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Sample records for carbon deflagration model

  1. CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.

    2013-07-01

    A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

  2. PRODUCTION OF THE p-PROCESS NUCLEI IN THE CARBON-DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes in the carbon-deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The seed abundances are obtained by calculating the s-process nucleosynthesis that is expected to occur in the repeating helium shell flashes on the carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarf (WD) during mass accretion from a binary companion. When the deflagration wave passes through the outer layer of the CO WD, p-nuclei are produced by photodisintegration reactions on s-nuclei in a region where the peak temperature ranges from 1.9 to 3.6 x 10{sup 9} K. We confirm the sensitivity of the p-process on the initial distribution of s-nuclei. We show that the initial C/O ratio in the WD does not affect much the yield of p-nuclei. On the other hand, the abundance of {sup 22}Ne left after s-processing has a large influence on the p-process via the {sup 22}Ne({alpha},n) reaction. We find that about 50% of p-nuclides are co-produced when normalized to their solar abundances in all adopted cases of seed distribution. Mo and Ru, which are largely underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II), are produced more than in SNe II although they are underproduced with respect to the yield levels of other p-nuclides. The ratios between p-nuclei and iron in the ejecta are larger than the solar ratios by a factor of 1.2. We also compare the yields of oxygen, iron, and p-nuclides in SNe Ia and SNe II and suggest that SNe Ia could make a larger contribution than SNe II to the solar system content of p-nuclei.

  3. X-ray emission from the remnant of a carbon deflagration supernova - SN 1572 (Tycho)

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Masai, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-11-01

    A spherically symmetric hydrodynamic code is used to study the evolution of a young supernova remnant on the basis of a carbon deflagration model for type Ia supernovae. The nonequilibrium X-ray emission has been determined for the elemental composition of the model. The discrepancy between the derived intensity of the Fe D-alpha line blend and the observed value is eliminated by assuming that the stratification of the elemental composition in the supernova ejecta is partially removed by mixing. 59 references.

  4. Properties of Deflagration Fronts and Models for Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Höflich, P.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed models of the explosion of a white dwarf that include self-consistent calculations of the light curve and spectra provide a link between observational quantities and the underlying explosion model. These calculations assume spherical geometry and are based on parameterized descriptions of the burning front. Recently, the first multidimensional calculations for nuclear burning fronts have been performed. Although a fully consistent treatment of the burning fronts is beyond the current state of the art, these calculations provide a new and better understanding of the physics. Several new descriptions for flame propagation have been proposed by Khokhlov et al. and Niemeyer et al. Using various descriptions for the propagation of a nuclear deflagration front, we have studied the influence on the results of previous analyses of Type Ia supernovae, namely, the nucleosynthesis and structure of the expanding envelope. Our calculations are based on a set of delayed detonation models with parameters that give a good account of the optical and infrared light curves and of the spectral evolution. In this scenario, the burning front first propagates in a deflagration mode and subsequently turns into a detonation. The explosions and light curves are calculated using a one-dimensional Lagrangian radiation-hydro code including a detailed nuclear network. We find that the results of the explosion are rather insensitive to details of the description of the deflagration front, even if its speed and the time from the transition to detonation differ almost by a factor of 2. For a given white dwarf (WD) and a fixed transition density, the total production of elements changes by less than 10%, and the distribution in the velocity space changes by less than 7%. Qualitatively, this insensitivity of the final outcome of the explosion to the details of the flame propagation during the (slow) deflagration phase can be understood as follows: for plausible variations in the speed of

  5. Engineering models of deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B.; Son, S.F.

    1995-07-01

    For the past two years, Los Alamos has supported research into the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in damaged energetic materials as part of the explosives safety program. This program supported both a theory/modeling group and an experimentation group. The goal of the theory/modeling group was to examine the various modeling structures (one-phase models, two-phase models, etc.) and select from these a structure suitable to model accidental initiation of detonation in damaged explosives. The experimental data on low-velocity piston supported DDT in granular explosive was to serve as a test bed to help in the selection process. Three theoretical models have been examined in the course of this study: (1) the Baer-Nunziato (BN) model, (2) the Stewart-Prasad-Asay (SPA) model and (3) the Bdzil-Kapila-Stewart model. Here we describe these models, discuss their properties, and compare their features.

  6. Observations and Modeling of the Component Mechanisms in Deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan; Oschwald, David; Novak, Alan; Holmes, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    We have used dynamic x-ray and proton radiography to observe the behavior of a series of HMX based energetic materials formulations undergoing thermal explosions. The result of these observations is a mechanism for deflagration based on both gas phase convective burning and solid phase conductive burning. The velocities for both the convective and conductive burns are tied together by the single combustion pressure driving both in a single experiment. The convective rate is directly measured as the burn front in the radiographs. The pressure associated with that rate is inferred from independently measured burn rate verses pressure data. This same pressure is then assumed to drive the conductive burning which begins as the convective burn front lights the material surface. Using a single, independently validated particle size distribution for damaged HMX, the combination of pressure driven convective lighting and conductive consumption is then calculated and compared to the measured transmission data sets. This same model with different initial pressurizations is used to successfully model deflagration in PBX9501, PBXN-9, and LX-07. In addition, a correlation between initial pressurization, convective/conductive velocity, and final ``reaction violence'' is observed. This leads us to the use of convective velocity as a metric for final energy release rate and therefore overall reaction violence.

  7. Modelling propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives come about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in a cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighbouring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration wave depends on both pressure and temperature, where pressure dependence is dominant at low shock level, and temperature dependence is dominant at a higher shock level. From the simulation we obtain deflagration (or burn) fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For intermediate shock levels the deflagration waves consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels the deflagration waves strengthen to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds and show how they depend on reaction rate and on other material parameters.

  8. Diffusively anisotropic model for the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Leonid; Sivashinsky, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    To elucidate the key mechanisms responsible for the transition from deflagrative to detonative combustion in smooth-walled channels, a reactive flow with anisotropic thermal and molecular diffusivities is considered. Setting the transverse diffusivities large compared to longitudinal diffusivities, the initially formed deflagration (despite no-slip boundary conditions) appears to be nearly planar and not accelerating. This, however, does not prevent its eventual abrupt transition to Chapman-Jouguet detonation.

  9. Theoretical light curves for deflagration models of type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinnikov, S. I.; Röpke, F. K.; Sorokina, E. I.; Gieseler, M.; Reinecke, M.; Travaglio, C.; Hillebrandt, W.; Stritzinger, M.

    2006-07-01

    Aims.We present synthetic bolometric and broad-band UBVRI light curves of SNe Ia for four selected 3D deflagration models of thermonuclear supernovae. Methods: .The light curves are computed with the 1D hydro code stella, which models (multi-group time-dependent) non-equilibrium radiative transfer inside SN ejecta. Angle-averaged results from 3D hydrodynamical explosion simulations with the composition determined in a nucleosynthetic postprocessing step served as the input to the radiative transfer model. Results: .The predicted model {UBV} light curves do agree reasonably well with the observed ones for SNe Ia in the range of low to normal luminosities, although the underlying hydrodynamical explosion models produced only a modest amount of radioactive {}56Ni(i.e. 0.24-0.42 M⊙) and relatively low kinetic energy in the explosion (less than 0.7 × 1051 erg). The evolution of predicted B and V fluxes in the model with a {}56Nimass of 0.42 M⊙ follows the observed decline rate after the maximum very well, although the behavior of fluxes in other filters deviates somewhat from observations, and the bolometric decline rate is a bit slow. The material velocity at the photospheric level is on the order of 104 km s-1 for all models. Using our models, we check the validity of Arnett's rule, relating the peak luminosity to the power of the deposited radioactive heating, and we also check the accuracy of the procedure for extracting the {}56Nimass from the observed light curves. Conclusions: .We find that the comparison between theoretical light curves and observations provides a useful tool to validate SN Ia models. The steps necessary for improving the agreement between theory and observations are set out.

  10. Numerical modeling of deflagration mode in coaxial plasma guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed coaxial plasma guns have been used in several applications in the field of space propulsion, nuclear fusion and materials processing. These devices operate in two modes based on the delay between gas injection and breakdown initiation. Larger delay led to the plasma detonation mode where a compression wave in the form of a luminous front propagates from the breech to the muzzle. Shorter delay led to the more efficient deflagration mode characterized by a relatively diffuse plasma with higher resistivity. The overall physics of the discharge in the two modes of operation and in particular the latter remain relatively unexplored. Here we perform a computational modeling study by solving the non-ideal Magneto-hydrodynamics equations for the quasi-neutral plasma in the coaxial plasma gun. A finite volume formulation on an unstructured mesh framework with an implicit scheme is used to do stable computations. The final work will present details of important species in the plasma, particle energies and Mach number at the muzzle. A comparison of the plasma parameters will be made with the experiments reported in ref. [1]. [4pt] [1] F. R. Poehlmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 123508 (2010)

  11. Mesoscale Modeling of Deflagration-Induced Deconsolidation in Polymer-Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. Keo; Reaugh, J. E.; Glascoe, E. A.; Kercher, J. R.; Friedman, G.

    2011-06-01

    Initially intact polymer-bonded explosives can transition from conductive burning to more violent convective burning via rapid deconsolidation at higher pressures. The pressure-dependent infiltration of cracks and pores, i.e., damage, by product gases at the burn-front is a key step in the transition to convective burning. However, the relative influence of pre-existing damage and deflagration-induced damage on the transition to convective burning is not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of explosive constituent properties, microstructure, and deflagration velocity on deconsolidation. We performed simulations using the multi-physics hydrocode, ALE3D. HMX was used as the model energetic grain. We used a JWL form for the unreacted and reacted equation-of-state of the HMX. Simplified strength and failure models were used for the HMX and the binder. The propensity for deconsolidation increased with increasing grain volume fraction, increasing porosity, decreasing binder strength, and increasing deflagration velocity. These studies are important because they enable the development of deflagration-induced damage models, as well as the design of inherently safer explosives. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded by the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program.

  12. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae. PMID:15245271

  13. TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. INTERMITTENCY AND THE DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2010-02-20

    The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of Type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. The bulk of turbulence in the ash regions appears to be less intermittent than predicted by the standard log-normal model and the She-Leveque model. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. The determination of the total number of regions at the flame surface, in which DDTs can be triggered, enables us to estimate the total number of events. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 s after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km s{sup -1}. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 s after ignition at a transition density close to 1 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}.

  14. Vented gas deflagrations; A detailed mathematical model tuned on a large set of experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Canu, P.; Rota, R.; Carra, S. . Ist. di Chimica Fisica); Morbidelli, M. )

    1990-04-01

    A detailed mathematical model based on conservation laws and physiochemical relationships has been developed to simulate vented gas deflagrations. The main phenomena involved are described using a priori relationships whenever well-established quantitative theories are available. In the case of flame front acceleration due to flame wrinkling in closed vessels or to turbulence induced by vent opening, where such theories do not exist two empirical relationships have been introduced. These have been tuned by comparison with a collection of about 160 literature experimental data, covering a wide range of values for vessel volume (0.001--199 m{sup 3}), initial pressure (0.1--0.4 MPa), and bursting pressure (0.1--2.96 MPa) and including various vessel shapes and fuel-air compositions. The obtained average relative error in the maximum explosion pressure values is equal to 10.4%, comparable with the uncertainty inherent to the vented deflagration data considered. A dedicated computer algorithm has been developed to provide a fast running simulation program (i.e., about 10 seconds of CPU time on a VAX 8650 for a typical deflagration process).

  15. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  16. The piston-flow interaction as a model for the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brailovsky, Irina; Kagan, Leonid; Sivashinsky, Gregory

    2011-01-15

    The piston-flow interaction induced by a piston pushing hydraulically resisted gas through a long tube is discussed. It is shown that the hydraulic resistance causes a significant precompression and preheating of the gas adjacent to the piston's edge. In the case of an explosive premixture this development may lead to a localized autoignition triggering detonation. It is suggested that the problem may serve as a guide for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition in tubes, with the piston modeling the impact of the advancing flame. (author)

  17. Vented gaseous deflagrations modelling of hinged inertial vent covers.

    PubMed

    Molkov, V V; Grigorash, A V; Eber, R M; Makarov, D V

    2004-12-10

    The model of explosion pressure build up in enclosures with inertial vent covers and the CINDY code implementing the model are validated against experiments by Hochst and Leuckel (1998) in a 50 m3 vessel with a pair of ceiling-mounted upwards-opening hinged doors in a 'butterfly' configuration with surface densities of 73 and 124 kg/m2 under conditions of initially quiescent and turbulent mixtures. The model and the code are further validated against an experiment by Zalosh (1978) in a 33.5 m3 room-like enclosure with a pair of wall-mounted rectangular doors, in a parallel configuration, each hinged at its bottom edge with a surface density of 23.1 kg/m2 and initially quiescent mixture. A formula for the torque acting upon a rotating venting door is derived under conditions of vent cover jet formation. The vent cover jet effect decreases the torque three times compared to an elementary approach valid at the start of vent cover movement. It is demonstrated that, similar to translating vent covers, the vent cover jet effect is crucial for prediction of interdependent vent cover displacement in time and pressure transients. PMID:15561358

  18. Reaction rate modeling in the deflagration to detonation transition of granular energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Kober, E.M.

    1996-07-01

    The problem of accidental initiation of detonation in granular material has been the initial focus of the Los Alamos explosives safety program. Preexisting models of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in granular explosives, especially the Baer and Nunziato (BN) model, have been examined. The main focus of this paper is the reaction rate model. Comparison with experiments are made using the BN rate model. Many features are replicated by the simulations. However, some qualitative features, such as inert plug formation in DDT tube-test experiments and other trends, are not produced in the simulations. By modifying the reaction rate model the authors show inert plug formation that more closely replicates the qualitative features of experimental observations. Additional improvements to the rate modeling are suggested.

  19. Benchmarking Of Improved DPAC Transient Deflagration Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, James E.; Hensel, Steve J.

    2013-03-21

    The transient deflagration code DPAC (Deflagration Pressure Analysis Code) has been upgraded for use in modeling hydrogen deflagration transients. The upgraded code is benchmarked using data from vented hydrogen deflagration tests conducted at the HYDRO-SC Test Facility at the University of Pisa. DPAC originally was written to calculate peak deflagration pressures for deflagrations in radioactive waste storage tanks and process facilities at the Savannah River Site. Upgrades include the addition of a laminar flame speed correlation for hydrogen deflagrations and a mechanistic model for turbulent flame propagation, incorporation of inertial effects during venting, and inclusion of the effect of water vapor condensation on vessel walls. In addition, DPAC has been coupled with CEA, a NASA combustion chemistry code. The deflagration tests are modeled as end-to-end deflagrations. The improved DPAC code successfully predicts both the peak pressures during the deflagration tests and the times at which the pressure peaks.

  20. MESOSCALE MODELING OF DEFLAGRATION-INDUCED DECONSOLIDATION IN POLYMER-BONDED EXPLOSIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K; Glascoe, E A; Reaugh, J E; Kercher, J R; Maienschein, J L

    2011-08-01

    Initially undamaged polymer-bonded explosives can transition from conductive burning to more violent convective burning via rapid deconsolidation at higher pressures. The pressure-dependent infiltration of cracks and pores, i.e., damage, by product gases at the burn-front is a key step in the transition to convective burning. However, the relative influence of pre-existing damage and the evolution of deflagration-induced damage during the transition to convective burning is not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of microstructure and initial pressurization on deconsolidation. We performed simulations using the multi-physics hydrocode, ALE3D. HMX-Viton A served as our model explosive. A Prout-Tompkins chemical kinetic model, Vielle's Law pressure-dependent burning, Gruneisen equation-of-state, and simplified strength model were used for the HMX. The propensity for deconsolidation increased with increasing defect size and decreasing initial pressurization, as measured by the increase in burning surface area. These studies are important because they enable the development of continuum-scale damage models and the design of inherently safer explosives.

  1. Observation and modeling of deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition in low-density HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringe, Joseph; Vandersall, Kevin; Reaugh, Jack; Levie, Harold; Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura; Parker, Gary

    2015-06-01

    We employ simultaneous flash x-ray radiography and streak imaging, together with a multi-phase finite element model, to understand deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) phenomena in low-density (~ 1.2 gm/cm3) powder of the explosive cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine (HMX). HMX powder was lightly hand-tamped in a 12.7 mm diameter column, relatively lightly-confined in an optically-transparent polycarbonate cylinder with wall thickness 25.4 mm. We observe apparent compaction of the powder in advance of the detonation transition, both by x-ray contrast and by the motion of small steel spheres pre-emplaced throughout the length of explosive. High-speed imaging along the explosive cylinder length provides a temporally continuous record of the transition that is correlated with the high-resolution x-ray image record. Preliminary simulation of these experiments with the HERMES model implemented in the ALE3D code enables improved understanding of the explosive particle burning, compaction and detonation phenomena which are implied by the observed reaction rate and transition location within the cylinder. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. The Deflagration Stage of Chandrasekhar Mass Models for Type Ia Supernovae. I. Early Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, C. M.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Dong, S.; Zingale, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present high-resolution, full-star simulations of the post-ignition phase of Type Ia supernovae using the compressible hydrodynamics code Castro. Initial conditions, including the turbulent velocity field and ignition site, are imported directly from a simulation of the last few hours of presupernova convection using a low Mach number code, Maestro. Adaptive mesh refinement allows the initial burning front to be modeled with an effective resolution of 36,8643 zones (136 m zone-1). The initial rise and expansion of the deflagration front are tracked until burning reaches the star's edge and the role of the background turbulence on the flame is investigated. The effect of artificially moving the ignition location closer to the star's center is explored. The degree to which turbulence affects the burning front decreases with increasing ignition radius since the buoyancy force is stronger at larger radii. Even central ignition—in the presence of a background convective flow field—is rapidly carried off-center as the flame is carried by the flow field. We compare our results to analytic models for burning thermals, and find that they reproduce the general trends of the bubble's size and mass, but underpredict the amount of buoyant acceleration due to simplifying assumptions of the bubble's properties. Overall, we find that the amount of mass that burns prior to flame break out is small, consistent with a "gravitationally confined detonation" occurring at a later epoch, but additional burning will occur following breakout that may modify this conclusion.

  3. A Semi-Analytic Model of a Buoyant Flame Bubble Propagation During the Deflagration Phase of a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumper, Kevin; Fisher, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are astronomical events in which a white dwarf, the cold remnant of a star that has exhausted its hydrogen fuel, detonates and briefly produces an explosion brighter than most galaxies. Many researchers think that they could occur as the white dwarf approaches a critical mass of 1.4 solar masses by accreting matter from a companion main sequence star, a scenario that is referred to as the single-degenerate channel. Assuming such a progenitor, we construct a semi-analytic model of the propagation of a flame bubble ignited at a single off-center point within the white dwarf. The bubble then rises under the influences of buoyancy and drag, burning the surrounding fuel material in a process called deflagration. We contrast the behavior of the deflagration phase in the presence of a physically high Reynolds number regime with the low Reynolds number regimes inherent to three-dimensional simulations, which are a consequence of numerical viscosity. Our work may help validate three-dimensional deflagration results over a range of initial conditions.

  4. The delayed-detonation model of a type IA supernovae. 1: The deflagration phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-05-01

    The nature of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is investigated by using two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. A new algorithm is used to treat the deflagration front. Assuming that it propagates locally at the laminar flame speed, the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts of the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. The burning front does become wrinkled, but the wavelength of the instability is much larger than the computational grid size and is resolved; this is consistent with previous analysis. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. This paper deals with the deflagration phase, from the onset of burning, through expansion and quenching of the flame, to the first contraction.

  5. The delayed-detonation model of a type Ia supernovae. 1: The deflagration phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    The nature of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is investigated by using two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. A new algorithm is used to treat the deflagration front. Assuming that it propagates locally at the laminar flame speed, the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts of the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. The burning front does become wrinkled, but the wavelength of the instability is much larger than the computational grid size and is resolved; this is consistent with previous analysis. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. This paper deals with the deflagration phase, from the onset of burning, through expansion and quenching of the flame, to the first contraction.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of pure deflagration models for thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Min; Jordan, George C. IV; Van Rossum, Daniel R.; Diemer, Benedikt; Graziani, Carlo; Kessler, Richard; Rich, Paul; Lamb, Don Q.; Meyer, Bradley

    2014-07-10

    We present a systematic study of the pure deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using three-dimensional, high-resolution, full-star hydrodynamical simulations, nucleosynthetic yields calculated using Lagrangian tracer particles, and light curves calculated using radiation transport. We evaluate the simulations by comparing their predicted light curves with many observed SNe Ia using the SALT2 data-driven model and find that the simulations may correspond to under-luminous SNe Iax. We explore the effects of the initial conditions on our results by varying the number of randomly selected ignition points from 63 to 3500, and the radius of the centered sphere they are confined in from 128 to 384 km. We find that the rate of nuclear burning depends on the number of ignition points at early times, the density of ignition points at intermediate times, and the radius of the confining sphere at late times. The results depend primarily on the number of ignition points, but we do not expect this to be the case in general. The simulations with few ignition points release more nuclear energy E{sub nuc}, have larger kinetic energies E{sub K}, and produce more {sup 56}Ni than those with many ignition points, and differ in the distribution of {sup 56}Ni, Si, and C/O in the ejecta. For these reasons, the simulations with few ignition points exhibit higher peak B-band absolute magnitudes M{sub B} and light curves that rise and decline more quickly; their M{sub B} and light curves resemble those of under-luminous SNe Iax, while those for simulations with many ignition points are not.

  7. The deflagration stage of Chandrasekhar mass models for type Ia supernovae. I. Early evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, C. M.; Woosley, S. E.; Dong, S.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Zingale, M.

    2014-02-10

    We present high-resolution, full-star simulations of the post-ignition phase of Type Ia supernovae using the compressible hydrodynamics code Castro. Initial conditions, including the turbulent velocity field and ignition site, are imported directly from a simulation of the last few hours of presupernova convection using a low Mach number code, Maestro. Adaptive mesh refinement allows the initial burning front to be modeled with an effective resolution of 36,864{sup 3} zones (136 m zone{sup –1}). The initial rise and expansion of the deflagration front are tracked until burning reaches the star's edge and the role of the background turbulence on the flame is investigated. The effect of artificially moving the ignition location closer to the star's center is explored. The degree to which turbulence affects the burning front decreases with increasing ignition radius since the buoyancy force is stronger at larger radii. Even central ignition—in the presence of a background convective flow field—is rapidly carried off-center as the flame is carried by the flow field. We compare our results to analytic models for burning thermals, and find that they reproduce the general trends of the bubble's size and mass, but underpredict the amount of buoyant acceleration due to simplifying assumptions of the bubble's properties. Overall, we find that the amount of mass that burns prior to flame break out is small, consistent with a gravitationally confined detonation' occurring at a later epoch, but additional burning will occur following breakout that may modify this conclusion.

  8. A subgrid-scale model for deflagration-to-detonation transitions in Type Ia supernova explosion simulations. Numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Röpke, F. K.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs are a promising model for normal Type Ia supernova explosions. In these white dwarfs, the burning starts out as a subsonic deflagration and turns at a later phase of the explosion into a supersonic detonation. The mechanism of the underlying deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is unknown in detail, but necessary conditions have been recently determined. The region of detonation initiation cannot be spatially resolved in multidimensional full-star simulations of the explosion. Aims: We develop a subgrid-scale model for DDTs in thermonuclear supernova simulations that is consistent with the currently known constraints. Methods: The probability of a DDT occurring is calculated from the distribution of turbulent velocities measured on the grid scale in the vicinity of the flame and the fractal flame surface area that satisfies further physical constraints, such as fuel fraction and fuel density. Results: The implementation of our DDT criterion provides a solid basis for simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions in the delayed detonation scenario. It accounts for the currently known necessary conditions for the transition and avoids the inclusion of resolution-dependent quantities in the model. The functionality of our DDT criterion is demonstrated by the example of one three-dimensional thermonuclear supernova explosion simulation.

  9. Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical examination of modeling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B.; Menikoff, R.; Son, S.F.; Kapila, A.K.; Stewart, D.S.

    1999-02-01

    The two-phase mixture model developed by Baer and Nunziato (BN) to study the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in granular explosives is critically reviewed. The continuum-mixture theory foundation of the model is examined, with particular attention paid to the manner in which its constitutive functions are formulated. Connections between the mechanical and energetic phenomena occurring at the scales of the grains, and their manifestations on the continuum averaged scale, are explored. The nature and extent of approximations inherent in formulating the constitutive terms, and their domain of applicability, are clarified. Deficiencies and inconsistencies in the derivation are cited, and improvements suggested. It is emphasized that the entropy inequality constrains but does not uniquely determine the phase interaction terms. The resulting flexibility is exploited to suggest improved forms for the phase interactions. These improved forms better treat the energy associated with the dynamic compaction of the bed and the single-phase limits of the model. Companion papers of this study [Kapila {ital et al.}, Phys. Fluids {bold 9}, 3885 (1997); Kapila {ital et al.}, in preparation; Son {ital et al.}, in preparation] examine simpler, reduced models, in which the fine scales of velocity and pressure disequilibrium between the phases allow the corresponding relaxation zones to be treated as discontinuities that need not be resolved in a numerical computation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Experiments on Magnetic Deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejada, Javier

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic deflagration was first observed in molecular magnets [1,2] and then in glassy magnetic materials like manganites [3,4] and intermetallic systems like Gd 5 Ge 4. The role of the chemical energy is played by the magnetic energy of the material. In the case of a molecular magnet, this is Zeeman energy, while in manganites and Gd 5 Ge 4 the free energy is a combination of the Zeeman energy and the energy of the metastable magnetic phase. In molecular magnets both the ignition process and the speed of the flame are assisted by quantum spin reversal. There also exists some evidence of the transition from deflagration to detonation. Various experimental techniques have been used to detect the speed of the magnetic flame. They include SQUID magnetometry, Hall bars and coils. Magnetic deflagration has been ignited by local heating, application of external fields, by surface acoustic waves and microwaves. High frequency EPR measurements of the population of spin levels permitted observation of magnetic deflagration in real time. The talk will review these experiments and their interpretation.

