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1

The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on the growth and yield of wheat in the Australian Grains Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (AGFACE) experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current predictions indicate that Australia is likely to be particularly challenged by the impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and the consequent perturbations in climate. The Australian Grains Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (AGFACE) project in Horsham, Victoria was designed to simulate predicted atmospheric carbon dioxide levels in the year 2050. The experiment measures the interacting effects of carbon dioxide

Rob Norton; Glenn Fitzgerald; Chris Korte

2

Air pollution: sensitive detection of ten pollutant gases by carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide lasers.  

PubMed

Detection sensitivities of a few parts per billion for ten gaseous pollutants have been evaluated by measuring the strength of the absorption of infrared radiation from carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide lasers. Ethylene concentrations as small as 5 parts per billion have been detected in air. The measured absorption strengths indicate that in mixtures of pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, the sensitivity is reduced by overlapping absorption bands. However, calculations indicate that it should be possible to detect nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 0.01 part per million in the presence of water vapor concentrations of 105 parts per million. PMID:5035485

Kreuzer, L B; Kenyon, N D; Patel, C K

1972-07-28

3

Carbon dioxide concentrator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Passed exhaled air through electrochemical cell containing alkali metal carbonate aqueous solution, and utilizes platinized electrodes causing reaction of oxygen at cathode with water in electrolyte, producing hydroxyl ions which react with carbon dioxide to form carbonate ions.

Williams, C. F.; Huebscher, R. G.

1972-01-01

4

Recommended Carbon Dioxide and Relative Humidity Levels for Maintaining Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At the request of the AFLC Surgeon, AFOEHL prepared a recommendation for carbon dioxide and relative humidity levels to maintain adequate indoor air quality. The report summarizes and analyzes the results of approximately 75 building investigations and ma...

B. J. Poitrast D. Carpenter

1990-01-01

5

Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium in Graphical Form.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The thermodynamic and transport properties necessary for heat transfer and gas flow experiments using air, carbon dioxide and helium are given in graphical form. These include density, enthalpy, specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and Prandtl ...

M. A. M. Pirie

1978-01-01

6

Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in soils evaluated by 222 Rn flux and soil air concentration profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from diverse soils in the surroundings of Mlaga (Spain) were made. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes were carried out by an indirect method from simultaneous measurements of 222Rn flux from the soil surface in parallel with concentration profile measurements of 222Rn, methane and carbon dioxide in the air of soil. Correlations found between

C. Dueas; M. C. Fernndez; J. Carretero; E. Liger

1999-01-01

7

Temperature VS Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students examine the relationship between carbon dioxide levels and global temperature change by studying a graph of these two variables. They will discover that by using data from ice cores, scientists can determine temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the air as far back as a hundred thousand years in the past. The students try to predict which variable is the independent one and then make a graph of temperature change and carbon dioxide levels. After making their graph, students describe the relationship between temperature and carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere to determine if their predictions were correct.

8

Infrared Carbon Dioxide Sensor and its Applications in Automotive Air-Conditioning Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the first carbon dioxide sensor designed for automotive applications. The sensor is based on the spectroscopic measurement principle. It includes a new robust micromachined infrared gas-detector and a corresponding, newly developed ASIC. First application studies show its suitability for automatic vehicle airmanagement systems and for leak detection in R744 air conditioning systems.

M. Arndt; M. Sauer

9

Carbon dioxide capture from atmospheric air using sodium hydroxide spray.  

PubMed

In contrast to conventional carbon capture systems for power plants and other large point sources, the system described in this paper captures CO2 directly from ambient air. This has the advantages that emissions from diffuse sources and past emissions may be captured. The objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of a NaOH spray-based contactor for use in an air capture system by estimating the cost and energy requirements per unit CO2 captured. A prototype system is constructed and tested to measure CO2 absorption, energy use, and evaporative water loss and compared with theoretical predictions. A numerical model of drop collision and coalescence is used to estimate operating parameters for a full-scale system, and the cost of operating the system per unit CO2 captured is estimated. The analysis indicates that CO2 capture from air for climate change mitigation is technically feasible using off-the-shelf technology. Drop coalescence significantly decreases the CO2 absorption efficiency; however, fan and pump energy requirements are manageable. Water loss is significant (20 mol H2O/mol CO2 at 15 degrees C and 65% RH) but can be lowered by appropriately designing and operating the system. The cost of CO2 capture using NaOH spray (excluding solution recovery and CO2 sequestration, which may be comparable) in the full-scale system is 96 $/ton-CO2 in the base case, and ranges from 53 to 127 $/ton-CO2 under alternate operating parameters and assumptions regarding capital costs and mass transfer rate. The low end of the cost range is reached by a spray with 50 microm mean drop diameter, which is achievable with commercially available spray nozzles. PMID:18497115

Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Keith, David W; Lowry, Gregory V

2008-04-15

10

Carbon dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Bubbles are an indicator of a chemical reaction. An indicator is an object, material, or organism that tells you if a specific substance is present. In the sugar test, carbon dioxide gas release is an indicator that yeast is using sugar to grow. The more gas produced, the more sugar a specific substance contains.

Arie Melamed-Katz (None;)

2007-06-19

11

Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensitivity of ventilation in amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, breathing air and water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, were acclimated to breathing either air or water and exposed to altered levels of oxygen and\\/or carbon dioxide in the medium. Hypercapnia (22, 36 and 73 torr CO2) stimulated a significant hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in both groups of crabs, with a much greater effect on scaphognathite frequency (?fSC=+700%) in air-breathing crabs than water-breathing crabs (?fSC=+100%).

Andrew T Gannon; Raymond P Henry

2004-01-01

12

Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensitivity of ventilation in amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, breathing air and water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, were acclimated to breathing either air or water and exposed to altered levels of oxygen and\\/or carbon dioxide in the medium. Hypercapnia (22, 36 and 73 torr CO2) stimulated a significant hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in both groups of crabs, with a much greater effect on scaphognathite frequency (DfSC=+700%) in air-breathing crabs than water-breathing crabs

Andrew T. Gannon; Raymond P. Henry

2004-01-01

13

Estuary Turbulence and Air-Water Carbon Dioxide Exchange  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mixing of constituents between estuarine bottom and surface waters or between estuarine surface waters and the atmosphere are two topics of growing interest, in part due to the potentially important role of estuaries in global carbon budgets. These two types of mixing are typically driven by turbulence, and a research project was developed to improve the scientific understanding of atmospheric and tidal controls on estuary turbulence and airwater exchange processes. Highlights of method development and field research on the Hudson River estuary include several deployments of bottom mounted current profilers to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget, and construction and deployment of an instrumented catamaran that makes autonomous measurements of air-water CO2 exchange (FCO2), water TKE dissipation at 50 cm depth (epsilon50), and other physical properties just above and below the air-water interface. On the Hudson, wind correlates strongly with epsilon50, but surface water speed and airwater heat flux also have moderate correlations with epsilon50. In partially mixed estuaries such as the Hudson, as well as salt wedge estuaries, baroclinic pressure forcing typically causes spring ebb tides to have much stronger upper water column shear than flood tides. The Hudson data are used to show that this shear leads to local shear instability and stronger near-surface turbulence on spring ebbs. Also, buoyancy budget terms are compared to demonstrate how water-to-air heat fluxes can influence stratification and indirectly influence epsilon50. Looking more closely at the role of wind forcing, it is demonstrated that inland propagation of the sea breeze on warm sunny days leads to arrival in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the air-water CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives epsilon50 comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water column. Modeling and observational studies often use remotely-measured winds to compute airwater fluxes (e.g. momentum, CO2), and this is shown to cause large flux errors during these periods, in terms of magnitude and diurnal phase.

Orton, Philip Mark

14

Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture  

PubMed Central

Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84? for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

2014-01-01

15

Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.  

PubMed

Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84? for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. PMID:24964404

Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

2014-01-01

16

Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

2010-01-01

17

Design and Development of an air-cooled Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no wearing parts. This paper discusses the design features of a TSAC hardware that uses air as the cooling medium and has Space Station application.

Mulloth, Lila M.

2003-01-01

18

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OXYGEN-NITROGEN RATIOS AS FACTORS AFFECTING SALMON SURVIVAL IN AIR-SUPERSATURATED WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were exposed to lethal levels of air-supersaturated water (120 percent, 125 percent, 130 percent total gas saturation) containing different oxygen-nitrogen ratios and different carbon dioxide concentrations. Fish mortality was not sign...

19

Response of soybean to air temperature and carbon dioxide concentration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Documented increases in global atmospheric CO concentration have stimulated interest in the direct effects of CO on plant growth and yield as well as the interactive effects of CO with other major climatic variables. This study was conducted to determine the effects and interactions of CO concentration and air temperature on the development, growth, total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC), and final

J. T. Baker; L. H. Jr. Allen; K. J. Boote; P. Jones; J. W. Jones

2009-01-01

20

Equation of state of shock-compressed liquids: Carbon dioxide and air  

SciTech Connect

Equation-of-state data were measured for liquid carbon dioxide and air shock-compressed to pressures in the range 28--71 GPa (280--710 kbar) using a two-stage light-gas gun. The experimental methods are described. The data indicate that shock-compressed liquid CO{sub 2} decomposes at pressures above 34 GPa. Liquid air dissociates above a comparable shock pressure, as does liquid nitrogen. Theoretical intermolecular potentials are derived for CO{sub 2} from the data. The calculated shock temperature for the onset of CO{sub 2} decomposition is 4500 K at a volume of 17 cm{sup 3}/mol.

Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Ree, F.H.; Ross, M.; Holmes, N.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Erskine, D.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California (USA))

1991-10-01

21

Brookhaven National Laboratory free-air carbon dioxide enrichment forest prototype -- Interim report  

SciTech Connect

A variety of approaches have been used in fumigation experiments to quantify the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]{sub atm}) on plants. Mot of these approaches, reviewed elsewhere (Allen 1992), entail some type of enclosure or chamber. Chambers provide containment of the CO{sub 2}-enriched air and in this way reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} required for the experiment. At the same time, chambers alter microclimate conditions in a variety of ways so that there is a significant chamber effect on the plants within. Free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) is an alternative experimental strategy in which CO{sub 2}-enriched air is released into the ambient environment in such a way as to provide effective experimental control over [CO{sub 2}]{sub atm} without causing any change in other environmental variables. Early types of free-air exposure systems were built in the Netherlands and England for exposing vegetation to elevated concentrations of atmospheric trace gases. The FACE Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered these original ideas in designing the BNL FACE systems. The purpose of the current BNL project in the Duke Forest is to develop a FACE system that can provide adequate control over [CO{sub 2}]{sub atm} in a tall forest setting. This report is a preliminary overview of the data and much remains to be done in the analysis.

Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Nagy, J.

1994-08-01

22

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Disposal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unless carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion is captured and disposed of safely and permanently, the concerns over climate change will eventually lead to the demise of fossil fuels. Because of their importance in today's energy market the phasing out of fossil fuels would likely precipitate a major energy crisis. Mineral sequestration and extraction of carbon dioxide from the air are two advanced technologies for carbon sequestration that aim at maintaining access to the vast fossil energy resources for centuries to come. While it is straightforward to dispose of carbon dioxide in limited amounts and for a limited time, permanent disposal of trillions of tons of carbon poses serious challenges. The formation of solid mineral carbonates from readily available minerals would provide safe and permanent storage. Capture of carbon dioxide from air makes it possible to sequester carbon dioxide emissions from sources other than power plants. This is important considering that even the relatively minor reductions suggested by the Kyoto Accord would have required the US to eliminate carbon dioxide emissions comparable to those of the entire 1990 coal fired power plant fleet. Capture of carbon dioxide from the air, would make it possible to close the carbon cycle in the transportation sector without phasing out liquid hydrocarbon fuels. It eliminates the need for long distance transport of carbon dioxide and allows the continued use of the existing energy infrastructure. Mineral sequestration at remote sites combined with on site carbon dioxide capture from air, would allow for long term stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. I will outline the current state of the technology and point to advances required before these approaches are ready for large-scale implementation.

Lackner, K. S.

2002-05-01

23

Spatial and seasonal variability of the air-sea equilibration timescale of carbon dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exchange of carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere tends to bring near-surface waters toward equilibrium by reducing the partial pressure gradient across the air-water interface. However, the equilibration process is not instantaneous; in general there is a lag between forcing and response. The timescale of air-sea equilibration depends on several factors involving the depth of the mixed layer, temperature, salinity, wind speed, and carbonate chemistry. In this work, we use a suite of observational datasets to generate climatological and seasonal composite maps of the air-sea equilibration timescale. The relaxation timescale exhibits considerable spatial and seasonal variations, which are largely set by changes in mixed layer depth and wind speed. The net effect is dominated by the mixed layer depth; the gas exchange velocity and carbonate chemistry parameters only provide partial compensation. Broadly speaking, the adjustment timescale tends to increase with latitude. We compare the observationally-derived air-sea gas exchange timescale with a model-derived surface residence time and a data-derived horizontal transport timescale, which allows us to define two non-dimensional metrics of gas exchange efficiency. These parameters highlight the Southern Ocean, equatorial Pacific, and North Atlantic as regions of inefficient air-sea equilibration where carbon anomalies are likely to form and persist. The efficiency parameters presented here can serve as simple tools for understanding regional air-sea disequilibrium in both observations and models. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License together with an author copyright. This license does not conflict with the regulations of the Crown Copyright.

Jones, Daniel; Ito, Takamitsu; Takano, Yohei; Hsu, Wei-Ching

2014-05-01

24

Air-sea disequilibrium of carbon dioxide enhances the biological carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sinking and subduction of organic material removes carbon from the surface ocean and stores it in inorganic form after remineralization. The wind-driven upwelling of deep waters, notably in the Southern Ocean, counteracts the biological carbon sequestration by returning excess carbon from the abyss, potentially releasing it back to the atmosphere. Numerical models have shown that significant fraction of the excess carbon in the Antarctic Surface Water is not degassed to the atmosphere but reenters into the deep ocean due to the incomplete air-sea equilibration, effectively increasing the efficiency of biological carbon storage in the deep ocean. We develop a simple theory to consider the controls on this effect. The theory predicts a strong coupling between biological carbon sequestration and air-sea disequilibrium expressed as a linear relationship between the biological carbon pump and the degree of supersaturation in the deep ocean. Sensitivity experiments with a three-dimensional ocean biogeochemistry model support this prediction and demonstrate that the disequilibrium pump almost doubles the efficiency of biological carbon sequestration, relative to the effect of nutrient utilization.

Ito, Takamitsu; Follows, Michael J.

2013-12-01

25

Lubricity effect of carbon dioxide used as an environmentally friendly refrigerant in air-conditioning and refrigeration compressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental concerns have increased the interest in alternative natural refrigerants for air-conditioning and refrigeration compressors. Carbon dioxide (CO2) or R744 is an attractive candidate to replace harmful hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants, which will need to be replaced in the near future due to their high global warming potential. In this paper the tribological behavior of gray cast iron in the presence of

Emerson Escobar Nunez; Kyriaki Polychronopoulou; Andreas A. Polycarpou

2010-01-01

26

Importance of active sites for char gasification in oxygen (air) and carbon dioxide. Annual report, October 1983September 1984  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonisothermal gasification reactivities in air (5 K\\/min) and the isothermal reactivities in carbon dioxide (973 and 1073 K) of a Montana lignite and chars, prepared by slow and rapid pyrolysis of the raw and suitably pretreated lignite, were measured by thermogravimetric analysis. The coal pretreatment involved demineralization, ion exchange with ammonium acetate, and subsequent ion exchange with calcium acetate. Reactivity

R. G. Jenkins; A. Piotrowski

1984-01-01

27

Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.  

PubMed

Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward. PMID:21112151

Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

2011-02-15

28

Free-air carbon dioxide enrichment: A new approach to research on carbon exchange processes  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial-atmospheric carbon balances are currently poorly understood and are vital for predicting future trends in the global carbon budget. Uncertainties in C exchange rates can best be reduced by realistic experiments to determine flux rates in managed and natural ecosystems. Such experiments must minimize any artificiality imposed by the apparatus and should be capable of economical and reliable operation over entire growing seasons or longer. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a system for exposing field-grown plants to controlled elevated concentrations of atmospheric gases, including CO{sub 2}, without use of confining chambers that alter important atmospheric exchange processes. This system, called FACE for Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment, has been proven in over 15000 hours of testing at three locations. FACE uses a 15--27 m. diameter array of vertical ventpipes and offers significant improvements over previous attempts at chamber-free fumigation. BNL's FACE arrays have demonstrated these capabilities in experiment on field-grown cotton. This paper reviews the design concepts of FACE and presents operational results from several recent field campaigns involving seasonal fumigation of field-grown cotton with CO{sub 2} at concentrations ranging from 500--700 ppm. The use of chamber-free experiments in conjunction with mathematical models of plant growth is discussed as a paradigm for assessing climate change effects on vegetation. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hendrey, G.R.; Lipfert, F.W.; Lewin, K.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-04-01

29

The carbon dioxide cycle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

James, P. B.; Hansen, G. B.; Titus, T. N.

2005-01-01

30

Soil air carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide concentrations in profiles under tallgrass prairie and cultivation  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the dynamics of gaseous production in soils is of interest because they are important sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. Changes in soil air carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentrations were studied in a Reading silt loam under prairie and cultivation. Concentrations were measured in situ over a 17-mo period to a depth of 3 m. Multilevel samples permitted collection of gases with subsequent measurement by gas chromatography in the laboratory. Soil air N{sub 2}O concentrations were near atmospheric levels for a majority of the study period in the prairie site but were significantly higher in the cultivated site. Annual mean N{sub 2}O concentrations were 0.403 and 1.09 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Soil air CO{sub 2} annual mean concentrations were 1.56 {times} 10{sup 4} and 1.10 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and ranged from 0.096 {times} 10{sup 4} to 6.45 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and 0.087 {times} 10{sup 4} to 3.59 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Concentrations generally increased with depth, with maximum soil air N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations at 1.0 m in the prairie site and 0.5 m in the cultivated site. Nitrous oxide in the cultivated site and CO{sub 2} at both sites did not change markedly over winter months, but CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O concentrations reached maximums during the summer months and decreased as the year progressed. Although soil air concentrations peaked and decreased faster at shallower depths, deeper depths exhibited relative maximum concentrations for longer time periods.

Sotomayor, D. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez (Puerto Rico). Agronomy and Soils Dept.; Rice, C.W. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

1999-05-01

31

A ballistic investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a blunt vehicle at hypersonic speeds in carbon dioxide and air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Missions to Mars require the successful development of aerobraking technology, and therefore a blunt cone representative of aerobrake shapes is investigated. Ballistic tests of the Pioneer Venus configuration are conducted in carbon dioxide and air at Mach numbers from 7 to 20 and Reynolds numbers from 0.1 x 10 exp 5 to 4 x 10 exp 6. Experimental results show that for defined conditions aerodynamic research can be conducted in air rather than carbon dioxide, providing savings in time and money. In addition, the results offer a prediction of flight aerodynamics during entry into the Martian atmosphere. Also discussed is a comparison of results from two data-reduction techniques showing that a five-degree-of-freedom routine employing weighted least-squares with differential corrections analyzes ballistic data more accurately.

Packard, James D.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yates, Leslie A.; Strawa, Anthony W.

1992-01-01

32

Hydrogen oxidation mechanism with applications to (1) the chaperon efficiency of carbon dioxide and (2) vitiated air testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ignition delay times for the hydrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide/argon system were obtained behind reflected shock waves. A detailed kinetic mechanism modeled the experimental hydrogen/oxygen data, Skinner and Ringrose's high-pressure data, and Slack and Grillo's hydrogen/air data. A carbon dioxide chaperon efficiency of 7.0 +/- 0.2 was determined. The reaction pathway H2O yields H2O2 yields OH yields H was required to model the high-pressure data. It is suggested that some of the lowest temperature data points (1.0 and 0.5 atm) for Slack and Grillo's hydrogen/air experiments are in error. It was found that the technique of simplifying a detailed kinetic mechanism for a limited range of experimental data may render the model useless for other test conditions.

Brabbs, Theodore A.; Lezberg, Erwin A.; Bittker, David A.; Robertson, Thomas F.

1987-01-01

33

Evaluation of Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Devices in Energy Cascade Systems under the Restriction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is necessary to introduce energy cascade systems into the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the refrigerating and air conditioning devices in cases of introducing both energy cascade systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. The authors have developed an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions results in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature one is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustor waste heat can reduce electric power for the turbo refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator.

Shimazaki, Yoichi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

34

Capturing Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners investigate carbon sequestration by creating a carbonated beverage out of apple juice and dry ice. This experiment illustrates how carbon dioxide can be stored in a substance. Learners compare and contrast the results to determine if liquid carbonation is an effective method for carbon sequestration. Safety note: this activity involves dry ice; please follow recommended guidelines.

