

    Thermal stability evaluation of exothermic chemical reactions is of great importance to the safer design and operation of chemical processes. Dominant reaction stoichiometries and their thermochemistry parameters are key elements in the evaluation process. Identification of significant reaction pathways under possible process conditions will lead to an understanding of the overall thermodynamic and kinetic behavior. The kinetics of 1,3-butadiene (BD) is an excellent example of conjugated dienes that undergo addition reactions. At elevated temperatures, 1,3-butadiene monomers can dimerize exothermally, and as temperature increases, secondary exothermic reactions will take place. The very high temperature and pressure rates that these reactions can attain may lead to a reaction runaway or even a thermal explosion. BD is a vapor at ambient conditions, usually stored as a pressurized liquid, and is a carcinogen, so the experimental evaluation is potentially difficult and hazardous. In this paper, the thermal stability of BD is evaluated. Dimerization and other secondary reactions are investigated by experimental thermal analysis using an automatic pressure adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC), by theoretical computational quantum chemistry methods, and empirical thermodynamic-energy correlations. A theoretical approach is conducted to predict some of the BD reaction behavior. Results are compared to other literature data obtained using different experimental methods. PMID:15518964

  2. Dynamic carbon 13 breath tests for the study of liver function and gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    In gastroenterological practice, breath tests (BTs) are diagnostic tools used for indirect, non-invasive assessment of several pathophysiological metabolic processes, by monitoring the appearance in breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate. Labelled substrates originally employed radioactive carbon 14 ((14)C) and, more recently, the stable carbon 13 isotope ((13)C) has been introduced to label specific substrates. The ingested (13)C-substrate is metabolized, and exhaled (13)CO2 is measured by mass spectrometry or infrared spectroscopy. Some (13)C-BTs evaluate specific (microsomal, cytosolic, and mitochondrial) hepatic metabolic pathways and can be employed in liver diseases (i.e. simple liver steatosis, non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, drug and alcohol effects). Another field of clinical application for (13)C-BTs is the assessment of gastric emptying kinetics in response to liquids ((13)C-acetate) or solids ((13)C-octanoic acid in egg yolk or in a pre-packed muffin or the (13)C-Spirulina platensis given with a meal or a biscuit). Studies have shown that (13)C-BTs, used for gastric emptying studies, yield results that are comparable to scintigraphy and can be useful in detecting either delayed- (gastroparesis) or accelerated gastric emptying or changes of gastric kinetics due to pharmacological effects. Thus, (13)C-BTs represent an indirect, cost-effective and easy method of evaluating dynamic liver function and gastric kinetics in health and disease, and several other potential applications are being studied. PMID:25339354

  3. Dynamic carbon 13 breath tests for the study of liver function and gastric emptying

    PubMed Central

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    In gastroenterological practice, breath tests (BTs) are diagnostic tools used for indirect, non-invasive assessment of several pathophysiological metabolic processes, by monitoring the appearance in breath of a metabolite of a specific substrate. Labelled substrates originally employed radioactive carbon 14 (14C) and, more recently, the stable carbon 13 isotope (13C) has been introduced to label specific substrates. The ingested 13C-substrate is metabolized, and exhaled 13CO2 is measured by mass spectrometry or infrared spectroscopy. Some 13C-BTs evaluate specific (microsomal, cytosolic, and mitochondrial) hepatic metabolic pathways and can be employed in liver diseases (i.e. simple liver steatosis, non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, drug and alcohol effects). Another field of clinical application for 13C-BTs is the assessment of gastric emptying kinetics in response to liquids (13C-acetate) or solids (13C-octanoic acid in egg yolk or in a pre-packed muffin or the 13C-Spirulina platensis given with a meal or a biscuit). Studies have shown that 13C-BTs, used for gastric emptying studies, yield results that are comparable to scintigraphy and can be useful in detecting either delayed- (gastroparesis) or accelerated gastric emptying or changes of gastric kinetics due to pharmacological effects. Thus, 13C-BTs represent an indirect, cost-effective and easy method of evaluating dynamic liver function and gastric kinetics in health and disease, and several other potential applications are being studied. PMID:25339354

  4. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  5. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  6. The Carbon-13 Pockets in AGB Stars and Their Fingerprints in Mainstream SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Davis, A. M.; Gallino, R.; Savina, M. R.; Bisterzo, S.; Gyngard, F.; Dauphas, N.; Pellin, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Strontium, Zr, and Ba isotopic compositions of mainstream presolar SiC grains are used to constrain the concentration and distribution of carbon-13, the main neutron source for the s-process, in the intershell region of asymptotic giant branch stars.