  11. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Simulations of the Deflagration Stage and Their Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.; Oran, Elaine S.; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y.; Rosenberg, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation.

  12. Thermonuclear supernovae: simulations of the deflagration stage and their implications.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S; Chtchelkanova, Almadena Y; Rosenberg, Robert O

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in the gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics are dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburned and partially burned material near the star center, whereas observations that imply these materials are present only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation. PMID:12446871

  13. Experiments and modelling of dynamic powder compaction in the scope of deflagration to detonation transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodard, Sebastien; Lapebie, Emmanuel; Saurel, Richard; Daniel, Eric; Tosello, Robert; Lafontaine, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Understanding DDT in granular media is of prime interest for ammunition safety. However, the mechanisms involved are multiphasic, granular and multi-scale. To progress in DDT understanding it is thus necessary to focus on some mechanisms. As compaction plays a prominent role in DDT it is important to accurately model this phenomenon. In this communication, dynamic compaction of inert powder is studied to focus on the mechanical effects taking place in early stages of DDT. Both experimental and modelling aspects are considered. A novel experimental setup is designed to generate a dynamic 1D compaction. It consists in a container filled with powder and closed by a piston. A projectile launched with a gas gun impacts the piston rod to compress the powder. High-speed cameras with grain-scale resolution record the test. The velocity field is determined with image correlation. A multiphase compaction model (Saurel et al., 2010) has been implemented. Granular effects are taken into account with a granular equation of state, determined by quasi-static compaction. With additional features such as wall friction, good agreement between experiments and computations is found. The experimental apparatus is then used to study reactive powders. This work is supported by DGA.

  14. Deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlov, A.M.; Oran, E.S.; Wheeler, J.C.

    1996-12-03

    The authors derive the criteria for deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in a Type Ia supernova. The theory is based on the two major assumptions: (i) detonation is triggered via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism inside a region of mixed fuel and products, (ii) the mixed region is produced by a turbulent mixing of fuel and products either inside an active deflagration front or during the global expansion and subsequent contraction of an exploding white dwarf. The authors determine the critical size of the mixed region required to initiate a detonation in a degenerate carbon oxygen mixture. This critical length is much larger than the width of the reaction front of a Chapman-Jouguet detonation. However, at densities greater than = 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc, it is much smaller than the size of a white dwarf. They derive the critical turbulent intensity required to create the mixed region inside an active deflagration front in which a detonation can form. They conclude that the density rho sub sigma at which a detonation can form in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf is low, approximately less than 2 to 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc, but greater than 5 x 10{sup 6} g/cc.

  15. Spontaneous Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2013-11-01

    We present the analysis of the spontaneous deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in turbulent thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae - explosions of degenerate white dwarf stars in binary stellar systems. We show results of first-principles numerical calculations that are used to develop and validate a subgrid-scale model for predicting the onset of DDT in full-star calculations. We also discuss detailed properties of laminar thermonuclear deflagrations for compositions and densities, at which DDT is expected to occur.

  16. Deflagration transient study of the CIF incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    2000-01-03

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) treats solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The transient responses of the CIF system to a deflagration, caused by an accidental charge of a modest quantity of solvent (e.g. toluene) into the rotary kiln, were a major safety concern. Using a dynamic computer model, a study was conducted to analyze the transient system responses to the rapid temperature and pressure surge in the kiln. The objective of the study was to determined the maximum pressure, temperature, and gas flow rate in each CIF component (rotary kiln, secondary combustion chamber, quencher, scrubber/cyclone, mist eliminator, reheaters, HEPAs, and ID fans). The resulting data provided a basis for the subsequent structural analysis. This paper will describe the CIF deflagration study in some detail, and present the results of the simulation scenarios.

  17. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  18. Deflagration analysis of the ITP facility utilizing the MELCOR/SR code

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.

    1993-07-01

    Under certain accident conditions, waste tanks in the In-Tank Processing (ITP) facility may contain significant concentrations of benzene and hydrogen. Because these gases are flammable, a safety analysis was required to demonstrate that the risk posed by the possible combustion of these gases is acceptable. In support of this analysis, the MELCOR/SR computer code was modified to simulate the combustion of benzene-hydrogen mixtures. MELCOR/SR was developed originally to analyze severe accidents that may occur in the SRS production reactors but many of its modules can be used also for non-reactor applications such as combustion and aerosol and radionuclide transport. The MELCOR/SR combustion model (package) was originally configured for the deflagration analysis of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures. With minor changes to the coding in the combustion package subroutines, and the addition of benzene thermodynamic and transport properties to the input decks, MELCOR/SR was modified to analyze deflagrations in benzene-hydrogen gas mixtures. A MELCOR/SR model was created consisting of two control volumes connected by flow paths. One volume represents a type III waste tank; the other, the environment. The flow paths represent vents that open during the deflagration. Choked flow and radiative heat transfer from the hot gas to the cooling coils and tank walls are phenomonalogical aspects accounted for in the model. Results from MELCOR/SR compared favorably with results from two other codes: COMPACT, a code similar to MELCOR/SR used in the preliminary ITP analysis and DPAC, a code developed specifically to analyze deflagrations in SRS waste tanks. Peak pressures predicted by MELCOR/SR (and by DPAC) for realistic waste tank conditions do not exceed the pressure required to fail the primary line of the tank. ({approximately}23 psig)

  19. a New Approach of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition in SNIa Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chièze, Jean Pierre; Charignon, Camille

    2015-03-01

    A wide class of type Ia thermonuclear supernovae models relies on the transition from the subsonic deflagration combustion regime to the supersonic detonation regime of the carbon and oxygen mixture of an accreting white dwarf, near the Chandrasekhar mass. We show that this can actually be achieved in a cold C+O white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass, with seed sound waves of relatively low Mach number M ˜ 0.02. Moreover, even weaker perturbations, with velocity perturbations as low as M ˜ 0.003 can trigger a detonation wave in SNIa progenitors models wich include the presence of a thin helium surface layer.

  20. Time-resolved Measurements of Spontaneous Magnetic Deflagration of Mn12 tBuAc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yizhang; Kent, A. D.; Zhang, Qing; Sarachik, M. P.; Baker, M. L.; Garanin, D. A.; Mhesn, Najah; Lampropoulos, Christos

    Magnetic deflagration in molecular magnets has been triggered by heat pulses and acoustic waves. In this work we report spontaneous magnetic deflagration (i.e. deflagration that occurs without an external trigger) in the axially symmetric single molecule magnet Mn12 tBuAc . Magnetic hysteresis measurements show steps due to resonant quantum tunneling (RQT) below 1K, confirming the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for this material and previous results. Deflagration speeds measured with a newly constructed higher bandwidth (2MHz) setup will be presented as a function of transverse and longitudinal fields Hx ⊗Hz both on and off resonance. A large increase in front velocity near RQT steps is observed in experiments with swept transverse fields and will be discussed in light of models of deflagration. Work supported by NSF-DMR-1309202 (NYU); ARO W911NF-13-1-0125 (CCNY); DMR-1161571(Lehman); Cottrell College Science Award (UNF).

  1. EDC-37 Deflagration Rates at Elevated Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-01-31

    We report deflagration rates on EDC-37 at high pressures. Experiments are conducted using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Pressure Strand Burner (HPSB) apparatus. The HPSB contains a deflagrating sample in a small volume, high pressure chamber. The sample consists of nine, 6.35 mm diameter, 6.35 mm length cylinders stacked on end, with burn wires placed between cylinders. Sample deflagration is limited to the cross-sectional surface of the cylinder by coating the cylindrical surface of the tower with Halthane 88-2 epoxy. Sample deflagration is initiated on one end of the tower by a B/KNO{sub 3} and HNS igniter train. Simultaneous temporal pressure history and burn front time of arrival measurements yield the laminar deflagration rate for a range of pressures and provide insight into deflagration uniformity. These measurements are one indicator of overall thermal explosion violence. Specific details of the experiment and the apparatus can be found in the literature.

  2. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Pierce, Timothy H

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  3. The type Iax supernova, SN 2015H. A white dwarf deflagration candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, M. R.; Kotak, R.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.; Rabinowitz, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Baltay, C.; Campbell, H. C.; Chen, T.-W.; Fink, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Galbany, L.; Hillebrandt, W.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Pakmor, R.; Röpke, F. K.; Ruiter, A. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Sullivan, M.; Valenti, S.; Young, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results based on observations of SN 2015H which belongs to the small group of objects similar to SN 2002cx, otherwise known as type Iax supernovae. The availability of deep pre-explosion imaging allowed us to place tight constraints on the explosion epoch. Our observational campaign began approximately one day post-explosion, and extended over a period of about 150 days post maximum light, making it one of the best observed objects of this class to date. We find a peak magnitude of Mr = -17.27± 0.07, and a (Δm15)r = 0.69 ± 0.04. Comparing our observations to synthetic spectra generated from simulations of deflagrations of Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, we find reasonable agreement with models of weak deflagrations that result in the ejection of ~0.2 M⊙ of material containing ~0.07 M⊙ of 56Ni. The model light curve however, evolves more rapidly than observations, suggesting that a higher ejecta mass is to be favoured. Nevertheless, empirical modelling of the pseudo-bolometric light curve suggests that ≲0.6 M⊙ of material was ejected, implying that the white dwarf is not completely disrupted, and that a bound remnant is a likely outcome.

  4. Stability of cosmological deflagration fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    In a cosmological first-order phase transition, bubbles of the stable phase nucleate and expand in the supercooled metastable phase. In many cases, the growth of bubbles reaches a stationary state, with bubble walls propagating as detonations or deflagrations. However, these hydrodynamical solutions may be unstable under corrugation of the interface. Such instability may drastically alter some of the cosmological consequences of the phase transition. Here, we study the hydrodynamical stability of deflagration fronts. We improve upon previous studies by making a more careful and detailed analysis. In particular, we take into account the fact that the equation of motion for the phase interface depends separately on the temperature and fluid velocity on each side of the wall. Fluid variables on each side of the wall are similar for weakly first-order phase transitions, but differ significantly for stronger phase transitions. As a consequence, we find that, for large enough supercooling, any subsonic wall velocity becomes unstable. Moreover, as the velocity approaches the speed of sound, perturbations become unstable on all wavelengths. For smaller supercooling and small wall velocities, our results agree with those of previous works. Essentially, perturbations on large wavelengths are unstable, unless the wall velocity is higher than a critical value. We also find a previously unobserved range of marginally unstable wavelengths. We analyze the dynamical relevance of the instabilities, and we estimate the characteristic time and length scales associated with their growth. We discuss the implications for the electroweak phase transition and its cosmological consequences.

  5. Jet initiation of deflagration and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krok, James Christopher

    We have constructed a facility for the study of jet-initiated deflagration and detonation in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The facility is built around two pressure vessels. Mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are spark-ignited in the driver vessel, generating a hot mixture of combustion products. The pressure rise ruptures a diaphragm, venting the products into the receiver vessel through nozzles of 12.7-92 mm diameter. The receiver is filled with hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures diluted with either nitrogen or steam. The deflagration tests studied the lean and maximum-dilution limits of hydrogen-air mixtures ignited by a hydrogen-steam jet. The lean limit of 6% hydrogen was comparable to other studies. The maximum dilution limit for steam was 60%. This is higher than the limit found in spark/glow plug ignition experiments. Shock oscillations in the receiver increased with nozzle size. Further tests studied the initiation of detonation in both hydrogen-air and stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen-diluent mixtures. In terms of jet diameter, D, and receiver detonation cell size, lambda, we found initiation limits of 2model does not adequately characterize jet initiation, as it does not reflect the conditions in the driver. The tests indicated that shock focusing plays an important role, promoting strong secondary explosions with or without prompt initiation of detonation. Mixtures with steam dilution were prone to DDT near the detonation limit, as the slower flame speed allows shock reflection and pressurization to occur before the reactants are consumed. Tests with nitrogen dilution had no DDT regime. Because of DDT and shock focusing, peak pressures were highest in mixtures that were slightly less sensitive than the detonation threshold. Schlieren movies confirmed the formation of a detonation near the nozzle exit.

  6. Jet initiation of deflagration and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krok, James Christopher

    We have constructed a facility for the study of jet-initiated deflagration and detonation in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The facility is built around two pressure vessels. Mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are spark-ignited in the driver vessel, generating a hot mixture of combustion products. The pressure rise ruptures a diaphragm, venting the products into the receiver vessel through nozzles of 12.7-92 mm diameter. The receiver is filled with hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures diluted with either nitrogen or steam.The deflagration tests studied the lean and maximum-dilution limits of hydrogen-air mixtures ignited by a hydrogen-steam jet. The lean limit of 6% hydrogen was comparable to other studies. The maximum dilution limit for steam was 60%. This is higher than the limit found in spark/glow plug ignition experiments. Shock oscillations in the receiver increased with nozzle size.Further tests studied the initiation of detonation in both hydrogen-air and stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen-diluent mixtures. In terms of jet diameter, D, and receiver detonation cell size, [?], we found initiation limits of 2 < D[?] < 7, where other experiments required a D[?] of 11 or more. We propose that the D[?] model does not adequately characterize jet initiation, as it does not reflect the conditions in the driver.The tests indicated that shock focusing plays an important role, promoting strong secondary explosions with or without prompt initiation of detonation. Mixtures with steam dilution were prone to DDT near the detonation limit, as the slower flame speed allows shock reflection and pressurization to occur before the reactants are consumed. Tests with nitrogen dilution had no DDT regime. Because of DDT and shock focusing, peak pressures were highest in mixtures that were slightly less sensitive than the detonation threshold. Schlieren movies confirmed the formation of a detonation near the nozzle exit.

  7. Deflagration, fronts of tunneling, and dipolar ordering in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    Although there is no exchange interaction in crystals of molecular magnets characterized by a giant effective spin S (S = 10 for Mn 12 , and Fe 8) , magnetic field B (D) generated by magnetic moments g μ B S of magnetic molecules creates energy bias W (D) = 2 Sg μ BB (D) on a molecule that largely exceeds the tunnelling splitting Δ of matching quantum states on different sides of the anisotropy barrier. Thus the dipolar field has a profound influence on the processes of tunnelling and relaxation in molecular magnets. Both theoretical and experimental works showed a slow non-exponential relaxation of the magnetization in both initially ordered and completely disordered states since most of the spins are off tunneling resonance at any time. Recently a new mode of relaxation via tunneling has been found, the so-called fronts of tunneling, in which (within a 1 d theoretical model) dipolar field adjusts so that spins are on resonance within the broad front core. In this ``laminar'' regime fronts of tunnelling are moving fast at speeds that can exceed that of the temperature-driven magnetic deflagration, if a sufficiently strong transverse field is applied. However, a ``non-laminar'' regime has also been found in which instability causes spins to go off resonance and the front speed drops. In a combination with magnetic deflagration, the laminar regime becomes more stable and exists in the whole dipolar window 0 <= W <=W (D) on the external bias W , where the deflagration speed strongly increases. Another dipolar effect in molecular magnets is dipolar ordering below 1 K that has recently been shown to be non-uniform because of formation of magnetic domains. An object of current research is possible non-uniformity of magnetic deflagration and tunneling fronts via domain instability that could influence their speed.

  8. Deflagrations in hybrid CONe white dwarfs: a route to explain the faint Type Iax supernova 2008ha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, M.; Ohlmann, S. T.; Pakmor, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Hillebrandt, W.; Marquardt, K. S.; Röpke, F. K.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Sim, S. A.; Taubenberger, S.

    2015-07-01

    Stellar evolution models predict the existence of hybrid white dwarfs (WDs) with a carbon-oxygen core surrounded by an oxygen-neon mantle. Being born with masses ˜1.1 M⊙, hybrid WDs in a binary system may easily approach the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh) by accretion and give rise to a thermonuclear explosion. Here, we investigate an off-centre deflagration in a near-MCh hybrid WD under the assumption that nuclear burning only occurs in carbon-rich material. Performing hydrodynamics simulations of the explosion and detailed nucleosynthesis post-processing calculations, we find that only 0.014 M⊙ of material is ejected while the remainder of the mass stays bound. The ejecta consist predominantly of iron-group elements, O, C, Si and S. We also calculate synthetic observables for our model and find reasonable agreement with the faint Type Iax SN 2008ha. This shows for the first time that deflagrations in near-MCh WDs can in principle explain the observed diversity of Type Iax supernovae. Leaving behind a near-MCh bound remnant opens the possibility for recurrent explosions or a subsequent accretion-induced collapse in faint Type Iax SNe, if further accretion episodes occur. From binary population synthesis calculations, we find the rate of hybrid WDs approaching MCh to be of the order of 1 per cent of the Galactic SN Ia rate.

  9. LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

    2006-10-23

    We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

  10. Partial spin reversal in magnetic deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, S.; Subedi, P.; Macià, F.; Li, S.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Christou, G.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    The reversal of spins in a magnetic material as they relax toward equilibrium is accompanied by the release of Zeeman energy, which can lead to accelerated spin relaxation and the formation of a well-defined self-sustained propagating spin-reversal front known as magnetic deflagration. To date, studies of Mn12-acetate single crystals have focused mainly on deflagration in large longitudinal magnetic fields, and they found a fully spin-reversed final state. We report a systematic study of the effect of a transverse magnetic field on magnetic deflagration, and we demonstrate that in small longitudinal fields the final state consists of only partially reversed spins. Further, we measured the front speed as a function of applied magnetic field. The theory of magnetic deflagration, together with a modification that takes into account partial spin reversal, fits the transverse field dependence of the front speed but not its dependence on the longitudinal field. The most significant result of this study is the finding of a partially spin-reversed final state, which is evidence that the spins at the deflagration front are also only partially reversed.

  11. Deflagration to detonation experiments in granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Dickson, P.M.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the authors report on continuing work involving a series of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments in which they study the piston-initiated DDT of heavily confined granular cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). These experiments were designed to he useful in model development and evaluation. A main focus of these experiments is the effect of density on the DDT event. Particle size distribution and morphology are carefully characterized. In this paper they present recent surface area analysis. Earlier studies demonstrated extensive fracturing and agglomeration in samples at densities as low as 75% TMD as evidenced by dramatic decreases in particle size distribution due to mild stimulus. This is qualitatively confirmed with SEM images and quantitatively studied with gas absorption surface area analysis. Also, in this paper they present initial results using a microwave interferometer technique. Dynamic calibration of the technique was performed, a 35 GHz signal is used to increase resolution, and the system has been designed to be inexpensive for repeated experiments. The distance to where deformation of the inner wall begins for various densities is reported. This result is compared with the microwave interferometer measurements.

  12. Deflagration to detonation transition in combustible gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Panfilov, I.I.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation of the process of deflagration to detonation transition in a combustible gas mixture. The type of combustion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) supported by a two-step reaction scheme is studied as a function of the activation energies. It is shown that both a deflagration to detonation transition and a deflagration wave that lags behind a leading shock are possible. Two types of deflagration to detonation transitions are found theoretically: initiation of detonation from the flame zone and initiation of detonation along a contact discontinuity in the compressed gas near the primary shock wave.

  13. Current Distribution Characterization and Circuit Analysis of a High Energy Pulsed Plasma Deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Poehlmann, Flavio; Cappelli, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Measurements and analysis of the transient current density within a coaxial electromagnetic plasma accelerator operating in a pulsed deflagration mode are presented. Current measurements are performed using an axial array of dual-Rogowksi coils in a balanced circuit configuration. An equivalent circuit model of the accelerator is formulated and compared with experimental data. Current distribution measurements were carried out over a wide range of operating conditions and compared with the equivalent circuit model in order to determine the governing physics of the discharge and verify the existence of a deflagration at all tested conditions.

  14. Development and application of a deflagration pressure analysis code for high level waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.J.; Thomas, J.K.

    1994-06-01

    The Deflagration Pressure Analysis Code (DPAC) was developed primarily to evaluate peak pressures for deflagrations in radioactive waste storage and process facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Deflagrations in these facilities are generally considered to be incredible events, but it was judged prudent to develop modeling capabilities in order to facilitate risk estimates. DPAC is essentially an engineering analysis tool, as opposed to a detailed thermal hydraulics code. It accounts for mass loss via venting, energy dissipation by radiative heat transfer, and gas PdV work. Volume increases due to vessel deformation can also be included using pressure-volume data from a structural analysis of the enclosure. This paper presents an overview of the code, benchmarking, and applications at SRS.

  15. Strategies for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, B.W.

    1992-05-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) phenomenon has been studied for many years. However, no comprehensive model of the DDT process is available. It is important to understand the mechanism by which an explosive will detonate when the source of ignition is a weak shock or flame, and to able to predict this response. We have identified several key areas of the DDT problem which need to be understood before any such prediction can be made, and have established a modest program to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the behavior of explosive under the conditions that can lead to DDT.

  16. Strategies for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) phenomenon has been studied for many years. However, no comprehensive model of the DDT process is available. It is important to understand the mechanism by which an explosive will detonate when the source of ignition is a weak shock or flame, and to able to predict this response. We have identified several key areas of the DDT problem which need to be understood before any such prediction can be made, and have established a modest program to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the behavior of explosive under the conditions that can lead to DDT.

  17. Modeling Carbon Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Model results will be reviewed to assess different methods for bounding the terrestrial role in the global carbon cycle. It is proposed that a series of climate model runs could be scoped that would tighten the limits on the "missing sink" of terrestrial carbon and could also direct future satellite image analyses to search for its geographical location and understand its seasonal dynamics.

  18. Hydrogen mixing and deflagration/detonation potential in a large, dry containment

    SciTech Connect

    Plys, M.G.; Elicson, G.T.; Cirauqui, C.; Otero, M.

    1996-12-31

    Severe accident analyses with MAAP4 may be supplemented by separate phenomena evaluations to determine the potential for deflagrations and detonations in a containment. Key phenomena evaluations are described here, and MAAP4 results are checked for consistency of the MAAP models for the case of a large, dry pressurized water reactor containment. For specific accident scenarios at Vandellos-II, we conclude that primary system heat losses induce significant containment mixing, rendering the potential for deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) highly unlikely to impossible and also signifying that hydrogen monitoring equipment should measure representative gas concentrations for application of severe accident management guidelines.

  19. Time-Resolved Plasma Density and Magnetic Field Measurements in a Pulsed Plasma Deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Cappelli, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of electron density and azimuthal magnetic field strength within a coaxial electromagnetic plasma accelerator operating in a pulsed deflagration mode are presented. Density measurements are performed via an optical interferometer of the Michelson type, while the Faraday rotation of the polarization plane of the same beam is measured in order to provide the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the direction of beam propagation. Experimental data is compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulation results and prior lower fidelity experimental results. Measurements were carried out over a wide range of operating conditions in order to validate the theoretical models describing the physics of the deflagration acceleration mechanism.

  20. Deflagration-to-detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charignon, C.; Chièze, J.-P.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We study a new mechanism for deflagration-to-detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. We characterise, in terms of wavelength and amplitude, the perturbations which will ignite a detonation after their amplification. Methods: This study was performed using the well tested HERACLES code, a conservative hydrodynamical code, validated in the present specific application by an analytical description of the propagation of sound waves in white dwarfs. Thermonuclear combustion of the carbon oxygen fuel was treated with the α-chain nuclear reactions network. Results: In planar geometry we found the critical parameter to be the height of shock formation. When it occurs in the inner dense regions (ρ > 106 g cm-3) detonation is inevitable but can take an arbitrarily long time. We found that ignition can be achieved for perturbation as low as Mach number: M ~ 0.005, with heating times compatible with typical explosion time scale (a few seconds). On the opposite no ignition occurs when shocks initiated by small amplitude or large wavelength form further away in less dense regions. We show finally that ignition is also achieved in a spherical self-gravitating spherical model of cold C+O white dwarf of 1.430 M⊙, but due to the spherical damping of sound waves it necessitates stronger perturbation (M ~ 0.02). Small perturbations (M ~ 0.003) could still trigger detonation if a small helium layer is considered. In the context of SNe Ia, one has to consider further the initial expansion of the white dwarf, triggered by the deflagration, prior to the transition to detonation. As the star expands, gradients get flatter and ignition requires increasingly strong perturbations.

  1. Structure and Stability of Deflagrations in Porous Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1999-03-01

    Theoretical two-phase-flow analyses have recently been developed to describe the structure and stability of multi-phase deflagrations in porous energetic materials, in both confined and unconfined geometries. The results of these studies are reviewed, with an emphasis on the fundamental differences that emerge with respect to the two types of geometries. In particular, pressure gradients are usually negligible in unconfined systems, whereas the confined problem is generally characterized by a significant gas-phase pressure difference, or overpressure, between the burned and unburned regions. The latter leads to a strong convective influence on the burning rate arising from the pressure-driven permeation of hot gases into the solid/gas region and the consequent preheating of the unburned material. It is also shown how asymptotic models that are suitable for analyzing stability may be derived based on the largeness of an overall activation-energy parameter. From an analysis of such models, it is shown that the effects of porosity and two-phase flow are generally destabilizing, suggesting that degraded propellants, which exhibit greater porosity than their pristine counterparts, may be more readily subject to combustion instability and nonsteady deflagration.