Saltz, Austen

2010-01-01

35

Role of activated carbon pellets in carbon dioxide removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The removal of carbon dioxide from gas\\/air streams is more often becoming necessary in many industries for different purposes. In cryogenic air separation plant, air has to be free from carbon dioxide before its liquefaction otherwise blockage due to freezing of heat exchange equipment would result. Enrichment of methane in biogas to have fuel of higher calorific value can be

S. C Sarkar; A Bose

1997-01-01

36

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides this new data on carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring in 1995. Data for one degree grid cells can be downloaded from the site in addition to code for analysis of the data.

37

Carbon Dioxide Fountain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)

Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

2007-01-01

38

Carbon Dioxide and Climate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

Brewer, Peter G.

1978-01-01

39

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration

T. Itoh; H. Kubo; H. Honda; T. Tominaga; Y. Makide; A. Yakohata; H. Sakai

1985-01-01

40

Sampling Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lab activity, student teams hypothesize which source has a greater becomes CO² concentration: their breath, auto exhaust, or air in the classroom. They test gas samples from each of these sources, plot data, and hypothesize about the respective role engine exhaust and animal respiration play in contemporary climate change. The lab procedures require Bromthymol Blue indicator solution (BTB), household ammonia, vinegar, and balloons. Links to videos supporting the investigations are provided. This activity is supported by a textbook chapter, "How is Carbon Dioxide Measured?," part of the unit, Climate Change, in Global Systems Science (GSS), an interdisciplinary course for high school students that emphasizes how scientists from a wide variety of fields work together to understand significant problems of global impact.

41

Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

2005-01-01

42

Eects of breathing air containing 3% carbon dioxide, 35% oxygen or a mixture of 3% carbon dioxide\\/35% oxygen on cerebral and peripheral oxygenation at 150 m and 3459 m  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eects of gas mixtures comprising supplementary 3% carbon dioxide, 35% oxygen or a combination of 3% CO2 plus 35% O2 in ambient air have been compared on arterial blood gases, peripheral and cerebral oxygenation and middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV) at 150 m and on acute exposure to 3459 m in 12 healthy subjects. Breathing 3% CO2 or 35%

C. H. E. IMRAY; S. WALSH; T. CLARKE; C. TIIVAS; H. HOAR; T. C. HARVEY; C. W. M. CHAN; P. J. G. FORSTER; A. R. BRADWELL; A. D. WRIGHT; Coventry CV

43

Carbon Dioxide Monitoring.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The collection of luminescent microorganisms are maintained under cultivation to provide suitable biosensors for the testing program for carbon dioxide. The basic bioluminescent agar medium is currently being used for growth of the cultures. Tests of lumi...

P. S. Biernacki J. J. Kalvinskas

1973-01-01

44

Carbon dioxide (reduction).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The twin problems of global warming, caused by an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, and limited fossil fuel resources have stimulated research in the utilization of CO2. These problems would be partially alleviated by the develo...

A. Fujita

2000-01-01

45

Distributions and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Western Arctic Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) by the Arctic Ocean is most likely increasing because of the rapid sea-ice retreat that lifted the barriers preventing gas exchange and light penetration for biological growth. Measurements of atmospheric and surface sea water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) were conducted during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) cruises from July to September in 2003 and 2008. The latitudinal distribution of pCO2 along the 169W transect showed a below-atmopsheric pCO2 level in most of the Western Arctic Ocean, with distinct regional differences from Bering Strait northward to the Central Acrctic Ocean. The average air-sea CO2 fluxes on the shelf and slope of the Chukchi Sea were -17.0 and -8.1 mmol m-2 d-1 respectively. In the ice-free zone, the partially ice-covered zone, and the heavily ice-covered zone of the Canada Basin, the fluxes were -4.2, -8.6, -2.5 mmol m-2 d-1 respectively. These rates are lower than other recent estimates. Our new results not only confirmed previous observations that most areas of the Western Arctic Ocean were a CO2 sink in general, but they also revealed that the previously unsampled central basins were a moderate CO2 sink. Analysis of controlling factors in different areas shows that pCO2 in Bering Strait was influenced not only by the Bering inflow waters but also by the high biological production. However, pCO2 fluctuated sharply because of strong water mixing both laterally and vertically. In the marginal ice zone (Chukchi Sea), pCO2 was controlled by ice melt and biological production, both of which would decrease pCO2 onshore of the ice edge. In the nearly ice-free southern Canada Basin, pCO2 increasd latitudinally as a result of atmospheric CO2 uptake due to intensive gas exchange, increased temperature, and decresed biological CO2 uptake due to limited nutrient supply. Finally, pCO2 was moderately lower than the atmospheric value and was relatively stable under the ice sheet of the central Arctic Ocean in very high latitudes. Thus it appears that the Arctic Ocean has a strong potential capacity of absorbing atmospheric CO2 in the future.

Gao, Zhongyong; Chen, Liqi; Sun, Heng; Chen, Baoshan; Cai, Wei-Jun

2012-12-01

46

Carbon dioxide sensor  

DOEpatents

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15

47

Effect of Carbon Dioxide on Multiplication of Fusarium in Soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

NUMEROUS studies have been made on the effects of carbon dioxide on fungal growth in pure culture, and on substrates other than soil. Since soil is the natural habitat of many fungi, and frequently has carbon dioxide-levels exceeding that present in normal air, it is important that effects of carbon dioxide-enriched air on fungal behaviour in soil be investigated. With

R. H. Stover; S. R. Freiberg

1958-01-01

48

The Development of Models for Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technologies for Spacecraft Air Revitalization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Through the respiration process, humans consume oxygen (O2) while producing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as byproducts. For long term space exploration, CO2 concentration in the atmosphere must be managed to prevent hypercapnia. Moreover, CO2 can be used as a source of oxygen through chemical reduction serving to minimize the amount of oxygen required at launch. Reduction can be achieved through a number of techniques. NASA is currently exploring the Sabatier reaction, the Bosch reaction, and co- electrolysis of CO2 and H2O for this process. Proof-of-concept experiments and prototype units for all three processes have proven capable of returning useful commodities for space exploration. All three techniques have demonstrated the capacity to reduce CO2 in the laboratory, yet there is interest in understanding how all three techniques would perform at a system level within a spacecraft. Consequently, there is an impetus to develop predictive models for these processes that can be readily rescaled and integrated into larger system models. Such analysis tools provide the ability to evaluate each technique on a comparable basis with respect to processing rates. This manuscript describes the current models for the carbon dioxide reduction processes under parallel developmental efforts. Comparison to experimental data is provided were available for verification purposes.

Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly

2012-01-01

49

Carbon Dioxide Removal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this experiment using sprigs of Elodea, learners will observe a natural process that removes carbon dioxide (CO2) from Earth's atmosphere. This process is a part of the carbon cycle and results in temperature suitable for life. Note: this experiment requires that learners make observations an hour or the next day after they set up the materials.

History, American M.

2008-01-01

50

Annual hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations and surface to air exchanges in a rural area (Qubec, Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The industrialization and the demographic expansion have both influenced the biogeochemical cycle of hydrogen (H 2), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2). In the actual context, knowledge about the spatial distribution of the natural sources and sinks of these trace gases is then crucial to infer possible effects of climate and land use changes on their global budget. This article reports the H 2, CO and CO 2 concentrations and micrometeorological fluxes measured during 1 year in a rural area of the mixed wood ecozone of Canada. Land use represents a critical issue in the control of trace gas natural sources or sinks of that region, which is the most densely habited in Canada. On average, the site emitted CO 2 at a rate of 7.7 g m -2 d -1 and consumed H 2 and CO at 0.34 and 5.1 mg m -2 d -1, respectively. Temperature was the most important factor affecting the H 2 and CO surface to air exchanges. The strength of the soil sink was maximal at the end of the summer, while H 2 and CO emissions were observed at the snow-melting period. In winter, H 2 and CO depositions were attributed to their oxidation by photochemically active compounds within the snow cover. When soil temperature was above 10 C, trace gas fluxes followed a well-defined diurnal cycle. H 2 and CO 2 deposition rates were positively correlated with H 2O fluxes, while CO followed the inverse trend. CO 2 diurnal variations resulted from a balance between photosynthesis and soil respiration, while some biotic and abiotic factors were proposed to explain the trend observed for H 2. In the case of CO, emissions originating from heat- and photo-induced reactions were involved in the attenuation in the strength of the soil sink during daytime. Measured fluxes were compared with the literature to show the relative importance of the rural areas in the studied trace gases budget.

Constant, Philippe; Poissant, Laurier; Villemur, Richard

51

Carbon Dioxide Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students work in groups, plotting carbon dioxide concentrations over time on overheads and estimating the rate of change over five years. Stacked together, the overheads for the whole class show an increase on carbon dioxide over five years and annual variation driven by photosynthesis. This exercise enables students to practice basic quantitative skills and understand how important sampling intervals can be when studying changes over time. A goal is to see how small sample size may give incomplete picture of data.

Richardson, Randy; Collection, Serc -.

52

Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Record  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 measurements constitute the longest continuous record of atmospheric CO2 concentrations available in the world. The Mauna Loa site is considered one of the most favorable locations for measuring undisturbed air because possible local influences are minimal. Methods and equipment used to obtain these measurements have remained essentially unchanged during the 47-year monitoring program. This easy to use dataset contains monthly averages of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations from 1958 through 2004.

Bollenbacher, A. F.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Piper, S. C.; Walker, Jeffrey S.

2010-07-05

53

Easily regenerable solid adsorbents based on polyamines for carbon dioxide capture from the air.  

PubMed

Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2 -free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle. PMID:24644023

Goeppert, Alain; Zhang, Hang; Czaun, Miklos; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A; Narayanan, S R

2014-05-01

54

Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carboncarbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially,

Iwao Omae

2006-01-01

55

Carbon dioxide fixation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO(sub 2) conv...

E. Fujita

2000-01-01

56

Bench Remarks: Carbon Dioxide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the properties of carbon dioxide in its solid "dry ice" stage. Suggests several demonstrations and experiments that use dry ice to illustrate Avogadro's Law, Boyle's Law, Kinetic-Molecular Theory, and the effects of dry ice in basic solution, in limewater, and in acetone. (TW)

Bent, Henry A.

1987-01-01

57

Carbon Dioxide Increases  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will analyze the Keeling Curve showing carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere since 1985 to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

58

Chemical Extraction of Carbon Dioxide From Air: A Strategy to Avoid Climate Change and Sustain Fossil Energy?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fossil energy use has benefited humankind but also threatens our environment. It has increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels from 280 ppm to 370 ppm, over the past century. This rise has been linked to with observed ocean acidification and global warming. Projections indicate that atmospheric CO2 could reach 540 to 970 ppm in 2100, with significant effects on our earth system. Given that fossil fuels are plentiful, cost-effective, and energy rich their use will be limited by our ability to mitigate their environmental impact. Carbon management provides potential solutions to this. Current approaches to manage carbon focus on capturing CO2 from large point sources such as power plants. They are limited because they fail to address emissions from transportation and the myriad of dispersed sources that amount to about half of all emissions. To solve this problem we have proposed and are developing direct CO2 extraction from air as a means to capture emissions from all sources [1-3]. It preserves our fuel distribution and transportation systems, and in principle could allow us to restore CO2 to pre-industrial levels. Our concept utilizes atmospheric circulation to capture CO2 directly from the dilute stream in air (370 ppm) by binding it to an adsorbent. Subsequent heating releases the bound CO2 as a pure stream suitable for permanent sequestration. For example, this cycle is favorable for Ca(OH)2 which reacts rapidly with CO2 to form CaCO3. The heat to recover CO2 from CaCO3 is 190 kJ/mole of C, less than half the heat of combustion of 500 kJ/ mole of C for coal. The scale of CO2 air-extraction plants to offset global emissions is large but could be manageable, and favorable relative to renewable sources. We report experiments on CO2 uptake by alkaline solutions as a function of pH, contact time, and mixing. Both active and passive mixing conditions are explored. Gram scale quantities of CO2 has been extracted from air by Ca(OH)2 and the product CaCO3 analyzed by X ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis. We identify the atmospheric sub-laminar boundary layer and the stagnant liquid surface as potential barriers to CO2 uptake. Strategies to overcome these limits are developed. We discuss other renewable, energy efficient, and effective CO2 scrubbers with lower binding energies. High-resolution simulations are also being performed to characterize the effects of atmospheric mixing, size and geometry of extractors on the collection efficiency. Capture of CO2 from air is a promising long term strategy to sustain fossil energy use by avoiding climate change but much research and development is needed to implement it. [1] Elliott S. et al.,Compensation of atmospheric CO2 buildup through engineered chemical sinkage, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(7), 1235-1238, 2001. [2] Dubey, M. K. et al., Extraction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through engineered chemical sinkage, 2002 American Chemical Society, Division of Fuel Chemistry Preprints, 47(1), 81-84, 2002. [3] Johnston, et al. Chemical Transport Modeling of Potential Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Sinks, in press Energy Conversion & Management, 2002.

Dubey, M. K.; Ziock, H.; Rueff, G.; Colman, J.; Smith, W. S.

2002-12-01

59

Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

1979-01-01

60

Carbon dioxide adsorbent study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was initiated on the feasibility of using the alkali metal carbonate - bi-carbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere of an EVA life support system. The program successfully demonstrates that carbon dioxide concentrations could be maintained below 0.1 mole per cent using this chemistry. Further a practical method for distributing the carbonates in a coherent sheet form capable of repeated regeneration (50 cycles) at modest temperatures (423 K), without loss in activity was also demonstrated. Sufficiently high reaction rates were shown to be possible with the carbonate - bi-carbonate system such that EVA hardware could be readily designed. Experimental and design data were presented on the basis of which two practical units were designed. In addition to conventional thermally regenerative systems very compact units using ambient temperature cyclic vacuum regeneration may also be feasible. For a one man - 8 hour EVA unit regenerated thermally at the base ship a system volume of 14 liters is estimated.

Onischak, M.; Baker, B. S.

1973-01-01

61

Modeling Carbon Dioxide Levels  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity students will explore levels of Carbon Dioxide ( C02) in the atmosphere over time. There is concern that levels of C02 are rising; and finding a good mathematical model for CO2 levels is an important part of determining if this is attributable to human technology. Students draw a scatter plot, choose two points to create a linear model for the data, then use the model to make predictions.

2009-01-01

62

Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in Waste Tanks (September 3, 1987).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Air flow rates and carbon dioxide concentrations of air entering and exiting eight H-Area waste tanks were monitored for a period of one year. The average instanteous concentration of carbon dioxide in air is within the range reported offsite, and therefo...

D. T. Hobbs

1987-01-01

63

Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

Schilling, J.B.

1997-09-01

64

[Life support of the Mars exploration crew. Control of a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal from space cabin air within a closed air regeneration cycle].  

PubMed

The author describes a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal integrated into a closed air regeneration cycle aboard spacecraft. The continuous operation of a double-adsorbent regeneration system with pCO2-dependable productivity is maintained through programmable setting of adsorption (desorption) semicycle time. The optimal system regulation curve is presented within the space of statistical performance family obtained in quasi-steady operating modes with controlled parameters of the recurrent adsorption-desorption cycle. The automatically changing system productivity ensures continuous intake of concentrated CO2. Control of the adsorption-desorption process is based on calculation of the differential adsorption (desorption) heat from gradient of adsorbent and test inert substance temperatures. The adaptive algorithm of digital control is implemented through the standard spacecraft interface with the board computer system and programmable microprocessor-based controllers. PMID:19621802

Chekov, Iu F

2009-01-01

65

THE RESPIRATORY RESPONSE TO CARBON DIOXIDE  

PubMed Central

1. A technique for determining the respiratory response to carbon dioxide on the Peabody principle is described. 2. The relation between minute volume of total pulmonary ventilation and percentage of carbon dioxide in the inspired air can be expressed by a simple mathematical formula, viz. Y = K + abz, in which Y is the ventilation rate, X is the CO2 content of the inspired air, and K, a, and b are constants characteristic for the individual. 3. The respiratory response to carbon dioxide as expressed by the total pulmonary ventilation is slightly greater at high oxygen percentages (90 per cent ) than at normal oxygen percentages in the inspired air. 4. Respiratory fatigue may consist of two elementsone nervous, manifesting itself in increased excitability of the center and a more marked response when the demand for pulmonary ventilation is small, the other muscular and involving an inability to respond when the demand for pulmonary ventilation is great.

Davies, H. Whitridge; Brow, George R.; Binger, Carl A. L.

1925-01-01

66

Carbon dioxide dynamics in Kelud volcanic lake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In November 2007, the extrusion of a new lava dome evaporated Kelud volcanic lake in Java, Indonesia. Four months before a detailed echo sounding survey of the volcanic lake coupled to floating accumulation chamber measurements detected abnormally high carbon dioxide emissions. It constituted the earliest sign of the volcanic unrest; well before any other monitored parameter. CO2 flux is quantified using an empirical equation based on the volume of bubbles backscattered in the water column. Its comparison with the fluxes retrieved from the floating chamber method better constrain carbon dioxide dynamics in the volcanic lake. It reveals that 70% of the carbon dioxide enters the lake in a dissolved form, while the remaining 30% is supplied to the lake on a gaseous state. Almost three-quarter of the ascending bubbles dissolve in the water column leaving the majority of the 330 Tons day-1 of carbon dioxide diffusing at the air-water interface.

Caudron, C.; Mazot, A.; Bernard, A.

2012-05-01

67

Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals

W. J. J. Huijgen; R. N. J. Comans

2007-01-01

68

SOIL AIR CARBON DIOXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN A NEW ENGLAND SPRUCE-FIR FORESTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Research and modeling efforts to evaluate soil-soil solution chemical interactions must take into account solution equilibria with soil air CO2. Measurements of soil air CO2 and soil temperature were made in the major horizons of a forest soil in eastern Maine through the 1985 gr...

69

Soil Air Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in a New England Spruce-Fir Forests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Research and modeling efforts to evaluate soil-soil solution chemical interactions must take into account solution equilibria with soil air CO2. Measurements of soil air CO2 and soil temperature were made in the major horizons of a forest soil in eastern ...

I. J. Fernandex P. A. Kosian

1987-01-01

70

Air plasma gasification of RDF as a prospective method for reduction of carbon dioxide emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waste disposal dumps are one of sources of carbonic gas penetration in the atmosphere. The waste is treated into RDF (refuse-derived fuel) and used in boilers for electric power or heat generation for decrease in carbonic gas emissions in the atmosphere. In industry power stations on the basis of the combined cycle have the highest efficiency of burning. The paper

A. N. Bratsev; I. I. Kumkova; V. A. Kuznetsov; V. E. Popov; S. V. Shtengel; A. A. Ufimtsev

2011-01-01

71

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01

72

Role of amine structure on carbon dioxide adsorption from ultradilute gas streams such as ambient air.  

PubMed

A fundamental study on the adsorption properties of primary, secondary, and tertiary amine materials is used to evaluate what amine type(s) are best suited for ultradilute CO(2) capture applications. A series of comparable materials comprised of primary, secondary, or tertiary amines ligated to a mesoporous silica support via a propyl linker are used to systematically assess the role of amine type. Both CO(2) and water adsorption isotherms are presented for these materials in the range relevant to CO(2) capture from ambient air and it is demonstrated that primary amines are the best candidates for CO(2) capture from air. Primary amines possess both the highest amine efficiency for CO(2) adsorption as well as enhanced water affinity compared to other amine types or the bare silica support. The results suggest that the rational design of amine adsorbents for the extraction of CO(2) from ambient air should focus on adsorbents rich in primary amines. PMID:22764080

Didas, Stephanie A; Kulkarni, Ambarish R; Sholl, David S; Jones, Christopher W

2012-10-01

73

Ballistic Range Measurements of Stagnation-Point Heat Transfer in Air and in Carbon Dioxide at Velocities up to 18,000 Feet Per Second  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new technique for measuring heat-transfer rates on free-flight models in a ballistic range is described in this report. The accuracy of the heat-transfer rates measured in this way is shown to be comparable with the accuracy obtained in shock-tube measurements. The specific results of the present experiments consist of measurements of the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates experienced by a spherical-nosed model during flight through air and through carbon dioxide at velocities up to 18,000 feet per second. For flight through air these measured heat-transfer rates agree well with both the theoretically predicted rates and the rates measured in shock tubes. the heat-transfer rates agree well with the rates measured in a shock tube. Two methods of estimating the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates in carbon dioxide are compared with the experimental measurements. At each velocity the measured stagnation-point heat-transfer rate in carbon dioxide is about the same as the measured heat-transfer rate in air.