  7. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  8. Neoproterozoic diamictite-cap carbonate succession and δ13C chemostratigraphy from eastern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsetti, Frank A.; Stewart, John H.; Hagadorn, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the occurrence of Neoproterozoic strata throughout the southwestern U.S. and Sonora, Mexico, glacial units overlain by enigmatic cap carbonates have not been well-documented south of Death Valley, California. Here, we describe in detail the first glaciogenic diamictite and cap carbonate succession from Mexico, found in the Cerro Las Bolas Group. The diamictite is exposed near Sahuaripa, Sonora, and is overlain by a 5 m thick very finely-laminated dolostone with soft sediment folds. Carbon isotopic chemostratigraphy of the finely-laminated dolostone reveals a negative δ13C anomaly (down to − 3.2‰ PDB) characteristic of cap carbonates worldwide. Carbon isotopic values rise to + 10‰ across ∼ 400 m of section in overlying carbonates of the Mina el Mezquite and Monteso Formations. The pattern recorded here is mostly characteristic of post-Sturtian (ca. ≤ 700 Ma), but pre-Marinoan (ca. ≥ 635 Ma) time. However, the Cerro Las Bolas Group shares ambiguity common to most Neoproterozoic successions: it lacks useful radiometric age constraints and biostratigraphically useful fossils, and its δ13C signature is oscillatory and therefore somewhat equivocal.

  9. C/sup 13/-depleted authigenic carbonate buildups from hydrocarbon seeps, Louisiana Continental Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H.; Sassen, R.; Aharon, P.; Carney, R.

    1989-03-01

    Geohazard and geochemical survey data consisting of high-resolution profiles, side-scale sonographs, drop cores, dredge samples, and borings have substantiated the consistent association between carbonate buildups and hydrocarbon seeps on the Louisiana continental slope. Analyses indicate a range of carbonate mineralogies including aragonite, Mg-calcite, and dolomite that are extremely depleted in the C/sup 13/ isotope (/approximately/dC/sup 13/ values to /minus/48/per thousand/ PDB). Microbial oxidation of methane (biogenic and thermogenic) and crude oil creates a source of pore water CO/sub 2/ containing isotopically light carbon, which triggers carbonate precipitation. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggests that both surface and subsurface lithification is taking place. Recent observations and samples collected using a Pisces class research submersible confirm the abundance of C/sup 13/-depleted sedimentary carbonates and massive authigenic buildups associated with the tops and flanks of shallow salt diapirs and gas hydrate hills. Although chemosynthetic communities (including tube worms and bivalves) with isotopically light carbon in tissues have been described from gas seeps, bacterial mats sampled from several seep areas using a submersible have /delta/C/sup 13/ values of /minus/28 to /minus/ /per thousand/ PDB, suggesting a crude oil contribution to microbial biomass. Lithoherms 15 m in vertical dimension are not unusual on dome crests. These features dominate mesoscale sea-floor topography on the slope and have important short-term impacts on platform locations as well as pipeline routing. They are of long-term importance as sites for low sea level reefs. Moreover, these observations provide new insight into the earliest stages of salt-dome cap-rock evolution.

  10. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  11. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene and diphenylacetylene on copper using the water-gas shift reaction as a hydrogen source

    SciTech Connect

    Fragale, C.; Gargano, M.; Rossi, M.

    1983-04-01

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of polyenes and acetylenes to monoolefins of a particular configuration is a matter of great interest in synthetic chemistry. Studies in this field have been principally devoted to the efficiency of catalytic systems and to the mechanism of the dihydrogen activation; many examples of stereo and regioselectivities have been discussed using either homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts for the reduction of various compounds (substrates) with molecular hydrogen. In the course of studies on selective hydrogenation reactions catalyzed by transition metal derivatives, it has been found that water and carbon monoxide can be employed as reagents in place of the more expensive pure dihydrogen for the partial hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene (C/sub 8/H/sub 12/) and of diphenylethyne (C/sub 14/H/sub 10/); these reactions are promoted by copper catalysts under relatively mild conditions. Experimental conditions and results are reported.

  12. Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Miehr, R.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2002-10-01

    The distribution of reaction sites on iron particles exposed to water containing carbon tetrachloride has been examined by measuring the locations of reaction products. The uniformity or localization of reaction sites has implications for understanding and modeling the reduction of environmental contaminants by iron in ground water systems. Granular iron surfaces similar to those being used for environmental remediation applications were studied using surfaces analysis techniques to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical structure of the surface and oxide films. Scanning Auger microscopy and imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that granular iron exposed to carbon tetrachloride-saturated water exhibits chloride-enriched regions occurred at pits rather than on the passive oxide film on the metal. Understanding the nature of the local solute reduction sites will play an important role in modeling the kinetics of reaction at passive iron oxide films in environmental systems.