  2. The deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.M.; Asay, B.; Campbell, A.W.; Ramsay, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    The transition from deflagration to detonation in porous beds of explosive and propellant has received considerable attention both experimentally and theoretically. In many cases, the use of a hot-gas-producing igniter complicates the interpretation and subsequent modeling of experiments because considerable effort is required to account for the effect of the igniter gases on the granular bed. Hot-wire ignition is less intrusive; however, the ignition front is not planar. Thus the early events in these experiments cannot be approximated as one-dimensional. We have studied the deflagration-to-detonation behavior of granular HMX confined in steel tubes with x-radiography, light emission, stress gauges, and various pin techniques. Simplification and consistency of results were obtained by igniting the HMX with a piston (initially at rest and in contact with the HMX) driven into the bed. A gasless igniter is used to stare the burning of the piston propellant (low-density HMX) providing the piston with a smooth initial motion. Analysis of the data gives a detailed picture of the DDT process under these conditions. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results show the transition from the burning to detonation is discontinuous. The results are discussed in terms of a descriptive model.

  3. CFD simulation of hydrogen deflagration in a vented room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolias, I. C.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N. C.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of hydrogen deflagration in a real scale vented room are performed. Two ignition points were simulated: at the wall opposite to the vent (back ignition) and at the center of the chamber (center ignition). The overpressure time series and flame front velocities are compared with the experimental results. The combustion model is based on the turbulent flame speed concept. The turbulent flame speed is calculated based on a modification of Yakhot's equation, in order to account for all the main physical mechanisms which appear in hydrogen deflagrations. Special attention is given to the simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability occurs at the vent area and results in sudden explosion of the mixture that has been pushed outside the chamber at the initial stage of the explosion. The importance of this external explosion to the generated overpressures inside the chamber is highlighted. The agreement between experimental and computational results is satisfactory in both back ignition and center ignition cases.

  4. Performance Impact of Deflagration to Detonation Transition Enhancing Obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Schauer, Frederick; Hopper, David

    2012-01-01

    A sub-model is developed to account for the drag and heat transfer enhancement resulting from deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) inducing obstacles commonly used in pulse detonation engines (PDE). The sub-model is incorporated as a source term in a time-accurate, quasi-onedimensional, CFD-based PDE simulation. The simulation and sub-model are then validated through comparison with a particular experiment in which limited DDT obstacle parameters were varied. The simulation is then used to examine the relative contributions from drag and heat transfer to the reduced thrust which is observed. It is found that heat transfer is far more significant than aerodynamic drag in this particular experiment.

  5. Deflagration studies on waste Tank 101-SY: Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K.L.; Zlochower, I.A.; Hertzberg, M.

    1991-07-01

    Waste slurries produced during the recovery of plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel are stored in underground storage tanks. While a variety of waste types have been generated, of particular concern are the wastes stored in Tank 101-SY. A slurry growth-gas evolution cycle has been observed since 1981. The waste consists of a thick slurry, consisting of a solution high in NaOH, NaNO{sub 3}, NaAlO{sub 2}, dissolved organic complexants (EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, and degradation products), other salts (sulfates and phosphates), and radionuclides (primarily cesium and strontium). During a gas release the major gaseous species identified include: hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Significant amounts of nitrogen may also be present. Traces of ammonia, carbon oxides, and other nitrogen oxides are also detected. Air and water vapor are also present in the tank vapor space. The purpose of the deflagration study is to determine risks of the hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and oxygen system. To be determined are pressure and temperature as a function of composition of reacting gases and the concentration of gases before and after the combustion event. Analyses of gases after the combustion event will be restricted to those tests that had an initial concentration of {le}8% hydrogen. This information will be used to evaluate safety issues related to periodic slurry growth and flammable gas releases from Tank 101-SY. the conditions to be evaluated will simulate gases in the vapor space above the salt cake as well as gases that potentially are trapped in pockets within/under the waste. The deflagration study will relate experimental laboratory results to conditions in the existing tanks.

  6. Deflagration Behavior of PBX 9501 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-04-15

    We report the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 at pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures of 150-180 C where the sample has been held at the test temperature for several hours before ignition. The purpose is to determine the effect on the deflagration behavior of material damage caused by prolonged exposure to high temperature. This conditioning is similar to that experienced by an explosive while it being heated to eventual explosion. The results are made more complicated by the presence of a significant thermal gradient along the sample during the temperature ramp and soak. Three major conclusions are: the presence of nitroplasticizer makes PBX 9501 more thermally sensitive than LX-04 with an inert Viton binder; the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 is more extreme and more inconsistent than that of LX-04; and something in PBX 9501 causes thermal damage to 'heal' as the deflagration proceeds, resulting in a decelerating deflagration front as it travels along the sample.

  7. Detonation and deflagration properties of pyrotechnic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Katsumi

    1996-07-01

    Theoretical calculation of detonation and deflagration properties of pyrotechnic mixtures have been performed including report charges and display charges. Calculation were performed with the KHT (Kihara-Hikta-Tanaka) code. KHT results are compared with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculation with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. Detonation properties computed by KHT and BKWS (Becker-Kistiakowskii-Wilson) give favorable agreement with experimental results of detonation velocity measurements. Hydrodynamic computation by one dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code using the isentrope given by KHT constant volume explosion, indicated that experimental results for blast wave measurement for 30kg and 50kg of report charge were an incomplete reaction. Underwater detonation experiments with explosive charge of 25g, however, indicates a more energetic nature than the KHT prediction. This scale effect indicates complicated slow reactions and a number of condensed phase deflagration products of powder mixtures such as aluminum or titanium with oxidizers such as potassium perchlorate or nitrate salts as suggested by Hobbs et al.

  8. Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

  9. Self-similar blast waves incorporating deflagrations of variable speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, R. H.; Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the development of a systematic approach to the problem of self-similar blast waves incorporating nonsteady flames. The regime covered by the presented solutions is bounded on one side by an adiabatic strong explosion and, on the other, by deflagration propagating at an infinite acceleration. Results for a representative set of accelerations are displayed, taking into account the full range of propagation speeds from zero to velocities corresponding to the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. It is found that the distribution of stored energy in the undisturbed medium determines the acceleration of the deflagration-shock wave system. The obtained results reveal the existence of a simple relation between the location of the deflagration and its Mach number.

  10. A study of deflagration and detonation in multiphase hydrocarbon-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Tyurnikov, M.V. . Dept. of Mechanics and Mathematics)

    1994-01-01

    This article represents a theoretical and experimental study of the problems of deflagration and detonation structure in heterogeneous media, which contains an oxidant in the gaseous phase and fuel in the form of either dispersed droplets in the oxidant flow or a thin film on the chamber walls. Detonation in such systems is shown to have a complex unsteady-state structure: the detonation front can exhibit mobile discontinuities and can pulsate periodically. A physical model of pulsating and spin detonation in heterogeneous media is developed. A system of governing equations with boundary conditions is composed that makes it possible to simulate mathematically the transition of deflagration to detonation. The transition process and the initiation of detonation are calculated numerically and studied experimentally. The comparison shows good agreement of theoretical and experimental results.

  11. Flame acceleration in channels with obstacles in the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Damir; Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Law, Chung K.; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2010-05-15

    It was demonstrated recently in Bychkov et al. [Bychkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 (2008) 164501], that the physical mechanism of flame acceleration in channels with obstacles is qualitatively different from the classical Shelkin mechanism. The new mechanism is much stronger, and is independent of the Reynolds number. The present study provides details of the theory and numerical modeling of the flame acceleration. It is shown theoretically and computationally that flame acceleration progresses noticeably faster in the axisymmetric cylindrical geometry as compared to the planar one, and that the acceleration rate reduces with increasing Mach number and thereby the gas compressibility. Furthermore, the velocity of the accelerating flame saturates to a constant value that is supersonic with respect to the wall. The saturation state can be correlated to the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration as well as the fast flames observed in experiments. The possibility of transition from deflagration-to-detonation in the obstructed channels is demonstrated. (author)

  12. Magneto-hydrodynamics simulation study of deflagration mode in co-axial plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies by Poehlmann et al. [Phys. Plasmas 17(12), 123508 (2010)] on a coaxial electrode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma accelerator have revealed two modes of operation. A deflagration or stationary mode is observed for lower power settings, while higher input power leads to a detonation or snowplow mode. A numerical modeling study of a coaxial plasma accelerator using the non-ideal MHD equations is presented. The effect of plasma conductivity on the axial distribution of radial current is studied and found to agree well with experiments. Lower conductivities lead to the formation of a high current density, stationary region close to the inlet/breech, which is a characteristic of the deflagration mode, while a propagating current sheet like feature is observed at higher conductivities, similar to the detonation mode. Results confirm that plasma resistivity, which determines magnetic field diffusion effects, is fundamentally responsible for the two modes.

  13. Magneto-hydrodynamics simulation study of deflagration mode in co-axial plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-15

    Experimental studies by Poehlmann et al. [Phys. Plasmas 17(12), 123508 (2010)] on a coaxial electrode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma accelerator have revealed two modes of operation. A deflagration or stationary mode is observed for lower power settings, while higher input power leads to a detonation or snowplow mode. A numerical modeling study of a coaxial plasma accelerator using the non-ideal MHD equations is presented. The effect of plasma conductivity on the axial distribution of radial current is studied and found to agree well with experiments. Lower conductivities lead to the formation of a high current density, stationary region close to the inlet/breech, which is a characteristic of the deflagration mode, while a propagating current sheet like feature is observed at higher conductivities, similar to the detonation mode. Results confirm that plasma resistivity, which determines magnetic field diffusion effects, is fundamentally responsible for the two modes.

  14. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone ofmore » only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.« less

  15. Ultrafast Chemistry under Nonequilibrium Conditions and the Shock to Deflagration Transition at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Mitchell A.; Cherukara, Mathew J.; Kober, Edward M.; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-13

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to describe the chemical reactions following shock-induced collapse of cylindrical pores in the high-energy density material RDX. For shocks with particle velocities of 2 km/s we find that the collapse of a 40 nm diameter pore leads to a deflagration wave. Molecular collisions during the collapse lead to ultrafast, multistep chemical reactions that occur under nonequilibrium conditions. WE found that exothermic products formed during these first few picoseconds prevent the nanoscale hotspot from quenching. Within 30 ps, a local deflagration wave develops. It propagates at 0.25 km/s and consists of an ultrathin reaction zone of only ~5 nm, thus involving large temperature and composition gradients. Contrary to the assumptions in current models, a static thermal hotspot matching the dynamical one in size and thermodynamic conditions fails to produce a deflagration wave indicating the importance of nonequilibrium loading in the criticality of nanoscale hot spots. These results provide insight into the initiation of reactive decomposition.

  16. Pre-ignition confinement and deflagration violence in LX-10 and PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J. W. Glascoe, E. A.; McClelland, M. A.; Greenwood, D.; Chambers, R. D.; Springer, H. K.; Levie, H. W.

    2014-08-07

    In thermal explosions of the nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)-based explosives LX-10 and PBX-9501, the pre-ignition spatial and temporal heating profile defines the ignition location. The ignition location then determines the extent of inertial confinement and the violence of the resulting deflagration. In this work, we present results of experiments in which ∼23 g cylinders of LX-10 and PBX 9501 in thin-walled aluminum confinement vessels were subjected to identical heating profiles but which presented starkly different energy release signatures. Post-explosion LX-10 containment vessels were completely fragmented, while the PBX 9501 vessels were merely ruptured. Flash x-ray radiography images show that the initiation location for the LX-10 is a few mm farther from the end caps of the vessel relative to the initiation location of PBX 9501. This difference increases deflagration confinement for LX-10 at the time of ignition and extends the pressurization time during which the deflagration front propagates in the explosive. The variation in the initiation location, in turn, is determined by the thermal boundary conditions, which differ for these two explosives because of the larger coefficient of thermal expansion and greater thermal stability of the Viton binder in LX-10 relative to the estane and bis(2,2-dinitropropyl) acetal/formal binder of the PBX 9501. The thermal profile and initiation location were modeled for LX-10 using the hydrodynamics and structures code ALE3D; results indicate temperatures in the vicinity of the ignition location in excess of 274 °C near the time of ignition. The conductive burn rates for these two explosives, as determined by flash x-ray radiography, are comparable in the range 0.1–0.2 mm/μs, somewhat faster than rates observed by strand burner experiments for explosives in the temperature range 150–180 °C and pressures up to 100 MPa. The thinnest-wall aluminum containment vessels

  17. Pre-ignition confinement and deflagration violence in LX-10 and PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringe, J. W.; Glascoe, E. A.; McClelland, M. A.; Greenwood, D.; Chambers, R. D.; Springer, H. K.; Levie, H. W.

    2014-08-01

    In thermal explosions of the nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)-based explosives LX-10 and PBX-9501, the pre-ignition spatial and temporal heating profile defines the ignition location. The ignition location then determines the extent of inertial confinement and the violence of the resulting deflagration. In this work, we present results of experiments in which ˜23 g cylinders of LX-10 and PBX 9501 in thin-walled aluminum confinement vessels were subjected to identical heating profiles but which presented starkly different energy release signatures. Post-explosion LX-10 containment vessels were completely fragmented, while the PBX 9501 vessels were merely ruptured. Flash x-ray radiography images show that the initiation location for the LX-10 is a few mm farther from the end caps of the vessel relative to the initiation location of PBX 9501. This difference increases deflagration confinement for LX-10 at the time of ignition and extends the pressurization time during which the deflagration front propagates in the explosive. The variation in the initiation location, in turn, is determined by the thermal boundary conditions, which differ for these two explosives because of the larger coefficient of thermal expansion and greater thermal stability of the Viton binder in LX-10 relative to the estane and bis(2,2-dinitropropyl) acetal/formal binder of the PBX 9501. The thermal profile and initiation location were modeled for LX-10 using the hydrodynamics and structures code ALE3D; results indicate temperatures in the vicinity of the ignition location in excess of 274 °C near the time of ignition. The conductive burn rates for these two explosives, as determined by flash x-ray radiography, are comparable in the range 0.1-0.2 mm/μs, somewhat faster than rates observed by strand burner experiments for explosives in the temperature range 150-180 °C and pressures up to 100 MPa. The thinnest-wall aluminum containment vessels presented here

  18. Neutrinos from type Ia supernovae: The deflagration-to-detonation transition scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Warren P.; Nagaraj, Gautam; Kneller, James P.; Scholberg, Kate; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.

    2016-07-01

    It has long been recognized that the neutrinos detected from the next core-collapse supernova in the Galaxy have the potential to reveal important information about the dynamics of the explosion and the nucleosynthesis conditions as well as allowing us to probe the properties of the neutrino itself. The neutrinos emitted from thermonuclear—type Ia—supernovae also possess the same potential, although these supernovae are dimmer neutrino sources. For the first time, we calculate the time, energy, line of sight, and neutrino-flavor-dependent features of the neutrino signal expected from a three-dimensional delayed-detonation explosion simulation, where a deflagration-to-detonation transition triggers the complete disruption of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf. We also calculate the neutrino flavor evolution along eight lines of sight through the simulation as a function of time and energy using an exact three-flavor transformation code. We identify a characteristic spectral peak at ˜10 MeV as a signature of electron captures on copper. This peak is a potentially distinguishing feature of explosion models since it reflects the nucleosynthesis conditions early in the explosion. We simulate the event rates in the Super-K, Hyper-K, JUNO, and DUNE neutrino detectors with the SNOwGLoBES event rate calculation software and also compute the IceCube signal. Hyper-K will be able to detect neutrinos from our model out to a distance of ˜10 kpc . At 1 kpc, JUNO, Super-K, and DUNE would register a few events while IceCube and Hyper-K would register several tens of events.

  19. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  20. Simulations of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions in methane-air systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A.; Gamezo, V.N.; Oran, E.S.

    2010-11-15

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT) in large obstructed channels filled with a stoichiometric methane-air mixture are simulated using a single-step reaction mechanism. The reaction parameters are calibrated using known velocities and length scales of laminar flames and detonations. Calculations of the flame dynamics and DDT in channels with obstacles are compared to previously reported experimental data. The results obtained using the simple reaction model qualitatively, and in many cases, quantitatively match the experiments and are found to be largely insensitive to small variations in model parameters. (author)

  1. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae: Numerical Convergence for Deflagration Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, V. N.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Oran, E. S.

    2002-05-01

    We consider a Type Ia supernova explosion originating as a deflagration in the center of a carbon-oxygen Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) with initial composition 0.5C+0.5O, central density 2.0 x 109 g/cm3 and initial radius 2.1 x 108 cm. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is based on reactive Euler equations of fluid dynamics coupled with an equation of state for a degenerate matter and a simplified kinetics of energy release. The energy-release model provides the correct propagation velocity for a laminar flame and takes into account carbon burning, as well as nuclear statistical quasi-equilibrium and equilibrium relaxations. The model for the turbulent burning on scales that are not resolved in the simulations is based on the assumption that burning on small scales is driven by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. We performed 3D calculations for the first 1.9 seconds of explosion using an adaptively refined structured mesh. For the highest-resolution case, the minimum cell size was 2.6 x 105 cm, and the mesh consisted of 108 computational cells by the end of the simulation. The flame, started as a sphere with the radius 3 x 106 cm, becomes very convoluted due to the RT and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities on resolved scales and develops multiple buoyant plumes. As the plumes grow, the unburnt material either sinks towards the center or expands more slowly than the burnt material inside the plumes. The material burns at all distances from the center even when the larger flame plumes reach the outer layers of the star. By 1.9 seconds, some of these plumes approach the surface of the expanding WD that extends to (5-6) x 108 cm from the center. About 50% of the material burns out releasing 1.3 x 1051 ergs of nuclear energy. The expansion velocity at the surface reaches 1.2 x 109 cm/s and continues to grow. A convergence study shows that at high resolutions, the results become practically independent on the computational cell size and

  2. Steady Deflagration of PBX-9501 Within a Copper Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Steven J.; Herrera, Dennis H.; Herrera, Tommy J.; Arellano, Jesus C.; Sandoval, Thomas D.

    2012-06-26

    A copper cylinder cook-off experiment has been designed to cause steady deflagration in PBX-9501 explosive material. The design is documented and preliminary copper expansion results are presented for steady deflagration with a reaction speed of 1092 +/- 24 m/s. The expansion of reaction products from the detonation of an explosive is something that is well understood, and reasonably simulated using documented equations of state (EOS) for many explosives of interest. These EOS were historically measured using a 'standard' copper cylinder test design; this design comprised an annealed, oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper tube filled with explosive material and detonated from one end. Expansion of the copper wall was measured as a function of time using either a streak camera (for classic testing), or more recently using laser velocimetry techniques. Expansion data were then used to derive the EOS in various preferred forms - which are not discussed here for the sake of brevity. [Catanach, et. al., 1999] When an explosive deflagrates rather than detonating, simulation becomes more difficult. Reaction products are released on a slower time scale, and the reactions are much more affected by the geometry and local temperature within the reaction environment. It is assumed that the standard, documented EOS will no longer apply. In an effort to establish a first order approximation of deflagration product behavior, a cook-off test has been designed to cause steady deflagration in PBX-9501 explosive material, and to record the copper expansion profile as a function of time during this test. The purpose of the current paper is to document the initial test design and report some preliminary results. A proposal for modification of the design is also presented.

  3. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  4. Deflagration of HMX-Based Explosives at High Temperatures and Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; DeHaven, M R; Black, C K

    2004-05-12

    We measure the deflagration behavior of energetic materials at extreme conditions (up to 520K and 1 GPa) in the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of violence of thermal explosions. The apparatus provides both temporal pressure history and flame time-of-arrival information during deflagration, allowing direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Samples may be heated before testing. Here we report the deflagration behavior of several HMX-based explosives at pressures of 10-600 MPa and temperatures of 300-460 K. We find that formulation details are very important to overall deflagration behavior. Formulations with high binder content (>15 wt%) deflagrate smoothly over the entire pressure range regardless of particle size, with a larger particle size distribution leading to a slower reaction. The deflagration follows a power law function with the pressure exponent being unity. Formulations with lower binder content ({le} 10% or less by weight) show physical deconsolidation at pressures over 100-200 MPA, with transition to a rapid erratic deflagration 10-100 times faster. High temperatures have a relatively minor effect on the deflagration rate until the HMX {beta} {yields} {delta} phase transition occurs, after which the deflagration rate increases by more than a factor of 10.

  5. Turbulent Deflagrated Flame Interaction with a Fluidic Jet Flow for Deflagration-to-Detonation Flame Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Jessica; McGarry, Joseph; Ahmed, Kareem

    2015-11-01

    Detonation is a high energetic mode of pressure gain combustion. Detonation combustion exploits the pressure rise to augment high flow momentum and thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. The driving mechanism of deflagrated flame acceleration to detonation is turbulence generation and induction. A fluidic jet is an innovative method for the production of turbulence intensities and flame acceleration. Compared to traditional obstacles, the jet reduces the pressure losses and heat soak effects while providing turbulence generation control. The investigation characterizes the turbulent flame-flow interactions. The focus of the study is on classifying the turbulent flame dynamics and the temporal evolution of turbulent flame regime. The turbulent flame-flow interactions are experimentally studied using a LEGO Detonation facility. Advanced high-speed laser diagnostics, particle image velocimetry (PIV), planar laser induced florescence (PLIF), and Schlieren imaging are used in analyzing the physics of the interaction and flame acceleration. Higher turbulence induction is observed within the turbulent flame after contact with the jet, leading to increased flame burning rates. The interaction with the fluidic jet results in turbulent flame transition from the thin reaction zones to the broken reaction regime.

  6. PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT DEFLAGRATION RATE MEASUREMENTS OF LLM-105 AND TATB BASED EXPLOSIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N; Koerner, J; Lorenz, K T; Maienschein, J L

    2009-11-10

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105 and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. Two different formulations of LLM-105 and three formulations of TATB were studied and results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate and become erratic. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  7. Deflagration Rate Measurements of Three Insensitive High Explosives: LLM-105, TATB, and DAAF

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Maienschein, J L; Lorenz, K T; Tan, N; Koerner, J G

    2010-03-08

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105, DAAF and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. One DAAF formulation, two different formulations of LLM-105, and four formulations of TATB were studied; results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating DAAF and TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  8. Integrated Climate and Carbon-cycle Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-03-06

    The INCCA model is a numerical climate and carbon cycle modeling tool for use in studying climate change and carbon cycle science. The model includes atmosphere, ocean, land surface, and sea ice components.

  9. Response of a Type III waste tank to hydrogen deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung; Jerrell, J.W.; Pelfrey, J.R.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1992-01-01

    The type III waste tank is built with ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel shells in the shape of a torus with a central concrete core. The tank is buried underground and covered with a four foot thick reinforced concrete slab. The tank is enriched by 2.5 foot thick reinforced concrete wall. Between the tank surface and the wall there is a 2.5 foot annular space. The tank itself is called the primary liner.'' The interior surface of the concrete wall is line with steel plates, called the secondary liner.'' The base of the tank rests on a concrete mat. Underneath the mat the secondary liner extends from the wall to the central column surfaces. The bottom liner is attached to the reinforced concrete foundation. Based on the conditions that the tank is filled with liquid wastes to 50% of the design capacity, and that the accumulation of hydrogen becomes 20% inside its free board, the resulting deflagration would cause an overpressure of 100 psig in the tank (Wallace and Yau, 1986). The task of this analysis is to simulate the hydrogen deflagration'' scenario in the Type III Waste Tank complex. During the deflagration, the stresses in the steel tank would be expected to exceed the elastic limit of the steel and the tank would then undergo large deformation. The concrete roof slab could be fractured by the expansion of the tank. The central concrete column would start to exhibit large deformation first. All the structural members in the system are expected to interact drastically during the deflagration.

  10. Response of a Type III waste tank to hydrogen deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung; Jerrell, J.W.; Pelfrey, J.R.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1992-05-01

    The type III waste tank is built with ASTM A516 Grade 70 steel shells in the shape of a torus with a central concrete core. The tank is buried underground and covered with a four foot thick reinforced concrete slab. The tank is enriched by 2.5 foot thick reinforced concrete wall. Between the tank surface and the wall there is a 2.5 foot annular space. The tank itself is called the ``primary liner.`` The interior surface of the concrete wall is line with steel plates, called the ``secondary liner.`` The base of the tank rests on a concrete mat. Underneath the mat the secondary liner extends from the wall to the central column surfaces. The bottom liner is attached to the reinforced concrete foundation. Based on the conditions that the tank is filled with liquid wastes to 50% of the design capacity, and that the accumulation of hydrogen becomes 20% inside its free board, the resulting deflagration would cause an overpressure of 100 psig in the tank [Wallace and Yau, 1986]. The task of this analysis is to simulate the ``hydrogen deflagration`` scenario in the Type III Waste Tank complex. During the deflagration, the stresses in the steel tank would be expected to exceed the elastic limit of the steel and the tank would then undergo large deformation. The concrete roof slab could be fractured by the expansion of the tank. The central concrete column would start to exhibit large deformation first. All the structural members in the system are expected to interact drastically during the deflagration.