Yee, Layton; Bailey, Harry E.; Woodward, Henry T.

1961-01-01

74

Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 3.4 vs 61.5 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 0.7 vs 42.9 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 1.6 vs 27.6 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 0.4 vs 21.4 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 1.4 vs 18.9 1.5, 81.5 2.3 vs 20.6 1.2, 89.2 0.7 vs 36.8 0.9, 91.3 0.8 vs 63.8 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective.

Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

2012-01-01

75

Absorption of Carbon Dioxide on Carbonic Anhydrase Containing Substrates.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme catalyzing carbon dioxide hydration, was evaluated for its enhancement of carbon dioxide removal when it is present in granular materials with high water content during exposure to carbon dioxide in an aerating stream. A...

J. P. Allen

1968-01-01

76

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

1985-12-01

77

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs) carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of concentrations of chlorofluoromethanes (CFMs), carbon dioxide and carbon isotope ratio in stratospheric and tropospheric air by grab-sampling systems are reported. The balloon-borne grab-sampling system has been launched from Sanriku Balloon Center three times since 1981. It consists of: (1) six sampling cylinders, (2) eight motor driven values, (3) control and monitor circuits, and (4) pressurized housing. Particular consideration is paid to the problem of contamination. Strict requirements are placed on the choice of materials and components, construction methods, cleaning techniques, vacuum integrity, and sampling procedures. An aluminum pressurized housing and a 4-m long inlet line are employed to prevent the sampling air from contamination by outgassing of sampling and control devices. The sampling is performed during the descent of the system. Vertical profiles of mixing ratios of CF2Cl2, CFCl3 and CH4 are given. Mixing ratios of CF2Cl2 and CFCl3 in the stratosphere do not show the discernible effect of the increase of those in the ground level background, and decrease with altitude. Decreasing rate of CFCl3 is larger than that of CF2Cl2. CH4 mixing ratio, on the other hand, shows diffusive equilibrium, as the photodissociation cross section of CH4 is small and concentrations of OH radical and 0(sup I D) are low.

Itoh, T.; Kubo, H.; Honda, H.; Tominaga, T.; Makide, Y.; Yakohata, A.; Sakai, H.

1985-01-01

78

Carbon dioxide: atmospheric overload  

SciTech Connect

The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing and may double within the next century. The result of this phenomenon, climatic alterations, will adversely affect crop production, water supplies, and global temperatures. Sources of CO2 include the combustion of fossil fuels, photosynthesis, and the decay of organic matter in soils. The most serious effect of possible climatic changes could occur along the boundaries of arid and semiarid regions. Shifts is precipitation patterns could accelerate the processes of desertification. An increase of 5..cap alpha..C in the average temperature of the top 1000 m of ocean water would raise sea level by 2 m. CO2 releases to the atmosphere can be reduced by controlling emissions from fossil fuel-fired facilities and by careful harvesting of forest regions. (3 photos, 5 references)

Not Available

1980-04-01

79

Spectroscopic carbon dioxide sensor for automotive applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic carbon dioxide sensor designed for automotive applications. The sensor is based on the well known infrared measurement principle. It includes a new robust infrared gas-detector and a corresponding, newly developed, ASIC. First application studies show its suitability for automatic vehicle ventilation systems and for leak detection in R744 air conditioning systems.

Michael Arndt; Maximilian Sauer

2004-01-01

80

Construction and testing of a wet-compression absorption carbon dioxide refrigeration system for vehicle air conditioner  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environmental benefits of the transcritical carbon dioxide (CO2) refrigeration cycle are considerable. But its application is greatly challenged by the high operation pressure, which could be as high as 120bar. A wet-compression absorption (WCA) CO2 refrigeration cycle was constructed by adding a non-volatile liquid into a CO2 refrigeration cycle. CO2 is highly soluble in the liquid and easily absorbed

Niu Yongming; Chen Jiangping; Chen Zhijiu; Chen Huanxin

2007-01-01

81

Three years of greenhouse gas column-averaged dry air mole fractions retrieved from satellite Part 1: Carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases. SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT is the first satellite instrument whose measurements are sensitive to concentration changes of the two gases at all altitude levels down to the Earth's surface where the source\\/sink signals are largest. We have processed three years (2003 2005) of SCIAMACHY near-infrared nadir measurements

O. Schneising; M. Buchwitz; J. P. Burrows; H. Bovensmann; M. Reuter; J. Notholt; R. Macatangay; T. Warneke

2008-01-01

82

Carbon Dioxide and Ocean Acidification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Demonstrates the affect of increased dissolved carbon dioxide on water pH using a cheap, non-toxic acid/base indicator. Students bubble breath through a straw into red cabbage juice and note the color change.

Lewis, Chris

83

NASA Satellite Sees Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will analyze a map of atmospheric carbon dioxide derived from satellite data. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

84

Tunable pulsed carbon dioxide laser  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transverse electrically-excited-atmosphere (TEA) laser is continuously tunable over several hundred megahertz about centers of spectral lines of carbon dioxide. It is operated in single longitudinal mode (SLM) by injection of beam from continuous-wave, tunable-waveguide carbon dioxide laser, which serves as master frequency-control oscillator. Device measures absorption line of ozone; with adjustments, it is applicable to monitoring of atmospheric trace species.

Megie, G. J.; Menzies, R. T.

1981-01-01

85

The annual cycle of carbon dioxide and parameters influencing the airsea carbon exchange in the Baltic Proper  

Microsoft Academic Search

A land-based field station, two moored buoys and data from the Finnpartner ship were used to investigate the variability of the airsea CO2-flux and parameters controlling the flux during one year in the Baltic Sea region. The agreement between the sea surface partial pressure of CO2 measured near the tower and from the ship in the central parts of the

Anna Rutgersson; Maria Norman; Bernd Schneider; Heidi Pettersson; Erik Sahle

2008-01-01

86

Magnesite disposal of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report our progress on developing a method for carbon dioxide disposal whose purpose it is to maintain coal energy competitive even is environmental and political pressures will require a drastic reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast to most other methods, our approach is not aiming at a partial solution of the problem, or at buying time for phasing out fossil energy. Instead, its purpose is to obtain a complete and economic solution of the problem, and thus maintain access to the vast fossil energy reservoir. A successful development of this technology would guarantee energy availability for many centuries even if world economic growth the most optimistic estimates that have been put forward. Our approach differs from all others in that we are developing an industrial process which chemically binds the carbon dioxide in an exothermic reaction into a mineral carbonate that is thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign.

Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Wendt, C.H.

1997-08-01

87

Plants Can't Do without Carbon Dioxide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to induce carbon dioxide deficiency to demonstrate its effects on plant growth. Suggests further studies to examine respiration by soil microbes and the effects of relative humidity, other gases, and air pollution on plant growth. (MDH)

Hershey, David R.

1992-01-01

88

Determination of carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in refinery hydrogen gases and air by gas chromatography.  

PubMed

This paper illustrates a method for determining trace amounts of CO, CH4 and CO2 with the detection limit of 0.15, 0.15 and 0.20 microg/l, respectively, in refinery hydrogen gases or in air. A simple modification of a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame-ionization detector is presented. A Porapak Q column, additionally connected with a short molecular sieve 5A packed column and a catalytic hydrogenation reactor on the Ni catalyst have been applied. The principle of the analytical method proposed is the separation of CO from O2 before the introduction of CO to the methanizer. The analytical procedure and examples of the results obtained have been presented. The modification applied makes it possible to use the GC instrument for other determinations, requiring utilization of the Porapak Q column and the flame-ionization detector. In such cases, the short molecular sieve 5A column and the methanizer can be by-passed. PMID:12650260

Kami?ski, Marian; Kartanowicz, Rafal; Jastrzebski, Daniel; Kami?ski, Marcin M

2003-03-14

89

Carbon dioxide fluxes across the air-water interface and its impact on carbon availability in aquatic systems  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion of CO{sub 2} across the air-water interface was analyzed with a model that simulates both transport and reaction of CO{sub 2} in a stagnant boundary layer. The atmospheric C influx was determined in relation to several environmental variables: pH, total dissolved inorganic C, temperature, and the thickness of the stagnant boundary layer in relation to ambient windspeed. We used the model to calculate the atmospheric CO{sub 2} influx into experimental ditches for a period of 6 to 8 months, starting in early spring. Three of the six ditches were dominated by aquatic macrophytes and three by benthic algae. Each series received three levels of external N and P input. A comparison with net C assimilation during the same period, as estimated from continuous oxygen measurements, showed that, especially in the ditches dominated by submersed macrophytes, a sizable fraction of the C requirements during this period could have been obtained from atmospheric CO{sub 2}. In the ditches dominated by benthic algae, this fraction was considerably less, but nonetheless substantial, and was related to the level of N and P loading. Increased primary production due to enhanced external N and P loading increased the atmospheric C input due to the resultant higher pH values. The trophic state with respect to N and P and the availability of C are therefore interrelated. 25 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Portielje, R.; Lijklema, L. [Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands)

1995-06-01

90

Carbon Dioxide - Our Common "Enemy"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health effects of brief and prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide continue to be a concern for those of us who manage this pollutant in closed volumes, such as in spacecraft and submarines. In both examples, considerable resources are required to scrub the atmosphere to levels that are considered totally safe for maintenance of crew health and performance. Defining safe levels is not a simple task because of many confounding factors, including: lack of a robust database on human exposures, suspected significant variations in individual susceptibility, variations in the endpoints used to assess potentially adverse effects, the added effects of stress, and the fluid shifts associated with micro-gravity (astronauts only). In 2007 the National Research Council proposed revised Continuous Exposure Guidelines (CEGLs) and Emergency Exposure Guidelines (EEGLs) to the U.S. Navy. Similarly, in 2008 the NASA Toxicology Group, in cooperation with another subcommittee of the National Research Council, revised Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). In addition, a 1000-day exposure limit was set for long-duration spaceflights to celestial bodies. Herein we examine the rationale for the levels proposed to the U.S. Navy and compare this rationale with the one used by NASA to set its limits. We include a critical review of previous studies on the effects of exposure to carbon dioxide and attempt to dissect out the challenges associated with setting fully-defensible limits. We also describe recent experiences with management of carbon dioxide aboard the International Space Station with 13 persons aboard. This includes the tandem operations of the Russian Vozduk and the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Removal System. A third removal system is present while the station is docked to the Shuttle spacecraft, so our experience includes the lithium hydroxide system aboard Shuttle for the removal of carbon dioxide. We discuss strategies for highly-efficient, regenerable removal of carbon dioxide that could meet the 1000-day SMAC of 0.5%, which would apply to long-duration voyages to Mars.

James, John T.; Macatangay, Ariel

2009-01-01

91

Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

2002-01-01

92

Net carbon dioxide exchange rates and predicted growth patterns in Alstroemeria Jacqueline' at varying irradiances, carbon dioxide concentrations, and air temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The influence of irradiance, CO[sub 2] concentration, and air temperature on leaf and whole-plant net C exchange rate (NCER) of Alstroemeria Jacqueline' was studied. At ambient CO[sub 2], leaf net photosynthesis was maximum at irradiances above 600 [mu]mol[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1] photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), while whole-plant NCER required 1,200 [mu]mol[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1] PAR to be saturated. Leaf and whole-plant NCERs were doubled under CO[sub 2] enrichment of 1,500 to 2,000 [mu]l CO[sub 2]/liter. Leaf and whole-plant NCERs declined as temperature increased from 20 to 35 C. Whereas the optimum temperature range for leaf net photosynthesis was 17 to 23 C, whole-plant NCER, even at high light and high CO[sub 2], declined above 12 C. Dark respiration of leaves and whole plants increased with a Q[sub 10] of [approx] 2 at 15 to 35 C. In an analysis of day effects, irradiance, CO[sub 2] concentration, and temperature contributed 58%, 23%, and 14%, respectively, to the total variation in NCER explained by a second-order polynomial model (R[sup 2] = 0.85). Interactions among the factors accounted for 4% of the variation in day C assimilation. The potential whole-plant growth rates during varying greenhouse day and night temperature regimes were predicted for short- and long-day scenarios. The data are discussed with the view of designing experiments to test the importance of C gain in supporting flowering and high yield during routine harvest of Alstroemeria plants under commercial greenhouse conditions.

Leonardos, E.D.; Tsujita, M.J.; Grodzinski, B. (Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Horticultural Science)

1994-11-01

93

Hydrocarbon Displacement by Carbon Dioxide Dispersions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is investigating methods to control the mobility of carbon dioxide for use in gas miscible displacements of hydrocarbons that are found in petroleum reservoirs. Carbon dioxide ...

J. R. Duda

1986-01-01

94

Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide  

DOEpatents

A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes (State College, PA); Zhang, Yinzhi (State College, PA); Kuchta, Matthew E. (State College, PA); Andresen, John M. (State College, PA); Fauth, Dan J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2009-10-20

95

Carbon dioxide transport over complex terrain  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The nocturnal transport of carbon dioxide over complex terrain was investigated. The high carbon dioxide under very stable conditions flows to local low-ground. The regional drainage flow dominates the carbon dioxide transport at the 6 m above the ground and carbon dioxide was transported to the regional low ground. The results show that the local drainage flow was sensitive to turbulent mixing associated with local wind shear.

Sun, J.; Burns, S. P.; Delany, A. C.; Oncley, S. P.; Turnipseed, A.; Stephens, B.; Guenther, A.; Anderson, D. E.; Monson, R.

2004-01-01

96

Carbon Dioxide - Sources and Sinks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lab activity, students use a chemical indicator (bromothymol blue) to detect the presence of carbon dioxide in animal and plant respiration and in the burning of fossil fuels and its absence in the products of plant photosynthesis. After completing the five parts of this activity, students compare the colors of the chemical indicator in each part and interpret the results in terms of the qualitative importance of carbon sinks and sources.

Universe, Windows T.

97

RECARBONATION AND LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE  

Microsoft Academic Search

After water has been lime-softened, it is frequently caustic; pH reduction is usually achieved by adding carbon dioxide to the watera process called recarbonation. Here is a history of recarbonation, with up-to-date information for modern installations.

Paul D. Haney; Carl L. Hamann

1969-01-01

98

Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.  

PubMed

A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency. PMID:24307628

Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

2014-01-13

99

Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0[sup 2] include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO[sup 2] and total concentration of dissolved C0[sup 2], sea-air pCO[sup 2] difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these

Tsung-Hung Peng; Taro Takahashi

1993-01-01

100

Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0² include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO² and total concentration of dissolved C0², sea-air pCO² difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and

Tsung-Hung Peng; Taro Takahashi

1993-01-01

101

The air we breathe: three vital respiratory gases and the red blood cell: oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

Three vital respiratory gases-oxygen (O(2)), nitric oxide (NO), and carbon dioxide (CO(2))-intersect at the level of the human red blood cell (RBC). In addition to hemoglobin (Hb)'s central role in O(2) transport, interaction of Hb with the Band 3 metabolon balances RBC energy flow. 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate enhances O(2) transport across the placenta and plays an important role in regulating RBC plasticity. NO is a key mediator of hypoxic vasodilation, but the precise role of RBC Hb remains controversial. In addition to established theories that depend on RBC uptake, delivery, and discharge of NO or its metabolites, an alternative hypothesis based on RBC permeability is suggested. NO depletion by free Hb may account for several clinical features seen during intravascular hemolysis or during deliberate infusion of Hb solutions used as RBC substitutes. CO(2) released by tissues triggers oxygen release through a series of well-coordinated reactions centered on the Band 3 metabolon. While RBC carbonic anhydrase and the Band 3 anion exchanger are central to this process, there is surprisingly little research on the kinetics of CO(2) clearance by transfusion. The three RBC gases are directly related to the three principal gases of Earth's atmosphere. Human fossil fuel consumption dumps 90 million metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere annually. Increasing CO(2) levels are linked to global warming, melting Arctic ice, rising sea levels, and climate instability. Just as individual cells depend on balance of the three vital gases, so too will their balance determine survival of life on Earth. PMID:21496039

Dzik, Walter H

2011-04-01

102

CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.  

SciTech Connect

This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

2000-12-09

103

Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) capable of performing as a CO.sub.2 or O.sub.2 sensor is disclosed, hi one implementation, a polymer solar cell can be connected to the HEMT for use in an infrared detection system. In a second implementation, a selective recognition layer can be provided on a gate region of the HEMT. For carbon dioxide sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, PEI/starch. For oxygen sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, indium zinc oxide (IZO). In one application, the HEMTs can be used for the detection of carbon dioxide and oxygen in exhaled breath or blood.

Ren, Fan (Inventor); Pearton, Stephen John (Inventor)

2012-01-01

104

Detectability and significance of 12 hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide concentration in an underground tunnel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Searching for small periodic signals, such as the 12 hr (S2) barometric tide, and monitoring their amplitude as a function of time, can provide important clues on the complex processes affecting fluid transport in unsaturated fractured media under multiple influences. Here, first, we show that a modified spectrogram analysis (MSA) is more efficient than simple Fourier transform to reveal weak periodic signals. Secondly, we show how transient periodic signals can be monitored as a function of time using spectrograms. These methods are applied to time-series of radon and carbon dioxide concentration, dripwater flow rates and air temperature measured during several years in the Roselend dead-end tunnel, located in the French Alps near an artificial lake. A weak S2 line is evidenced in radon concentration, with enhanced amplitude during transient radon bursts. Similarly, the S2 line is observed using MSA in dripwater flow rates which sample mainly fracture flow, as suggested by a hydrochemical analysis, while it is not seen in dripwater flow rates sampling matrix flow. In the absence of a strong 24 hr line, the presence of a S2 line suggests sensitivity to barometric pressure, and thus a significant advective contribution in radon and some dripwater transport. No S2 line is observed in the carbon dioxide time-series. The temporal structure of the S2 component, however, is not similar in the radon concentration and the dripwater flow rates, suggesting, in particular, that dripwater does not play a significant role in the generation of radon bursts. Temperature time-series exhibit a significant S2 contribution, induced by atmospheric pressure, spatially organised in the tunnel, decreasing vertically upwards. A remarkable transient temperature inversion during radon bursts suggests that the additional advective air contributions responsible for the radon bursts occur from the non-saturated rocks below the tunnel.

Richon, Patrick; Perrier, Frdric; Pili, Eric; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe

2009-03-01

105

Interpreting recent carbon dioxide data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using web-accessed climate data, students will examine the latitudinal distribution of CO2 and explain how (and why) that has changed over (recent) time. They will then work in groups of two or three to download, graph, and interpret carbon dioxide concentration data from one individual location (different groups will be assigned a different site). Each student will complete a series of questions to ensure their understanding of the concepts outlined above.

Gordon, Elizabeth

106

Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

2011-01-01

107

Carbon dioxide review 1982  

SciTech Connect

The buildup of CO/sub 2/ is a reality, monitored with increasing precision since 1957 and inferred for much earlier dates. A statistical section gives the monitored values to 1980, as well as a review of a long series of measurements made at Mauna Loa by the pioneers of such monitoring, Charles D. Keeling, Robert B. Bacastow, and Timothy P. Whorf. The book discusses internal transport processes in the ocean, of ocean-atmosphere interaction, of the magnitude of forest and soil carbon wastage, of the future course of fossil-fuel consumption. Yet something else emerges, too: if the CO/sub 2/ buildup continues; if the big general circulation models are right about its impact on climate, and if we have not miscalculated the potential role of the oceans, then we face a climatic change in the next century and a half like nothing the post-glacial world, and hence civilized humanity, has seen.

Clark, W.C. (ed.)

1982-01-01

108

Carbon dioxide measurements in the stratosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mass spectrometer experiment for the analysis of minor constituents in the stratosphere has been flown successfully four times from Palestine, Texas on board a balloon gondola. The carbon dioxide mixing ratio, which shows unexpectedly large variations in the stratosphere, reached 400 ppm in one particular night flight. This is about 20% higher than the ground value. Evidence is presented that the experiment performed well during each of the balloon flights. The isotopic ratio C-12/C-13 was measured and found in good agreement with previous air analyses showing a depletion of C-13.

Mauersberger, K.; Finstad, R.

1980-01-01

109

Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an activity measuring the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in carbonated water at different temperatures. The amount of carbon dioxide is measured by the amount of dilute ammonia solution needed to produce a pH indicator color change. (PR)

Bush, Pat; And Others

1992-01-01

110

Carbon dioxide equilibria and their applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide, bicarbonate ion, and carbonate ion comprise the most important acid-base system in natural waters, and the equilibria between them regulate the pH of seawater, as well as most rainwater, stream water, river water, and groundwater. Carbon Dioxide Equilibria and Their Applications provides a clear, compact presentation of this topic, which is central to geochemistry and environmental engineering. It

1992-01-01

111

Closed carbon dioxide filtration revisited.  