  13. DFT Study of Oxygen Reduction Reaction on N-substituted Carbon Electrodes. Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Tomoya, Nakzono; Miyazaki, Soichi; Miura, Toshiko; Takeuchi, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Tokio

    2011-05-01

    Carbon alloys attract attention as metal-free cathode catalysts. Mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions are investigated using the DFT calculations and molecular models such as N-substituted coronene, circum pyrene, and corannulene. The overall oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is decomposed into five elementary reactions. Adsorption of O2 is important as the first step of reduction, and it depends strongly on the spin density on C atoms, introduced by the N atom. Secondly the peripheral C atoms have an advantage due to the rehybridization freedom to the sp3 configuration. Based on the reversible electrode potential (REP) for each elementary reaction, the overpotential is expected for the first reduction of O2 to OOH and the final reduction of OH to H2O. These features indicate that N-substituted carbon electrode resembles Pt electrode compared to other less active metals, such as Au.

  14. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  15. 12C/ 13C kinetic isotope effects of the gas-phase reactions of isoprene, methacrolein, and methyl vinyl ketone with OH radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, Richard; Koppmann, Ralf; Rudolph, Jochen

    The stable-carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the gas-phase reactions of isoprene, methacrolein (MACR), and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with OH radicals were studied in a 25 L reaction chamber at (298 ± 2) K and ambient pressure. The time dependence of both the stable-carbon isotope ratios and the concentrations was determined using a gas-chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) system. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in the KIE experiments had natural-abundance isotopic composition thus KIE data obtained from these experiments can be directly applied to atmospheric studies of isoprene chemistry. All 12C/ 13/C KIE values are reported as ɛ values, where ɛ = (KIE - 1) × 1000‰, and KIE = k12/ k13. The following average stable-carbon KIEs were obtained: (6.56 ± 0.12)‰ (isoprene), (6.47 ± 0.27)‰ (MACR), and (7.58 ± 0.47)‰ (MVK). The measured KIEs all agree within uncertainty to an inverse molecular mass (MM) dependence of OHɛ(‰) = (487 ± 18)MM -1, which was derived from two previous studies [ J. Geophys. Res.2000, 105, 29329-29346; J. Phys. Chem. A2004, 108, 11537-11544]. Upon adding the isoprene, MACR, and MVK OHɛ values from this study, the inverse MM dependence changes only marginally to OHɛ(‰) = (485 ± 14)MM -1. The addition of these isoprene OHɛ values to a recently measured set of ɛO3 values in an analogous study [ Atmos. Environ.2008, 42, 8728-8737] allows for estimates of the average change in the 12C/ 13C ratio due to processing in the troposphere.

  16. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. PMID:25973732

  17. Hydrogenolysis Of 5-Carbon Sugars, Sugar Alcohols And Compositions For Reactions Involving Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werpy, Todd A.; Frye, Jr., John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2004-01-13

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  18. Hydrogenolysis of 5-carbon sugars, sugar alcohols, and other methods and compositions for reactions involving hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werpy, Todd A; Zacher, Alan H

    2002-11-12

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  19. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  20. Oxygen electrode reaction in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report, September 15, 1987--September 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, A.J.; White, R.E.

    1992-07-07

    Molten carbonate fuel cell system is a leading candidate for the utility power generation because of its high efficiency for fuel to AC power conversion, capability for an internal reforming, and a very low environmental impact. However, the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell is limited by the oxygen reduction reaction and the cell life time is limited by the stability of the cathode material. An elucidation of oxygen reduction reaction in molten alkali carbonate is essential because overpotential losses in the molten carbonate fuel cell are considerably greater at the oxygen cathode than at the fuel anode. Oxygen reduction on a fully-immersed gold electrode in a lithium carbonate melt was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry to determine electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters. The dependences of electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters on gas composition and temperature were examined to determine the reaction orders and the activation energies. The results showed that oxygen reduction in a pure lithium carbonate melt occurs via the peroxide mechanism. A mass transfer parameter, D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O}, estimated by the cyclic voltammetry concurred with that calculated by the EIS technique. The temperature dependence of the exchange current density and the product D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O} were examined and the apparent activation energies were determined to be about 122 and 175 kJ/ mol, respectively.