  11. Magnetic deflagration in the molecular magnet manganese-12-ac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, Sean

    In 1995, Paulsen and Park [1, 2] observed abrupt spontaneous reversals of the magnetization in crystals of the molecular magnet Mn12-ac, which they dubbed "magnetic avalanches". They suggested that the magnetic avalanches were a thermal runaway process where the reversing spins release heat stimulating further relaxation. Various exotic phenomena were proposed as an alternative explanations [3]. In 2005, Suzuki et al. [4] established that this spontaneous magnetic relaxation occurs as a "front" separating regions of opposing magnetization that propagates at a constant speed through the crystal. They suggested that this propagating front is analogous to a flame in chemical deflagration and introduced the thermal relaxation process, magnetic deflagration. The analysis presented there was limited by lack of data. A more thorough comparison with the theory would require the ability to trigger avalanches in a more controlled way rather than wait for their spontaneous occurrence. The work presented in this thesis is a continuation of the program initiated by Suzuki [4, 5]. Significant progress experimental progress has been made allowing us to trigger avalanches over a wide range of conditions. The magnetization dynamics and the ignition temperatures are studied in detail using an array of micro-sized Hall sensors and Germanium thermometers. In addition, we report the existence of a new species of avalanches consisting only of the fast-relaxing isomers of Mn12-ac, the so-called "minor species". We explore avalanches of both species, as well as the interaction between them. Finally, a detailed analysis is performed to compare the experiment with the theory of magnetic deflagration [6]. We find the theory of magnetic deflagration to be consistent with the data and extract values for the key physical quantities: the thermal diffusivity and avalanche front temperatures. Agreement between our predicted values and an independent measurement of these quantities would provide

  12. Hycam camera study of the features of a deflagrating munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Trevor J.; Bussell, T. J.; Chick, M. C.

    1991-04-01

    We report on the use of a rotating prism high speed camera (Hycam) in a field study of the early stages of the breakup characteristics of a deflagrating Composition B loaded 105 mm HE shell. The experiments are part of a program aimed at assessing candidate processes that may contribute to the mass detonation hazard of explosive stores. The experimental requirements for the successful observation of the deflagrating shell are described in detail. The camera was run at 35,000 to 40,000 pictures per second with a 1/10 shutter fitted. High intensity illumination of the shell was provided by an array of class S flash bulbs and diffusion screen. Baffles were essential in order to screen the shell from the expanding products of the shaped explosive charge device used to produce the controlled deflagration of the shell. The technique successfully allowed the determination of several parameters associated with the event including shell expansion rate, time to shell burst and initial fragment velocity. Products escaping from the cracking shell limited the use of the technique for studying shell to shell interactions.

  13. Four simple ocean carbon models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the key processes that determine oceanic CO2 uptake and sets this description within the context of four simple ocean carbon models. These models capture, in varying degrees, these key processes and establish a clear foundation for more realistic models that incorporate more directly the underlying physics and biology of the ocean rather than relying on simple parametric schemes. The purpose of this paper is more pedagogical than purely scientific. The problems encountered by current attempts to understand the global carbon cycle not only require our efforts but set a demand for a new generation of scientist, and it is hoped that this paper and the text in which it appears will help in this development.

  14. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  15. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  16. Three-dimensional Delayed-Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.; Oran, Elaine S.

    2005-04-01

    We study a Type Ia supernova explosion using large-scale three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics with a simplified mechanism for nuclear reactions and energy release. The initial deflagration stage of the explosion involves a subsonic turbulent thermonuclear flame propagating in the gravitational field of an expanding white dwarf. The deflagration produces an inhomogeneous mixture of unburned carbon and oxygen with intermediate-mass and iron-group elements in central parts of the star. During the subsequent detonation stage, a supersonic detonation wave propagates through the material unburned by the deflagration. The total energy released in this delayed-detonation process, (1.3-1.6)×1051 ergs, is consistent with a typical range of kinetic energies obtained from observations. In contrast to the deflagration model, which releases only about 0.6×1051 ergs, the delayed-detonation model does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between three-dimensional simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions.

  17. Study on the Mechanism of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition Process of Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lan; Dong, Hefei; Pan, Hao; Hu, Xiaomian; Zhu, Jianshi

    2014-10-01

    We present a numerical study of the mechanisms of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process of explosives to assess its thermal stability. We treated the modeling system as a mixture of solid explosives and gaseous reaction products. We utilized a one-dimensional two-phase flow modeling approach with a space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Simulation results show that in the chemical reaction process a plug area of high density with relatively slow chemical reactions preceeds the new violent reactions and the consequent detonation. We found that steady detonation occurs at the regions where physical characteristics, such as pressure, density, temperature, and velocity, peak simultaneously. These simulation results agree well with high-temperature DDT tube experiments.

  18. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition in Unconfined Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Gardiner, Thomas; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    Deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) can occur in environments ranging from experimental and industrial systems on Earth to astrophysical thermonuclear supernovae explosions. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in elucidating the nature of this process in confined systems with walls, obstacles, etc. It remains unclear, however, whether a subsonic turbulent flame in an unconfined environment can undergo a DDT. We present simulations of premixed flames in stoichiometric H2-air and CH4-air mixtures interacting with high-intensity turbulence. These calculations demonstrate the DDT in unconfined systems unassisted by shocks or obstacles. We discuss the mechanism of this process and its implications.

  19. Deflagration-to-detonation transition project. Quarterly report, December 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, M.L.

    1980-09-01

    Progress in a project on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is reported. The activities of this project pertain primarily to the development of small, safe, low-voltage, hot-wire detonators. Its major goals are: the formulation of a modeling capability for DDT of the explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt (III) perchlorate (CP); the development of improved DDT materials; the establishment of a data base for corrosion, compatibility, and reliability of CP-loaded detonators; and the design and development of advanced DDT components. Information is included on materials development, component development, and compatibility studies encompassing the thermal and chemical stability of CP in contact with the component materials. (LCL)

  20. Carbonate rock depositional models: A microfacies approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carozzi, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonate rocks contain more than 50% by weight carbonate minerals such as calcite, dolomite, and siderite. Understanding how these rocks form can lead to more efficient methods of petroleum exploration. Micofacies analysis techniques can be used as a method of predicting models of sedimentation for carbonate rocks. Micofacies in carbonate rocks can be seen clearly only in thin sections under a microscope. This section analysis of carbonate rocks is a tool that can be used to understand depositional environments, diagenetic evolution of carbonate rocks, and the formation of porosity and permeability in carbonate rocks. The use of micofacies analysis techniques is applied to understanding the origin and formation of carbonate ramps, carbonate platforms, and carbonate slopes and basins. This book will be of interest to students and professionals concerned with the disciplines of sedimentary petrology, sedimentology, petroleum geology, and palentology.

  1. Potential VOC Deflagrations in a Vented TRU Drum

    SciTech Connect

    Mukesh, GUPTA

    2005-04-07

    The objective of the analysis is to examine the potential for lid ejection from a vented transuranic (TRU) waste drum due to pressure buildup caused by the deflagration of hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the drum. In this analysis, the AICC pressure for a stoichiometric mixture of VOCs is calculated and then compared against the experimental peak pressure of stoichiometric combustion of propane and hexane in a combustion chamber. The experimental peak pressures of propane and hexane are about 12 percent lower than the calculated AICC pressure. Additional losses in the drum are calculated due to venting of the gases, drum bulging, waste compaction, and heat losses from the presence of waste in the drum. After accounting for these losses, the final pressures are compared to the minimum observed pressure that ejects the lid from a TRU drum. The ejection pressure of 105 psig is derived from data that was recorded for a series of tests where hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited inside sealed TRU drums. Since the calculated pressures are below the minimum lid ejection pressure, none of the VOCs and the hydrogen (up to 4 percent) mixtures present in the TRU waste drum is expected to cause lid ejection if ignited. The analysis of potential VOC deflagrations in a vented TRU drum can be applied across the DOE-Complex since TRU waste is stored in drums throughout the complex.

  2. Mechanism of deflagration-to-detonation transitions above repeated obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Ohyagi, S.

    2012-11-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the mechanism of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). Because, this mechanism has relevance to safety issues in industries, where combustible premixed gases are in general use. A stoichiometric gas of oxygen and hydrogen (oxy-hydrogen) is ignited in a tube, repeated obstacles are installed, and the DDT behaviours are visualized using a high-speed video camera. The pitch and height of the repeated obstacles and the initial pressure of the oxy-hydrogen premixed gas are varied in an attempt to obtain the optimum conditions that cause DDT a short distance from the ignition source. The experiments identified DDT as being essentially caused by one of the following mechanisms: (1) A deflagration wave is accelerated in terms of a vortex, which is generated behind the obstacle, and the flame acceleration induces a secondary shock wave. Eventually, the shock-flame interaction ahead of the obstacle causes DDT via a very strong local explosion. (2) Each shock wave generated by relatively weak local explosions between the obstacles is not sufficient to cause DDT directly, but DDT results from an accumulation of shock waves. The detonation induction distance is also examined, taking into account the physical and chemical parameters of the obstacles and the oxy-hydrogen premixed gas.

  3. EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF DEFLAGRATION TO DETONATION DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C.; Townsley, Dean M.; Chamulak, David A.; Brown, Edward F.; Timmes, F. X.

    2010-09-01

    We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {sub sun} for a 1 Z{sub sun} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M{sub sun} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

  4. Evaluating systematic dependencies of type Ia supernovae : the influence of deflagration to detonation density.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A. P.; Calder, A. C.; Townsley, D. M.; Chamulak, D. A.; Brown, E. F.; Timmes, F. X.

    2010-09-01

    We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} for a 1 Z {circle_dot} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

  5. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  6. Measurement and ALE3D Simulation of Violence in a Deflagration Experiment With LX-10 and Aermet-100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-22

    We describe the results of a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7 % HMX, 5.3 % Viton A) confined in an AerMet 100 (iron-cobalt-nickel alloy) tube with reinforced end caps. The experimental measurements are compared with predictions of an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE3D) computer model. ALE3D is a three-dimensional multi-physics computer code capable of solving coupled equations describing thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. In particular, we focus on the processes linked to fracture and fragmentation of the AerMet tube driven by the LX-10 deflagration.

  7. Mediterranean Miocene carbonates: facies models and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Miocene carbonates can bridge the gap between Holocene and older carbonate sequences, thus enhancing understanding of depositional and diagenetic patterns. Miocene carbonates can bridge this gap because of their similarity to Holocene counterparts and the ease of using these carbonates to reconstruct tectonic, paleogeographic, and paleoclimatic settings. In the Mediterranean, the Miocene provides a superb set of exposures and a wide variety of facies models in different geologic settings.

  8. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  9. DEFLAGRATION RATES OF SECONDARY EXPLOSIVES UNDER STATIC MPA - GPA PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J; Young, C; Long, G; Maienschein, J; Glascoe, E; Hansen, D; Wardell, J; Black, C; Sykora, G

    2009-07-30

    We provide measurements of the chemical reaction propagation rate (RPR) as a function of pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC) and strand burner technologies. Materials investigated include HMX and RDX crystalline powders, LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton A), and Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax). The anomalous correspondence between crystal structure, including in some instances isostructural phase transitions, on pressure dependent RPRs of HMX and RDX are correlated to confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic results. The contrast between DAC GPa and strand burner MPa regime measurements yield insight into explosive material burn phenomena. Here we highlight pressure dependent physicochemical mechanisms that appear to affect the deflagration rate of precompressed energetic materials.

  10. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebcke, P. E.; Dickson, P. M.; Field, J. E.

    1996-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation transition process has been observed in pressed granular columns of the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate. Charges were confined within a steel housing which had been fitted with a polycarbonate window to allow direct recording by high-speed streak photography. The explosive was thermally ignited by a gasless pyrotechnic mixture to minimize pre-pressurization of the charge. The results indicate that upon ignition, early choked flow of the combustion gases prevents the continued propagation of the combustion via a convective heat transfer mechanism and that the propagation of reaction becomes governed by a leading compaction wave which causes ignition through the mechanical formation of hot spots. Detonation finally occurs when the leading front of an accelerating plug of highly compacted material (density close to the theoretical maximum) formed between the reaction front and the leading compaction wave, attains the critical pressure necessary for shock-to-detonation transition.

  11. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  12. Deflagration Behavior of HMX-Based Explosives at High Temperatures and Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F

    2003-11-20

    We report the deflagration behavior of several HMX-based explosives at pressure from 10-600 MPa and temperatures from 20-180 C. We have made laminar burn rate measurements with the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner, in which burn wires are used to record the time-of-arrival of the burn front in the cylindrical sample as a function of pressure. The explosive samples are 6.4 mm in diameter and 63 mm long, with ten burn wires embedded at different positions in the sample. Burning on the cylindrical surface is inhibited with an epoxy layer. With this direct measurement we do not have to account for product gas equation of state or heat losses in the system, and the burn wires allow detection of irregular burning. We find that formulation details are very important to overall deflagration behavior - the presence of 10% or less by weight of binder leads to physical deconsolidation and rapid deflagration at high pressures, and a larger particle size distribution leads to slower deflagration. High temperatures have a relatively minor effect on the deflagration rate until the beta-to-delta phase transition temperature is reached, beyond which the deflagration rate increases approximately 40-fold.

  13. High-speed OH-PLIF imaging of deflagration-to-detonation transition in H2-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, Lorenz R.; Mével, Rémy; Fiala, Thomas; Hasslberger, Josef; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is considered a standard experimental technique in combustion diagnostics. However, it has only been occasionally applied to explosion experiments with fast combustion regimes. It has been shown that single-shot OH-PLIF with high pulse energies yields clear fluorescence images of fast deflagrations and also detonations. This paper presents the first application of high-speed OH-PLIF at 20 kHz repetition rate to a deflagration-to-detonation transition experiment. Hydrogen-air mixtures at initial atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature are investigated. Satisfactory results are obtained for flame speeds up to about 500 m/s. Flame instabilities and turbulence-flame interactions are observed. Two factors limit the applicability of HS OH-PLIF toward higher flame speeds: excessive flame luminescence masking the HS OH-PLIF signal and strong absorption of laser light by the flame. The variation in OH-PLIF signal-to-background ratio across a DDT process is studied using a 1D laminar premixed flame simulation extended by spectroscopic models.

  14. A universal model for nanoporous carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Supercapacitors based on nanoporous carbon materials, commonly called electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), are emerging as a novel type of energy-storage device with the potential to substitute batteries in applications that require high power densities. Nanoporous carbon supercapacitors are generally viewed as a parallel-plate capacitor since supercapacitors store energy by charge separation in an electric double layer formed at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The EDLC model has been used to characterize the energy storage of supercapacitors for decades. We comment in this chapter on the shortcomings of the EDLC model when applied to nanoporous carbon supercapacitors. In response to the latest experimental breakthrough in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors, we have proposed a heuristic model that takes pore curvature into account as a replacement for the EDLC model. When the pore size is in the mesopore regime (2 50 nm), electrolyte counterions enter mesoporous carbons and approach the pore wall to form an electric double-cylinder capacitor (EDCC); in the micropore regime (< 2 nm), solvated/desolvated counterions line up along the pore axis to form an electric wire-in-cylinder capacitor (EWCC). In the macropore regime (> 50 nm), where pores are large enough so that pore curvature is no longer significant, the EDCC model can be reduced to the EDLC model. With the backing of experimental data and quantum density functional theory calculations, we have shown that the EDCC/EWCC model is universal for carbon supercapacitors with diverse carbon materials and electrolytes. The strengths and limitations of this new model are discussed. The new model allows the supercapacitor properties to be correlated with pore size, specific surface area, Debye length, electrolyte concentration, dielectric constant, and solute ion size, and may lend support to the systematic optimization of the properties of carbon supercapacitors through experiments.

  15. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular HMX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, A. W.

    1980-01-01

    Granular HMX of three degrees of fineness was packed into heavy-walled steel tubes closed at both ends. Ignition was obtained at one end using an intimate mixture of finely divided titanium and boron as an igniter that produced heat with little gas. The distance to detonation was determined by examination of the resulting tube fragments. By inserting tightly-fitted neoprene diaphragms periodically into the HMX column, it was shown that the role of convective combustion was limited to the initial stage of the deflagration to detonation (DDT) process. Experiments in which various combinations of two of the three types of HMX were loaded into the same tube showed that heating by adiabatic shear of explosive grains was an essential factor in the final buildup to detonation. A description of the DDT process is developed in which conductive burning is followed in turn by convective burning, bed collapse with plug formation, onset of accelerated burning at the front of the plug through heating by intercrystalline friction and adiabatic shear, and intense shock formation resulting in high-order detonation.

  16. Computer Simulations to Study the High-Pressure Deflagration of HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2003-07-11

    The accepted micro-mechanical picture of the build-up of detonation in solid explosives from a shock is that imperfections are a source of hot spots. The hot spots ignite and link up in the reaction zone by high-pressure deflagration. Although the deflagration is subsonic, there are so many ignition sites that the pressure build-up is rapid enough to strengthen the initial shock. Quantitative advances in this research require a detailed understanding of deflagration at the high pressure, 1 to 50 GPa, which is present in the reaction zone. We performed direct numerical simulations of high-pressure deflagrations using a simplified global (3-reaction) chemical kinetics scheme. We used ALE-3D to calculate coupled chemical reactions, heat transfer, and hydrodynamic flow for finite-difference zones comprising a mixture of reactants and products at pressure and temperature equilibrium. The speed of isobaric deflagrations depends on the pressure and initial temperature. We show how this dependence changes with kinetic parameters, including the order of the last reaction step and the heat of formation of the species formed, relative to the reactant.

  17. Study on the Mechanism of the Deflagration to Detonation Transition Process of Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yangjun; Hu, Xiaomian; Wei, Lan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we presented a numerical study of the mechanisms of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process of explosives to assess its thermal stability. We treated the modeling system as a mixture of solid explosives and gaseous reaction products. We utilized a one-dimensional two-phase flow modeling approach with space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. Simulation results show a plug area of high density with relatively slow chemical reactions, whose forward boundary is the fast running shock wave, and rearward boundary is the burning wave.We identified a criterion of steady detonation through a detailed analysis of the characteristics of the reaction process: steady detonation occurs at locations where different physical quantities, such as pressure, density, temperature and velocity, reach peak values simultaneously.We also simulated the high temperature DDT tube experiments of HMX-based high explosive. We found good agreement between the simulation results of detonation velocity and run length determined by the above criterion and the experimental results.

  18. Computational Study of Deflagration to Detonation Transition in a Straight Duct: Effect of Energy Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Hu, Zongmin; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    Numerical simulation based on the Euler equation and one-step reaction model is carried out to investigate the process of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) occurring in a straight duct. The numerical method used includes a high resolution fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme for spatial discretization, coupled with a third order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta time stepping method. In particular, effect of energy release on the DDT process is studied. The model parameters used are the heat release at q=50, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5, the specific heat ratio at 1.2, and the activation temperature at Ti=15, respectively. For all the cases, the initial energy in the spark is about the same compared to the detonation energy at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. It is found from the simulation that the DDT occurrence strongly depends on the magnitude of the energy release. The run-up distance of DDT occurrence decreases with the increase of the energy release for q=50 20, and increases with the increase of the energy release for q=50 20. It is concluded from the simulations that the interaction of the shock wave and the flame front is the main reason for leading to DDT.

  19. Modelling Carbon Nanotubes-Based Mediatorless Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Petrauskas, Karolis; Razumiene, Julija

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate. PMID:23012537

  20. Modelling carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor.

    PubMed

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Petrauskas, Karolis; Razumiene, Julija

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate. PMID:23012537

  1. Processing, characterization and modeling of carbon nanofiber modified carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalot Rivera, Francis J.

    Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites are used in high temperature applications because they exhibit excellent thermomechanical properties. There are several challenges associated with the processing of C/C composites that include long cycle times, formation of closed porosity within fabric woven architecture and carbonization induced cracks that can lead to reduction of mechanical properties. This work addresses various innovative approaches to reduce processing uncertainties and thereby improve thermomechanical properties of C/C by using vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) in conjunction with carbon fabric and precursor phenolic matrix. The different aspects of the proposed research contribute to understanding of the translation of VGCNFs properties in a C/C composite. The specific objectives of the research are; (a) To understand the mechanical properties and microstructural features of phenolic resin precursor with and without modification with VGCNFs; (b) To develop innovative processing concepts that incorporate VGCNFs by spraying them on carbon fabric and/or adding VGCNFs to the phenolic resin precursor; and characterizing the process induced thermal and mechanical properties; and (c) To develop a finite element model to evaluate the thermal stresses developed in the carbonization of carbon/phenolic with and without VGCNFs. Addition of VGCNFs to phenolic resin enhanced the thermal and physical properties in terms of flexure and interlaminar properties, storage modulus and glass transition temperature and lowered the coefficient of thermal expansion. The approaches of spraying VGCNFs on the fabric surface and mixing VGCNFs with the phenolic resin was found to be effective in enhancing mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting C/C composites. Fiber bridging, improved carbon yield and minimization of carbonization-induced damage were the benefits of incorporating VGCNFs in C/C composites. Carbonization induced matrix cracking predicted by the finite

  2. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator: Math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Carlson, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    A steady state computer simulation model of an Electrochemical Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (EDC) has been developed. The mathematical model combines EDC heat and mass balance equations with empirical correlations derived from experimental data to describe EDC performance as a function of the operating parameters involved. The model is capable of accurately predicting performance over EDC operating ranges. Model simulation results agree with the experimental data obtained over the prediction range.

  3. On the mechanism of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, M. A.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Chukalovskii, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    The flame acceleration and the physical mechanism underlying the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) have been studied experimentally, theoretically, and using a two-dimensional gasdynamic model for a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture by taking into account the chain chemical reaction kinetics for eight components. A flame accelerating in a tube is shown to generate shock waves that are formed directly at the flame front just before DDT occurred, producing a layer of compressed gas adjacent to the flame front. A mixture with a density higher than that of the initial gas enters the flame front, is heated, and enters into reaction. As a result, a high-amplitude pressure peak is formed at the flame front. An increase in pressure and density at the leading edge of the flame front accelerates the chemical reaction, causing amplification of the compression wave and an exponentially rapid growth of the pressure peak, which 'drags' the flame behind. A high-amplitude compression wave produces a strong shock immediately ahead of the reaction zone, generating a detonation wave. The theory and numerical simulations of the flame acceleration and the new physical mechanism of DDT are in complete agreement with the experimentally observed flame acceleration, shock formation, and DDT in a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture.

  4. Deflagration-to-detonation transition project: quarterly report for the period September through November 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, M. L.

    1980-07-01

    The activities of the Sandia Laboratories project on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) pertain primarily to the development of small, safe, low-voltage, hot-wire detonators. Its major goals are: the formulation of a modeling capability for DDT of the explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP); the development of improved DDT materials; the establishment of a data base for corrosion, compatibility, and reliability of CP-loaded detonators; and the design and development of advanced DDT components. Progress in this research is reported. The planned development of the MC3423 detonator has been completed and the final design review meeting has been held. Additional work must be performed to establish satisfactory output function. Ignition sensitivity data have also been obtained. Ignition and shock testing experiments for development of the MC3533 detonator have been planned. An initial version of the component will utilize available MC3423 headers, while the final design will incorporate a new header that has been designed and ordered. Detonator performance studies have been planned to optimize CP density-length factors. Feasibility studies on the MC3196A detonator have continued in an effort to obtain a reliable 50-200 ..mu..s function time.

  5. The Peculiar SN 2005hk: Do Some Type Ia Supernovae Explode As Deflagrations?

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.M.; Li, W.; Frieman, J.A.; Blinnikov, S.I.; DePoy, D.; Prieto, J.L.; Milne, P.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, Gaston; Morrell, N.; Hamuy, M.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Roth, M.; Gonzalez, S.; Krzeminski, W.; Filippenko, A.V.; Freedman, W.L.; Chornock, R.; Jha, S.; Madore, B.F.; Persson, S.E.; /Las Campanas Observ. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab /Moscow, ITEP /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Chile U., Santiago /Texas A-M /Carnegie Inst. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Caltech, IPAC /Notre Dame U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /New Mexico State U. /Chicago U., FLASH /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.

    2006-11-14

    We present extensive u{prime}g{prime}r{prime}i{prime} BV RIY JHK{sub s} photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called 'the most peculiar known type Ia supernova'. Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our Y JH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from {approx} 10 days before to {approx}60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosity of this light curve, plus the low expansion velocities and absence of a secondary maximum at red and near-infrared wavelengths, are all in reasonable agreement with model calculations of a 3D deflagration which produces {approx} 0.25 M{sub {circle_dot}} of {sup 56}Ni.

  6. Gravitational waves from deflagration bubbles in first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel

    2008-10-15

    The walls of bubbles in a first-order phase transition can propagate either as detonations, with a velocity larger than the speed of sound, or deflagrations, which are subsonic. We calculate the gravitational radiation that is produced by turbulence during a phase transition which develops via deflagration bubbles. We take into account the fact that a deflagration wall is preceded by a shock front which distributes the latent heat throughout space and influences other bubbles. We show that turbulence can induce peak values of {omega}{sub GW} as high as {approx}10{sup -9}. We discuss the possibility of detecting at LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antennae) gravitational waves produced in the electroweak phase transition with wall velocities v{sub w} < or approx. 10{sup -1}, which favor electroweak baryogenesis.

  7. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  8. Plasma-assisted ignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition.