PubMed

There are compelling reasons why the closed carbon dioxide filtration method for inhalation anaesthesia deserves serious reconsideration. Use of the closed absorption system today can provide all the benefits recognised by those who introduced it seventy to eighty years ago. A most important benefit is the increased opportunity of learning afforded the user, which leads either neophyte or senior clinician to improvement of both concept and clinical skills. The current resurgence of interest is fully appropriate for all physicians who aspire to be true specialists in the care of patients during clinical anaesthesia. PMID:7978194

Morris, L E

1994-08-01

112

Changes in soil C-isotopic composition in an agroecosystem under Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) treatment during a crop rotation period.  

PubMed

FACE (Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) has been used since 1999 to evaluate the effects of future atmospheric CO(2) concentrations on an arable crop agroecosystem. The experiment conducted at the Institute of Agroecology at the Federal Research Centre in Braunschweig consists of a typical local crop rotation of winter barley, a cover crop, sugar beet and winter wheat. The atmospheric CO2 concentration of ambient air is about 375 ppm with a delta13C value of -7 to -9 per thousand, and 550 ppm (delta13C value = -20.2 per thousand) during daylight hours in the rings fumigated with additional CO2. Thus, the surplus C can be traced in the agricultural system. Over the course of the first experimental period (3-year crop rotation period), the C-isotopic composition and the C concentration in soil were monitored monthly. Plant samples were analysed according to the relevant developmental stages of the crop under cultivation. A 13C depletion was observed in plant parts, as well as in soil samples from the FACE rings under CO2 enrichment, indicating that labelled C has reached both respective ecosystem compartments. Albeit farming management practice (especially ploughing) leads to a mixing of 'old' and 'new' C compounds throughout all soil horizons down to the end of the ploughing layer and resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of newly formed C compounds in the soil, isotope analysis of soil C reflected where the surplus C went. PMID:15880658

Giesemann, Anette

2005-01-01

113

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

SciTech Connect

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01

114

Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0{sup 2} include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO{sup 2} and total concentration of dissolved C0{sup 2}, sea-air pCO{sup 2} difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0{sup 2} uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0{sup 2} from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0{sup 2} fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

Peng, Tsung-Hung [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Takahashi, Taro [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

1993-06-01

115

Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0[sup 2] include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO[sup 2] and total concentration of dissolved C0[sup 2], sea-air pCO[sup 2] difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0[sup 2] uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0[sup 2] from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0[sup 2] fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

Peng, Tsung-Hung (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Takahashi, Taro (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

1993-01-01

116

Sorption of carbon dioxide onto sodium carbonate  

SciTech Connect

Sodium carbonate was used as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} from a gaseous stream of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and moisture. The breakthrough data of CO{sub 2} were measured in a fixed bed to observe the reaction kinetics of CO{sub 2}-carbonate reaction. Several models such as the shrinking-core model, the homogeneous model, and the deactivation model in the non-catalytic heterogeneous reaction systems were used to explain the kinetics of reaction among CO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and moisture using analysis of the experimental breakthrough data. Good agreement of the deactivation model was obtained with the experimental breakthrough data. The sorption rate constant and the deactivation rate constant were evaluated by analysis of the experimental breakthrough data using a nonlinear least squares technique and described as Arrhenius form.

Sang-Wook Park; Deok-Ho Sung; Byoung-Sik Choi; Kwang-Joong Oh; Kil-Ho Moon [Pusan National University, Busan (Republic of Korea). Division of Chemical Engineering

2006-07-01

117

Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic CO(sup 2) include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO(sup 2) and total concentration of dissolved CO(sup 2), sea-air pCO(sup 2) difference, gas exchange rate across th...

T. H. Peng T. Takahashi

1993-01-01

118

The Carbon Dioxide Greenhouse: Is It Effective?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity allows students to compare the thermal properties of carbon dioxide with those of air, and can be extended to compare water vapor as well. Students discover that the gas which absorbs the most heat (infrared radiation) is the most effective greenhouse gas because in the atmosphere it would absorb more infrared coming from the surface of the Earth. This activity could be used as either a demonstration or a laboratory activity depending on the availability of equipment. Either a data logger is used to record the changing temperature of air and of carbon dioxide in plastic bottles as they are heated using electric lamps, and then allowed to cool, or if a data logger is not available, then thermometers can be used instead and monitored by students. The site contains teacher notes and instructions with a list of materials and a photograph showing the setup. It also has an introduction for the students and questions for them to answer along with a glossary.

119

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

The authors' long term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The major objectives of the project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coal being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals, to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. The specific accomplishments of this project during this reporting period are summarized below in three broad categories outlining experimentation, model development, and coal characterization. (1) Experimental Work: Our adsorption apparatus was reassembled, and all instruments were tested and calibrated. Having confirmed the viability of the experimental apparatus and procedures used, adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on wet Fruitland coal were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia). These measurements showed good agreement with our previous data and yielded an expected uncertainty of about 2%. Preparations are underway to measure adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on two other coals. (2) Model Development: The experimental data were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of various adsorption models, including the Langmuir/loading ratio correlation, two-dimensional cubic equations of state, and the local density model. In general, all models performed well for Type I adsorption exhibited by methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide up to 8.3 MPa (average deviations within 2%). However, for pressures higher than 8.3 MPa (1200 psia), carbon dioxide produced multilayer adsorption behavior similar to Type IV adsorption. Our results to date indicate that the SLD model may be a suitable choice for modeling multilayer coalbed gas adsorption. However, model improvements are required to (a) account for coal heterogeneity and structure complexity, and (b) provide for more accurate density predictions. (3) Coal Characterization: We have identified several well-characterized coals for use in our adsorption studies. The criteria for coal selection has been guided by the need for coals that (a) span the spectrum of properties encountered in coalbed methane production (such as variation in rank), and (b) originate from coalbed methane recovery sites (e.g., San Juan Basin, Black Warrior Basin, etc.). At Pennsylvania State University, we have completed calibrating our instruments using a well-characterized activated carbon. In addition, we have conducted CO{sub 2} and methane uptakes on four samples, including (a) a widely used commercial activated carbon, BPL from Calgon Carbon Corp.; (b) an Illinois No.6 bituminous coal from the Argonne Premium Coal sample bank; (c) a Fruitland Intermediate coal sample; (d) a dry Fruitland sample. The results are as expected, except for a greater sensitivity to the outgassing temperature. ''Standard'' outgassing conditions (e.g., 383.2 K, overnight), which are often used, may not be appropriate for gas storage in coalbeds. Conditions that are more representative of in-situ coal (approximately 313.2 K) may be much more appropriate. In addition, our results highlight the importance of assessing the degree of approach to adsorption equilibrium.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2001-06-15

120

Trigeminally-mediated alteration of cardiorespiratory rhythms during nasal application of carbon dioxide in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stimulation of the upper respiratory tract with air-borne irritants can result in dramatic alterations of cardiorespiratory rhythms that include apnea, bradycardia and selective peripheral vasoconstriction. Since carbon dioxide can stimulate receptors in the nasal passages, we wanted to determine if this odorless gas can induce the same autonomic changes as air-borne irritants. Passing 100% carbon dioxide through the nasal passages

Parviz Yavari; Paul F. McCulloch; W. Michael Panneton

1996-01-01

121

27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24.319...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still...

2009-04-01

122

27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24.319...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still...

2010-04-01

123

46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a)...

2013-10-01

124

Carbon Dioxide Reduction with Alkali-Metal Amalgams.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The reduction of carbon dioxide by alkali-metal amalgams was studied as a potential means for reclamation of carbon dioxide waste gas in space systems. The carbon dioxide reduction reactions were investigated at moderate temperatures and pressures - typic...

C. M. Cox R. W. Treharne

1968-01-01

125

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global warming is increasing ocean tempera- tures and raising sea levels. New scientific research shows that our oceans are beginning to face yet another threat due to global warm- ing-related emissions - their basic chemistry is changing because of the uptake of carbon dioxide released by human activities. When carbon dioxide is absorbed by the oceans it reacts with seawater

Richard A. Feely; Christopher L. Sabine; Victoria J. Fabry

126

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most datasets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to atmospheric carbon dioxide data includes: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric carbon dioxide records from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and other data from the NOAA/CMDL continuous monitoring network Data from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network Atmospheric CO2 records from continuous measurements at Jubany Station, Antarctica and from 10 sites in the SIO air sampling network Historical data from the extended Vostok ice core (2003) and the Siple Station ice core (1997) Historical records from the Law Dome DE08, DE08-2, and DSS ice cores (1998) AmeriFlux Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Data from the Canadian Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network Flask Samples from at U.S.S.R.-Operated Sites (1991) The CISIRO (Australia) Monitoring Program from Aircraft for 1972-1981 CO2 Concentrations in Surface Water and the Atmosphere during 1986-1989 NOAA/PMEL Cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans Surface Water and Atmospheric CO2 and Nitrous Oxide Observations by Shipboard Automated Gas Chromatography: Results from Expeditions Between 1977 and 1990 (1992) IPCC Working Group 1, 1994: Modeling Results Relating Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations to Industrial Emissions (1995). New datasets are added when available to the category of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

127

Mercury accumulation in grass and forb species as a function of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and mercury exposures in air and soil.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to investigate the potential for atmospheric Hg degrees uptake by grassland species as a function of different air and soil Hg exposures, and to specifically test how increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentrations may influence foliar Hg concentrations. Four common tallgrass prairie species were germinated and grown for 7 months in environmentally controlled chambers using two different atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg major; 3.7+/-2.0 and 10.2+/-3.5 ng m(-3)), soil Hg (<0.01 and 0.15+/-0.08 micro g g(-1)), and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (390+/-18, 598+/-22 micro mol mol(-1)) exposures. Species used included two C4 grasses and two C3 forbs. Elevated CO(2) concentrations led to lower foliar Hg concentrations in plants exposed to low (i.e., ambient) air Hg degrees concentrations, but no CO(2) effect was apparent at higher air Hg degrees exposure. The observed CO(2) effect suggests that leaf Hg uptake might be controlled by leaf physiological processes such as stomatal conductance which is typically reduced under elevated CO(2). Foliar tissue exposed to elevated air Hg degrees concentrations had higher concentrations than those exposed to low air Hg degrees , but only when also exposed to elevated CO(2). The relationships for foliar Hg concentrations at different atmospheric CO(2) and Hg degrees exposures indicate that these species may have a limited capacity for Hg storage; at ambient CO(2) concentrations all Hg absorption sites in leaves may have been saturated while at elevated CO(2) when stomatal conductance was reduced saturation may have been reached only at higher concentrations of atmospheric Hg degrees . Foliar Hg concentrations were not correlated to soil Hg exposures, except for one of the four species (Rudbeckia hirta). Higher soil Hg concentrations resulted in high root Hg concentrations and considerably increased the percentage of total plant Hg allocated to roots. The large shifts in Hg allocation patterns-notably under soil conditions only slightly above natural background levels-indicate a potentially strong role of plants in belowground Hg transformation and cycling processes. PMID:16631233

Millhollen, A G; Obrist, D; Gustin, M S

2006-10-01

128

Electrochemical processing of carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

With respect to the negative role of carbon dioxide on our climate, it is clear that the time is ripe for the development of processes that convert CO(2) into useful products. The electroreduction of CO(2) is a prime candidate here, as the reaction at near-ambient conditions can yield organics such as formic acid, methanol, and methane. Recent laboratory work on the 100 A scale has shown that reduction of CO(2) to formate (HCO(2)(-)) may be carried out in a trickle-bed continuous electrochemical reactor under industrially viable conditions. Presuming the problems of cathode stability and formate crossover can be overcome, this type of reactor is proposed as the basis for a commercial operation. The viability of corresponding processes for electrosynthesis of formate salts and/or formic acid from CO(2) is examined here through conceptual flowsheets for two process options, each converting CO(2) at the rate of 100 tonnes per day. PMID:18702129

Oloman, Colin; Li, Hui

2008-01-01

129

Microfluidic studies of carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) sequestration, storage and recycling will greatly benefit from comprehensive studies of physical and chemical gas-liquid processes involving CO2 . Over the past five years, microfluidics emerged as a valuable tool in CO2 -related research, due to superior mass and heat transfer, reduced axial dispersion, well-defined gas-liquid interfacial areas and the ability to vary reagent concentrations in a high-throughput manner. This Minireview highlights recent progress in microfluidic studies of CO2 -related processes, including dissolution of CO2 in physical solvents, CO2 reactions, the utilization of CO2 in materials science, and the use of supercritical CO2 as a "green" solvent. PMID:24961230

Abolhasani, Milad; Gnther, Axel; Kumacheva, Eugenia

2014-07-28

130

How Is Carbon Dioxide Measured?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this textbook chapter, scientists studying the concentration of becomes CO² in the atmosphere are profiled. The techniques for measuring and recording carbon dioxide concentrations at the Mauna Loa Observatory are described. A link to a video clip of an interview with NOAA scientist Dr. Pieter Tans is included. This is the fifth chapter in the unit, Climate Change, which addresses the question of how human activities are changing Earth's climate. The resource includes three classroom investigations, links to current news articles, and a suite of pre and post unit assessments. A teacher's guide supports classroom use. The resource is part of Global Systems Science (GSS), an interdisciplinary course for high school students that emphasizes how scientists from a wide variety of fields work together to understand significant problems of global impact.

131

Global food insecurity. Treatment of major food crops with elevated carbon dioxide or ozone under large-scale fully open-air conditions suggests recentmodelsmayhaveoverestimatedfutureyields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictions of yield for the globe's major grain and legume arable crops suggest that, with a moderate temperature increase, production may increase in the temperate zone, but decline in the tropics. In total, global food supply may show little change. This security comes from inclusion of the direct effect of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, (CO2), which significantly stimulates yield

Stephen P. Long; Elizabeth A. Ainsworth; Andrew D. B. Leakey; Patrick B. Morgan

132

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOEpatents

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14

133

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

During the present reporting period, six complementary tasks involving experimentation, model development, and coal characterization were undertaken to meet our project objectives: (1) A second adsorption apparatus, utilizing equipment donated by BP Amoco, was assembled. Having confirmed the reliability of this additional experimental apparatus and procedures, adsorption isotherms for CO{sub 2}, methane, ethane, and nitrogen on wet Fruitland coal and on activated carbon were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia). These measurements showed good agreement with our previous data and yielded an expected uncertainty of about 3%. The addition of this new facility has allowed us to essentially double our rate of data production. (2) Adsorption isotherms for pure CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen on wet Illinois-6 coal and on activated carbon were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia) on our first apparatus. The activated carbon measurements showed good agreement with literature data and with measurements obtained on our second apparatus. The expected uncertainty of the data is about 3%. The Illinois-6 adsorption measurements are a new addition to the existing database. Preparations are underway to measure adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on DESC-8 coal. (3) Adsorption from binary mixtures of methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} at a series of compositions was also measured on the wet Fruitland coal at 319.3 K (115 F), using our first apparatus. The nominal compositions of these mixtures are 20%/80%, 40%/60%, 60%/40%, and 80%/20%. The experiments were conducted at pressures from 100 psia to 1800 psia. The expected uncertainty for these binary mixture data varies from 2 to 9%. (4) A study was completed to address the previously-reported rise in the CO{sub 2} absolute adsorption on wet Fruitland coal at 115 F and pressures exceeding 1200 psia. Our additional adsorption measurements on Fruitland coal and on activated carbon show that: (a) the Gibbs adsorption isotherm for CO{sub 2} under study exhibits typical adsorption behavior for supercritical gas adsorption, and (b) a slight variation from Type I absolute adsorption may be observed for CO{sub 2}, but the variation is sensitive to the estimates used for adsorbed phase density. (5) The experimental data were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of various adsorption models, including the Langmuir/loading ratio correlation, a two-dimensional cubic equation of state (EOS), a new two-dimensional (2-D) segment-segment interactions equation of state, and the simplified local density model (SLD). Our model development efforts have focused on developing the 2-D analog to the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) EOS and an improved form of the SLD model. The new PGR EOS offers two advantages: (a) it has a more accurate repulsive term, which is important for reliable adsorption predictions, and (b) it is a segment-segment interactions model, which should more closely describe the gas-coal interactions during the adsorption process. In addition, a slit form of the SLD model was refined to account more precisely for heterogeneity of the coal surface and matrix swelling. In general, all models performed well for the Type I adsorption exhibited by methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide up to 8.3 MPa (average deviations within 2%). In comparison, the SLD model represented the adsorption behavior of all fluids considered within 5% average deviations, including the near-critical behavior of carbon dioxide beyond 8.3 MPa (1200 psia). Work is in progress to (a) derive and implement the biporous form of the SLD model, which would expand the number of structural geometries used to represent the heterogeneity of coal surface; and (b) extend the SLD model to mixture predictions. (6) Proper reduction of our adsorption data requires accurate gas-phase compressibility (Z) factors for methane, ethane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide and their mixtures to properly analyze our experimental adsorption data. A careful evaluation of t

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2001-06-15

134

Carbon Dioxide in the Gulf of Trieste  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coastal marine regions such as the Gulf of Trieste (GOT) in the Northern Adriatic Sea serve as the link between carbon cycling on land and the ocean interior and potentially contribute large uncertainties in the estimate of anthropogenic CO2 uptake. This system may be either a sink or a source for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the sources and sinks as a result of biological and physical controls for air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes in coastal waters may substantially alter the current view of the global carbon budget for unique terrestrial and ocean regions such as the GOT. GOT is a semi-enclosed Mediterranean basin situated in the northern part of Adriatic Sea. It is one of the most productive regions in the Mediterranean and is affected by extreme fresh river input, phytoplankton blooms, and large changes of air-sea exchange during Bora high wind events. The unique combination of these environmental processes and relatively small size of the area makes the region an excellent study site for investigations of air-sea interaction, and changes in biology and carbon chemistry. Here we investigate biological (phytoplankton blooms) and physical (freshwater input and winds) controls on the temporal variability of pCO2 in the GOT. The aqueous CO2 was measured at the Coastal Oceanographic buoy VIDA, Slovenia using the SAMI CO2 sensor. Our results indicate that: 1) The GOT was a sink for atmospheric CO2 in late spring of 2007; 2) Aqueous pCO2 was influenced by fresh water input from rivers entering the GOT and biological production associated with high nutrient input; 3) Surface water pCO2 showed a strong correlation with SST when river plumes where not present at the buoy location, and reasonable correlation with SSS during the presence of the plume.

Turk, D.; Malacic, V.; Degrandpre, M. D.; McGillis, W. R.

2009-04-01

135

Historical and present developments of ejector refrigeration systems with emphasis on transcritical carbon dioxide air-conditioning applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives an overview of historical and present developments on how ejectors can be utilized to improve the performance of air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. Research on ejector refrigeration cycles that utilize low-grade energy sources to produce cooling is summarized. Another major class of ejector refrigeration cycles that is described tries to recover expansion work by means of a two-phase

Stefan Elbel

2011-01-01

136

Growth and yield response of field-grown tropical rice to increasing carbon dioxide and air temperature  

SciTech Connect

Although the response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and air temperature has been examined at the greenhouse or growth chamber level, no field studies have been conducted under the tropical, irrigated conditions where the bulk of the world`s rice is grown. At the International Rice Research Institute, rice (cv. IR 72) was grown from germination until maturity for the 1994 wet and 1995 dry seasons at three different CO{sub 2} concentrations (ambient, ambient + 200, and ambient + 300 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1}) resulted in a significant increase in total plant biomass (+31%, +40%) and crop yield (+15%, + 27%) compared with the ambient control. The increase in crop yield was associated with an increase in the number of panicles per square meter and a greater percentage of filled spikelets. Simultaneous increases in CO{sub 2} and air temperature did not alter the biomass at maturity (relative to elevated CO{sub 2} alone), but plant development was accelerated at the higher growth temperature regardless of CO{sub 2} concentration. Grain yield, however, became insensitive to CO{sub 2} concentration at the higher growth temperature. Increasing both CO{sub 2} and air temperature also reduced grain quality (e.g., protein content). The combination of CO{sub 2} and temperature effects suggests that, in warmer regions (i.e., >34{degrees}C) where rice is grown, quantitative and qualitative changes in rice supply are possible if both CO{sub 2} and air temperature continue to increase. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Ziska, L.H. [USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD (United States); Namuco, O.; Moya, T.; Quilang, J. [International Rice Research Inst., Manila (Philippines)

1997-01-01

137

Photolytical Generation of Carbon Dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide has been found by Cassini VIMS throughout the Saturnian system in locations such as Iapetus' equator where the temperature is too high for it to remain as free ice for more than a few hundred years. We suggest that the 4.26 micron absorption feature found on Iapetus and Hyperion (that has been attributed to complexed CO2) is the result of either UV photolysis or ion bombardment driving chemistry between the carbon rich layer and the water ice regolith. We conducted experiments to simulate the generation of CO2 by UV radiation under conditions similar to those on the surface of Iapetus. A simulated icy regolith was created in an argon atmosphere using flash-frozen, degassed water crushed into sub-millimeter sized particles. Isotopically labeled amorphous carbon (13C), which was ground into a fine dust, was mixed into the regolith allowing for extensive grain contact. This sample was placed in a vacuum chamber and cooled to temperatures as low at 60K. The sample was irradiated with UV light, and the products were measured using both a mass spectrometer to identify free molecules and an IR spectrometer for molecules that remained trapped on and in the simulated regolith. We report on the production and reaction rates of CO2 and CO, as well as the generation of free hydrogen and oxygen as detected by a SRS-100 mass spectrometer. We also identify residual products that either freeze on the surface or become entrained by or adsorbed onto the ice grains. We attempt to match the CO2 absorption feature found on Iapetus with that seen in our simulation, perhaps identifying a possible source of CO2 in the Saturnian system. Finally, we estimate the time required for these reactions to occur on Iapetus to see if UV photolysis would be effective.