  1. Reaction Kinetics of CO2 Carbonation with Mg-Rich Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Dr. Soonchul; Fan, Maohong; DaCosta, Dr. Herbert F.M.; Russell, Dr. Armistead; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    Due to their low price, wide availability, and stability of the resulting carbonates, Mg-rich minerals are promising materials for carbonating CO{sub 2}. Direct carbonation of CO{sub 2} with Mg-rich minerals reported in this research for the first time could be considerably superior to conventional liquid extraction processes from an energy consumption perspective due to its avoidance of the use of a large amount of water with high specific heat capacity and latent heat of vaporization. Kinetic models of the reactions of the direct CO{sub 2} carbonation with Mg-rich minerals and within simulated flue gas environments are important to the scale-up of reactor designs. Unfortunately, such models have not been made available thus far. This research was initiated to fill that gap. Magnesium silicate (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), a representative compound in Mg-rich minerals, was used to study CO{sub 2} carbonation reaction kinetics under given simulated flue gas conditions. It was found that the chosen sorbent deactivation model fits well the experimental data collected under given conditions. A reaction order of 1 with respect to CO{sub 2} is obtained from experimental data. The Arrhenius form of CO{sub 2} carbonation with Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} is established based on changes in the rate constants of the chosen deactivation model as a function of temperature.

  2. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    collected solids from the CO reactions appeared to be the most reacted (i.e., the most changed from the unreacted lignin) according to solid state 13C-NMR analysis, and the widest variety of products (methoxy-substituted phenolic compounds) were obtained when using CO according to GC/MS analysis. Therefore, reactions with CO were completed that varied the initial reaction pressure (300, 500 and 800 psi) in order to elucidate the effects of CO pressure. Similar conversion (≈54--58%) and DCM-soluble liquid product yields (≈53--62%) were obtained for the different pressure reactions, but the reactions with an initial pressure of 500 psi had the greatest change in aromaticity from the unreacted lignin. Additional reactions between Organosolv lignin and H2O with CO (initial pressure of 500 psi) were conducted where the reaction time was varied (15, 30 and 60 min.) to determine the effect of reaction time. Longer reaction time (60 min.) appeared to inhibit conversion to low molecular weight compounds (i.e., conversion and DCM-soluble yields were lower at ≈53% and ≈28%, respectively). Solid state 13C-NMR of collected residues also showed that there are losses in carbons representative of both guaiacyl and syringyl components as reaction time increases, which may indicate that methoxy groups are being cleaved or the products are reacting with each other (i.e., repolymerization) to form high molecular weight compounds as reaction time is increased. The role of H2O and the gases during the baseline reactions and the expanded CO reactions is not intuitive based on the results, so reactions with lignin model compounds (i.e., aromatic aldehydes represented by vanillin and syringaldehyde, aromatic ketones represented by acetovanillone and acetosyringone, and aromatic ethers represented by dibenzyl ether and 2-phenethyl phenyl ether) were completed to study this. From these results, the suggested reaction pathway of Organosolv lignin reactions in subcritical H2O with and without

  3. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  4. Melting of carbonated pelites at 8-13 GPa: generating K-rich carbonatites for mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Daniele; Schmidt, Max W.

    2011-07-01

    The melting behaviour of three carbonated pelites containing 0-1 wt% water was studied at 8 and 13 GPa, 900-1,850°C to define conditions of melting, melt compositions and melting reactions. At 8 GPa, the fluid-absent and dry carbonated pelite solidi locate at 950 and 1,075°C, respectively; >100°C lower than in carbonated basalts and 150-300°C lower than the mantle adiabat. From 8 to 13 GPa, the fluid-present and dry solidi temperatures then increase to 1,150 and 1,325°C for the 1.1 wt% H2O and the dry composition, respectively. The melting behaviour in the 1.1 wt% H2O composition changes from fluid-absent at 8 GPa to fluid-present at 13 GPa with the pressure breakdown of phengite and the absence of other hydrous minerals. Melting reactions are controlled by carbonates, and the potassium and hydrous phases present in the subsolidus. The first melts, which composition has been determined by reverse sandwich experiments, are potassium-rich Ca-Fe-Mg-carbonatites, with extreme K2O/Na2O wt ratios of up to 42 at 8 GPa. Na is compatible in clinopyroxene with D_{{Na}}^{{{{cpx}}/{{carbonatite}}}} = 10{-}18 at the solidus at 8 GPa. The melt K2O/Na2O slightly decreases with increasing temperature and degree of melting but strongly decreases from 8 to 13 GPa when K-hollandite extends its stability field to 200°C above the solidus. The compositional array of the sediment-derived carbonatites is congruent with alkali- and CO2-rich melt or fluid inclusions found in diamonds. The fluid-absent melting of carbonated pelites at 8 GPa contrasts that at ≤5 GPa where silicate melts form at lower temperatures than carbonatites. Comparison of our melting temperatures with typical subduction and mantle geotherms shows that melting of carbonated pelites to 400-km depth is only feasible for extremely hot subduction. Nevertheless, melting may occur when subduction slows down or stops and thermal relaxation sets in. Our experiments show that CO2-metasomatism originating from subducted

  5. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.; Robinson, P.R.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cyclic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  6. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cylic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  7. High-Temperature Measurements and a Theoretical Study of the Reaction of OH with 1,3-Butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Vasu, Subith; Zador, J.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Golden, David; Miller, James A.