    PubMed

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nickolay; Rakitin, Aleksandr

    2012-02-13

    Non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential to control ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and to become an extremely promising technology for a wide range of applications, including aviation gas turbine engines, piston engines, RAMjets, SCRAMjets and detonation initiation for pulsed detonation engines. The analysis of discharge processes shows that the discharge energy can be deposited into the desired internal degrees of freedom of molecules when varying the reduced electric field, E/n, at which the discharge is maintained. The amount of deposited energy is controlled by other discharge and gas parameters, including electric pulse duration, discharge current, gas number density, gas temperature, etc. As a rule, the dominant mechanism of the effect of non-equilibrium plasma on ignition and combustion is associated with the generation of active particles in the discharge plasma. For plasma-assisted ignition and combustion in mixtures containing air, the most promising active species are O atoms and, to a smaller extent, some other neutral atoms and radicals. These active particles are efficiently produced in high-voltage, nanosecond, pulse discharges owing to electron-impact dissociation of molecules and electron-impact excitation of N(2) electronic states, followed by collisional quenching of these states to dissociate the molecules. Mechanisms of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) initiation by non-equilibrium plasma were analysed. For longitudinal discharges with a high power density in a plasma channel, two fast DDT mechanisms have been observed. When initiated by a spark or a transient discharge, the mixture ignited simultaneously over the volume of the discharge channel, producing a shock wave with a Mach number greater than 2 and a flame. A gradient mechanism of DDT similar to that proposed by Zeldovich has been observed experimentally under streamer initiation. PMID:22213667

  9. Deep Soil: Quantifying and Modeling Subsurface Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Devine, W.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Some soil carbon datasets that are spatially rich, such as the USDA Forest Service Inventory and Analysis National Program dataset, sample soil to only 20 cm (8 inches), despite evidence that substantial stores of soil C can be found deeper in the soil profile. The maximum extent of tree rooting is typically many meters deep and provides: direct exchange with the soil solution; redistribution of water from deep horizons toward the surface during times of drought; resources for active microbial communities in deep soil around root channels; and direct carbon inputs through exudates and root turnover. This study examined soil carbon to a depth of 2.5 meters across 22 soils in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Excavations at 20 additional sites took place in summer 2014, greatly expanding the spatial coverage and extent of the data set. Forest floor and mineral soil bulk density samples were collected at depths of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 meters. Pool estimates from systematic sampling depths shallower than 1.5 m yielded significantly smaller estimates than the total soil stock to 2.5 meters (P<0.01). On average, only 5% of soil C was found in the litter layer, 35% was found below 0.5 meter, and 21% was found below 1.0 meter. Due to the difficulty of excavating and measuring deep soil carbon, a series of nonlinear mixed effect models were fit to the data to predict deep soil carbon stocks given sampling to 1.0 meter. A model using an inverse polynomial function predicted soil carbon to 2.5 meters with -5.6% mean error. The largest errors occurred in Andisols with non-crystalline minerals, which can adsorb large quantities of carbon on mineral surfaces and preserve it from decomposition. An accurate spatial dataset of soil depth to bedrock would be extremely useful to constrain models of the vertical distribution of soil carbon. Efforts to represent carbon in spatial models would benefit from considering the vertical distribution of carbon in soil. Sampling

  10. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program test report. Heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassnacht, P. O.

    1971-01-01

    A heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions is presented. Three tests were authorized to investigate whether heat flux measurements may be used as effective hazards evaluation criteria to determine safe quantity distances for pyrotechnics. A passive sensor study was conducted simultaneously to investigate their usefulness in recording events and conditions. It was concluded that heat flux measurements can effectively be used to evaluate hazards criteria and that passive sensors are an inexpensive tool to record certain events in the vicinity of deflagrating pyrotechnic stacks.

  11. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics. PMID:21329200

  12. Stochastic multiscale model for carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Biswal, B; Oren, P-E; Held, R J; Bakke, S; Hilfer, R

    2007-06-01

    A multiscale model for the diagenesis of carbonate rocks is proposed. It captures important pore scale characteristics of carbonate rocks: wide range of length scales in the pore diameters; large variability in the permeability; and strong dependence of the geometrical and transport parameters on the resolution. A pore scale microstructure of an oolithic dolostone with generic diagenetic features is successfully generated. The continuum representation of a reconstructed cubic sample of side length 2mm contains roughly 42 x 10{6} crystallites and pore diameters varying over many decades. Petrophysical parameters are computed on discretized samples of sizes up to 1000{3}. The model can be easily adapted to represent the multiscale microstructure of a wide variety of carbonate rocks. PMID:17677251

  13. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  14. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  15. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  16. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  17. Autoignition due to hydraulic resistance and deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, L.; Sivashinsky, G.

    2008-07-15

    A further development of the friction-based concept of the deflagration-to-detonation transition is presented. Employing Zeldovich's quasi-one-dimensional formulation for combustion in hydraulically resisted flows, the autoignition of the unburned gas subjected to the friction-induced precompression and preheating is assessed. It is shown that autoignition, triggering the transition, is readily attainable for quite realistic parameters. (author)

  18. Visualization techniques for modelling carbon allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Joan; Pine, Polina

    2009-04-01

    Carbon takes many different forms, each with its own electronic structure and has a fantastic range of properties. As well as graphite/diamond, a hexagonal diamond called londsdaleite, and amorphous carbons of sp 2, sp 3 and mixed natures there are all the fullerenes, graphene, nanotubes, etc. Fortunately, their different electronic structures take distinct geometrical forms, so that deducing the geometry of a sample that has been simulated is a crucial step towards understanding its properties. Visualization is essential for understanding sample geometries. AViz [J. Adler, Computers in Science and Engineering 5 (2003) 61] is an Atomistic Visualization package developed at the Technion that can be freely downloaded and installed. Both still and animated AViz implementations for viewing data from our atomistic simulations of carbon allotropes enable understanding of the simulation results and when compared with laboratory experiments and theoretical models provide insight into nanodiamond growth, gas flow in nanotubes, nanotube vibrations and other topics of current research interest.

  19. Performance model of molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, S.; Sasaki, A.; Urushibata, H.; Tanaka, T. )

    1990-06-01

    A performance model of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), that is an electrochemical energy conversion device for electric power generation, is discussed. The authors' purpose is to improve the presumptive ability of the MCFC model and to investigate the impact of MCFC characteristics in fuel cell system simulations. Basic data are obtained experimentally by single-cell tests. The authors pay special attention to the MCFC overall characteristics with respect to oxidant composition. A correlation formula based on the experimental data is derived as for the cell voltage, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures. After three types of the MCFC system option are assumed, trade-off studies are made dependant on the performance models.

  20. Improving carbon model phenology using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exrayat, Jean-François; Smallman, T. Luke; Bloom, A. Anthony; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    Carbon cycle dynamics is significantly impacted by ecosystem phenology, leading to substantial seasonal and inter-annual variation in the global carbon balance. Representing inter-annual variability is key for predicting the response of the terrestrial ecosystem to climate change and disturbance. Existing terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs) often struggle to accurately simulate observed inter-annual variability. TEMs often use different phenological models based on plant functional type (PFT) assumptions. Moreover, due to a high level of computational overhead in TEMs they are unable to take advantage of globally available datasets to calibrate their models. Here we describe the novel CARbon DAta MOdel fraMework (CARDAMOM) for data assimilation. CARDAMOM is used to calibrate the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon version 2 (DALEC2) model using Bayes' Theorem within a Metropolis Hastings - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MH-MCMC). CARDAMOM provides a framework which combines knowledge from observations, such as remotely sensed LAI, and heuristic information in the form of Ecological and Dynamical Constraints (EDCs). The EDCs are representative of real world processes and constrain parameter interdependencies and constrain carbon dynamics. We used CARDAMOM to bring together globally spanning datasets of LAI and the DALEC2 and DALEC2-GSI models. These analyses allow us to investigate the sensitivity ecosystem processes to the representation of phenology. DALEC2 uses an analytically solved model of phenology which is invariant between years. In contrast DALEC2-GSI uses a growing season index (GSI) calculated as a function of temperature, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and photoperiod to calculate bud-burst and leaf senescence, allowing the model to simulate inter-annual variability in response to climate. Neither model makes any PFT assumptions about the phenological controls of a given ecosystem, allowing the data alone to determine the impact of the meteorological

  1. Critical deflagration waves leading to detonation onset under different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Fan, Xiao-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-speed turbulent critical deflagration waves before detonation onset in H2-air mixture propagated into a square cross section channel, which was assembled of optional rigid rough, rigid smooth, or flexible walls. The corresponding propagation characteristic and the influence of the wall boundaries on the propagation were investigated via high-speed shadowgraph and a high-frequency pressure sampling system. As a comprehensive supplement to the different walls effect investigation, the effect of porous absorbing walls on the detonation propagation was also investigated via smoke foils and the high-frequency pressure sampling system. Results are as follows. In the critical deflagration stage, the leading shock and the closely following turbulent flame front travel at a speed of nearly half the CJ detonation velocity. In the preheated zone, a zonary flame arises from the overlapping part of the boundary layer and the pressure waves, and then merges into the mainstream flame. Among these wall boundary conditions, the rigid rough wall plays a most positive role in the formation of the zonary flame and thus accelerates the transition of the deflagration to detonation (DDT), which is due to the boost of the boundary layer growth and the pressure wave reflection. Even though the flexible wall is not conducive to the pressure wave reflection, it brings out a faster boundary layer growth, which plays a more significant role in the zonary flame formation. Additionally, the porous absorbing wall absorbs the transverse wave and yields detonation decay and velocity deficit. After the absorbing wall, below some low initial pressure conditions, no re-initiation occurs and the deflagration propagates in critical deflagration for a relatively long distance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51206182).

  2. Modeling the Carbon Dust Around Evolved Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, John; Chiar, Jean E.; Povich, Matthew S.; Egan, Michael P.; Jones, Anthony P.; Tielens, Xander

    2015-01-01

    We used a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to model the dust emission around the evolved carbon star, IRAS 07134+1005. We assume the axially symmetric superwind dust shell model as defined by Meixner et al. 1997 (ApJ, 482, 897). IRAS 07134+1005 is a '21 mm' object and is, thus, a carbon-rich, low metallicity star with a large infrared excess. In order to determine the characteristics of the circumstellar carbonaceous dust, we use a set of optical constants for carbonaceous materials computed over a range of H/C and band-gaps. This is the first study to use a set of known hydrocarbon types that covered a range of hydrogen atom fractions and thus a span of aromatic rich (low hydrogen atom fraction) to aliphatic rich (high hydrogen atom fraction) hydrocarbon materials. Our observational data (photometry and spectroscopy from the literature) cover the wavelength range from 0.352-100 mm. We compare our model spectrum and simulated mid-IR images to the observed spectral energy distribution and images to draw conclusions about the nature of the hydrocarbon dust around IRAS 07134+1005.Support for this work came from National Science Foundation under Award No. AST-1322432, a PAARE Grant for the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) and AST-1359346, an REU Site Grant at the SETI Institute, and by the John Templeton Foundation through its New Frontiers in Astronomy and Cosmology, administered by Don York of the University of Chicago.

  3. Two dimensional numerical prediction of deflagration-to-detonation transition in porous energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Narin, B; Ozyörük, Y; Ulas, A

    2014-05-30

    This paper describes a two-dimensional code developed for analyzing two-phase deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) phenomenon in granular, energetic, solid, explosive ingredients. The two-dimensional model is constructed in full two-phase, and based on a highly coupled system of partial differential equations involving basic flow conservation equations and some constitutive relations borrowed from some one-dimensional studies that appeared in open literature. The whole system is solved using an optimized high-order accurate, explicit, central-difference scheme with selective-filtering/shock capturing (SF-SC) technique, to augment central-diffencing and prevent excessive dispersion. The sources of the equations describing particle-gas interactions in terms of momentum and energy transfers make the equation system quite stiff, and hence its explicit integration difficult. To ease the difficulties, a time-split approach is used allowing higher time steps. In the paper, the physical model for the sources of the equation system is given for a typical explosive, and several numerical calculations are carried out to assess the developed code. Microscale intergranular and/or intragranular effects including pore collapse, sublimation, pyrolysis, etc. are not taken into account for ignition and growth, and a basic temperature switch is applied in calculations to control ignition in the explosive domain. Results for one-dimensional DDT phenomenon are in good agreement with experimental and computational results available in literature. A typical shaped-charge wave-shaper case study is also performed to test the two-dimensional features of the code and it is observed that results are in good agreement with those of commercial software. PMID:24721693

  4. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  5. Modeling of Carbon Impurity Anomalous Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Roland; Voitsekhovitch, Irina; Benkadda, Sadri; Beyer, Peter; Koubiti, Mohamed; Marandet, Yannick; Godbert-Mouret, Laurence; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold; Pankin, Andre

    2001-10-01

    An improvement of plasma confinement by impurity seeding has been observed on different Tokamak. The understanding of the physics of the impurity transport is an important step towards the control of the plasma confinement in such regimes. Different physical mechanisms of the anomalous transport of carbon impurity and their impact on the evolution of the scenario of a tokamak discharge are analyzed in this work. This is done by using a self-consistent modeling of thermal electron and ion energy, and main ion and carbon impurity content with the multi-mode model taking into account the contributions from different types of plasma instabilities [1]. This study has been performed for the medium size tokamak with a central heating of the electron and ion species, and with both central (NBI) and wall particle source. The L-mode scenario and the scenario with an improved particle and energy confinement due to the reversed q-profile has been analyzed and the influence of the carbon impurity on the plasma evolution has been investigated by varying the starting time and the magnitude of the carbon influx. The effect of the main ion dilution on the growth rate as well as the effect of radiative cooling at the plasma edge on the power balance are analyzed under different conditions. 1. Bateman G., et al., Phys. Plasmas, 5 (1998) 1793

  6. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2011-04-01

    Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

  7. Theoretical Model for Nanoporous Carbon Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Huang, Jingsong

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented anomalous increase in capacitance of nanoporous carbon supercapacitors at pore sizes smaller than 1 nm [Science 2006, 313, 1760.] challenges the long-held presumption that pores smaller than the size of solvated electrolyte ions do not contribute to energy storage. We propose a heuristic model to replace the commonly used model for an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) on the basis of an electric double-cylinder capacitor (EDCC) for mesopores (2 {50 nm pore size), which becomes an electric wire-in-cylinder capacitor (EWCC) for micropores (< 2 nm pore size). Our analysis of the available experimental data in the micropore regime is confirmed by 1st principles density functional theory calculations and reveals significant curvature effects for carbon capacitance. The EDCC (and/or EWCC) model allows the supercapacitor properties to be correlated with pore size, specific surface area, Debye length, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant, and solute ion size. The new model not only explains the experimental data, but also offers a practical direction for the optimization of the properties of carbon supercapacitors through experiments.

  8. Modeling the diffusion effects through the iron carbonate layer in the carbon dioxide corrosion of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rajappa, S.; Zhang, R.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    A mechanistic model was developed for predicting carbon dioxide corrosion rates of carbon steel pipes in multiphase flow conditions. The model incorporates the chemistry, thermodynamics of carbon dioxide dissolution, multiphase mass transfer, electrochemical kinetics on the metal surface and the presence of a corrosion product film. The predicted corrosion rates show good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. BOREAS TE-19 Ecosystem Carbon Balance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Frolking, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-19 team developed a model called the Spruce and Moss Model (SPAM) designed to simulate the daily carbon balance of a black spruce/moss boreal forest ecosystem. It is driven by daily weather conditions, and consists of four components: (1) soil climate, (2) tree photosynthesis and respiration, (3) moss photosynthesis and respiration, and (4) litter decomposition and associated heterotrophic respiration. The model simulates tree gross and net photosynthesis, wood respiration, live root respiration, moss gross and net photosynthesis, and heterotrophic respiration (decomposition of root litter, young needle and moss litter, and humus). These values can be combined to generate predictions of total site net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE), total soil dark respiration (live roots + heterotrophs + live moss), spruce and moss net productivity, and net carbon accumulation in the soil. To date, simulations have been of the BOREAS NSA-OBS and SSA-OBS tower sites, from 1968-95 (except 1990-93). The files include source code and sample input and output files in ASCII format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Existing Soil Carbon Models Do Not Apply to Forested Wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C C; Song, B; Jurgensen, M F; Li, C

    2001-09-14

    Evaluation of 12 widely used soil carbon models to determine applicability to wetland ecosystems. For any land area that includes wetlands, none of the individual models would produce reasonable simulations based on soil processes. Study presents a wetland soil carbon model framework based on desired attributes, the DNDC model and components of the CENTURY and WMEM models. Proposed synthesis would be appropriate when considering soil carbon dynamics at multiple spatial scales and where the land area considered includes both wetland and upland ecosystems.

  11. Counterpart of the Darrieus-Landau instability at a magnetic deflagration front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukimenko, O.; Modestov, M.; Dion, C. M.; Marklund, M.; Bychkov, V.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic instability at the front of the spin avalanche in a crystal of molecular magnets is considered. This phenomenon reveals similar features with the Darrieus-Landau instability, inherent to classical combustion flame fronts. The instability growth rate and the cutoff wavelength are investigated with respect to the strength of the external magnetic field, both analytically in the limit of an infinitely thin front and numerically for finite-width fronts. The presence of quantum tunneling resonances is shown to increase the growth rate significantly, which may lead to a possible transition from deflagration to detonation regimes. Different orientations of the crystal easy axis are shown to exhibit opposite stability properties. In addition, we suggest experimental conditions that could evidence the instability and its influence on the magnetic deflagration velocity.

  12. The Darrieus-Landau instability in fast deflagration and laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Modestov, Mikhail; Marklund, Mattias

    2008-03-15

    The problem of the Darrieus-Landau instability at a discontinuous deflagration front in a compressible flow is solved. Numerous previous attempts to solve this problem suffered from the deficit of boundary conditions. Here, the required additional boundary condition is derived rigorously taking into account the internal structure of the front. The derived condition implies a constant mass flux at the front; it reduces to the classical Darrieus-Landau condition in the limit of an incompressible flow. It is demonstrated that in general the solution to the problem depends on the type of energy source in the flow. In the common case of a strongly localized source, compression effects make the Darrieus-Landau instability considerably weaker. Particularly, the instability growth rate is reduced for laser ablation in comparison to the classical incompressible case. The instability disappears completely in the Chapman-Jouguet regime of ultimately fast deflagration.

  13. The role and importance of porosity in the deflagration rates of HMX-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Hsu, P C; Springer, H K

    2011-03-15

    The deflagration behavior of thermally damaged HMX-based materials will be discussed. Strands of material were burned at pressures ranging from 10-300 MPa using the LLNL high pressure strand burner. Strands were heated in-situ and burned while still hot; temperatures range from 90-200 C and were chosen in order to allow for thermal damage of the material without significant decomposition of the HMX. The results indicate that multiple variables affect the burn rate but the most important are the polymorph of HMX and the nature and thermal stability of the non-HE portion of the material. Characterization of the strands indicate that the thermal soak produces significant porosity and permeability in the sample allowing for significantly faster burning due to the increased surface area and new pathways for flame spread into the material. Specifically, the deflagration rates of heated PBXN-9, LX-10, and PBX-9501 will be discussed and compared.

  14. Silicon Carbide Derived Carbons: Experiments and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Miklos

    2011-02-28

    The main results of the computational modeling was: 1. Development of a new genealogical algorithm to generate vacancy clusters in diamond starting from monovacancies combined with energy criteria based on TBDFT energetics. The method revealed that for smaller vacancy clusters the energetically optimal shapes are compact but for larger sizes they tend to show graphitized regions. In fact smaller clusters of the size as small as 12 already show signatures of this graphitization. The modeling gives firm basis for the slit-pore modeling of porous carbon materials and explains some of their properties. 2. We discovered small vacancy clusters and their physical characteristics that can be used to spectroscopically identify them. 3. We found low barrier pathways for vacancy migration in diamond-like materials by obtaining for the first time optimized reaction pathways.

  15. A report on the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the high explosive LX-04

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Granholm, R H; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Sandusky, H W

    2004-06-30

    The deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) was investigated for 1.874 g/cc (98.8 % of theoretical maximum density) LX-04 in moderate confinement (4340 steel tube at R{sub C} 32 with 1.020 inch inside diameter and 0.235 inch thick wall) at both ambient initial temperature (roughly 20 C) and at an initial temperature of 186 C. No transition to detonation was observed in a 295 mm column length for either case.

  16. Deflagration Behavior of PBXN-109 and Composition B at High Pressures and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F

    2002-03-11

    We report deflagration rate measurements on PBXN-109 (RDWAVHTPB) and Composition B (RXDTTNThrvax) at pressures from 1,500-100,000 psi (10-700 MPa). This was done with the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner, in which embedded wires are used to record the time-of-arrival of the burn front in the cylindrical sample as a function of pressure. The propellant samples are 6.4 mm in diameter and 6.4 mm long, with burn wires inserted between samples. Burning on the cylindrical surface is inhibited with an epoxy or polyurethane layer. With this direct measurement we do not have to account for product gas equation of state or heat losses in the system, and the burn wires allow detection of irregular burning. We report deflagration results for PBXN-109 as received, and also after it has been damaged by heating. The burn behavior of pristine PBXN-109 is very regular, and exhibits a reduction in pressure exponent from 1.32 to 0.85 at pressures above 20,000 psi (135 MPa). When PBXN-109 is thermally damaged by heating to 170-180 C, the deflagration rate is increased by more than a factor of 10. This appears to be a physical effect, as the faster burning may be explained by an increase in surface area. Our results with Composition B show an apparent 2nd order pressure dependence for initial deflagration, followed by deconsolidation and onset of very rapid and erratic burning. The deconsolidation may be the result of the TNT melting as heat flows into the sample.

  17. Assessing variability in belowground carbon for CMIP-5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd-Brown, K. E.; Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Post, W. M.; Allison, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    Soil carbon stocks and heterotrophic respiration are critical components of the global carbon cycle. This study compared soil carbon survey data with modeled stocks and assessed the magnitude of change in modeled soil carbon between 1850 and 2005. Model means (1995-2005) from the CMIP-5 historical experiment were compared to soil carbon estimates from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) across biomes derived from the MODIS/Terra+Aqua land cover type. Changes in soil carbon stocks were calculated as the difference between the 1850-1860 and 1995-2005 model means. In general, the models overestimated modern soil carbon stocks in areas of relatively low soil carbon (<100 kg m^-2) by 310 Pg (28%) and underestimated modern soil carbon stocks in areas of relatively high soil carbon (>100 kg m^-2) by 1012 Pg (85%) (n=7). Total modern soil carbon ranged from 1120-2523 Pg among the models versus 2280 Pg from the HWSD. These results imply that the models do not represent the high soil carbon of peatlands well. Models underestimated soil carbon in the boreal forest by 417 Pg (61%) (sd=47, cv=0.11, n=7). Soil carbon predictions for temperate forests were closest to HWSD with an overestimate of 13 Pg (21%) (sd=13, cv=0.96, n=7). Over the course of the simulations, average model soil carbon stocks increased 6% gobally (sd=4, cv=0.65, n=7) from 1563 Pg to 1664 Pg. This change was accompanied by a 22% (sd=5, cv=0.26, n=4) increase in modeled NPP from 73 Pg-C/yr to 89 Pg-C/yr for models that report NPP. In summary, the CMIP5 models tend to underestimate total soil carbon stocks, particularly in areas with high soil carbon concentration. Despite rising temperatures over the past 150 years, these models also predicted a substantial increase in soil carbon stocks that is likely due to increased NPP. Whether this rate of increase can be verified with empirical data or sustained over the 21st century is unclear. Given the discrepancies between modeled and observed distributions of

  18. Quantum deflagration in Mn12-acetate in the presence of a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Pradeep; Velez, Saul; Li, Shiqi; Sarachik, Myriam; Tejada, Javier; Kent, Andrew; Mukherjee, Shreya; Christou, George

    2012-02-01

    Mn12-acetate single crystal have been shown to exhibit abrupt reversal of the magnetic moment through propagation of a narrow front at subsonic velocities, termed magnetic deflagration [1]. Experiments where avalanches in Mn12-acetate are triggered at a fixed applied field have shown that the velocity of the front has maxima at resonant fields (kHo, Ho = 0.45 T, k>1), due to thermally assisted tunneling of magnetization [2]. Application of a transverse field increases the tunnel splitting, which increases the magnetic relaxation and allows us to explore the deflagration for the first time at small longitudinal fields (k=0 and 1). Using time resolved measurements of local magnetization by an array of micron sized Hall sensors at temperature of 350 mK, we present the measurements on both spontaneously ignited and triggered deflagration for a large transverse field (> 3 T) allowing us to explore directly the effect of a significant tunneling splitting on both the ignition and the velocity of the front. [1] Y. Suzuki, et. al PRL 95, 147201 (2005) [2] A. Hernandez-Minguez, et. al, PRL 95, 217205 (2005)

  19. Different stages of flame acceleration from slow burning to Chapman-Jouguet deflagration.

    PubMed

    Valiev, Damir M; Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2009-09-01

    Numerical simulations of spontaneous flame acceleration are performed within the problem of flame transition to detonation in two-dimensional channels. The acceleration is studied in the extremely wide range of flame front velocity changing by 3 orders of magnitude during the process. Flame accelerates from realistically small initial velocity (with Mach number about 10(-3)) to supersonic speed in the reference frame of the tube walls. It is shown that flame acceleration undergoes three distinctive stages: (1) initial exponential acceleration in the quasi-isobaric regime, (2) almost linear increase in the flame speed to supersonic values, and (3) saturation to a stationary high-speed deflagration velocity. The saturation velocity of deflagration may be correlated with the Chapman-Jouguet deflagration speed. The acceleration develops according to the Shelkin mechanism. Results on the exponential flame acceleration agree well with previous theoretical and numerical studies. The saturation velocity is in line with previous experimental results. Transition of flame acceleration regime from the exponential to the linear one, and then to the constant velocity, happens because of gas compression both ahead and behind the flame front. PMID:19905222

  20. A comparison of deflagration rates, at elevated pressures and temperatures, with thermal explosion results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascoe, Elizabeth; Springer, H. Keo; Tringe, Joseph W.; Maienschein, Jon L.