Palmer, E. E.; Brown, R. H.

2008-12-01

138

Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Chemically Modified Carbon Adsorbents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon adsorbents were chemically modified to have base sites on their surfaces, and the adsorption characteristics of carbon dioxide on them were investigated. Three kinds of carbon materials were used as support materials: two activated carbons and a carbon black. Base sites were introduced by impregnating the support materials with calcium acetate solution, followed by calcination at 700C for 2

Hyun-K Song; Kun-Hing Lee

1998-01-01

139

Silver oxide sorbent for carbon dioxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Material can be regenerated at least 20 times by heating at 250 C. Sorbent is compatible with environment of high humidity; up to 20% by weight of carbon dioxide can be absorbed. Material is prepared from silver carbonate, potassium hydroxide or carbonate, and sodium silicate.

Colombo, G. V.

1974-01-01

140

Global Deforestation: Contribution to Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 1015 and 228 1015 grams. Between 1.8 1015 and 4.7 1015 grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly

G. M. Woodwell; J. E. Hobbie; R. A. Houghton; J. M. Melillo; B. Moore; B. J. Peterson; G. R. Shaver

1983-01-01

141

LIFETIME OF EXCESS ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE  

EPA Science Inventory

We explore the effects of a changing terrestrial biosphere on the atmospheric residende time of carbon dioxide using three simple ocean carbon cycling models and a model of global terrestrial carbon cycling. e find differences in model behavior associated with the assumption of a...

142

Carbon Dioxide Absorption and Desorption by Tris with Carbonic Anhydrase.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One concept of carbon dioxide control in aerospace vehicle atmosphere regeneration and control requires an efficient gas absorber which is effective in a moist gas stream. A tris (tri(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane) solution containing the enzyme, carbonic an...

J. P. Allen

1967-01-01

143

Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Concentrator Subsystem Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fabrication of a one-person Electrochemical Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator subsystem incorporating advanced electrochemical, mechanical, and control and monitor instrumentation concepts is discussed. This subsystem included an advanced liquid...

D. B. Heppner, M. J. Dahlausen, F. H. Schubert

1983-01-01

144

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

EIA Publications

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01

145

Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the ...

M. C. Trachtenberg

1998-01-01

146

Cost Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Concentrators.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A methodology is developed to predict the relevant contributions of the more intangible cost elements encountered in the development of flight-qualified hardware and is used to predict the costs of three carbon dioxide concentration systems. The cost and ...

M. M. Yakut

1972-01-01

147

Carbon Dioxide Catastrophes: Past and Future Menace.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbon dioxide is important in its role as coupler of the terrestrial biosphere to inorganic chemical processes and as the principal greenhouse gas controlling Earth's surface temperature. The hypothesis that atmospheric CO2 levels have diminished with ti...

M. E. Baur

1988-01-01

148

Field performance testing of a Free-Air Controlled Enrichment (FACE) system for the regulation of carbon dioxide concentrations in a cotton field at Yazoo City, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

A Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) array was assembled in a cotton field at Yazoo City, MS, in the summer of 1987 to develop and evaluate control of CO/sub 2/ concentrations over extended periods in an agricultural setting. A variety of system configurations was tested in 17 case-runs, at CO/sub 2/ concentration set points of 500, 600 and 700 ppM. Reliable data were obtained from 532 hours out of 602 hours of operation. In general, a better degree of control was obtained at the 500 and 600 ppM set points than at 700 ppM. In the worst case, 1-second observations differed by more than 20% of the 700 ppM set point for no more than 17% of the time. In the best case, 1-sec CO/sub 2/ concentration was 20% or more away from the 500 ppM set point for no more than 6% of the time. The coefficients of variation for daytime measurements at a 600 ppM set point were 0.16, 0.07, 0.03, and 0.02, for 1-second, 5-minute, 30-minute and 1-hour aggregations, respectively, indicating the effect of data aggregation on perceived performance. Over all, the FACE system greatly exceeded performance criteria. Analysis and discussion of factors influencing system performance are presented. Field site selection and layout, advantages and disadvantages of the Yazoo City field site, and the physical FACE system and its control equipment and software are described. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Kolber, Z.; Kolber, D.; Lipfert, F.W.; Daum, M.

1988-12-01

149

The effect of free air carbon dioxide enrichment and nitrogen fertilisation on the chemical composition and nutritional value of wheat and barley grain.  

PubMed

A rising atmospheric CO2 concentration might influence the nutrient composition of feedstuffs and consequently the nutritional value for livestock. The present study investigates the effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on the chemical composition and nutritional value of winter wheat cv. "Batis" and winter barley cv. "Theresa". Both cereals were grown at two different atmospheric CO2 concentrations (ambient CO2 [AMBI]: 380ppm and enriched CO2 [free air carbon dioxide enrichment, FACE]: 550ppm) for two growing seasons. The influence of two different nitrogen (N) fertilisation levels (adequate N supply [N100] and nearly 50% of adequate N supply [N50]) were studied as well. A significant effect was observed for the crude protein content, which declined at FACE condition in a range of 8-16gkg(-1) in wheat and of 10-20gkg(-1) in barley. A reduced N fertilisation level resulted in a strong reduction of crude protein concentration in both cereal species. In wheat, a decrease in N supply significantly enhanced the concentration of starch and crude fibre. In barley, only the concentration of fructose increased under FACE condition and reduced N fertilisation. The FACE did not have major effects on the concentrations of minerals, while the influence of N fertilisation was different for both cereals. Whereas no effects could be observed for barley, a reduced N supply caused a significant reduction in concentrations of zinc, manganese and iron in wheat. Furthermore, an undirected effect of atmospheric CO2 and N fertilisation levels were found for the amino acid concentrations. Based on these results, future scenarios of climate change would have an impact on the nutritional value of cereal grains. PMID:23870025

Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Hther, Liane; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Wtzig, Hermann; Dnicke, Sven

2013-08-01

150

Atmospheric carbon dioxide record from flask measurements at Lampedusa Island  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Air samples from Lampedusa Island, located south of Sicily in the Mediterranean sea, were collected weekly from May 1992 through December 2000 and analyzed for carbon dioxide content. "On the basis of annual averages calculated from monthly averages, CO2 levels at Lampedusa Island have risen from 360.80 in 1993 to 371.27 in 2000. The data show an average trend of +1.5 ppmv/y." The data from the study, newly available this month from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), include a plot of mean carbon dioxide concentration (ppmv) against time and a text table of the annual mean values. Methods, notes, and references are also provided.

Chamard, Paolo.; Ciattaglia, Luigi.; Di Sarra, Alcide.; Monteleone, Francesco.

2001-01-01

151

Preparation of titania\\/silica mesoporous composites with activated carbon template in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Titania\\/silica mesoporous composites have been prepared with nanoscale casting process using activated carbon as template in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The composite precursor of tetrabutyl titanate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were dissolved in supercritical CO2, and then coated on activated carbon in the desired supercritical condition. After removal of activated carbon template by calcinations in air at 600C, TiO2\\/SiO2

Qun Xu; Haijuan Fan; Yiqun Guo; Yanxia Cao

2006-01-01

152

Nanoporous ferric oxide prepared with activated carbon template in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanoporous ferric oxide has been prepared with nanoscale casting process using activated carbon template in supercritical carbon dioxide. The precursors with the cosolvent of acetone were dissolved in supercritical CO2, and then attached to activated carbon in the supercritical condition. After removal of the activated carbon template by calcinations in air at 873K, the nanoporous Fe2O3 was obtained. Four factors

Haijuan Fan; Qun Xu; Yiqun Guo; Qi Peng; Zhenzhong Hou

2006-01-01

153

Mitigating strategies for carbon dioxide problems  

SciTech Connect

Society can take steps to enhance our ability to adapt more easily to carbon dioxide induced changes. Given the rapidity of social and technological change in the twentieth century, facilitating adjustment is important. With the exception of data collection and analysis focused on climate, enhancing each of these functions will be to the general benefit of society, but will not be unique to carbon dioxide-induced problems. Carbon dioxide issues can provide a rationale, but more probably will be a catalyst, for pushing society to enhance its ability to adapt to and exploit change. Carbon dioxide is but one of many factors which will have an enormous impact on the economic and social institutions of the United States in the twenty-first century. If carbon dioxide-induced changes were as large as now appears possible, and if they were the only major change, then it would be worthwhile to invest in enhancing education and capital formation so that we could minimize the effects of adverse changes and take advantage of beneficial ones. Since carbon dioxide-induced changes are likely to be only one, possibly small, source of change, there is all the more reason to devote resources to making our economic and social institutions more flexible and adaptable. 7 references.

Lave, L.B.

1982-05-01

154

Hydraulic time constants for transpiration of loblolly pine at a free-air carbon dioxide enrichment site.  

PubMed

The impact of stored water on estimates of transpiration from scaled sap flux measurements was assessed in mature Pinus taeda (L.) at the Duke Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) site. We used a simple hydraulic model with measurements of sap flux (J) at breast height and the base of the live crown for 26 trees over 6 months to examine the effects of elevated CO(2) (eCO(2)) and fertilization (N(F)) treatments, as well as temporal variation in soil moisture (M(()(t)())), on estimates of the hydraulic time constant (?). At low M(()(t)()), there was little (<12%) difference in ? of different treatments. At high M(()(t)()), differences were much greater, with ? reductions of 27, 52 and 34% in eCO(2), N(F) and eCO(2)??N(F) respective to the control. Incorporating ? with these effects into the analysis of a larger data set of previous J measurements at this site (1998-2008) improved agreement between modeled and measured values in 92% of cases. However, a simplified calibration of ? that neglected treatment and soil moisture effects performed more dependably, improving agreement in 98% of cases. Incorporating ? had the effect of increasing estimates of reference stomatal conductance at 1 kPa vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and saturating photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) an average of 12-14%, while increasing estimated sensitivities to VPD and PAR. A computationally efficient hydraulic model, such as the one presented here, incorporated into a hierarchical model of stomatal conductance presents a novel approach to including hydraulic time constants in estimates of stomatal responses from long-term sap flux data sets. PMID:23192973

Ward, Eric J; Bell, David M; Clark, James S; Oren, Ram

2013-02-01

155

Mineralization strategies for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in three primary research areas--each concerned with sequestering carbon dioxide into mineral matrices. Direct mineral carbonation was pioneered at Albany Research Center. The method treats the reactant, olivine or serpentine in aqueous media with carbon dioxide at high temperature and pressure to form stable mineral carbonates. Recent results are introduced for pretreatment by high-intensity grinding to improve carbonation efficiency. To prove feasibility of the carbonation process, a new reactor was designed and operated to progress from batch tests to continuous operation. The new reactor is a prototype high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop reactor that will furnish information on flow, energy consumption, and wear and corrosion resulting from slurry flow and the carbonation reaction. A promising alternative mineralization approach is also described. New data are presented for long-term exposure of carbon dioxide to Colombia River Basalt to determine the extent of conversion of carbon dioxide to permanent mineral carbonates. Batch autoclave tests were conducted using drill-core samples of basalt and reacted under conditions that simulate in situ injection into basalt-containing geological formations.

Penner, Larry R.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.

2003-01-01

156

A correlation of optimal heat rejection pressures in transcritical carbon dioxide cycles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, a cycle simulation model has been developed to optimize the coefficient of performance (COP) of transcritical carbon dioxide air-conditioning cycles. The analysis shows that the COP of the transcritical carbon dioxide cycle varies nonmonotonically with the heat rejection pressure; a maximum COP occurs at an optimal heat rejection pressure. It is further revealed that the values of

S. M. Liao; T. S. Zhao; A. Jakobsen

2000-01-01

157

Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N limitation. C-LAMP is a sub-project of the Computational Climate Science End Station led by Dr. Warren Washington, using computing resources at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS).

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Covey, Curtis [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2008-01-01

158

Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO2]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 232% when the surrounding air [CO2] was raised to 550~ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA' and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO2] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO2] was abruptly raised to 550~ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO2] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40N to 70N. For CLM3- CASA', the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N limitation. C-LAMP is a sub-project of the Computational Climate Science End Station led by Dr. Warren Washington, using computing resources at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS). lamp/

Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Thornton, P.; Covey, C.; Bonan, G.; Running, S.; Norby, R.

2008-12-01

159

Carbon dioxide sequestration by ex-situ mineral carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process developed for carbon dioxide sequestration utilizes a slurry of water mixed with olivine- forsterite end member (MgSiO), which is reacted with supercritical CO to produce magnesite (MgCO). Carbon dioxide is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid, which likely dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO⁻. The H{sup +} hydrolyzes the silicate mineral, freeing the cation (Mg{sup 2+}), which

W. K. OConnor; D. C. Dahlin; P. C. Turner

2000-01-01

160

Carbon Dioxide- Where Does it All Go?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will use a diagram of carbon fluxes, which shows the sources that contribute to current atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This problem is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

161

Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2005-05-10

162

Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2010-02-02

163

Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

2005-05-10

164

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and carbon reservoir changes.  

PubMed

The net release of CO(2) from the biosphere to the atmosphere between 1850 and 1950 is estimated to amount to 1.2 x 10(9) tons of carbon per year. During this interval, changes in land use reduced the total terrestrial biomass by 7 percent. There has been a smaller reduction in biomass over the last few decades. In the middle 19th century the air had a CO(2) content of approximately 268 parts per millon, and the total increase in atmospheric CO(2) content since 1850 has been 18 percent. Major sinks for fossil fuel CO(2) are the thermocline regions of large oceanic gyres. About 34 percent of the excess CO(2) generated so far is stored in surface and thermocline gyre waters, and 13 percent has been advected into the deep sea. This leaves an airborne fraction of 53 percent. PMID:17759647

Stuiver, M

1978-01-20

165

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project has developed, an important additional objective has been added to the above original list. Namely, we have been encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we have participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing directly to the DOE projects listed above, have also provided direct synergism with the original goals of our work. Specific accomplishments of this project during the current reporting period are summarized in three broad categories outlining experimentation, model development, and coal characterization.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2003-03-10

166

Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture  

PubMed Central

New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

2014-01-01

167

Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1960 and 1980 was between 135 X 10¹⁵ and 228 X 10¹⁵ grams. Between 1.8 X 10¹⁵ and 4.7 X 10¹⁵ grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly

G. M. Woodwell; J. E. Hobbie; R. A. Houghton; J. M. Melillo; B. Moore; B. J. Peterson; G. R. Shaver

1983-01-01

168

Polymers for metal extractions in carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

A composition useful for the extraction of metals and metalloids comprises (a) carbon dioxide fluid (preferably liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide); and (b) a polymer in the carbon dioxide, the polymer having bound thereto a ligand that binds the metal or metalloid; with the ligand bound to the polymer at a plurality of locations along the chain length thereof (i.e., a plurality of ligands are bound at a plurality of locations along the chain length of the polymer). The polymer is preferably a copolymer, and the polymer is preferably a fluoropolymer such as a fluoroacrylate polymer. The extraction method comprises the steps of contacting a first composition containing a metal or metalloid to be extracted with a second composition, the second composition being as described above; and then extracting the metal or metalloid from the first composition into the second composition.

DeSimone, Joseph M. (7315 Crescent Ridge Dr., Chapel Hill, NC 27516); Tumas, William (1130 Big Rock Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Powell, Kimberly R. (103 Timber Hollow Ct. Apartment 323, Chapel Hill, NC 27514); McCleskey, T. Mark (1930 Camino Mora, Los Alamos, NM 87544); Romack, Timothy J. (5810 Forest Ridge Dr., Durham, NC 27713); McClain, James B. (8530 Sommersweet La., Raleigh, NC 27612); Birnbaum, Eva R. (1930 Camino Mora, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

2001-01-01

169

Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere and in Atlantic Ocean Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation of carbon dioxide partial pressures in the atmosphere and surface ocean conducted as part of a cooperative study under the general sponsorship of the International Geophysical Year is summarized. Results are given for about 470 hours of air analyses and 200 individual surface ocean water measurements made from 1957 to 1959 between 60N and 58S. Over the Atlantic

Taro Takahashi

1961-01-01

170

Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1960 and 1980 was between 135 X 10/sup 15/ and 228 X 10/sup 15/ grams. Between 1.8 X 10/sup 15/ and 4.7 X 10/sup 15/ grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the releases from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 X 10/sup 15/ grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed.

Woodwell, G.M.; Hobbie, J.E.; Houghton, R.A.; Melillo, J.M.; Moore, B.; Peterson, B.J.; Shaver, G.R.

1983-12-09

171

Carbon Dioxide Removal System of the Regenerable Solid Adsorbent Type.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of a regenerable carbon dioxide removal system is discussed. The system utilizes solid zeolites to adsorb carbon dioxide and silica gel for predrying the gas stream. The system is completely regenerable, operates automatically and continuo...

G. A. Remus P. P. Nuccio R. J. Honegger

1969-01-01

172

International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Performance testing of the International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly flight hardware in the United States Laboratory during 1999 is described. The CDRA exceeded carbon dioxide performance specifications and operated flawlessly. Data from this test is presented.

Knox, James C.

2000-01-01

173

46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a)...

2013-10-01

174

Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

1993-01-01

175

Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

1991-01-01

176

Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

2005-01-01

177

Carbon dioxide dynamics in an artificial ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental artificial ecosystem was established as a tool to understand the behavior of closed ecosystem and to develop the technology for a future bioregenerative life support system for lunar or planetary exploration. Total effective volume of the system is 0.7 m3 . It consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a photo-bioreactor which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella), respectively. For uniform and sustained observations, lettuce and silkworms was cultivated using sequential cultivation method, and microalgae using continuous culture. Four researchers took turns breathing the system air through a tube for brief periods every few hours. A mathematic model, simulating the carbon dioxide dynamics was developed. The main biological parameters concerning photosynthesis of lettuce and microalgae, respiration of silkworms and human were validated by the experimental data. The model described the respiratory relationship between autotrophic and heterotrophic compartments. A control strategy was proposed as a tool for the atmosphere management of the artificial ecosystem.

Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Liu, Hong

178

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

EIA Publications

U.S. Energy Information Administration releases its online analysis of 2012 energy-related carbon dioxide emissions today. It indicates U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of fossil fuels were 5,290 million metric tons carbon dioxide in 2012, a decrease of almost 4% from the 2011 level. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions have declined in five of the last seven years and are the lowest they have been since 1994.

2013-10-21

179

Carbon Dioxide Research Conference: Carbon Dioxide, Science and Consensus.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The DOE program focuses on three areas each of which requires more research before the many CO sub 2 -related questions can be answered. These areas include the global carbon cycle, climate effects, and vegetation effects. Additional information is needed...

1983-01-01

180

Methanation of carbon dioxide: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although being very challenging, utilization of carbon dioxide (CO2) originating from production processes and flue gases of CO2-intensive sectors has a great environmental and industrial potential due to improving the resource efficiency of industry\\u000a as well as by contributing to the reduction of CO2 emissions. As a renewable and environmentally friendly source of carbon, catalytic approaches for CO2 fixation in

Wang Wei; Gong Jinlong

2011-01-01

181

Platinum catalyst for forming carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a platinum wire catalytic apparatus for catalyzing the reaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen to form carbon dioxide by directly heating the catalyst to an activation temperature of about 1000{degrees} C. The improvement comprises a layer of platinum black deposited on the surface of the platinum wire to form a coating whereby the wire with the coating is directly heated to an activation temperature within the range of about 150 to 300{degrees} C.

McNeil, J.A.; Cohn, D.B.