    2010-07-27

    The reaction of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with 1,3-butadiene (C4H6) was studied behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range 1011-1406 K and at pressures near 2.2 atm. OH radicals were produced by shock-heating tert-butyl hydroperoxide, (CH3)3-CO-OH, and were monitored by narrow line width ring dye laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) line of the OH A-X (0,0) band near 306.7 nm. OH time histories were modeled using a comprehensive 1,3-butadiene oxidation mechanism, and rate constants for the reaction of OH with 1,3-butadiene were extracted by matching modeled and measured OH concentration time histories. Detailed error analyses yielded an uncertainty estimate of ±13% at 1200 K for the rate coefficient of the target reaction. The current data extends the temperature range of the only previous high-temperature study for this reaction. The rate coefficient and the branching fractions for the H-abstraction channels of the target reaction were also calculated over the temperature range 250-2500 K using variational transition-state theory based on QCISD(T)/cc-pV∞Z//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) quantum chemistry. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results above 1200 K.

  8. The Development and Application of Two-Chamber Reactors and Carbon Monoxide Precursors for Safe Carbonylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Friis, Stig D; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-04-19

    , an array of low-pressure carbonylations were developed applying only near stoichiometric amounts of carbon monoxide. Importantly, carbon isotope variants of the CO precursors, such as (13)COgen, Sila(13)COgen, or even (14)COgen, provide a simple means for performing isotope-labeling syntheses. Finally, the COware applicability has been extended to reactions with other gases, such as hydrogen, CO2, and ethylene including their deuterium and (13)C-isotopically labeled versions where relevant. The COware system has been repeatedly demonstrated to be a valuable reactor for carrying out a wide number of transition metal-catalyzed transformations, and we believe this technology will have a significant place in many organic research laboratories. PMID:26999377

  9. Modeling reaction-driven cracking during mineral carbonation in peridotite for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, A. N.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Matter, J.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    In situ mineral carbonation in mantle peridotite has been proposed as a mechanism for long-term, environmentally benign CO2 sequestration1,2. This process converts peridotite and CO2 to carbonate minerals, like magnesite, in the subsurface, providing permanent and safe storage of the CO2. The volume that can be sequestered in this manner is an open question as peridotite carbonation involves a positive volume change and peridotite aquifers have limited porosity and permeability to accommodate the addition of solid volume. Conversion of peridotite to magnesite results in a volume increase of ~44%, which will fill the existing pore space and could limit the extent of carbonation by reducing porosity and permeability, clogging fluid flow paths, and armoring the reactive surface area. Alternatively, the force of crystallization and changes in fluid pressure from carbonation could act as driving forces for mechanical deformation and fracture propagation within the peridotite, creating new porosity, permeability, and reactive surface area, allowing carbonation to continue3. Natural examples of peridotite that have been entirely converted to magnesite suggest that reactive cracking from mineral carbonation is possible given the right conditions, such as elevated temperature and pCO2 2. Results will be presented from a reactive transport model that has been developed for peridotite carbonation using TOUGHREACT v.24. This model evaluates water and CO2 flow through peridotite fractured at different scales using a multiple continuum mesh. The effect of fluid flow, chemical reactions, and porosity and permeability feedbacks on carbonation rate and extent are explored, as is the effect of temperature. Peridotite carbonation is exothermic, so the release of heat of reaction could be balanced with the fluid injection temperature to maintain the 185oC conditions that facilitate the fastest carbonation rate2. The effect of fluid temperature and flow rate on the rate of carbonation

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using SBA-15 as a template by the reaction of methane and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Feng; Kim, Geon-Joong

    2011-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized using Ni loaded mesoporous SBA-15 as a template by reaction of methane and carbon dioxide. The influences of nickel content on the selectivity and crystallinity of CNTs were investigated. It can be seen that the crooked CNTs with a diameter varied from 9.9, 12.5 to 36.5 nm with creasing content of Ni from 5, 15, and 30 wt%/SBA-15. A uniform diameter and good quality CNTs were obtained in our system. PMID:21456259