    2011-06-01

    Previously, the deflagration rate and behavior of HMX-based explosives have been correlated with the violence of thermal explosion experiments. In particular, HMX materials that experience deconsolidative burning at elevated pressures (i.e. P = 200 - 600 MPa) also produce significantly more violent thermal explosions. Recently, we have measured the deflagration rates of HMX-based explosives at elevated temperatures (i.e. T = 150 - 180C) and moderate pressures (i.e. P = 10 - 100 MPa). These conditions more closely mimic the pressure and temperatures of an explosive shortly after ignition of a thermal explosion. We will discuss the deflagration rates of HMX based explosives at elevated temperatures and make comparisons with thermal explosion studies on the same materials. The Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Technology Development Program is acknowledged for funding. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Models for generation of carbonate cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Bova, J.A.; Koerschner, W.F.

    1986-02-01

    Computer modeling provides a quantitative approach to a better understanding of actual carbonate cyclic sequences. To model carbonate cycles, the authors can use water-depth-dependent sedimentation rate for each facies, an initial lag time, linear subsidence, tidal range, and period and amplitude of sea-level oscillation about a horizontal datum. Tidal-flat-capped cycles up to a few meters thick result from low-amplitude sea-level oscillation of a few meters and short lag times. Nonerosive caps reflect sea-level lowering being balanced by subsidence, and basinward migration of the shoreline not exceeding tidal-flat progradation rate. When higher amplitude sea-level oscillations occur, the tidal flats are abandoned on the inner shelf during sea-level fall, because seaward movement of the strandline outpaces progradation rate of flats. Increased amplitude also results in sea-level falling faster than flats can subside, so that disconformities with thick vadose profiles develop. High-amplitude (100 m or more) oscillations result in incipient drowning of platforms and juxtaposition of deep-water facies against shallow-water facies within cycles. Sea level falls before the platform can build to the sea-level highstand, and the shoreline migrates much more rapidly than tidal flats can prograde; thus, cycles are disconformity-bounded and lack tidal-flat caps. 10 references.

  2. The AEM and regional carbonate aquifer modeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cady; Mifflin, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The analytic element method (AEM) has been applied to a 15,000-km2 area of the Paleozoic carbonate rock terrain of Nevada. The focus is the Muddy River springs area, which receives 1.44 m3/s (51 ft3/s) of regionally derived ground water, and forms the Muddy River. The study was undertaken early in 2000 to support the development of a cooling water supply for a gas-fired generation facility 20 km south of the Muddy River springs. The primary objectives of the AEM modeling were to establish a better understanding of regional fluxes and boundary conditions and to provide a framework for examination of more local transient effects using MODFLOW. Geochemical evidence available in 2000 suggested two separate flow fields, one in the north discharging at the springs, and a southern area of small hydraulic gradients. To be conservative, however, hydraulic continuity between the two areas was maintained in the 2000 AEM model. Using new monitoring well data collected in the south, and analyses confirming that seasonal pumping effects in the north are not propagated to the south, a later AEM model that included a barrier calibrated with relative ease. The analytic element model was well suited for simulating an area larger than the immediate area of interest, was easy to modify as more information became available, and facilitated the stepwise development of multiple conceptual models of the site. PMID:16405463

  3. First principles model of carbonate compaction creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformation. From first principles we develop a simple micromechanical model of creep in rocks under compressional stress that combines microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This model was then upscaled by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core and reservoir scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and has few input parameters: effective stress, temperature, water saturation porosity, and material parameters. Material parameters are porosity, pore size distribution, Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite, the dissolution, and precipitation rates of calcite, and the diffusion rate of calcium carbonate, all of which are independently measurable without performing any type of deformation or creep test. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to test the model which successfully predicts the magnitude of the resulting strain rate under very different effective stress, temperature, and water saturation conditions. The model was used to predict the observed compaction of a producing chalk reservoir.

  4. Distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.; McFadden, L.D.; Harden, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    A model that describes the distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils as a function of dust flux, time, climate, and other soil-forming factors shows which factors most strongly influence the accumulation of carbonate and can be used to evaluate carbonate-based soil age estimates or paleoclimatic reconstructions. Models for late Holocene soils have produced carbonate distributions that are very similar to those of well-dated soils in New Mexico and southern California. These results suggest that (1) present climate is a fair representation of late Holocene climate, (2) carbonate dust flux can be approximated by its Holocene rate, and (3) changes in climate and/or dust flux at the end of the Pleistocene effected profound and complex changes in soil carbonate distributions. Both higher carbonate dust flux and greater effective precipitation are required during the latest Pleistocene-early Holocene to explain carbonate distributions in latest Pleistocene soils. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Baldocchi, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

  6. Models for naturally fractured, carbonate reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Ozkan, G.; Zhan, X.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    This report outlines the need for new tools for the simulation of fractured carbonate reservoirs. Several problems are identified that call for the development of new reservoir simulation physical models and numerical techniques. These include: karst and vuggy media wherein Darcy`s and traditional multi-phase flow laws do not apply; the need for predicting the preproduction state of fracturing and stress so that the later response of effective stress-dependent reservoirs can be predicted; and methods for predicting the fracturing and collapse of vuggy and karst reservoirs in response to draw-down pressure created during production. Specific research directions for addressing each problem are outlined and preliminary results are noted.

  7. Modelling Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Fen Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Roppel, Mario; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges between soil and atmosphere on several fen peatland use areas at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements on our site of varying types of agricultural land use. There we found significant differences in the annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Annual balances were constructed by applying single respiration and photosynthesis CO2 models for each measurement campaign. These models were based on LLOYD-TAYLOR (1994) and Michaelis-Menten-Kinetics respectively. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the

  8. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model.

    PubMed

    Sanmukh, Swapnil; Khairnar, Krishna; Paunikar, Waman; Lokhande, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, though a major component of the global carbon cycle, its source is not yet well understood. A key element of the carbon cycle is the microbial conversion of DOC into inedible forms. The primary aim of this study is to understand the phage conversion from organic to inorganic carbon during phage-host interactions. Time studies of phage-host interactions under controlled conditions reveal their impact on the total carbon content of the samples and their interconversion of organic and inorganic carbon compared to control samples. A total organic carbon (TOC) analysis showed an increase in inorganic carbon content by 15-25 percent in samples with bacteria and phage compared to samples with bacteria alone. Compared to control samples, the increase in inorganic carbon content was 60-70-fold in samples with bacteria and phage, and 50-55-fold for samples with bacteria alone. This study indicates the potential impact of phages in regulating the carbon cycle of aquatic systems. PMID:26213615

  9. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model

    PubMed Central

    Sanmukh, Swapnil; Khairnar, Krishna; Paunikar, Waman; Lokhande, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, though a major component of the global carbon cycle, its source is not yet well understood. A key element of the carbon cycle is the microbial conversion of DOC into inedible forms. The primary aim of this study is to understand the phage conversion from organic to inorganic carbon during phage-host interactions. Time studies of phage-host interactions under controlled conditions reveal their impact on the total carbon content of the samples and their interconversion of organic and inorganic carbon compared to control samples. A total organic carbon (TOC) analysis showed an increase in inorganic carbon content by 15-25 percent in samples with bacteria and phage compared to samples with bacteria alone. Compared to control samples, the increase in inorganic carbon content was 60-70-fold in samples with bacteria and phage, and 50-55-fold for samples with bacteria alone. This study indicates the potential impact of phages in regulating the carbon cycle of aquatic systems. PMID:26213615

  10. Carbon Dynamics and Export from Flooded Wetlands: A Modeling Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Described in this article is development and validation of a process based model for carbon cycling in flooded wetlands, called WetQual-C. The model considers various biogeochemical interactions affecting C cycling, greenhouse gas emissions, organic carbon export and retention. ...

  11. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  12. MODEL OF CARBON CYCLING IN THE PLANKTONIC FOOD WEB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model of carbon fluxes through the heterotrophic microbial food web is developed from a synthesis of laboratory and field research. he basis of the model is the segregation of organic carbon into lability classes that are defined by bioassay experiments. acteria, p...

  13. MODEL OF CARBON CYCLING IN PLANKTONIC FOOD WEBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model of carbon fluxes through the heterotrophic microbial food web is developed from a synthesis of laboratory and field research,The basis of the model is the segregation of organic carbon into lability classes that are defined by bioassay experiments. acteria, p...

  14. A thermodynamic model for growth mechanisms of multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaatz, Forrest H.; Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes are grown via thermal chemical vapor deposition between temperatures of 630 and 830 C using acetylene in nitrogen as the carbon source. This process is modeled using classical thermodynamics to explain the total carbon deposition as a function of time and temperature. An activation energy of 1.60 eV is inferred for nanotube growth after considering the carbon solubility term. Scanning electron microscopy shows growth with diameters increasing linearly with time. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy show multiwall nanotubes surrounded by a glassy-carbon sheath, which grows with increasing wall thickness as growth temperatures and times rise.

  15. Deflagration-to-detonation in granular HMX: Ignition, kinetics, and shock formation

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.M.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.

    1993-06-01

    Experimental studies and analysis of the deflagration-to detonation transition (DDT) in granular HMX are continued. Experiments performed using a direct-gasless igniter exhibit the same phenomenology as those ignited with a piston. Simple kinetics and mechanics describe the formation of the {approximately}100% TMD plug in terms of competing pressurization processes. A mass-conservation analysis of the experimentally observed structures shows how the low velocities characteristic of convective burning are amplified to shock-wave velocities through non-convective processes.

  16. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  17. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the optical emission produced thereby is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  18. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  19. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, P; Chaland, F; Masse, L

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas. PMID:15600681

  20. Deflagration-to-detonation transition in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, P.; Chaland, F.; Masse, L.

    2004-11-01

    By means of highly resolved one-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, we provide an understanding of the burn process in inertial-confinement-fusion baseline targets. The cornerstone of the phenomenology of propagating burn in such laser-driven capsules is shown to be the transition from a slow unsteady reaction-diffusion regime of thermonuclear combustion (some sort of deflagration) to a fast detonative one. Remarkably, detonation initiation follows the slowing down of a shockless supersonic reaction wave driven by energy redeposition from the fusion products themselves. Such a route to detonation is specific to fusion plasmas.

  1. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Induced by Hot Jets in a Supersonic Premixed Airstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Zhou, Jin; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Detonation is initiated through a hot jet in a supersonic premixed mixture of H2 and air, which is produced by using a air heater. The results show that initiation fails in the low-equivalence-ratio premixed gas. With the increase of equivalence ratio, the hot jet can induce deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in the premixed mixture, which an indirect initiation of detonation. Further studies show that the DDT process is due to the combined effect of a local hemispherical explosion shock wave, the bow shock, and the flame produced by the hot jet.

  2. Study on the deflagration-to-detonation transition course of porous energetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lan; Hao, Pengcheng; Dong, Hefei; Hu, Xiaomian; Zhu, Jianshi

    2012-02-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) course of energetic material with different porosity ratio was studied utilizing a one-dimensional two-phase flow code. The equations were numerically solved by space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The distribution of physical quantities such as pressure and temperature were obtained together with their evolution history. The physical rules before detonation were mainly analyzed and the effect of convection on the chemical reaction of energetic material was emphasized on.

  3. NHS at forefront of carbon modelling.

    PubMed

    Brockway, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Paul Brockway, senior sustainability consultant at Arup, reports on a carbon footprint study undertaken at the Barts and the London NHS Trust which set out to "understand carbon hotspots and identify actions that can save both money and carbon". The completion of the Barts study, believed to have been the first such initiative involving an NHS Trust, follows a national, Sustainability Development Unit-commissioned footprint study led by the author in 2008, and described in detail in the article, "Assessing the full carbon impacts of healthcare", in the IFHE Digest 2010. PMID:21058618

  4. Modeling fire and the terrestrial carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, I. C.; Kelley, D. I.; Foster, P. N.; Friedlingstein, P.; Harrison, S. P.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2011-09-01

    Four CO2 concentration inversions and the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) versions 2.1 and 3 are used to provide benchmarks for climate-driven modeling of the global land-atmosphere CO2 flux and the contribution of wildfire to this flux. The Land surface Processes and exchanges (LPX) model is introduced. LPX is based on the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Spread and Intensity of FIRE (LPJ-SPITFIRE) model with amended fire probability calculations. LPX omits human ignition sources yet simulates many aspects of global fire adequately. It captures the major features of observed geographic pattern in burnt area and its seasonal timing and the unimodal relationship of burnt area to precipitation. It simulates features of geographic variation in the sign of the interannual correlations of burnt area with antecedent dryness and precipitation. It simulates well the interannual variability of the global total land-atmosphere CO2 flux. There are differences among the global burnt area time series from GFED2.1, GFED3 and LPX, but some features are common to all. GFED3 fire CO2 fluxes account for only about 1/3 of the variation in total CO2 flux during 1997-2005. This relationship appears to be dominated by the strong climatic dependence of deforestation fires. The relationship of LPX-modeled fire CO2 fluxes to total CO2 fluxes is weak. Observed and modeled total CO2 fluxes track the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) closely; GFED3 burnt area and global fire CO2 flux track the ENSO much less so. The GFED3 fire CO2 flux-ENSO connection is most prominent for the El Niño of 1997-1998, which produced exceptional burning conditions in several regions, especially equatorial Asia. The sign of the observed relationship between ENSO and fire varies regionally, and LPX captures the broad features of this variation. These complexities underscore the need for process-based modeling to assess the consequences of global change for fire and its implications for the carbon cycle.

  5. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy: An Economic Model for Limiting Climate Change by Managing Anthropogenic Carbon Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss an economic model for comprehensive carbon management that focuses on changes in carbon flux in the biosphere due to anthropogenic activity. The two unique features of the model include: 1. A shift in emphasis from primarily carbon emissions, toward changes in carbon flux, mainly carbon extraction, and 2. A carbon price vector (CPV) to express the value of changes in carbon flux, measured in changes in carbon sequestration, or carbon residence time. The key focus with the economic model is the degree to which carbon flux changes due to anthropogenic activity. The economic model has three steps: 1. The CPV metric is used to value all forms of carbon associated with any anthropogenic activity. In this paper, the CPV used is a logarithmic chronological scale to gauge expected carbon residence (or sequestration) time. In future economic models, the CPV may be expanded to include other factors to value carbon. 2. Whenever carbon changes form (and CPV) due to anthropogenic activity, a carbon toll is assessed as determined by the change in the CPV. The standard monetary unit for carbon tolls are carbon toll units, or CTUs. The CTUs multiplied by the quantity of carbon converted (QCC) provides the total carbon toll, or CT. For example, CT = (CTU /mole carbon) x (QCC moles carbon). 3. Whenever embodied carbon (EC) attributable to a good or service moves via trade to a jurisdiction with a different CPV metric, a carbon toll (CT) is assessed representing the CPV difference between the two jurisdictions. This economic model has three clear advantages. First, the carbon pricing and cost scheme use existing and generally accepted accounting methodologies to ensure the veracity and verifiability of carbon management efforts with minimal effort and expense using standard, existing auditing protocols. Implementing this economic model will not require any new, special, unique, or additional training, tools, or systems for any entity to achieve their minimum

  6. The uncertainty of modeled soil carbon stock change for Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Heikkinen, Juha

    2013-04-01

    Countries should report soil carbon stock changes of forests for Kyoto Protocol. Under Kyoto Protocol one can omit reporting of a carbon pool by verifying that the pool is not a source of carbon, which is especially tempting for the soil pool. However, verifying that soils of a nation are not a source of carbon in given year seems to be nearly impossible. The Yasso07 model was parametrized against various decomposition data using MCMC method. Soil carbon change in Finland between 1972 and 2011 were simulated with Yasso07 model using litter input data derived from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) and fellings time series. The uncertainties of biomass models, litter turnoverrates, NFI sampling and Yasso07 model were propagated with Monte Carlo simulations. Due to biomass estimation methods, uncertainties of various litter input sources (e.g. living trees, natural mortality and fellings) correlate strongly between each other. We show how original covariance matrices can be analytically combined and the amount of simulated components reduce greatly. While doing simulations we found that proper handling correlations may be even more essential than accurate estimates of standard errors. As a preliminary results, from the analysis we found that both Southern- and Northern Finland were soil carbon sinks, coefficient of variations (CV) varying 10%-25% when model was driven with long term constant weather data. When we applied annual weather data, soils were both sinks and sources of carbon and CVs varied from 10%-90%. This implies that the success of soil carbon sink verification depends on the weather data applied with models. Due to this fact IPCC should provide clear guidance for the weather data applied with soil carbon models and also for soil carbon sink verification. In the UNFCCC reporting carbon sinks of forest biomass have been typically averaged for five years - similar period for soil model weather data would be logical.

  7. Modelled sensitivities of biogenic carbon fluxes to variations in carbon dioxide and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartau, M.; Engel, A.; Voelker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.; Schroeter, J.

    2003-04-01

    One particular task of marine ecosystem models is to simulate the biogenic transformation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into organic matter and hence to quantify the export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to deep oceanic layers. To date, environmental changes, such as increasing carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO_2) and temperature, are perceived to have an impact on the formation of organic carbon. However, well established nitrogen or phosphorus based ecosystem models are insensitive to variations in the carbonate system. In order to investigate biological responses to pCO_2 variations, ecosystem models need to distinguish between carbon, nitrogen, and/or phosphorus cycles. We present a simple biological model which decouples carbon from nitrogen fluxes such that carbon found in transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) is additionally accounted for. The model regards phytoplankton acclimation to varying environmental conditions, having included parameterizations for phytoplankton growth as proposed by Geider et al.~(1998, L&O). By means of data assimilation, an optimal parameter set is determined, which brings model results into agreement with experimental data. From the optimised model results it is infered that about 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exuded by phytoplankton is subsequently transformed into TEP, eventually influencing the amount of POC available for the export flux. Model sensitivity studies are performed at local sites and along a latitudinal transect (30^oN-60^oN at 19^oW) in the North Atlantic. As soon as CO_2 limitation for phytoplankton growth is explicitely considered in the model, the formation of POC shows great sensitivity to pCO_2 variations. Temperature variations alter remineralisation rates and growth efficiencies. With the current model version dependencies between biomass accumulation, the date of nutrient depletion to occur, and the exudation of organic compounds are acquired.

  8. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare these to observationally-derived diagnostics derived from the International Soil Carbon Database (ISCN) to assess the realism of model predictions of carbon depthattenuation, and the ability of observations to provide a constraint on rates of decomposition at depth.

  9. Chemical Energy Release in Several Recently Discovered Detonation and Deflagration Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2010-10-01

    Several recent experiments on complex detonation and deflagration flows are analyzed in terms of the chemical energy release required to sustain these flows. The observed double cellular structures in detonating gaseous nitromethane-oxygen and NO2-fuel (H2, CH4, and C2H6) mixtures are explained by the amplification of two distinct pressure wave frequencies by two exothermic reactions, the faster reaction forming vibrationally excited NO* and the slower reaction forming highly vibrationally excited N2**. The establishment of a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) deflagration behind a weak shock wave, the C-J detonation established after a head-on collision with a shock front, and the C-J detonation conditions established in reactive supersonic flows are quantitatively calculated using the chemical energy release of a H2 + Cl2 mixture. For these three reactive flows, these calculations illustrate that different fractions of the exothermic chemical energy are used to sustain steady-state propagation. C-J detonation calculations on the various initial states using the CHEETAH chemical equilibrium code are shown to be in good agreement with experimental detonation velocity measurements for the head-on collision and supersonic flow detonations.

  10. A model of carbon production in a cometary coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A model of the cometary ionosphere is developed in order to account for the large population of metastable C(D-1) atoms detected via the ultraviolet spectrum of Comet West (1976 VI). Dissociative recombination of CO(plus) ions and electrons is shown to be the dominant source of carbon atoms rather than photodissociation of CO so that the derived carbon production rate is only a lower limit to the evaporation rate of the carbon bearing mother molecule.

  11. The sphere-in-contact model of carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D; Pullman, David P; Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-01-01

    A sphere-in-contact model is presented that is used to build physical models of carbon materials such as graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes and fullerene. Unlike other molecular models, these models have correct scale and proportions because the carbon atoms are represented by their atomic radius, in contrast to the more commonly used space-fill models, where carbon atoms are represented by their van der Waals radii. Based on a survey taken among 65 undergraduate chemistry students and 28 PhD/postdoctoral students with a background in molecular modeling, we found misconceptions arising from incorrect visualization of the size and location of the electron density located in carbon materials. Based on analysis of the survey and on a conceptual basis we show that the sphere-in-contact model provides an improved molecular representation of the electron density of carbon materials compared to other molecular models commonly used in science textbooks (i.e., wire-frame, ball-and-stick, space-fill). We therefore suggest that its use in chemistry textbooks along with the ball-and-stick model would significantly enhance the visualization of molecular structures according to their electron density. Graphical Abstract A sphere-in-contact model of C60-fullerene. PMID:26791534

  12. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, William I.; Fox, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Watershed-scale carbon budgets remain poorly understood, in part due to inadequate simulation tools to assess in-stream carbon fate and transport. A new numerical model termed ISOtope-based FLuvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) is formulated to simulate the fluvial organic carbon budget in watersheds where hydrologic, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes are coupled to control benthic and transported carbon composition and flux. One ISOFLOC innovation is the formulation of new stable carbon isotope model subroutines that include isotope fractionation processes in order to estimate carbon isotope source, fate, and transport. A second innovation is the coupling of transfers between carbon pools, including algal particulate organic carbon, fine particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and particulate and dissolved inorganic carbon, to simulate the carbon cycle in a comprehensive manner beyond that of existing watershed water quality models. ISOFLOC was tested and verified in a low-gradient, agriculturally impacted stream. Results of a global sensitivity analysis suggested the isotope response variable had unique sensitivity to the coupled interaction between fluvial shear resistance of algal biomass and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon. Model calibration and validation suggested good agreement at event, seasonal, and annual timescales. Multiobjective uncertainty analysis suggested inclusion of the carbon stable isotope routine reduced uncertainty by 80% for algal particulate organic carbon flux estimates.

  13. Response Of Ocean Carbon Export To Different Model Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoglu, Baris; Kideys, Ahmet E.

    2013-04-01

    Effects of climate change on the biological carbon pump (BCP) and vice-versa, and the influence of change in ecosystem structure on the dynamics of BCP are vital topics to understand the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and sequestration of greenhouse gases. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. However, due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. For this reason, the primary aim of this study is to provide new parameterizations of the downward flux of organic carbon, suitable for inclusion in numerical models. The study area was chosen to be the North Atlantic Basin (NA) and the surrounding shelf seas. In the scope of this study, first, the skill of existing models in representing particle fluxes were compared theoretically. The unique algorithms used in three state-of-the art ecosystem models ERSEM, PISCES and MEDUSA have been compared and tested against observational data collected at the PAP mooring site. For testing purposes, algorithms were inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model. Following comparison of existing algorithms, new experimental results obtained from targeted mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations, will be utilized to develop improved formulations. New algorithms will be compared to existing model formulations using a standard validation data set complied within the framework of BASIN. In order to assess algorithm response under differing hydrographic environments, each set of algorithms will be tested within a 1D framework at three sites

  14. Integrating microbial diversity in soil carbon dynamic models parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Benjamin; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Leterme, Philippe; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Viaud, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Faced with the numerous concerns about soil carbon dynamic, a large quantity of carbon dynamic models has been developed during the last century. These models are mainly in the form of deterministic compartment models with carbon fluxes between compartments represented by ordinary differential equations. Nowadays, lots of them consider the microbial biomass as a compartment of the soil organic matter (carbon quantity). But the amount of microbial carbon is rarely used in the differential equations of the models as a limiting factor. Additionally, microbial diversity and community composition are mostly missing, although last advances in soil microbial analytical methods during the two past decades have shown that these characteristics play also a significant role in soil carbon dynamic. As soil microorganisms are essential drivers of soil carbon dynamic, the question about explicitly integrating their role have become a key issue in soil carbon dynamic models development. Some interesting attempts can be found and are dominated by the incorporation of several compartments of different groups of microbial biomass in terms of functional traits and/or biogeochemical compositions to integrate microbial diversity. However, these models are basically heuristic models in the sense that they are used to test hypotheses through simulations. They have rarely been confronted to real data and thus cannot be used to predict realistic situations. The objective of this work was to empirically integrate microbial diversity in a simple model of carbon dynamic through statistical modelling of the model parameters. This work is based on available experimental results coming from a French National Research Agency program called DIMIMOS. Briefly, 13C-labelled wheat residue has been incorporated into soils with different pedological characteristics and land use history. Then, the soils have been incubated during 104 days and labelled and non-labelled CO2 fluxes have been measured at ten

  15. CarbonTracker-Lagrange: A model-data assimilation system for North American carbon flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Chen, Huilin; van der Velde, Ivar; Andrews, Arlyn; Sweeney, Colm; Baker, Ian; Ju, Weimin; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid; Tans, Pieter; Peters, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the regional carbon fluxes is of great importance for climate-related studies. To derive these carbon fluxes, atmospheric inverse modeling methods are often used. Different from global inverse modeling, regional studies need to deal with lateral boundary conditions (BCs) at the outer atmospheric domain studied. Also, regional inverse modeling systems typically use a higher spatial resolution and can be more computation-intensive. In this study, we implement a regional inverse modeling system for atmospheric CO₂ based on the CarbonTracker framework. We combine it with a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model, the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model driven by the Weather Forecast and Research meteorological fields (WRF-STILT). The new system uses independent information from aircraft CO₂ profiles to optimize lateral BCs, while simultaneously optimizing biosphere fluxes with near-surface CO₂ observations from tall towers. This Lagrangian transport model with precalculated footprints is computational more efficient than using an Eulerian model. We take SiBCASA biosphere model results as prior NEE from the terrestrial biosphere. Three different lateral BCs, derived from CarbonTracker North America mole fraction fields, CarbonTracker Europe mole fraction fields and an empirical BC from NOAA aircraft profiles, are employed to investigate the influence of BCs. To estimate the uncertainties of the optimized fluxes from the system and to determine the impacts of system setup on biosphere flux covariances, BC uncertainties and model-data mismatches, we tested various prior biosphere fluxes and BCs. To estimate the transport uncertainties, we also tested an alternative Lagrangian transport model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model driven by the North American Mesoscale Forecast System meteorological fields (HYSPLIT-NAM12). Based on the above tests, we achieved an ensemble of inverse estimates from our system

  16. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  17. A global predictive model of carbon in mangrove soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Sunny L.; Siikamäki, Juha V.