1991-05-28

182

A Simple Model for Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will create and use a differential equation of rate-of-change of atmospheric carbon dioxide. They will refer to the "Keeling Curve" graph and information on the sources and sinks of carbon on Earth to create the equation and apply it to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

183

Carbon dioxide hydrationand dehydration kinetics in seawater  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rate constants for the hydration and dehydration reactions of carbon dioxide with water and with hydroxyl ion were measured in seawater by a pH-stat method at salinities (X lO:l) from 3.4 to 37.06 at 25C and from 5\\

Kenneth S. Johnson

1982-01-01

184

Carbon dioxide embolism during endoscopic vein harvesting.  

PubMed

Endoscopic vein harvesting (EVH) is becoming common for the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Using carbon dioxide insufflations during the vein harvest can produce rare but catastrophic CO(2) embolism. We report a case of massive right atrial CO(2) embolism due to femoral vein injury which occurred during the performance of a routine EVH procedure. PMID:18381362

Tamim, Muhammed; Omrani, Maher; Tash, Adel; El Watidy, Ahmed

2008-08-01

185

Ocean Acidification: The Other Carbon Dioxide Problem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NOAA video discusses how the ocean absorbs the increased amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, thereby changing the pH and buffering action of the ocean. These changes in pH are impacting calcifying organisms, such as corals and shellfish, and related food chains and ecosystems.

Noaa; Administration, National O.

186

Carbon dioxide laser management cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this report we describe the use of the carbon dioxide laser for the outpatient management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A comparison of treatment effectiveness for different grades of CIN is also included. Two hundred fifty-six cases were evaluated by colposcopy, cytology, and histopathology, treated by at least 5 to 6 mm of laser vaporization, and followed up for

J. H. Bellina; V. C. Wright; J. I. Voros; M. A. Riopelle; V. Hohenschutz

1981-01-01

187

Geothermal carbon dioxide for use in greenhouses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geothermal fluids often contain carbon dioxide, which is a very effective growth stimulant for plants in greenhouses. Studies have shown that as CO concentration is increased from a normal level of 300 ppm (mmol\\/kmol) to levels of approximately 1000 ppm crop yields may increase by up to 15% (Ullmann`s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, 1989). It is suggested that geothermal greenhouse

M. G. Dunstall; G. Graeber

1997-01-01

188

World Electricity Consumption and Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will analyze a table of global electricity consumption to answer a series of questions and consider the production of carbon dioxide associated with that consumption. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

189

Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Anderson, SC)

2001-01-01

190

Nitrile oxide cycloadditions in supercritical carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

The regioselectivity of dipolar cycloadditions of mesitonitrile oxide to various dipolarophiles in supercritical carbon dioxide can be tuned by changes in density, the magnesium bromide-mediated cycloaddition to pent-1-en-3-ol proceeding with higher stereoselectivity than in most conventional solvents. PMID:15543310

Lee, Connie K Y; Holmes, Andrew B; Al-Duri, Bushra; Leeke, Gary A; Santos, Regina C D; Seville, Jonathan P K

2004-11-21

191

Recent Events: a Perspective on Carbon Dioxide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will compare the carbon dioxide produced as a result of two 2010 events: the eruption of the Eyjafjalla Volcano and the burning of oil on the ocean surface to address the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

192

DIETHANOLAMINE-CARBON DIOXIDE BUFFER PRODUCES ETHYLENE  

EPA Science Inventory

Carbon dioxide concentrates in containers are frequently controlled by using a diethanolamine-bicarbonate buffer. Current studies show that this buffer produces ethylene and that the production increases with increasing pH and/or time in the incubation vessel. Ethylene is not pro...

193

Urban carbon dioxide in Portland, Oregon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region since late July, 2009. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites average 400-410ppm and show considerable variability due to CO2 sources, sinks and meteorological drivers of ventilation. Within this variability, a marked 20-30ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO2 is dominated by petroleum sources (70-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO (r2=0.70 to 0.80), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO2 concentrations. In addition to CO2 at the fixed sites, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer. Results from these field data show relatively homogenous CO2 concentrations throughout residential Portland neighborhoods with significant enhancements in CO2 on busy roadways or near areas of traffic congestion.

Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M.; Rice, A. L.

2010-12-01

194

27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General...not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100...

2010-04-01

195

27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General...not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100...

2009-04-01

196

27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General...not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100...

2010-04-01

197

27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section...Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT...52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General...not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100...

2009-04-01

198

Absorption of carbon dioxide in waste tanks (October 21, 1986).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide in eight waste tanks located in H-Area has been monitored for a period of six months. All of the tanks are continuously absorbing carbon dioxide. Approximately 75% of the carbon dioxide entering the waste tanks...

D. T. Hobbs

1986-01-01

199

49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered...

2010-10-01

200

49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered...

2009-10-01

201

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three

C A Smith; A J Simon; R D Belles

2011-01-01

202

Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

Holmes, R. F. (inventor)

1973-01-01

203

Vegetation Response to Carbon Dioxide and Climate: Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to vegetation response to carbon dioxide and climate includes: Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) (Trends Online) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001) Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000) Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994) A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (1999) A Database of Woody Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 (1999) Forest Responses to Anthropogenic Stress (FORAST) Database (1995) Effects of CO2 and Nitrogen Fertilization on Growth and Nutrient Content of Juvenile Ponderosa Pine (1998) Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2Irrigation, and Nitrogen (1992) Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine Pinus Virginiana Mill.(1985)

204

HIGH PRESSURE VAPOR LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM FOR CARBON DIOXIDE + ETHANOL + 2BUTANONE SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vapor-liquid equilibrium was measured for three binary systems, carbon dioxide + ethanol, carbon dioxide + 2-butanone, and ethanol + 2-butanone, and a ternary system, carbon dioxide + ethanol + 2-butanone, at 313.2K. A circulation type apparatus was used in case of the high pressure systems, carbon dioxide + ethanol, carbon dioxide + 2-butanone, and carbon dioxide + ethanol + 2-butanone,

Tomoya TSUJI; Masatoshi SAKAI; Toshihiko HIAKI

205

Quadrupole-based mass spectrometric evaluation of isotope ratios of carbon dioxide in expired air from mice and men following the administration of 13 C-methyl methionine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for the measurement of the isotopic ratio of 13CO2\\/12CO2 in expired air from individual mice and from humans by means of a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer system. Following the\\u000a administration of 13C-methyl methionine or another appropriately labeled substrate, the 13C portion of the molecule is converted to 13CO2. The 13CO2 enters the carbonate pool(s) and is ultimately

Raymond L. Furner; Renato D. Alarcon; Tomeko Irving

1992-01-01

206

The potential use of carbon dioxide as a carrier gas for drug delivery into open wounds.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide is a fundamental biological gas and due to its unique properties it is frequently used as a medical gas. In minimally invasive surgery carbon dioxide is insufflated into the "closed" surgical wound to facilitate laparoscopy. Furthermore, a method has recently been developed to create a local atmosphere of 100% carbon dioxide in an open wound to prevent air embolism and ensuing neurological impairment in open heart surgery. In the present paper the authors propose that carbon dioxide also may be used as a carrier gas for delivery of potent medical agents into a wound. With theoretical and experimental arguments the authors explain why carbon dioxide should be suitable for this purpose, and describe the potential advantages and implications of the suggested method. PMID:18990501

Persson, Mikael; van der Linden, Jan

2009-02-01

207

Fate of air pollutants: removal of ethylene, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide by soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ultimate sink for many air pollutants is unknown. Data are presented here in support of the idea that reaction with soil, through microbial or chemical means, can remove ethylene, other hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide from the air. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

F. B. Abeles; L. E. Craker; L. E. Forrence; G. R. Leather

1971-01-01

208

High Levels of Carbon Dioxide Threaten Oyster Survival  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It has been widely reported that the build up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air, which is caused by human behavior, will likely lead to climate change and have major implications for life on earth. But less focus has been given to global warmings evil twin, ocean acidification, which occurs when CO2 lowers the pH of water bodies, thus making them more acidic. This lesser known phenomenon may have catastrophic effects on all sea life. Inna Sokolova, associate professor of biology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studies the affect of high carbon dioxide on oyster survival, growth and shell hardness. The results of her research suggest that creatures once thought to be fairly adaptable to changes in the environment, may be in serious trouble.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2010-08-04

209

Carbon Dioxide: Production and Sequestration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will refer to a satellite image to calculate the rate of carbon sequestration in the areas of bare land and forested lawn shown to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

210

The Headache of Carbon Dioxide Exposures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbon dioxide (CO2), a natural product of human metabolism, accumulates quickly in sealed environments when humans are present, and can induce headaches, among other symptoms. Major resources are expended to control CO2 levels to concentrations that are tolerable to the crews of spacecraft and submersible craft. It is not practical to control CO2 levels to those found in the ambient environment on earth. As NASA looks ahead to long-duration missions conducted far from earth, difficult issues arise related to the management and effects of human exposure to CO2. One is the problem of pockets of CO2 in the habitat caused by excess generation of the gas in one location without a mechanism to purge the area with fresh air. This results in the crew rebreathing CO2 from their exhaled breath, exposing them to a much higher concentration of CO2 than whole-module measurements would suggest. Another issue is the potential increased sensitivity to CO2 in microgravity. For example, based on anecdotal information, it appears that space crews may be more susceptible than submarine crews to some of the subtle, yet adverse effects of CO2 exposure. Another issue, not unique to spaceflight, is the possibility of inter-individual differences in the susceptibility of crewmembers to CO2 exposure. Again, anecdotal reports from the International Space Station (ISS) crews suggest that certain individuals may experience a greater susceptibility. The implications associated with these issues are extremely important as NASA sets CO2 exposure limits that protect the crew from this compound s subtle adverse effects, without causing an unwarranted expenditure of resources to scrub CO2 from the habitat atmosphere.

James, John T.

2007-01-01

211

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid  

SciTech Connect

The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine and 84% conversion of olivine to the carbonate in 6 hours. The results from the current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, or some combination of the two. Future tests are intended to examine a broader pressure/temperature regime, various pretreatment options, as well as other mineral groups.

O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

2000-01-01

212

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2001-01-01

213

Climate impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The global temperature rose by 0.2/sup 0/C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4/sup 0/C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.

Hansen, J.; Johnson, D.; Lacis, A.; Lebedeff, S.; Lee, P.; Rind, D.; Russell, G.

1981-08-28

214

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4 degrees C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.

Hansen, J.; Johnson, D.; Lacis, A.; Lebedeff, S.; Lee, P.; Rind, D.; Russell, G.

1981-08-01

215

[Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO[sub 2]. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO[sub 2] on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO[sub 2] in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

Not Available

1992-01-01

216

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The global temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4 degrees C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-01-01

217

Solubilities of phenols in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium solubilities of pure anthracene at 50 C, 1-naphthol at 35, 45, and 55 C, and hydroquinone at 35 and 45 C in supercritical carbon dioxide over a pressure range of about 85--300 bar have been measured using a supercritical fluid extractor coupled with an external high-pressure liquid chromatographer. The solubility results, along with those for other phenols reported in the literature, are correlated with the translated-modified Peng Robinson equation of state.

Coutsikos, P.; Magoulas, K.; Tassios, D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

1995-07-01

218

Carbon dioxide capture with concentrated, aqueous piperazine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrated, aqueous piperazine (PZ) has been investigated as a novel amine solvent for carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption. The CO2 absorption rate of aqueous PZ is more than double that of 7m MEA and the amine volatility at 40C ranges from 11 to 21ppm. Thermal degradation is negligible in concentrated, aqueous PZ up to a temperature of 150C, a significant advantage

Stephanie A. Freeman; Ross Dugas; David H. Van Wagener; Thu Nguyen; Gary T. Rochelle

2010-01-01

219

Improved immobilized carbon dioxide capture sorbents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capture of carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas streams has been achieved by using immobilized and aminated-SBA-15 solid sorbents. SBA-15, a mesoporous silica material with a uniform pore size of 21 nm and a surface area of 200?230 m2\\/g. The solid sorbents prepared in this study exhibit similar or improved capacities relative to those already used to control CO2

M. L. Gray; Y. Soong; K. J. Champagne; H. Pennline; J. P. Baltrus; R. W. Stevens Jr.; R. Khatri; S. S. C. Chuang; T. Filburn

2005-01-01

220

Polymerizations in Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past few years, remarkable progress has been made in defining the scope and limitations of carbon dioxide (CO2) as an inert polymerization medium. It has appear that CO2 represents a viable solvent choice for a variety of propagation mechanisms including both chain growth and step growth polymerizations.\\u000a When the environmental advantages of CO2 are combined with its ability

Dorian A. Canelas; Joseph M. DeSimone

221

Transport of Carbon Dioxide and Radioactive Waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A comparative assessment of carbon dioxide (CO2) and radioactive waste transport systems associated with electricity generation was undertaken on the basis of 15 criteria\\u000a grouped under three areas, namely the transport chain, policy aspects and state of the technology. For CO2, we considered exclusively the transport that would take place under a future large-scale capture and storage infrastructure.\\u000a Our study

Daro R. Gmez; Michael Tyacke

222

A weekly cycle in atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new statistic called the Mean Symmetrized Residual (MSR) for detection and quantification of a weekly cycle in measured daily atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). At the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, we conclude that CO2 concentrations, on average, are significantly lower (0.022 parts per million by volume, ppmv) on weekends (SaturdaySunday) than during the rest of the week.

Randall S. Cerveny; Kevin J. Coakley

2002-01-01

223

Bench-to-bedside review: Carbon dioxide  

PubMed Central

Carbon dioxide is a waste product of aerobic cellular respiration in all aerobic life forms. PaCO2 represents the balance between the carbon dioxide produced and that eliminated. Hypocapnia remains a common - and generally underappreciated - component of many disease states, including early asthma, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and acute lung injury. Induction of hypocapnia remains a common, if controversial, practice in both adults and children with acute brain injury. In contrast, hypercapnia has traditionally been avoided in order to keep parameters normal. More recently, advances in our understanding of the role of excessive tidal volume has prompted clinicians to use ventilation strategies that result in hypercapnia. Consequently, hypercapnia has become increasingly prevalent in the critically ill patient. Hypercapnia may play a beneficial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation and tissue injury, but may hinder the host response to sepsis and reduce repair. In contrast, hypocapnia may be a pathogenic entity in the setting of critical illness. The present paper reviews the current clinical status of low and high PaCO2 in the critically ill patient, discusses the insights gained to date from studies of carbon dioxide, identifies key concerns regarding hypocapnia and hypercapnia, and considers the potential clinical implications for the management of patients with acute lung injury.

2010-01-01

224

Carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy  

PubMed Central

Bariatric restrictive and malabsorptive operations are being carried out in most countries laparoscopically. Carbon dioxide or gas embolism has never been reported in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. We report a case of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in a young super obese female patient. Early diagnosis and successful management of this complication are discussed. An 18-year-old super obese female patient with enlarged fatty liver underwent LSG under general anesthesia. During initial intra-peritoneal insufflation with CO2 at high flows through upper left quadrant of the abdomen, she had precipitous fall of end-tidal CO2 and SaO2 % accompanied with tachycardia. Early suspicion led to stoppage of further insufflation. Clinical parameters were stabilized after almost 30 min, while the blood gas analysis was restored to normal levels after 1 h. The area of gas entrainment on the damaged liver was recognized by the surgeon and sealed and the surgery was successfully carried out uneventfully. Like any other laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide embolism can occur during bariatric laparoscopic surgery also. Caution should be exercised when Veress needle is inserted through upper left quadrant of the abdomen in patients with enlarged liver. A high degree of suspicion and prompt collaboration between the surgeon and anesthetist can lead to complete recovery from this potentially fatal complication.

Zikry, Amir Abu; DeSousa, Kalindi; Alanezi, Khaled H

2011-01-01

225

Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions  

SciTech Connect

A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

Gosink, T.A.; Kelley, J.J.

1981-03-01

226

Carbon dioxide makes heat therapy work  

SciTech Connect

Scientists can now propagate healthy blueberry and raspberry plants from virus-infected stock by treating it with heat and carbon dioxide. Plants are grown at 100/sup 0/F, which makes them develop faster than the virus can spread. Then cuttings are taken of the new growth - less than an inch long - and grown into full-sized, virus-free plants. But in this race to outdistance the virus, some plant species are not able to take the heat. Some even die. Chemical reactions double for every 14/sup 0/F rise in temperature. So, if you try to grow a plant at 100/sup 0/F that was originally growing at 86/sup 0/F, it will double its respiration rate. Adding carbon dioxide increases the rate of photosynthesis in plants, which increases the plant's food reserves. What carbon dioxide does to allow some plants to grow at temperatures at which they would otherwise not survive and it allows other plants to grow for longer periods at 100/sup 0/F. One problem with the process, says Converse, is that the longer plants are exposed to heat the greater the mutation rate. So, resulting clones should be closely examined for trueness to horticultural type.

Sherman, H.

1987-01-01

227

Extraction of furfural with carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

A new approach to separate furfural from aqueous waste has been investigated. Recovery of furfural and acetic acid from aqueous effluents of a paper mill has successfully been applied on an industrial scale since 1981. The process is based on the extraction of furfural and acetic acid by the solvent trooctylphosphineoxide (TOPO). Common extraction of both substances may cause the formation of resin residues. Improvement was expected by selective extraction of furfural with chlorinated hydrocarbons, but ecological reasons stopped further development of this project. The current investigation is centered in the evaluation of extraction of furfural by supercritical carbon dioxide. The influence of temperature and pressure on the extraction properties has been worked out. The investigation has considered the multi-component system furfural-acetic acid-water-carbon dioxide. Solubility of furfural in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide has been measured, and equilibrium data for the ternary system furfural-water-CO{sub 2} as well as for the quaternary system furfural-acetic acid-water-CO{sub 2} have been determined. A high-pressure extraction column has been used for evaluation of mass transfer rates.

Gamse, T.; Marr, R. [Institut fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Graz (Austria); Froeschl, F.; Siebenhofer, M. [VTU, Graz (Austria)

1997-01-01

228

Carbon dioxide reduction by the Bosch process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prototype units for carrying out the reduction of carbon dioxide to elementary carbon have been built and operated successfully. In some cases, however, startup difficulties have been reported. Moreover, the recycle reactor product has been reported to contain only small amounts of water and undesirably high yields of methane. This paper presents the results of the first phase of an experimental study that was carried out to define the mechanisms occurring in the reduction process. Conclusions are drawn and possible modifications to the present recycle process are suggested.

Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.

1975-01-01

229

Carbon dioxide capture at the molecular level.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide is recognized as a typical greenhouse gas and drastic reduction of CO2 emissions from industrial process is becoming more and more important in relation to global warming. In fact, the reaction between monoethanolamine (MEA) and CO2 in aqueous solution has been widely used for the removal from flue gases. In this study, the role of the interplay between solvent water and nitrogen (MEA)-carbon (CO2) bond formation is discussed based on the molecular theory using RISM-SCF-SEDD, which is the hybrid method of quantum chemistry of solute and statistical mechanics of solvent. PMID:19774287

Iida, Kenji; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Atsushi; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

2009-10-14

230

Carbon dioxide sensitivity of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.  

PubMed

Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks of zinc, cobalt, and cadmium, including the framework ZIF-8 commercially sold as Basolite Z1200, exhibit surprising sensitivity to carbon dioxide under mild conditions. The frameworks chemically react with CO2 in the presence of moisture or liquid water to form carbonates. This effect, which has been previously not reported in metal-organic framework chemistry, provides an explanation for conflicting reports on ZIF-8 stability to water and is of outstanding significance for evaluating the potential applications of metal-organic frameworks, especially for CO2 sequestration. PMID:24889776

Mottillo, Cristina; Fri?i?, Tomislav

2014-07-14

231

Carbon Dioxide Aquariums Greenhouse Gas Lesson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This classroom activity looks at carbon dioxide and its role in climate change. Students will perform an in-class experiment using aquariums. CO2 gas will be added to one aquarium, and measurements are taken of both aquariums over a one or two week period. This lesson includes step by step instructions on carrying out the experiment. The unit is a good introduction to the concepts of the carbon cycle, heat transfer, energy flow in ecosystems, the human impact on ecosystems and climate, non-renewable energy, resource consumption and pollution. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format. A class worksheet is included with the document.