    2014-10-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly vanishing natural environments worldwide. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services and have recently become known for their exceptional capacity to store carbon. Research shows that mangrove conservation may be a low-cost means of reducing CO2 emissions. Accordingly, there is growing interest in developing market mechanisms to credit mangrove conservation projects for associated CO2 emissions reductions. These efforts depend on robust and readily applicable, but currently unavailable, localized estimates of soil carbon. Here, we use over 900 soil carbon measurements, collected in 28 countries by 61 independent studies, to develop a global predictive model for mangrove soil carbon. Using climatological and locational data as predictors, we explore several predictive modeling alternatives, including machine-learning methods. With our predictive model, we construct a global dataset of estimated soil carbon concentrations and stocks on a high-resolution grid (5 arc min). We estimate that the global mangrove soil carbon stock is 5.00 ± 0.94 Pg C (assuming a 1 meter soil depth) and find this stock is highly variable over space. The amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-rich mangroves (approximately 703 ± 38 Mg C ha-1) is roughly a 2.6 ± 0.14 times the amount of carbon per hectare in the world’s most carbon-poor mangroves (approximately 272 ± 49 Mg C ha-1). Considerable within country variation in mangrove soil carbon also exists. In Indonesia, the country with the largest mangrove soil carbon stock, we estimate that the most carbon-rich mangroves contain 1.5 ± 0.12 times as much carbon per hectare as the most carbon-poor mangroves. Our results can aid in evaluating benefits from mangrove conservation and designing mangrove conservation policy. Additionally, the results can be used to project changes in mangrove soil carbon stocks based on changing climatological predictors, e.g. to

  18. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  19. Nucleation and electrolytic deposition of lead on model carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cericola, D.; Spahr, M.

    2016-08-01

    There is a general consensus in the lead acid battery industry for the use of carbon additives as a functional component in the negative paste to boost the battery performance with regards to charge acceptance and cycle life especially for upcoming automotive and energy storage applications. Several mechanisms are discussed in the scientific literature and the affinity of the carbon surfaces to lead species seems to play a key role. With a set of experiments on model carbon electrodes we gave evidence to the fact that some carbon materials promote spontaneous nucleation of lead crystals. We propose a mechanism such that the carbon, as soon as in a lead containing environment, immobilizes some lead on its surface. Such immobilized lead acts as nucleation seed for the deposition of lead when a current is passed through the material. It is therefore possible to differentiate and select the carbon materials based on their ability to form nucleation seeds.

  20. Leaching modelling of slurry-phase carbonated steel slag.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Stramazzo, A

    2016-01-25

    In the present work the influence of accelerated mineral carbonation on the leaching behaviour of basic oxygen furnace steel slag was investigated. The environmental behaviour of the material as evaluated through the release of major elements and toxic metals under varying pH conditions was the main focus of the study. Geochemical modelling of the eluates was used to derive a theoretical description of the underlying leaching phenomena for the carbonated material as compared to the original slag. Among the investigated elements, Ca and Si were most appreciably affected by carbonation. A very clear effect of carbonation on leaching was observed for silicate phases, and lower-Ca/Si-ratio minerals were found to control leaching in carbonated slag eluates as compared to the corresponding untreated slag sample as a result of Ca depletion from the residual slag particles. Clear evidence was also gained of solubility control for Ca, Mg and Mn by a number of carbonate minerals, indicating a significant involvement of the original slag constituents in the carbonation process. The release of toxic metals (Zn, V, Cr, Mo) was found to be variously affected by carbonation, owing to different mechanisms including pH changes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonates as well as sorption onto reactive mineral surfaces. The leaching test results were used to derive further considerations on the expected metal release levels on the basis of specific assumptions on the relevant pH domains for the untreated and carbonated slag. PMID:26489916

  1. Accreting white dwarf models for type 1 supernovae. 1: Presupernova evolution and triggering mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1981-01-01

    As a plausible explosion model for a Type I supernova, the evolution of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in binary systems was investigated from the onset of accretion up to the point at which a thermonuclear explosion occurs. The relationship between the conditions in the binary system and the triggering mechanism for the supernova explosion is discussed, especially for the cases with relatively slow accretion rate. It is found that the growth of a helium zone on the carbon-oxygen core leads to a supernova explosion which is triggered either by the off-center helium detonation for slow and intermediate accretion rates or by the carbon deflagration for slow and rapid accretion rates. Both helium detonation and carbon deflagration are possible for the case of slow accretion, since in this case the initial mass of the white dwarf is an important parameter for determining the mode of ignition. Finally, various modes of building up the helium zone on the white dwarf, namely, direct transfer of helium from the companion star and the various types and strength of the hydrogen shell flashes are discussed in some detail.

  2. Model of carbon cycling in planktonic food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, J.P.; Coffin, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    A mathematical model of carbon fluxes through the heterotrophic microbial food web is developed from a synthesis of laboratory and field research. The basis of the model is the segregation of organic carbon into lability classes that are defined by bioassay experiments. Bacteria, phytoplankton, three trophic levels of zooplankton, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) are modeled. The descriptions of bacterial growth and utilization of the various classes of substrate were treated as universal constants in the application of the model to three distinct ecosystems, ranging from oligotrophic to highly eutrophic. The successful application of the model to these diverse ecosystems supports the basic validity of the description of the microbial food web and the dynamics of carbon flux. The model indicates that the dynamics of bacteria and protozoan zooplankton production govern the rates of oxidation of carbon entering the water column. Explicit consideration of these groups would improve the capability of eutrophication models to predict dissolved oxygen dynamics, particularly when projecting responses to loading changes.

  3. Observed nighttime conductance alters modeled global hydrology and carbon budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardozzi, D. L.; Zeppel, M. J. B.; Fisher, R. A.; Tawfik, A.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere regulates climate through carbon, water, and energy exchanges with the atmosphere. Land surface models estimate plant transpiration, which is actively regulated by stomatal pores, and provide projections essential for understanding Earth's carbon and water resources. Empirical evidence from 204 species suggests that significant amounts of water are lost through leaves at night, though land surface models typically reduce stomatal conductance to nearly zero at night. Here, we apply observed nighttime stomatal conductance values to a global land surface model, to better constrain carbon and water budgets. We find that our modifications increase transpiration up to 5 % globally, reduce modeled available soil moisture by up to 50 % in semi-arid regions, and increase the importance of the land surface on modulating energy fluxes. Carbon gain declines up to ~ 4 % globally and > 25 % in semi-arid regions. We advocate for realistic constraints of minimum stomatal conductance in future climate simulations, and widespread field observations to improve parameterizations.

  4. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  5. Modeling of exposure to carbon monoxide in fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict carboxyhemoglobin concentrations in regions of the body for short exposures to carbon monoxide levels expected during escape from aircraft fires. The model includes the respiratory and circulatory dynamics of absorption and distribution of carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin. Predictions of carboxyhemoglobin concentrations are compared to experimental values obtained for human exposures to constant high carbon monoxide levels. Predictions are within 20% of experimental values. For short exposure times, transient concentration effects are predicted. The effect of stress is studied and found to increase carboxyhemoglobin levels substantially compared to a rest state.

  6. Isotropic simple global carbon model: The use of carbon isotopes for model development. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use and deforestation have perturbed the natural global carbon cycle. As a result, the atmospheric CO2 concentration has rapidly increased, causing the potential for global warming. A twenty four compartment isotopic simple global carbon model (IS-GCM) has been developed for scenario analysis, research needs prioritization, and for recommending strategies to stabilize the atmospheric CO2 level. CO2 fertilization and temperature effects are included in the terrestrial biosphere, and the ocean includes inorganic chemistry which, with ocean water circulation, enables the calculation of time-variable oceanic carbon uptake. The eight compartment simple global carbon model (SGCM) served as the basis of the ISGCM model development. Carbon isotopes, C-13 (stable carbon) and C-14(radiocarbon), were used for model constraints as well as results from SGCM that led to multiple compartments in ISGCM. The ISGCM was calibrated with the observed CO2 concentrations, delta C-13, and Delta C-14 in the atmosphere, Delta C-14 in the soil and Delta C-14 in the ocean. Also, ISGCM was constrained by literature values of oceanic carbon uptake (gas exchange) and CO2 emissions from deforestation. Inputs (forcing functions in the model) were the CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use and deforestation. Scenario analysis, together with emission strategies tests, indicate that urgent action to reduce anthropogenic emissions would need to be taken to stabilize atmospheric CO2. Results showed that quantitatively, forest management is just as effective as the reduction of fossil fuel emissions in controlling atmospheric CO2. Sensitivity analysis of temperature feedback suggests that future global warming would cause an additional perturbation in the global-carbon cycle, resulting in depletion of soil organic carbon, accumulation of plant biomass, and the increase of atmospheric CO2.

  7. Traceable components of terrestrial carbon storage capacity in biogeochemical models.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; Hararuk, Oleksandra

    2013-07-01

    Biogeochemical models have been developed to account for more and more processes, making their complex structures difficult to be understood and evaluated. Here, we introduce a framework to decompose a complex land model into traceable components based on mutually independent properties of modeled biogeochemical processes. The framework traces modeled ecosystem carbon storage capacity (Xss ) to (i) a product of net primary productivity (NPP) and ecosystem residence time (τE ). The latter τE can be further traced to (ii) baseline carbon residence times (τ'E ), which are usually preset in a model according to vegetation characteristics and soil types, (iii) environmental scalars (ξ), including temperature and water scalars, and (iv) environmental forcings. We applied the framework to the Australian Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) model to help understand differences in modeled carbon processes among biomes and as influenced by nitrogen processes. With the climate forcings of 1990, modeled evergreen broadleaf forest had the highest NPP among the nine biomes and moderate residence times, leading to a relatively high carbon storage capacity (31.5 kg cm(-2) ). Deciduous needle leaf forest had the longest residence time (163.3 years) and low NPP, leading to moderate carbon storage (18.3 kg cm(-2) ). The longest τE in deciduous needle leaf forest was ascribed to its longest τ'E (43.6 years) and small ξ (0.14 on litter/soil carbon decay rates). Incorporation of nitrogen processes into the CABLE model decreased Xss in all biomes via reduced NPP (e.g., -12.1% in shrub land) or decreased τE or both. The decreases in τE resulted from nitrogen-induced changes in τ'E (e.g., -26.7% in C3 grassland) through carbon allocation among plant pools and transfers from plant to litter and soil pools. Our framework can be used to facilitate data model comparisons and model intercomparisons via tracking a few traceable components for all terrestrial carbon

  8. Experimental investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in hydrocarbon-air gaseous mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Tyurnikov, M.V.

    1995-03-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of deflagration to detonation transition in gas mixtures with exothermic chemical reaction using the experimental method of nonintrusive diagnostics of the process. Schlieren photochronography in the optical sections in different places of the tube is performed using the laser as a source of light. Experimental results of visualization of the transition process in hydrocarbon-air gas mixtures show several different flow patterns: (1) The detonation wave originates in the flame zone. (2) The detonation wave originates between the flame zone and primary shock wave. (3) The secondary combustion zone originates between primary shock and the flame and causes the detonation. (4) Spontaneous flame occurs that leads to the combustion to detonation transition. The influence of the flame zone on the originating strong detonation wave is noticed.

  9. Effects of a Vortex Flow on Characteristics of Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asato, Katsuo; Miyasaka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yuta; Ishikawa, Soushin; Tanabashi, Kouki

    The effects of a vortex flow (VF) on the characteristics of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) were examined in order to achieve the shortest distance of DDT for a pulse detonation engine (PDE). The DDT distances in a vortex flow were shortened by 15-47 % than those in a counterflow. The shortening effect becomes remarkable as the rotating velocity increases. Formation of the area of higher energy density in the ignition domain of the tube, and flame acceleration due to rapid flame propagation in the vortex flow and promotion of turbulence near the tube wall by the rotating velocity in the transition domain of the tube are considered to be the governing factors in shortening the DDT distance.

  10. Mesoscale challenge of extending atomistic scale chemistry of initiation reactions to deflagration-to-detonation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-06-01

    Predictive simulations connecting chemistry that follow the shock or thermal initiation of energetic materials to subsequent deflagration or detonation events is currently outside the realm of possibilities. Molecular dynamics and first-principles based dynamics have made progress in understanding reactions in picosecond to nanosecond time scale. However, connecting the events that leads to deflagration will require simulations using much larger length and time scale to connect the full reaction network. This constitutes a mesoscale challenge in energetic materials research. Recent advances in addressing this mesoscale chemistry challenge in other domains will be discussed. Development in coarse-grain simulations and accelerating reactive MD simulations faces the challenge of simplifying the chemistry by making assumptions on the mechanism with consequences on the outcome. For example, results from thermal ignition of different phases of RDX shows a complex reaction and deterministic behavior for critical temperature before ignition. First-principles calculations for validation of key pathways observed will be discussed. The kinetics observed is dependent on the hot spot temperature, system size and thermal conductivity. Smaller hot spots in simulations needed higher temperature for ignition of the solid. For cases where ignition is observed, the incubation period is dominated by intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions. The gradual temperature and pressure increase in the incubation period is accompanied by accumulation of heavier polyradicals. The polyradicals with triazine rings from the RDX molecules intact undergo ring-opening reactions which fuel a series of rapid exothermic chemical reactions. Our ongoing work on connecting mesoscale and continuum scale will be discussed. Funding from DTRA Grant # HDTRA1-13-1-0018 acknowledged.

  11. Design and optimization of a deflagration to detonation transition (ddt) section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo, Francisco X.

    Throughout the previous century, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have used and optimized the `traditional' combustion process called deflagration (subsonic combustion). An alternative form of combustion, detonation (supersonic combustion), can increase the thermal efficiency of the process by anywhere from 20 - 50%. Even though several authors have studied detonation waves since the 1890's and a plethora of papers and books have been published, it was not until 2008 that the first detonation-powered flight took place. It lasted for 10 seconds at 100 ft. altitude. Achieving detonation presents its own challenges: some fuels are not prone to detonate, severe vibrations caused by the cyclic nature of the engine and its intense noise are some of the key areas that need further research. Also, to directly achieve detonation either a high-energy, bulky, ignition system is required, or the combustion chamber must be fairly long (5 ft. or more in some cases). In the latter method, a subsonic flame front accelerates within the combustion chamber until it reaches supersonic speeds, thus detonation is attained. This is called deflagration-todetonation transition (DDT). Previous papers and experiments have shown that obstacles, such as discs with an orifice, located inside the combustion chamber can shorten the distance required to achieve detonation. This paper describes a hands-on implementation of a DDT device. Different disc geometries inside the chamber alter the wave characteristics at the exit of the tube. Although detonation was reached only when using pure oxygen, testing identified an obstacle configuration for LPG and air mixtures that increased pressure and wave speed significantly when compared to baseline or other obstacle configurations. Mixtures of LPG and air were accelerated to Mach 0.96 in the downstream frame of reference, which would indicate a transition to detonation was close. Reasons for not achieving detonation may include poor fuel and oxidizer mixing

  12. Modeling the contribution of dissolved organic carbon to carbon sequestration during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wentao; Tian, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a carbon reservoir that is as large as the atmospheric CO2 pool, and its contribution to the global carbon cycle is gaining attention. As DOC is a dissolved tracer, its distribution can serve to trace the mixing of water masses and the pathways of ocean circulation. Published proxy and model reconstructions have revealed that, during the last glacial maximum (LGM), the pattern of deep ocean circulation differed from that of the modern ocean, whereby additional carbon is assumed to have been sequestered in stratified LGM deep water. The aim of this study is to explore the distribution of DOC and its production/removal rate during the LGM using the Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model (GENIE). Modeled results reveal that increased salinity of bottom waters in the Southern Ocean is associated with stronger stratification and oxygen depletion. The stratified LGM deep ocean traps more nutrients, resulting in a decrease in the DOC reservoir size that, in turn, causes a negative feedback for carbon sequestration. This finding requires an increase in DOC lifetime to compensate for the negative feedback. The upper limit of DOC lifetime is assumed to be 20,000 years. Modeled results derive an increase (decrease) in DOC reservoir by 100 Pg C leading to an atmospheric CO2 decrease (increase) of 9.1 ppm and a dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C increase (decrease) of 0.06‰. The DOC removal rate is estimated to be 39.5 Tg C year-1 in the deep sea during the LGM. The contribution of DOC to the LGM carbon cycle elucidates potential carbon sink-increasing strategies.

  13. Using Radiocarbon to Test Models of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Lin, H.; Randerson, J.

    2007-05-01

    The radiocarbon content of carbon stored in and respired by ecosystems provides a direct measure of ecosystem carbon dynamics that can be directly compared to model predictions. Because carbon cycles through ecosystems on a variety of timescales, the mean age of C in standing biomass and soil organic matter pools is older than the mean age of microbially respired carbon. In turn, each pathway for C transit through ecosystems my respond differently to edaphic conditions; for example, soil organic matter mean age is controlled by factors affecting stabilization of C on very long timescales, such as mineralogy, while a factor like litter quality that effects decomposition rates reflects vegetation and climate characteristics. We compare the radiocarbon signature of heterotrophically respired CO2 across a number of ecosystems with models predicted using the CASA ecosystem model. The major controls of microbially respired CO2 from ecosystems include the residence time of C in living plant pools (i.e. the age of C in litter inputs to soil) and factors that control decomposition rates (litter quality and climate). Major differences between model and measured values at low latitudes are related to how woody debris pools are treated differently in models and measurements. The time lag between photosynthesis and respiration is a key ecosystem property that defines its potential to store or release carbon given variations in annual net primary production. Radiocarbon provides a rare case where models can be directly compared with measurements to provide a test of this parameter.

  14. Understanding the Dynamics of Soil Carbon in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd-Brown, K. E.; Luo, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Allison, S. D.; Smith, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon stocks have the potential to be a strong source or sink for carbon dioxide over the next century, playing a critical role in climate change. These stocks are the result of small differences between much larger primary carbon fluxes: gross primary production, litter fall, autotrophic respiration and heterotrophic respiration. There was little agreement on predicted soil carbon stocks between Earth system models (ESMs) in the most recent Climate Model Intercomparison Project. Predicted present-day stocks ranged from roughly 500 Pg to over 3000 Pg and predicted changes over the 21st century ranged from -70 Pg to +250 Pg). The primary goal of this study was to understand why such large differences exist. We constructed four reduced complexity models to describe the primary carbon fluxes, making different assumptions about how soil carbon fluxes are modelled in ESMs. For each of these reduced complexity models we statistically inferred the most likely model parameters given the gridded ESM simulation outputs. Gross primary production was best explained by incoming short wave radiation, CO2 concentration, and leaf area index (global GPP comparison of simulation vs reduced complexity model of R2>0.9 (p < 1e-4) with slopes between 0.65 and 1.2 and intercepts between -13 and 67 Pg C yr-1). Autotrophic respiration was best explained as a proportion of GPP (R2 > 0.9 (p < 1e-4) with slopes between 0.78 and 1.1 and intercepts between -15 and 14 Pg C yr-1). Flux between the vegetation and soil pools were best explained as a proportion of the vegetation carbon stock (R2 > 0.9 (p < 1e-4) with slopes between 0.9 and 2.1 and intercepts between -65 and 25 Pg C yr-1). Finally heterotrophic respiration was best explained as a function of soil carbon stocks and soil temperature (R2 > 0.9 (p < 1e-4) with slopes between 0.7 and 1.5 and intercepts between -40 and 15 Pg C yr-1). This research suggests three main lines of decomposition model improvement: 1) improve connecting sub-models

  15. Tracking Inter-Regional Carbon Flows: A Hybrid Network Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The mitigation of anthropogenic carbon emissions has moved beyond the local scale because they diffuse across boundaries, and the consumption that triggers emissions has become regional and global. A precondition of effective mitigation is to explicitly assess inter-regional transfer of emissions. This study presents a hybrid network model to track inter-regional carbon flows by combining network analysis and input-output analysis. The direct, embodied, and controlled emissions associated with regions are quantified for assessing various types of carbon flow. The network-oriented metrics called "controlled emissions" is proposed to cover the amount of carbon emissions that can be mitigated within a region by adjusting its consumption. The case study of the Jing-Jin-Ji Area suggests that CO2 emissions embodied in products are only partially controlled by a region from a network perspective. Controlled carbon accounted for about 70% of the total embodied carbon flows, while household consumption only controlled about 25% of Beijing's emissions, much lower than its proportion of total embodied carbon. In addition to quantifying emissions, the model can pinpoint the dominant processes and sectors of emissions transfer across regions. This technique is promising for searching efficient pathways of coordinated emissions control across various regions connected by trade. PMID:27063784

  16. Modeled carbon respiration of microbial communities with explicit enzyme representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd-Brown, K. E.; Allison, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    Most carbon cycling models do not represent microbial biomass and extracellular enzymes directly. We previously introduced a partial differential equation and agent-based model to investigate dynamics of microbial decomposers and carbon respiration. In this model we explored the respiration rate of a microbial community comprised of producers (microbes that secrete foraging enzymes) and cheaters (microbes that do not secrete enzymes but benefit from them) The inclusion of cheaters reduced the producer population, which in turn reduced the amount of enzyme in the system and slowed the conversion of substrate into product. This limited the overall biomass and reduced the amount of CO2 released by the system. Here we introduce an analogous ordinary differential equation model for well-mixed systems, such as chemostats and aquatic or marine environments. We tested this model against experimental data from communities of Pseudomonas bacteria that produce protease enzymes. We found that the new model matches the experimental data and hypothesize that diffusion would reduce the expected respiration rate in diffusion-limited systems, such as soils or agar plates,. Our models suggest that enzyme producers grow more slowly due to the added energetic burden of enzyme production. Furthermore, mixed cheater/producer communities are less efficient at mineralizing carbon substrates than pure producer populations. Diffusion of enzymes through the system plays a key role in reducing the overall respiration rate. These results have potential implications for soil and aquatic carbon models, suggesting that both microbial biomass and community composition should be explicitly represented. If community composition is ignored, then there could be a systematic overestimation of the carbon respired from the system. Our results emphasize that mechanistic modeling of microbial communities can improve prediction of carbon cycling under varying environmental conditions.

  17. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical-Electrical Coupling of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun-Qiang; Jiang, Hanqiang

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively due to their unique properties, ranging from electrical, mechanical, optical, to thermal properties. The coupling between the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes has emerged as a new field, which raises both interesting fundamental problems and huge application potentials. In this article, we will review our recently work on the theoretical modeling on mechanical-electrical coupling of carbon nanotubes subject to various loading conditions, including tension/compression, torsion, and squashing. Some related work by other groups will be also mentioned.

  18. A Universal Model for Nanoporous Carbon Supercapacitors Applicable to Diverse Pore Regimes, Carbons, and Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Huang, Jingsong; Meunier, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Supercapacitors, commonly called electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), are emerging as a novel type of energy storage device with the potential to substitute batteries in applications requiring high power densities. In response to the latest experimental breakthrough in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors, we propose a heuristic theoretical model that takes pore curvature into account as a replacement for the EDLC model which is based on a traditional parallel-plate capacitor. When the pore size is in the mesopore regime (2-50 nm), counterions enter mesoporous carbons and approach the pore wall to form an electric double-cylinder capacitor (EDCC); in the micropore regime (< 2 nm), solvated/desolvated counterions line up along the pore axis to form an electric wire-in-cylinder capacitor (EWCC). In the macropore regime (> 50 nm) where pores are large enough so that the pore curvature is no longer significant, the EDCC model can be reduced naturally to the EDLC model. We present density functional theory calculations and detailed analyses of available experimental data in various pore regimes, showing the significant effects of pore curvature on the supercapacitor properties of nanoporous carbons. It is shown that the EDCC/EWCC model is universal to carbon supercapacitors with diverse carbon materials including activated carbons, template carbons, and novel carbide-derived carbons, and with diverse electrolytes including organic electrolytes such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4), tetraethylammonium methyl-sulfonate (TEAMS) in acetonitrile, aqueous H2SO4 and KOH electrolytes, and even ionic liquid electrolyte such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimmidazolium bis(trifluromethane-sulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). The EDCC/EWCC model allows the supercapacitor properties to be correlated with pore size, specific surface area, Debye length, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant, and solute ion size, and may lend a support for the systematic optimization of the

  19. A study on the characteristics of the deflagration of hydrogen-air mixture under the effect of a mesh aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Wang, Chenxu; Han, Mengxing; Xu, Zilong

    2015-12-15

    Mesh aluminum alloys (MAAs) have been widely used in military and civilian applications to suppress the explosion of flammable gases (fluids) inside containers. However, MAAs have not been tested in or applied to the hydrogen suppression-explosions. Hence, a typical MAA product, i.e., one that has been in wide use, is selected as the experimental material in the present study. The characteristics of the deflagration of hydrogen-air mixture inside an MAA-filled tube are investigated, and the effects of the filling density of the MAA and the concentration of hydrogen in air on the deflagration are examined. The suppressing effect of the MAA on the deflagration of hydrogen-air mixture is compared with its effect on the deflagration of a typical hydrocarbon fuel in air. The results show that not only is the existing MAA product unable to effectively suppress the deflagration of hydrogen-air mixture, but it also increases the maximum explosion pressure, which is opposite to the satisfactory suppressing effect of the MAA product on the deflagration of hydrocarbon fuels such as methane. The results of this study provide a scientific basis for the effective prevention of explosion accidents with hydrogen and for the development of explosion-suppression products. PMID:26124063

  20. An Urban Diffusion Simulation Model for Carbon Monoxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. B.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple Gaussian-type diffusion simulation model for calculating urban carbon (CO) concentrations as a function of local meteorology and the distribution of traffic is described. The model can be used in two ways: in the synoptic mode and in the climatological mode. (Author/BL)

  1. Analytical modeling of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have received widespread attention as promising carbon-based nanoelectronic devices. Due to their exceptional physical, chemical, and electrical properties, namely a high surface-to-volume ratio, their enhanced electron transfer properties, and their high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes can be used effectively as electrochemical sensors. The integration of carbon nanotubes with a functional group provides a good and solid support for the immobilization of enzymes. The determination of glucose levels using biosensors, particularly in the medical diagnostics and food industries, is gaining mass appeal. Glucose biosensors detect the glucose molecule by catalyzing glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. This action provides high accuracy and a quick detection rate. In this paper, a single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose detection is analytically modeled. In the proposed model, the glucose concentration is presented as a function of gate voltage. Subsequently, the proposed model is compared with existing experimental data. A good consensus between the model and the experimental data is reported. The simulated data demonstrate that the analytical model can be employed with an electrochemical glucose sensor to predict the behavior of the sensing mechanism in biosensors. PMID:24428818

  2. Export and Cycling of Continental Shelf Carbon: A Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedlecki, S.; Archer, D.; Mahadevan, A.

    2004-12-01

    Continental margins play a significant role in the production and burial of organic carbon in the ocean, but these areas are poorly resolved in global circulation models. In this study, a high-resolution three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic idealized coastal model of the eastern United States after Mahadevan and Archer, 2000, 1998, was modified to simulate organic carbon production and export off the shelf. The model assumes a periodic north and south boundary, solid offshore and bottom boundaries, and a shelf-break density front determined by bathymetry. The model uses a free surface and a sigma grid in the vertical. We are in the process of formulating a carbon and nutrient component for this model. The model is initialized with a vertical nutrient profile taken from the open Atlantic Ocean. Mesoscale wind-driven circulation and vertical diffusion bring nutrients to the euphotic zone. Primary production is based on light availability and nutrient concentration. The particles advect with the flow and sink with a specified velocity. Remineralization is first-order in carbon concentration, and produces ammonia. Ammonia is slowly reoxidized to nitrate in subsurface waters, and used for recycled production in the euphotic zone. We are searching for a model of the production, sinking, and interconversion of multiple types of particles, which predicts the observed trends in f-ratio from coastal to pelagic ecosystems. The model is sensitive to sinking velocity, remineralization rate, vertical diffusivity, the uptake rate of nitrate, the uptake rate of ammonia, and the oxidation rate of ammonia to nitrate. Using the steady state solution of the one-dimensional model to initialize the three-dimensional model, we study the effect of vertical and horizontal advection and three-dimensional oceanographic processes on the distribution and export of carbon from the coastal system. We will compare the sensitivities of a box-budget, a one-dimensional diffusional, and the full 3-D

  3. Effect of a nitrogen-carbon interaction on terrestrial carbon fluxes estimated by biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    It is important for the global warming to accurately understand the terrestrial carbon fluxes at global scale. Estimating spatial and temporal patterns in the carbon fluxes, recently, many global biosphere models were proposed and developed. However, since the model analyses have always some uncertainties. One of the major uncertainties is an effect of nitrogen cycle on the carbon cycle, as nitrogen largely controls carbon dynamics as plant and soil microbe nutrients. A goal of this study is to investigate the effect of terrestrial carbon-nitrogen interaction on NPP using new biosphere model. Firstly, a new nitrogen cycle model was constructed including twelve main nitrogen flows (nitrogen fixation, deposition, nitrifications, volatilization, nitrate leaching, plant uptake, allocation, translocation, retranslocation, soil organic and inorganic nitrogen dynamics), and fourteen pools (three biomass, four litter fall, five soil organic, and two inorganic). Secondly, the nitrogen model was integrated to the existing biosphere model, BEAMS (Biosphere model integrating Eco-physiological And Mechanistic approaches using Satellite data) [Sasai et al., 2005, 2007]. The new biosphere model was run for 20 years (1982-2001) at a global scale. The inputs datasets used were NCEP/NCAR re-analysis and fPAR/LAI based on NOAA/AVHRR produced by Boston University. The two-dimensional distributions of monthly GPP and NPP were calculated. And, the GPP estimates by the original and new BEAMS were compared with ground measurements at flux-tower sites. We compared seasonal changes in GPP between the new model and eddy covariance measurements at flux sites. As a result, the GPP estimates had good agreement with the GPP measurements (r2 = 0.91). In view of a comparison in GPP between the measurements and the original BEAMS (r2 = 0.84), the new model is better than the original BEAMS. Especially, we could observe an indisputable improvement of the new model on a seasonal change in the growing

  4. Recent carbonate sedimentation on Balearic platform: model for temperate-climate carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Fornos, J.; Rodriguez-Perea, A.; Massuti, C.; Pomar, L.; Acosta, J.; Herranz, P.; Sanz, J.L.

    1989-03-01

    Existing models for carbonate sedimentation on continental platforms are derived from the study of modern carbonate platforms in tropical climates. The Balearic platform in the western Mediterranean provides a new model for carbonate sedimentation in a temperature, semiarid climate. On most of the continental shelf around the Balearic Islands, modern sediments are exclusively bioclastic carbonates. Shoreline carbonate sediments are bioclastic sands and muds accumulating in beach-dune systems without significant tidal influence (there are no astronomical tides in the western Mediterranean ). From the upper shoreface to 35 m deep, the sandy bottom is extensively colonized by sea grass (Posidonia oceanica), the rhizomes and roots of which form a rigid entrapment that retains the sediment derived from calcareous organisms living within the sea grass and from calcareous epiphytes living on the stems and leaves. Archeological dating establishes a rate of vertical accretion in this zone of 10/sup 3/ Bubnoff units (1 Bubnoff unit = 1 mm/1000 years). Between depths of 40 and 60 m, carbonate sands are composed predominantly or red-algal fragments. Intensely bioturbated wave ripples occur in environments dominated by laminar red algae (Lithothamnium and Phymatolithon). Below depths of 60 m, coarse sediment produced by rhodolitic and ramose red algae is deposited in areas of tens to hundreds of meters in size. Biogenic buildups up to 2 m high occur in sandy areas as well as in deeper muddy areas. At the same depth in open-platform zones, the bottom topography is characterized by large hummocks several hundred meters across. From the horizontal distribution of facies, it is possible to construct the probable vertical sequence of lithofacies which would characterize carbonates accumulating on a temperate-climate carbonate shelf. Many of these lithofacies are recognized in upper Miocene limestones on the Balearic Islands.

  5. A carbon footprint simulation model for the cork oak sector.

    PubMed

    Demertzi, Martha; Paulo, Joana Amaral; Arroja, Luís; Dias, Ana Cláudia

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a simulation model for the calculation of the carbon footprint of the cork oak sector (CCFM) is developed for the first time. A life cycle approach is adopted including the forest management, manufacturing, use and end-of-life stages. CCFM allows the user to insert the cork type used as raw material and its respective quantity and the distances in-between the various stages. The user can choose among different end-of-life destination options for the used cork products. The option of inserting different inputs, allows the use of the present simulation model for different cork oak systems, in different countries and with different conditions. CCFM allows the identification of the stages and products with the greatest carbon footprint and thus, a better management of the sector from an environmental perspective. The Portuguese cork oak sector is used as an application example of the model. The results obtained showed that the agglomeration industry is the hotspot for the carbon footprint of the cork sector mainly due to the production of the resins that are mixed with the cork granules for the production of agglomerated cork products. The consideration of the biogenic carbon emissions and sequestration of carbon at the forest in the carbon footprint, resulted to a great decrease of the sector's carbon footprint. Future actions for improvement are suggested in order to decrease the carbon footprint of the entire cork sector. It was found that by decreasing by 10% the emission factor of the agglomeration and transformation industries, substituting the transport trucks by more recent ones and by decreasing by 10% the cork products reaching the landfilling end-of-life destinations (while increasing the quantities reaching incineration and recycling), a decrease of the total CF (excluding the biogenic emissions and sequestration) of the entire cork industry by 10% can be achieved. PMID:27235900

  6. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  7. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  8. Simulation of carbon gasification kinetics using an edge recession model

    SciTech Connect

    Takashi Kyotani; Leon y Leon, C.A.L.; Radovic, L.R. )

    1993-07-01

    An edge recession modeling method is proposed as a new approach to the prediction of carbon gasification kinetics. Using this method, the variations in reactive surface area (RSA) and specific reactivity (R) with conversion were simulated for several polynuclear aromatic molecules adopted as models of carbon crystallites. The effects of crystallite size and shape, edge site reactivity and vacancies on the changes in RSA and R with conversion were investigated. As a result, RSA and R were found to be essentially independent of crystallite shape, but to depend on crystallite size and the presence of vacancies. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental data for several kinds of model carbon crystallites. In the case of structurally disordered carbons (such as chars), simultaneous gasification of model crystallites of two different sizes gave better predictions than that of single-size crystallites. The edge recession model is proposed as an alternative, or at least complementary, approach to the more conventional (and, arguably, less physically meaningful) pore structure development models.

  9. Elevated temperature alters carbon cycling in a model microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, A.; Li, Z.; Thomas, B. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Pan, C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's climate is regulated by biogeochemical carbon exchanges between the land, oceans and atmosphere that are chiefly driven by microorganisms. Microbial communities are therefore indispensible to the study of carbon cycling and its impacts on the global climate system. In spite of the critical role of microbial communities in carbon cycling processes, microbial activity is currently minimally represented or altogether absent from most Earth System Models. Method development and hypothesis-driven experimentation on tractable model ecosystems of reduced complexity, as presented here, are essential for building molecularly resolved, benchmarked carbon-climate models. Here, we use chemoautotropic acid mine drainage biofilms as a model community to determine how elevated temperature, a key parameter of global climate change, regulates the flow of carbon through microbial-based ecosystems. This study represents the first community proteomics analysis using tandem mass tags (TMT), which enable accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification of proteins. We compare protein expression levels of biofilms growing over a narrow temperature range expected to occur with predicted climate changes. We show that elevated temperature leads to up-regulation of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein modification, and down-regulation of proteins involved in growth and reproduction. Closely related bacterial genotypes differ in their response to temperature: Elevated temperature represses carbon fixation by two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation is significantly up-regulated at higher temperature by a third closely related genotypic group. Leptospirillum group III bacteria are more susceptible to viral stress at elevated temperature, which may lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, this proteogenomics approach revealed the effects of climate change on carbon cycling pathways and other

  10. CRITIQUE OF CARBON BASED TREE GROWTH MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulation models of the processes that control carbohydrate balance in coniferous trees are reviewed, and their appropriateness for assessing pollution effects is considered. Currently such models are at the forefront of attempts to simulate the growth process of trees, but they...

  11. Belize model, a carbonate-clastic shelf buildup

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.

    1987-05-01

    Belize, a small Central American country located on the Caribbean Sea south of the Yucatan Peninsula, offers an excellent modern analog of a mixed carbonate/clastic shelf buildup. Its 175-mi long reef tract, second longest in the world, restricts a shallow shelf depobasin into which terrigenous clastics source from the Maya Mountains to the west and carbonates dominate from the east. Mixed lithologies occur along strandlines, in submarine channels, and in lagoons and river-delta fronts, which are scattered throughout the depobasin. Energy sources from both land and sea influence sedimentation. Heavy summer rains flood the basin with arkosic and quartzose clastics, and periodic sea storms and hurricanes drive carbonate particles from the reef tract landward into the basin. Modern environments include the reef tract, carbonate tidal flats, shallow shelf patch reefs, lagoons, cayes, mainland coast deltas, estuaries, lagoons, and beach/bar barriers. Modern sediments include reef metazoans, algae, coralline algae, lime mud, quartz, and feldspathic sand and clay. The setting for the model has been influenced by Tertiary tectonics and Pleistocene sea level changes. Karstification occurred during the past 10,000 years, partly controlling topography and resulting Holocene sediment patterns. Facies patterns of the Belize Holocene are compared to the Jurassic of Montana. The Middle Jurassic Piper Formation exhibits a nearly 100-mi long carbonate barrier/buildup restricting a clastic-dominated shelf. Other ancient mixed carbonate/clastic terranes may fit this model as well.

  12. Evaluating soil carbon in global climate models: benchmarking, future projections, and model drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd-Brown, K. E.; Randerson, J. T.; Post, W. M.; Allison, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    The carbon cycle plays a critical role in how the climate responds to anthropogenic carbon dioxide. To evaluate how well Earth system models (ESMs) from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) represent the carbon cycle, we examined predictions of current soil carbon stocks from the historical simulation. We compared the soil and litter carbon pools from 17 ESMs with data on soil carbon stocks from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). We also examined soil carbon predictions for 2100 from 16 ESMs from the rcp85 (highest radiative forcing) simulation to investigate the effects of climate change on soil carbon stocks. In both analyses, we used a reduced complexity model to separate the effects of variation in model drivers from the effects of model parameters on soil carbon predictions. Drivers included NPP, soil temperature, and soil moisture, and the reduced complexity model represented one pool of soil carbon as a function of these drivers. The ESMs predicted global soil carbon totals of 500 to 2980 Pg-C, compared to 1260 Pg-C in the HWSD. This 5-fold variation in predicted soil stocks was a consequence of a 3.4-fold variation in NPP inputs and 3.8-fold variability in mean global turnover times. None of the ESMs correlated well with the global distribution of soil carbon in the HWSD (Pearson's correlation <0.40, RMSE 9-22 kg m-2). On a biome level there was a broad range of agreement between the ESMs and the HWSD. Some models predicted HWSD biome totals well (R2=0.91) while others did not (R2=0.23). All of the ESM terrestrial decomposition models are structurally similar with outputs that were well described by a reduced complexity model that included NPP and soil temperature (R2 of 0.73-0.93). However, MPI-ESM-LR outputs showed only a moderate fit to this model (R2=0.51), and CanESM2 outputs were better described by a reduced model that included soil moisture (R2=0.74), We also found a broad range in soil carbon responses to climate change

  13. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  14. Frequency of deflagration in the in-tank precipitation process tanks due to loss of nitrogen purge system. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.M.; Mason, C.L.; Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Gupta, M.K.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    High-level liquid wastes (HLLW) from the processing of nuclear material at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are stored in large tanks in the F- and H-Area tank farms. The In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process is one step in the processing and disposal of HLLW. The process hazards review for the ITP identified the need to implement provisions that minimize deflagration/explosion hazards associated with the process. The objective of this analysis is to determine the frequency of a deflagration in Tank 48 and/or 49 due to nitrogen purge system failures (including external events) and coincident ignition source. A fault tree of the nitrogen purge system coupled with ignition source probability is used to identify dominant system failures that contribute to the frequency of deflagration. These system failures are then used in the recovery analysis. Several human actions, recovery actions, and repair activities are identified that reduce total frequency. The actions are analyzed and quantified as part of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). The probabilities of failure of these actions are applied to the fault tree cutsets and the event trees.

  15. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., <10%) in shells from aquatic organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions

  16. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  17. A model of compaction creep in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2015-04-01

    Rocks in compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformations. We created a simple conceptual micomechanical model of creep in rocks combining microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This was then scaled up to macroscopic scale by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and have a few input parameters: effective stress, porosity, pore size distribution, temperature and water saturation. Internal parameters are Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite and dissolution rates of calcite, all of which are measurable independently. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to verify the model which was able to predict the magnitude of the resulting strain in largely different effective stress, temperature and water saturation conditions. The model was also able to predict the compaction of a producing chalk reservoir with a good agreement. Further generalization of the model might function as a general theory of long-term creep of rocks in compressional settings.

  18. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  19. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  20. Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Bolstad

    2006-11-01

    We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

  1. Modelling uncertainty of carbon stocks changes in peats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro; Aalders, Inge; Morrice, Jane; Hough, Rupert

    2015-04-01

    Global warming might change the hydrology of upland blanket peats in Scotland with increased risk of release of the stored carbon. It is therefore important to model the loss of carbon in peat areas with estimation of the damage potential. The presented approach has the potential to provide important information for the assessment of carbon stocks over large areas, but also in case of changes of land use, such as construction of wind farms. The provided spatial uncertainty is important for including the results in further environmental and climate-change models and for decision making in order to provide alternatives and prioritisation. In this study, main peat properties (i.e. depth, water content, bulk density and carbon content) were modelled using a hybrid GAM-geostatistical 3D approach that allows full uncertainty propagation. The approach used involves 1) modelling the trend with full 3D spatial correlation, i.e., exploiting the values of the neighbouring pixels in 3D-space, and 2) 3D kriging as spatial component. The uncertainty of the approach is assessed with iterations in both steps of the process. We studied the difference between local estimates obtained with the present method and local estimates obtained assuming the global average value across the test area for Carbon content and bulk density. To this end, virtual pits with a surface area of 30x30 m were excavated for the whole peat depth at randomly selected locations. Calculated uncertainty was used to estimate credible intervals of C loss. In this case the estimates obtained with the proposed approach are higher that what would be obtained by assuming spatial homogeneity and using just average values across the area. This has implications for environmental decision making and planning as, in this case, it is likely that more carbon would be lost than estimated using traditional approaches.

  2. Carbon accumulation of tropical peatlands over millennia: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Kurnianto, Sofyan; Warren, Matthew; Talbot, Julie; Kauffman, Boone; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Frolking, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Tropical peatlands cover an estimated 440,000 km2 (~10% of global peatland area) and are significant in the global carbon cycle by storing about 40-90 Gt C in peat. Over the past several decades, tropical peatlands have experienced high rates of deforestation and conversion, which is often associated with lowering the water table and peat burning, releasing large amounts of carbon stored in peat to the atmosphere. We present the first model of long-term carbon accumulation in tropical peatlands by modifying the Holocene Peat Model (HPM), which has been successfully applied to northern temperate peatlands. Tropical HPM (HPMTrop) is a one-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic model with a monthly time step that simulates peat mass remaining in annual peat cohorts over millennia as a balance between monthly vegetation inputs (litter) and monthly decomposition. Key model parameters were based on published data on vegetation characteristics, including net primary production partitioned into leaves, wood, and roots; and initial litter decomposition rates. HPMTrop outputs are generally consistent with field observations from Indonesia. Simulated long-term carbon accumulation rates for 11,000-year-old inland, and 5000-year-old coastal peatlands were about 0.3 and 0.59 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1), and the resulting peat carbon stocks at the end of the 11,000-year and 5000-year simulations were 3300 and 2900 Mg C ha(-1), respectively. The simulated carbon loss caused by coastal peat swamp forest conversion into oil palm plantation with periodic burning was 1400 Mg C ha(-1) over 100 years, which is equivalent to ~2900 years of C accumulation in a hectare of coastal peatlands. PMID:25044171

  3. Modeling of elemental carbon over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyro, S.; Simpson, D.; Tarrasón, L.; Klimont, Z.; Kupiainen, K.; Pio, C.; Yttri, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    The regional EMEP model has been applied to calculate EC concentrations over Europe for the years 2002-2004 using a new EC emission inventory. The results are compared with measurements from the CARBOSOL and EMEP EC/OC campaigns. The model underestimates EC concentrations by 19% on average, and the spatial correlation is 0.80. For individual sites, the model bias varies from -79 to 77% and the average temporal correlation is 0.53, varying from 0.25 to 0.79. The model flattens the north-south EC gradient as it tends to overestimate EC for Nordic sites and underestimate EC for more southern sites. We have also studied the contributions of various processes to the model EC results. Using EC as a tracer of primary PM emissions from combustion sources we have made a preliminary evaluation of the anthropogenic EC (PM) emission. There are indications of a possible underestimation of EC emissions from traffic in some areas and both underestimation and overestimation of EC emissions from residential combustion for some European countries. The largest uncertainties probably lie in EC emissions from residential wood/fossil combustion and are associated with both emission factors and spatial and temporal variation. The need to develop accurate and time resolved wildfire emissions is emphasized. The effect of EC aging is shown be rather limited for most of Europe (1 to 4%). Changes in EC wet scavenging ratio have a noticeable effect on calculated EC (between 5 and 25% for most Europe and 30-40% in remote areas), but EC scavenging ratios are still poorly known.

  4. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  5. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  6. Calibration and testing or models of the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, W.R.; Killough, G.G.; Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A ten-compartment model of the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon is presented. The two less-abundant isotopes of carbon, /sup 13/C and /sup 14/C, as well as total carbon, are considered. The cycling of carbon in the ocean is represented by two well-mixed compartments and in the world's terrestrial ecosystems by seven compartments, five which are dynamic and two with instantaneous transfer. An internally consistent procedure for calibrating this model against an assumed initial steady state is discussed. In particular, the constraint that the average /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio in the total flux from the terrestrial component of the model to the atmosphere be equal to that of the steady-state atmosphere is investigated. With this additional constraint, the model provides a more accurate representation of the influence of the terrestrial system on the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio of the atmosphere and provides an improved basis for interpreting records, such as tree rings, reflecting historical changes in this ratio.

  7. Modeling of induced seismicity during mineral carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, V.; Bercovici, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Rapidly developing carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are a promising way of reducing the climate impact of greenhouse gases. These technologies involve injecting large amounts of CO2-bearing fluids underground, which potentially leads to high pore pressure and the conditions for seismic activity in the proximity of the injection site. Previously, we developed a simple conceptual model to estimate the seismic risk of mineral or mafic CCS operations (Yarushina & Bercovici, GRL vol.40, doi:10.1002/grl.50196, 2013). In this model, the storage reservoir is treated as a porous rock with grains that evolve during carbonation reactions. Seismic triggering occurs when local stresses at grain-grain contacts reach the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. We showed that injection of CO2 into reactive mafic or ultramafic rocks potentially reduces seismic risk since carbonation reactions increase the contact area between the rock grains and reduce the local stresses. Here we further develop this model and consider the effect of fluid injection flux and pressure gradients along grain boundaries on induced seismicity. Grain evolution not only changes the stress support but also alters the matrix permeability, which in turn affects the driving pressure gradients and the associated deviatoric stresses. The resulting coupled porous flow, chemical reactive grain-growth and failure model is an important step in understanding the seismic risks of carbon sequestration.

  8. An extremely carbon enhanced 'nova' model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starrfield, S. G.; Sparks, W. M.; Truran, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Expanding upon the authors' earlier work, Hoyle and Clayton (1974) have suggested that a thermonuclear runaway in a white dwarf envelope that consists of equal numbers of protons and C-12 nuclei will produce the s or r-process elements. The present work studies such a runaway and finds that these initial conditions cause a 'super' nova outburst that does not result in any s or r-process nucleosynthesis. However, the model is very interesting in that it reaches peak temperatures of 1.6 billion K and peak burning rates exceeding 2 times 10 to the 23rd erg/gm/sec. A shock forms and ejects 10 to the 29th grams moving with speeds up to 60,000 km/sec. The peak bolometric magnitude is -21.2 and this model will also produce a gamma-ray burst.

  9. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  10. Information for seasonal models of carbon fluxes in terrestrial biomes

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This report is a compilation of information that can be used in developing seasonal carbon flux models for several principal terrestrial biome types. The information includes flux data as well as models made either to simulate such data or to deduce fluxes not directly measurable. The report is divided into three sections that examine (1) photosynthetic production, (2) litterfall, and (3) decomposition during a year. The sections on photosynthetic production and decomposition discuss a large number of models that relate the processes to basic abiotic variables in each of several biome types. The information on litterfall, however, is largely empirical phenology data. A fourth section demonstrates the application of this compiled information to a compartment model of seasonal carbon flux in terrestrial biomes. 14 figs., 12 tabs.