Orzali, Joe

2009-01-01

232

Reduction of carbon dioxide on modified glassy carbon electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere gives an important contribution to environmental pollution due to the progressive increase of its production everywhere from many sources. It is believed now that the capacity of the biosphere, due to absorption and transformation of CO{sub 2}, has been considerably exceeded and many attempts to overcome this problem by different ways, have been successful. Electrochemical reduction seems to be an appropriate route for carbon dioxide consumption and its transformation to useful compounds. Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide on glassy carbon (GC) was studied by applying different potential regimes and monitoring the effect of the electrode surface conditioning, as well as the nature of supporting electrolyte, upon the nature of the reaction. In the case of constant potential electrolyses, a rapid decay of the cathodic current was observed, while application of a suitable pulse program to the working electrode, in addition to the ultrasonic cleaning of the surface, allowed completion of the reaction without premature current downfall. Modification of the electrode surface, by applying potential pulses, caused a decrease of the reduction potential of CO{sub 2} on glassy carbon. High yields in carbon monoxide and methanol were obtained in these media, with the highest value obtained for methanol in sodium chloride and carbon monoxide in ammonium oxalate.

Hernandez, R.M.; Marquez, J.; Marquez, O.P.; Choy, M.; Ovalles, C.; Garcia, J.J.; Scharifker, B.

1999-11-01

233

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Reservoir Changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The net release of CO2 from the biosphere to the atmosphere between 1850 and 1950 is estimated to amount to 1.2 109 tons of carbon per year. During this interval, changes in land use reduced the total terrestrial biomass by 7 percent. There has been a smaller reduction in biomass over the last few decades. In the middle 19th

Minze Stuiver

1978-01-01

234

Sequestering Naturally Occurring Liquid Carbon Dioxide in the Deep Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Liquid carbon dioxide has been found as shallow as 1,500 meters in seafloor ooze. Did the liquid carbon dioxide originate from volcanic activity? Or did bacteria convert organic matter, which started as atmospheric carbon dioxide, into methane and liquid carbon dioxide? At typical ocean temperatures carbon dioxide coming out of solution below 600 meters will be liquid. Therefore, one likely mechanism for generating liquid carbon dioxide in seafloor ooze is the bacterial decomposition of organic matter. This paper examines quantitative and qualitative bacterial decomposition of aquatic biomass, with an emphasis on assessing and demonstrating feasibility. Calculations suggest natural processes sequestering liquid carbon dioxide in the seafloor can be sustainably increased to decrease atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. First, algae growing on the ocean surface absorb carbon dioxide. The algae are then gathered into a submerged container. Naturally occurring bacteria will digest the algae producing methane, liquid carbon dioxide, and ammonium. The ammonium can be recycled as a nutrient for growing more algae. Bacterial decomposition continues in dilute solutions with any biomass. The process does not require any particular biomass. Also, concentrating the biomass by removing water is not essential. The buoyancy provided by water allows relatively inexpensive tension fabric structures to contain the dilute algae and decomposition products. Calculations based on algae growth in open ponds and experience with bacterial decomposition at 1 to 5 bar pressures suggest the economics of the associated macro-algae growing and harvesting can favor increasing ocean species diversity.

Capron, M. E.

2008-12-01

235

Carbon dioxide solubility and carbon isotope fractionation in basaltic melt  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide solubility and isotope fractionation data for a MORB composition at 1,200-1,400C and 5-20 kbar have been obtained using piston-cylinder apparatus and stepped-heating mass spectrometry. Carbon dioxide solubility in basalt melt at 5, 10 and 20 kbar is 0.15-0.17%, 0.45-0.51%, and 1.49%, respectively. Values for {Delta}Co{sub 2}(vap) - CO 2/3{sup {minus}} (basalt melt), obtained from the difference between the isotopic compositions for coexisting vapor and melt, vary from 1.8% to 2.2%. A review of measured and estimated values for carbon isotope fractionation between CO{sub 2} vapor and carbon dissolved in basic melts shows variation from 1.8% to 4.6%. Results of this study and other considerations favor relatively small equilibrium CO{sub 2} vapor melt fractionation factors around 2%.

Mattey, D.P. (Univ. of London, Egham Hill (United Kingdom) Univ. of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia))

1991-11-01

236

Tribological Studies on Scuffing Due to the Influence of Carbon Dioxide Used as a Refrigerant in Compressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in air-conditioning systems are known to have a negative effect on the environment, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a candidate as a replacement refrigerant. Research work related to CO2 as a refrigerant has been focused primarily on its thermodynamic performance, whereas work in the area of tribology related to carbon dioxide is absent. In this study, the

NICHOLAOS G. DEMAS; ANDREAS A. POLYCARPOU; THOMAS F. CONRY

2005-01-01

237

Automated carbon dioxide cleaning system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solidified CO2 pellets are an effective blast media for the cleaning of a variety of materials. CO2 is obtained from the waste gas streams generated from other manufacturing processes and therefore does not contribute to the greenhouse effect, depletion of the ozone layer, or the environmental burden of hazardous waste disposal. The system is capable of removing as much as 90 percent of the contamination from a surface in one pass or to a high cleanliness level after multiple passes. Although the system is packaged and designed for manual hand held cleaning processes, the nozzle can easily be attached to the end effector of a robot for automated cleaning of predefined and known geometries. Specific tailoring of cleaning parameters are required to optimize the process for each individual geometry. Using optimum cleaning parameters the CO2 systems were shown to be capable of cleaning to molecular levels below 0.7 mg/sq ft. The systems were effective for removing a variety of contaminants such as lubricating oils, cutting oils, grease, alcohol residue, biological films, and silicone. The system was effective on steel, aluminum, and carbon phenolic substrates.

Hoppe, David T.

1991-01-01

238

Carbon Dioxide Transport through Membranes*  

PubMed Central

Several membrane channels, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and the RhAG protein of the rhesus complex, were hypothesized to be of physiological relevance for CO2 transport. However, the underlying assumption that the lipid matrix imposes a significant barrier to CO2 diffusion was never confirmed experimentally. Here we have monitored transmembrane CO2 flux (JCO2) by imposing a CO2 concentration gradient across planar lipid bilayers and detecting the resulting small pH shift in the immediate membrane vicinity. An analytical model, which accounts for the presence of both carbonic anhydrase and buffer molecules, was fitted to the experimental pH profiles using inverse problems techniques. At pH 7.4, the model revealed that JCO2 was entirely rate-limited by near-membrane unstirred layers (USL), which act as diffusional barriers in series with the membrane. Membrane tightening by sphingomyelin and cholesterol did not alter JCO2 confirming that membrane resistance was comparatively small. In contrast, a pH-induced shift of the CO2 hydration-dehydration equilibrium resulted in a relative membrane contribution of about 15% to the total resistance (pH 9.6). Under these conditions, a membrane CO2 permeability (3.2 1.6 cm/s) was estimated. It indicates that cellular CO2 uptake (pH 7.4) is always USL-limited, because the USL size always exceeds 1 ?m. Consequently, facilitation of CO2 transport by AQP1, RhAG, or any other protein is highly unlikely. The conclusion was confirmed by the observation that CO2 permeability of epithelial cell monolayers was always the same whether AQP1 was overexpressed in both the apical and basolateral membranes or not.

Missner, Andreas; Kugler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Sommer, Klaus; Mathai, John C.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Pohl, Peter

2008-01-01

239

Carbon dioxide: A substitute for phosgene  

SciTech Connect

One of the many goals of the green chemistry movement is to eliminate the use of phosgene (COCl{sub 2}), an extremely hazardous compound used in many syntheses, including the production of carbamates, organic carbonates, and polymers. One of the most interesting options for eliminating this compound is to replace it with CO{sub 2}. In addition to carbon dioxide`s abundance and benign nature, it has the benefits of recycling carbon and of reducing the amount of CO{sub 2} released into the atmosphere when its use is linked with other processes that emit CO{sub 2}. Several synthetic strategies that do not use phosgene are under development. The authors briefly review the most interesting ones and then expand on the use of CO{sub 2} as a potential building block for organic carbamates, carbonates, and isocyanates. One of these routes, polycarbonate synthesis, is already in industrial-scale operation: PAC Polymers Inc. currently produces CO{sub 2}-epoxide copolymers. The synthesis of carbamates and substituted ureas has been developed, and this process awaits industrial exploitation.

Aresta, M.; Quaranta, E. [Univ. of Bari (Italy)

1997-03-01

240

Changes in Strawberry Anthocyanins and Other Polyphenols in Response to Carbon Dioxide Treatments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide-enriched atmospheres are used to reduce the incidence and severity of decay and to extend the postharvest life of strawberries. The influence of CO2 on the postharvest quality parameters of strawberries, particularly the stability of anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds, was investigated. Freshly harvested strawberries were placed in jars ventilated continuously with air or air enriched with 10%, 20%,

Maria I. Gil; Deirdre M. Holcroft; Adel A. Kader

1997-01-01

241

Six-man, self-contained carbon dioxide concentrator system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A six man, self contained electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrating subsystem was successfully designed and fabricated. It was a preprototype engineering model designed to nominally remove 6.0 kg (13.2 lb) CO2/day with an inlet air CO2 partial pressure of 400 N/sq m (3 mm Hg) and an overcapacity removal capability of 12.0 kg (26.4 lb) CO2/day. The design specifications were later expanded to allow operation at space station prototype CO2 collection subsystem operating conditions.

Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Marshall, R. D.; Shumar, J. W.

1974-01-01

242

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. In contrast, chemical recycling of carbon dioxide from natural and industrial sources as well as varied human activities or even from the air itself to

George A. Olah; Alain Goeppert; G. K. Surya Prakash

2009-01-01

243

The nature of carbon dioxide waters in Snaefellsnes, western Iceland  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over 20 occurrences of thermal and non-thermal waters rich in carbon dioxide are known in the Snaefellsnes Peninsula of western Iceland. On the basis of the thermal, chemical and isotopic characteristics of these waters, and hydrological considerations, it is concluded that they represent meteoric waters which have seeped to variable depths into the bedrock. Ascending carbon dioxide gas originating from intrusions or the mantle mixes with the meteoric waters to produce carbon dioxide waters: at considerable depth in the case of the thermal carbon dioxide waters but close to the surface in the case of cold carbon dioxide waters. The occurrence of carbon dioxide waters cannot be regarded as evidence for underground geothermal reservoirs. ?? 1983.

Arnorsson, S.; Barnes, I.

1983-01-01

244

PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS AMONG FORMALDEHYDE, CHLORINE, AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Photochemical reactions among chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and formaldehyde were studied, using parts-per-million concentrations in 1 atm of air. The reactant mixtures were irradiated by ultraviolet fluorescent lamps and simultaneously analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared te...

245

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system,

David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

2005-01-01

246

Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect: A Problem Evaluation Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes exercises to examine the global carbon cycle. Students are asked to predict consequences of increased carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and to suggest ways to mitigate problems associated with these higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A comparison modeling exercise examines some of the variables related to the success

Brewer, Carol A.; Beiswenger, Jane M.

1993-01-01

247

Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mixing of carbon in the form of high sulfur coal with sulfuric acid reduces the temperature of sulfuric acid decomposition from 830.degree. C. to between 300.degree. C. and 400.degree. C. The low temperature sulfuric acid decomposition is particularly useful in thermal chemical cycles for splitting water to produce hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is produced as a commercially desirable byproduct. Lowering of the temperature for the sulfuric acid decomposition or oxygen release step simplifies equipment requirements, lowers thermal energy input and reduces corrosion problems presented by sulfuric acid at conventional cracking temperatures. Use of high sulfur coal as the source of carbon for the sulfuric acid decomposition provides an environmentally safe and energy efficient utilization of this normally polluting fuel.

Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); England, Christopher (Inventor)

1984-01-01

248

Hemodynamic effects of carbon dioxide insufflation during endoscopic vein harvesting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. A prospective study was performed assessing the hemodynamic effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation during endoscopic vein harvesting (EVH) using the Guidant Vasoview Uniport system.Methods. Five hemodynamic and respiratory parameters (end-tidal carbon dioxide, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, mean arterial pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, and cardiac output), were measured in 100 consecutive patients undergoing EVH with CO2

Richard M Vitali; Ramachandra C Reddy; Peter J Molinaro; Mario F Sabado; Israel J Jacobowitz

2000-01-01

249

Preparation of perlite-based carbon dioxide absorbent.  

PubMed

A new highly efficient carbon dioxide absorbent consisting of sodium hydroxide, expanded perlite and acid-base indicator was prepared. The absorption efficiency, absorption capacity, flow resistance and color indication for the absorbent were tested and compared with some commercial products. The absorbent can reduce the carbon dioxide content in gases to 3.3 ppb (v/v) and absorbs not less than 35% of its weight of carbon dioxide. Besides its large capacity and sharp color indication, the absorbent has an outstanding advantage of small flow resistance in comparison with other commercial carbon dioxide absorbents. Applications in gas analysis and purification were also investigated. PMID:18965919

He, H; Wu, L; Zhu, J; Yu, B

1994-02-01

250

A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto.  

PubMed

An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. PMID:9933159

Carlson, R W

1999-02-01

251

A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

Carlson, R. W.

1999-01-01

252

High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of two binary systems: Carbon dioxide + cyclohexanol and carbon dioxide + cyclohexanone  

SciTech Connect

Vapor-liquid equilibria for carbon dioxide + cyclohexanol and carbon dioxide + cyclohexanone were measured using an apparatus based on a static-analytic method with in situ samplings. P, T, x, y measurements were made at pressures up to 22 MPa. The carbon dioxide + cyclohexanol system was studied at 433 and 473 K, and carbon dioxide + cyclohexanone, at 433 and 473 K. The results are correlated by the Redlich-Kwong-Soave and Peng and Robinson equations and several mixing rules. The best fittings are obtained with the Peng-Robinson equation of state and a two-parameter mixing rule, i.e., within 1.1% for both pressures and vapor mole fractions on the carbon dioxide + cyclohexanone system and within 1.9% for pressures and 2.9% for vapor mole fractions on the carbon dioxide + cyclohexanol system. More recent equations by Patel and Teja and Salim and Trebble show no significant advantages.

Laugier, S. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie et Physique de Bordeaux, Talence (France)] [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie et Physique de Bordeaux, Talence (France); Richon, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau (France)] [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau (France)

1997-01-01

253

Development of a prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design information was obtained for a new, regenerable carbon dioxide control system for extravehicular activity life support systems. Solid potassium carbonate was supported in a thin porous sheet form and fabricated into carbon dioxide absorber units. Carbon dioxide and water in the life support system atmosphere react with the potassium carbonate and form potassium bicarbonate. The bicarbonate easily reverts to the carbonate by heating to 150 deg C. The methods of effectively packing the sorbent material into EVA-sized units and the effects of inlet concentrations, flowrate, and temperature upon performance were investigated. The cycle life of the sorbent upon the repeated thermal regenerations was demonstrated through 90 cycles.

Onischak, M.

1976-01-01

254

Cost analysis of carbon dioxide concentrators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology is developed to predict the relevant contributions of the more intangible cost elements encountered in the development of flight-qualified hardware and is used to predict the costs of three carbon dioxide concentration systems. The cost and performance data from Gemini, Skylab, and other programs are utilized as a basis for establishing the cost estimating relationships. The concentration systems analyzed are the molecular sieves C02 concentrator, the hydrogen-depolarized concentrator, and the regenerable solid desiccant concentrator. Besides the cost estimates for each system, their comparative criteria including relative characteristics, operational differences, and development status are considered.

Yakut, M. M.

1972-01-01

255

Searching for clues to ancient carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Something on Earth just won't stop fiddling with the thermostat. In the past 500 million years, the planet has shivered through ice ages lasting millions of years and sweltered through episodes of global warmth. Climatologists, eager to know what keeps jiggling the planet's temperature setting, have focused their suspicions on carbon dioxide, the same heat-trapping gas expected to drive up temperatures in coming decades. Catching this suspect in the act has been difficult, however; the atmospheres of millions of years ago are gone with the wind.

Appenzeller, T.

1993-02-12

256

Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator subsystem development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fabrication of a one-person Electrochemical Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator subsystem incorporating advanced electrochemical, mechanical, and control and monitor instrumentation concepts is discussed. This subsystem included an advanced liquid cooled unitized core composite cell module and integrated electromechanical components. Over 1800 hours with the subsystem with removal efficiencies between 90%. and 100%; endurance tests with a Fluid Control Assembly which integrates 11 gas handling components of the subsystem; and endurance testing of a coolant control assembly which integrates a coolant pump, diverter valve and a liquid accumulator were completed.

Heppner, D. B.; Dahlausen, M. J.; Schubert, F. H.

1983-01-01

257

Vapor-liquid phase coexistence of alkane-carbon dioxide and perfluoroalkane-carbon dioxide mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both government and industry are seeking benign substitutes for the many organic solvents used in industry. Solvents are used as media for cleaning, for chemical reactions, and for chemical separation, and most of the solvents used are hazardous to health, safety, and the environment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO) is often considered as an ideal solvent substitute, but several important classes

S. T. Cui; H. D. Cochran; P. T. Cummings

1999-01-01

258

40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers. (b) The use of linearizing circuits is permitted. (c) The minimum water rejection...

2013-07-01

259

Modeling flow of mineralized carbon dioxide slurry  

SciTech Connect

Direct mineral carbonation was investigated at Albany Research Center (US DOE) as a means to sequester carbon dioxide into stable mineral matrices. Although previous work focused on treating Mg-containing minerals in conventional autoclaves, recent work has been done using pipeline-reactor technology for the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) reaction of the minerals in aqueous/CO2 media. Sequestration of CO2 using above-ground reactors may be uneconomical, but the technology may also be applicable in geological sequestration of CO2. Progress is described in using a prototype HTHP flow-loop reactor to model flow in the dynamic three-phase system to help determine the pumping-energy requirements to optimize reactivity.

Penner, Larry R.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Saha, K.K. (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Arizona State University)

2005-04-01

260

Carbon dioxide enrichment inhibits nitrate assimilation in wheat and Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

The concentration of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere may double by the end of the 21st century. The response of higher plants to a carbon dioxide doubling often includes a decline in their nitrogen status, but the reasons for this decline have been uncertain. We used five independent methods with wheat and Arabidopsis to show that atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment inhibited the assimilation of nitrate into organic nitrogen compounds. This inhibition may be largely responsible for carbon dioxide acclimation, the decrease in photosynthesis and growth of plants conducting C(3) carbon fixation after long exposures (days to years) to carbon dioxide enrichment. These results suggest that the relative availability of soil ammonium and nitrate to most plants will become increasingly important in determining their productivity as well as their quality as food. PMID:20466933

Bloom, Arnold J; Burger, Martin; Rubio Asensio, Jose Salvador; Cousins, Asaph B

2010-05-14

261

Chemical Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Utilizing supercritical fluids as environmentally benign solvents for chemical synthesis is one of the new approaches in the "greening" of chemistry. Carbon dioxide is the most widely used gas for supercritical fluid studies because of its moderate critical constants, nontoxic nature, and availability in pure form. One unique property of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is its high solubility for fluorinated compounds. Thus sc-CO2 can be used to replace Freons that are conventionally used as solvents for synthesis of perfluoro-polymers. Another property of sc-CO2 is its miscibility with gases such as H2. Heterogeneous reactions involving these gases may become homogeneous reactions in sc-CO2. Reactions in sc-CO2 may offer several advantages including controlling phase behavior and products, increasing speed of reactions, and obtaining specific reaction channels. This paper describes the following nine types of chemical reactions reported in the literature utilizing sc-CO2 as a solvent to illustrate the unique properties of the supercritical fluid reaction systems: (i) hydrogenation and hydroformylation, (ii) synthesis of organometallic compounds, (iii) metal chelation and extraction, (iv) preparation of inorganic nanoparticles, (v) stereo-selectivity of lipase-catalyzed reactions, (vi) asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation, (vii) polymerization, (viii) Diels-Alder reaction, and (ix) free radical reactions.

Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaoyuan

1998-12-01

262

Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO2) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO2 transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO2 tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO2: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO2-II (refs 1,2) above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO2-V (refs 3-5) and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO2 (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO2 (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO2-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50GPa occurs via intermediate phases II (refs 1,2), III (refs 7,8) and IV (refs 9,10). The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P42/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp3 hybridization.

Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

2007-01-01

263

Reactions of Carbon Dioxide with Silicates under High Pressures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Reactions of carbon dioxide with molten glass under high pressures were studied. Two special types of apparatus were employed. The results supported the existence of equilibria between silicates and carbonates. No evidence was found for the existence of e...

W. Weyl

1975-01-01

264

66 FR 66994 - Controlling Corrosion on Hazardous Liquid and Carbon Dioxide Pipelines  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...195 Controlling Corrosion on Hazardous Liquid and Carbon Dioxide Pipelines; Final Rule...2137-AD24 Controlling Corrosion on Hazardous Liquid and Carbon Dioxide Pipelines AGENCY...corrosion control standards for hazardous liquid and carbon dioxide pipelines. The...

2001-12-27

265

46 CFR 34.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage-T/ALL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Carbon dioxide storage-T/ALL. 34.15-20 Section 34.15-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.15-20 Carbon dioxide storageT/ALL....

2013-10-01

266

76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Streams in Geologic Sequestration Activities AGENCY: Environmental...to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams...to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 )...

2011-09-09

267

Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions  

SciTech Connect

The data base required to adequately ascertain seasonal source and sink strengths in the arctic regions is difficult to obtain. However, there are now a reasonable quantity of data for this polar region to estimate sources and sinks within the Arctic which may contribute significantly to the annual tropospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration fluctuation. The sea-ice-air and the sea-air interfaces account for most of the contribution to the sources and sinks for carbon dioxide. Although the arctic and subarctic region is small in extent, it certainly is not impervious and ice sealed. Our estimate, based on historical data and current research, indicates that the Arctic, which is about 4% of the earth's surface, is an annual net sink for approx. 10/sup 15/ g CO/sub 2/ accounting for an equivalent of approx. 3% of the annual anthropogenic contribution of CO/sub 2/ to the troposphere.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1982-01-01

268

Monitoring Troposphere Carbon Dioxide Spatial and Temporal Distribution Changes over China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide is an important component of the Earth's atmosphere because it absorbs and emits infrared radiation at wavelengths of 4.26 ?m and 14.99 ?m, thereby playing a role in the greenhouse effect. The concentration of the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere has reached 391 ppm (parts per million) as of October 2012 and rose by 2.0 ppm/yr during 2000-2009. Global carbon dioxide emissions are widely seen as a major factor responsible for an increase in world temperatures. The carbon dioxide emissions in China have grown strongly in the past decade. It overtakes the United States and has become the world's largest energy consumer. In this work we analyze atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration variability on both temporal and spatial scale over China. AIRS mid-tropospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO_2) Level 3 Monthly Gridded data showed that the average distribution of carbon dioxide concentration in the middle troposphere over China from January 2003 to December 2011 was extremely uneven showing a great seasonal component. High consistency of the seasonal variation characteristics was observed between the AIRS data and Waliguan close ground station data from 2003 to 2011. High concentrations were observed over the northeast plain, Inner Mongolia autonomous region and Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region March to May as compared to the lower values over the southern region. Over the 35N-45N range there were significant enhancements, yet Tibetan plateau and Yunan showed lower carbon dioxide concentration. In summer, Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang Uygur and northern Gansu showed high concentrations, yet in September and October, the high value was still concentrated in the north area about latitude 40N. During the winter season high carbon dioxide concentrations fluctuated between eastern regions in December and the western Xinjiang, Qinghai province and in most parts of the eastern area during January and February. Hence, we have found that spring concentrations are highest while the winter ones are the lowest. Further analysis is undergoing between the carbon dioxide concentrations and the surface average temperature. Preliminary results show that the carbon dioxide average concentration has linear rising trend over the past 9 years and have an obvious seasonal variability.

Jiang, Y.; El-Askary, H. M.

2013-12-01

269

Hydrodynamic Controls on Carbon Dioxide Efflux from Inland Waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensive research has been undertaken on carbon dioxide efflux from lakes, estuaries and oceans, but much less attention has been given to rivers and streams, especially lower order streams. River systems are often over-saturated with carbon dioxide and so tend to act as sources of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. It has been thought that rivers act as pipes carrying this terrestrial carbon to the oceans. However, recent studies have shown that a significant amount of the carbon is reprocessed within the system in a series of transformations and losses. Fluvial evasion of carbon dioxide is now recognised to be a significant component of carbon cycles, however the factors controlling carbon dioxide efflux and its magnitude remain poorly understood and quantified. This research aims to quantify, and better understand the controls on, freshwater carbon dioxide evasion. Data are presented here from field measurements that commenced in Sept 2013 in two contrasting Scottish rivers: the River Kelvin which has a large (335 km.sq) part-urban catchment with predominantly non-peat soils and Drumtee Water, a small (9.6 km.sq) rural catchment of peat soils and agricultural land. Using a floating chamber with the headspace connected to an infrared gas analyser to measure changes in carbon dioxide concentration, efflux rates from 0.22 - 47.4 ?mol CO2/m.sq/sec were measured, these close to the middle of the range of previously reported values. At one site on the River Kelvin in May 2013 an influx of -0.61 - -3.53 ?mol CO2/m.sq/sec was recorded. Whereas previous research finds carbon dioxide efflux to increase with decreasing river size and a more organic-rich soil catchment, here the controls on carbon dioxide evasion are similar across the contrasting catchments. Carbon dioxide evasion shows seasonality, with maximum fluxes in the summer months being up to twice as high as the winter maxima. Linear regression demonstrates that evasion increases with increased flow velocity, water surface disturbance indicated by Froude number, and turbulent mixing indicated by Reynolds number. Similar relationships with season, flow velocity and turbulence have been reported previously, but there is little known about the mechanisms involved. When comparing spot carbon dioxide efflux measurements to river stage time series data, carbon dioxide efflux is more sensitive to an increase in stage at more turbulent measurement points. Further investigation of the mechanisms will be obtained by measurement of DIC concentration and isotopic composition to assess the controls of carbon source versus degassing, and the analysis of the interactions between hydraulic and seasonal controls and carbon dioxide fluxes extended.

Long, H. E.; Waldron, S.; Hoey, T.; Newton, J.; Quemin, S.

2013-12-01

270

Advances and trends in primary and small secondary batteries with zinc anodes and manganese dioxide and\\/or air cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incremental improvements continue to be made year by year in the consumer carbon-zinc and alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells. In addition, primary and secondary zinc-air cells many with substantial amounts of manganese dioxide in the cathode are becoming more common in consumer use. The gain in the past fifteen years in the carbon zinc cells approaches fifteen percent and that in

Brooke Schumm

2000-01-01

271

Foaming agents for carbon dioxide and steam floods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes improvement in a steam flood or carbon dioxide flood in an underground hydrocarbon formation. The improvement comprises: injecting into an injection well above 0.05% to about 5% by weight aqueous surfactant solution which will foam and reduce the permeability of swept zones, forcing steam or carbon dioxide into unswept areas of the formation, the aqueous surfactant solution

Naae

1991-01-01

272

Solid amine compounds as sorbents for carbon dioxide: A concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid amine compounds were examined as possible absorbents for removal of carbon dioxide in life support systems of type which may be employed in high altitude aircraft, spacecraft, or submarines. Many solid amine compounds release absorbed carbon dioxide when heated in vacuum, therefore, when properly packaged spent amine compounds can be readily regenerated and put back into service.

Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

1972-01-01

273

An Electrochemical Technic for Measuring Carbon Dioxide Content of Blood.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An electrochemical technic for measuring carbon dioxide content in whole blood has been devised and evaluated. This technic has been extended to measure the Bunsen solubility coefficient of carbon dioxide. The method requires a membrane-covered pH electro...

R. J. Reyes J. R. Neville

1967-01-01

274

Drug pharmacokinetics and the carbon dioxide breath test  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interrelationship of the pharmacokinetics of a drug and the expiration of carbon dioxide formed as a metabolite have been studied. The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug that affect the usefulness of the carbon dioxide excretion as a measure of liver function were examined by means of computer simulations. The parent drug extraction ratio, fraction demethylated, volume of distribution, and

Ioanis Parashos

1986-01-01

275

The acid rain\\/carbon dioxide threat Control strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many of the world's most troublesome problems are closely interrelated. A case in point is the acid rain\\/carbon dioxide threat. Acid rain is the commonly used synonym for the major ingredients in the ongoing regional forest dieback, and carbon dioxide is a major influencing factor in the man-induced global geophysical experiment which is feared to lead to unacceptable climatic changes.

Wilfrid Bach

1985-01-01

276

Carbon dioxide and climate: Summaries of research in FY 1988  

SciTech Connect

Detailed worldwide measurements indicate that the amount of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere has increased about 25 percent during the past 188 years, primarily because of fossil-fuel combustion and deforestation. Carbon dioxide is one of several trace gases that can modify the earth's heat balance by absorbing outgoing radiation from the earth's surface, thereby increasing the amount of heat retained by the atmosphere--the so-called greenhouse effect. Scientific analyses suggest that this increase could substantially affect climate, agriculture, and other human endeavors. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program is aimed at improving the scientific knowledge base to enable researchers to project future atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, to estimate carbon dioxide-induced global and regional climate changes, and to assess the responses of vegetation to higher concentrations of carbon dioxide and changing climate. The Department of Energy is the lead federal agency for research related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its responsibility is to sponsor a program of directed research and to coordinate this research with relevant activities of other federal agencies, private concerns, and international institutions. This Program Summary documents the activities and products of the Carbon Dioxide Research (CDR) Program in Fiscal Year 1988. The Summary provides descriptions of all projects funded during the year and a brief overview of the CDR Program's goals, objectives, and organization. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-10-01

277

Carbon Dioxide Changes During the Last 400,000 years  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will analyze a graph of carbon dioxide concentration in the last 400,000 years and consider the rise in carbon dioxide of the last 150 years. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

278

Flexible substrates as basis for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A photocatalytic system for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide was designed and constructed. The system relies on thin films of the photocatalyst prepared at low temperature using spray coating. We formulated inks based on the well-known photocatalyst titanium dioxide and characterized the performance in this setting. Glass substrates were used for model studies with an active area of 100cm2

Jacob Jensen; Mette Mikkelsen; Frederik C. Krebs

2011-01-01

279

Ocean Acidification Consequences of Stabilization of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate ocean chemistry changes that would result from the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations at different levels. To determine the fate of ocean chemistry after atmospheric carbon dioxide is stabilized, we perform a suite of simulations using the UVic Earth system model in which atmospheric CO2 is stabilized at levels ranging from 280 ppm to 5000 ppm. Atmospheric

L. Cao; K. Caldeira

2007-01-01

280

Climate Science in a Nutshell: Where Carbon Dioxide Come From?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This short video discusses where carbon dioxide, the gas that is mainly responsible for warming up our planet and changing the climate, comes from. It discusses how the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide comes directly from the burning of fossil fuels and indirectly from the human need for energy.

Nutshell, Planet; Network, Utah E.

281

Herbivore responses to plants grown in enriched carbon dioxide atmospheres  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our initial study of sagebrush and grasshopper responses to elevated and historical carbon dioxide atmospheres is complete and has been accepted for publication. The study on Biomass Allocation Patterns of Defoliated Sagebrush Grown Under Two Levels of Carbon Dioxide has completed and the manuscript has been submitted for publication. We have completed the study of plant growth under two nutrient

Lincoln

1990-01-01

282

A Tenuous Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere on Jupiter's Moon Callisto  

Microsoft Academic Search

An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the CO, v,, band was observed up to 100 km above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10\\

Robert W. Carlson

1999-01-01

283

Carbon dioxide sequestration by ex-situ mineral carbonation  

SciTech Connect

The process developed for carbon dioxide sequestration utilizes a slurry of water mixed with olivine- forsterite end member (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), which is reacted with supercritical CO{sub 2} to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Carbon dioxide is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid, which likely dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. The H{sup +} hydrolyzes the silicate mineral, freeing the cation (Mg{sup 2+}), which reacts with the HCO{sub 3}{sup -} to form the solid carbonate. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural mineral, have demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are slow at ambient temperature (22 degrees C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 7.4 MPa). However, at elevated temperature and pressure, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant conversion to the carbonate occurs. Extent of reaction is roughly 90% within 24 h, at 185 degrees C and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 11.6 MPa. Current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, and/or solution modification. Subsequent tests are intended to examine these options, as well as other mineral groups.

O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Turner, P.C.; and Walters, R.P.

2000-01-01

284

Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

1994-01-01

285

Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same  

DOEpatents

In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

Perry, Robert James (Niskayuna, NY); Lewis, Larry Neil (Scotia, NY); O'Brien, Michael Joseph (Clifton Park, NY); Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY); Kniajanski, Sergei (Clifton Park, NY); Lam, Tunchiao Hubert (Clifton Park, NY); Lee, Julia Lam (Niskayuna, NY); Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona (Ballston Spa, NY)

2011-10-04

286

Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ? H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (<2000 ?eq/kg), the difference between the true and apparent removal is small and can be ignored for many applications. Analytical and reporting standards are recommended to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide removal.

Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

2012-01-01

287

Determination of sulfur forms in wine including free and total sulfur dioxide based on molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide in the air-acetylene flame.  

PubMed

A new method for the determination of sulfur forms in wine, i.e., free SO(2), total SO(2), bound SO(2), total S, and sulfate, is presented. The method is based on the measurement of the carbon monosulfide (CS) molecular absorption produced in a conventional air-acetylene flame using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry. Individual sulfur forms can be distinguished because of the different sensitivities of the corresponding CS molecular absorption. The sensitivity of free SO(2) is about three times higher than the value for bound SO(2) and sulfate. The method makes use of procedures similar to those used in classic reference methods. Its performance is verified by analyzing six wine samples. Relative standard deviations are between 5 and 13% for free SO(2) and between 1 and 3% for total SO(2). For the validation of the accuracy of the new method, the results are compared with those of reference methods. The agreement of the values for total SO(2) with values of the classic method is satisfactory: five out of six samples show deviations less than 16%. Due to the instability of free SO(2) in wine and the known problems of the used reference method, serious deviations of the free SO(2) results are found for three samples. The evaluation of the limits of detection focuses on the value for free SO(2), which is the sulfur form having by far the lowest concentration in wine. Here, the achievable limit of detection is 1.8 mg L(-1). [figure: see text] Detection of non-metal elements using continuum source flame absorption spectrometry. PMID:17972067

Huang, Mao Dong; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Florek, Stefan; Heitmann, Uwe; Okruss, Michael; Patz, Claus-Dieter

2008-01-01

288

Detectability and significance of the 12h barometric tide in the radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, carbon dioxide concentration and air temperature of an underground laboratory.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radon concentration has been measured since 1995 in the Roselend dead-end tunnel, in the French Alps, together with other geophysical and geochemical parameters. Bursts of radon concentration, reaching 65,600 Bq m-3 and up to several weeks duration, are observed over a background level of ca. 800 Bq m-3. These bursts appear to be related to the bedrock deformation or to the hydrogeological processes associated with the yearly cycle of water level in the nearby artificial Roselend Lake. In order to work out a generation mechanism, for these bursts, we developed tools to characterize the transport properties in the host rocks. Here, we concentrate on the 12h (S2) barometric tide. We first show, using real radon time series integrating synthetic signals, that a modified spectrogram method is more efficient than simple FFT to evidence weak periodic signals in such a context. Then, we apply this method to the radon concentration in the tunnel atmosphere measured by two different sensors: the AlphaGUARDTM sensor based on volumetric detection in an ionizing chamber, and the BarasolTM sensor, based on surface detection. Using the time series recorded by the AlphaGUARDTM, the S2 line, difficult to see with a simple FFT method, emerges clearly with our spectrogram method. This S2 line is not seen using the BarasolTM time series, illustrating the superior sensitivity of the AlphaGUARDTM for this particular purpose. Using a regular spectrogram analysis, we further show that the amplitude of the S2 line in the AlphaGUARDTM data depends on time, and appears particularly strong during the radon bursts. The presence of the S2 line reveals a high sensitivity of radon exhalation flux from the tunnel wall to changes of atmospheric pressure, and thus supports the advective transport mechanism for the radon bursts. A small but clear S2 component is also evidenced using our spectrogram method in a dripwater flow rate time series, representing a flow averaged over a 6 m2 area of the tunnel ceiling, while it is not observed in the flow rate of a more localized dripping. This suggests that some water drippings can also be affected by atmospheric pressure variations. The temporal structures of the S2 component in the flow rate and in the radon concentration, however, are not similar, indicating that water dripping from the ceiling cannot be the dominant source mechanism for the radon bursts. No S2 component is observed in the time series of carbon dioxide, but an interesting pattern is revealed by the S2 component of a temperature profile in the atmosphere. This study illustrates how a refined analysis to extract the S2 component in various geophysical time series can provide interesting clues on the complex processes affecting transport of fluids in unsaturated fractured media under multiple influences.

Richon, P.; Perrier, F.; Pili, E.; Boudon, G.; Villemant, B.; Sabroux, J.

2007-12-01

289

Ruthenium-catalysed alkoxycarbonylation of alkenes with carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

Alkene carbonylations represent a major technology for the production of value-added bulk and fine chemicals. Nowadays, all industrial carbonylation processes make use of highly toxic and flammable carbon monoxide. Here we show the application of abundantly available carbon dioxide as C1 building block for the alkoxycarbonylations of industrially important olefins in the presence of a convenient and inexpensive ruthenium catalyst system. In our system, carbon dioxide works much better than the traditional combination of carbon monoxide and alcohols. The unprecedented in situ formation of carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide and alcohols permits an efficient synthesis of carboxylic acid esters, which can be used as detergents and polymer-building blocks. Notably, this transformation allows the catalytic formation of C-C bonds with carbon dioxide as C1 source and avoids the use of sensitive and/or expensive reducing agents (for example, Grignard reagents, diethylzinc or triethylaluminum). PMID:24518431

Wu, Lipeng; Liu, Qiang; Fleischer, Ivana; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

2014-01-01

290

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation on Ni(110).  

PubMed

We demonstrate that the key step for the reaction of CO 2 with hydrogen on Ni(110) is a change of the activated molecule coordination to the metal surface. At 90 K, CO 2 is negatively charged and chemically bonded via the carbon atom. When the temperature is increased and H approaches, the H-CO 2 complex flips and binds to the surface through the two oxygen atoms, while H binds to the carbon atom, thus yielding formate. We provide the atomic-level description of this process by means of conventional ultrahigh vacuum surface science techniques combined with density functional theory calculations and corroborated by high pressure reactivity tests. Knowledge about the details of the mechanisms involved in this reaction can yield a deeper comprehension of heterogeneous catalytic organic synthesis processes involving carbon dioxide as a reactant. We show why on Ni the CO 2 hydrogenation barrier is remarkably smaller than that on the common Cu metal-based catalyst. Our results provide a possible interpretation of the observed high catalytic activity of NiCu alloys. PMID:18665600

Vesselli, Erik; De Rogatis, Loredana; Ding, Xunlei; Baraldi, Alessandro; Savio, Letizia; Vattuone, Luca; Rocca, Mario; Fornasiero, Paolo; Peressi, Maria; Baldereschi, Alfonso; Rosei, Renzo; Comelli, Giovanni

2008-08-27

291

Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8(+0.25)(-0.25)? petagrams of carbon (Pg?C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32(+0.52)(-0.26)? Pg?C?yr(-1) from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1?Pg?C?yr(-1) is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally. PMID:24256802

Raymond, Peter A; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Drr, Hans; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

2013-11-21

292

Global food insecurity. Treatment of major food crops with elevated carbon dioxide or ozone under large-scale fully open-air conditions suggests recent models may have overestimated future yields  

PubMed Central

Predictions of yield for the globe's major grain and legume arable crops suggest that, with a moderate temperature increase, production may increase in the temperate zone, but decline in the tropics. In total, global food supply may show little change. This security comes from inclusion of the direct effect of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, [CO2], which significantly stimulates yield by decreasing photorespiration in C3 crops and transpiration in all crops. Evidence for a large response to [CO2] is largely based on studies made within chambers at small scales, which would be considered unacceptable for standard agronomic trials of new cultivars or agrochemicals. Yet, predictions of the globe's future food security are based on such inadequate information. Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) technology now allows investigation of the effects of rising [CO2] and ozone on field crops under fully open-air conditions at an agronomic scale. Experiments with rice, wheat, maize and soybean show smaller increases in yield than anticipated from studies in chambers. Experiments with increased ozone show large yield losses (20%), which are not accounted for in projections of global food security. These findings suggest that current projections of global food security are overoptimistic. The fertilization effect of CO2 is less than that used in many models, while rising ozone will cause large yield losses in the Northern Hemisphere. Unfortunately, FACE studies have been limited in geographical extent and interactive effects of CO2, ozone and temperature have yet to be studied. Without more extensive study of the effects of these changes at an agronomic scale in the open air, our ever-more sophisticated models will continue to have feet of clay.

Long, Stephen P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Leakey, Andrew D.B; Morgan, Patrick B

2005-01-01

293

Calcium Oxide Matrices and Carbon Dioxide Sensors  

PubMed Central

Homogeneous matrices of calcium oxide (CaO) were prepared by mixing this material with polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as malleable inert support in order to obtain processable composites. Preliminary tests were carried out to assess the best concentration of CaO in the composite, individuated in the CaO/PEG weight ratio of 1/4. Experimental data highlighted that the composite was able to selectively detect carbon dioxide (CO2) via a nanogravimetric method by performing the experiments inside an atmosphere-controlled chamber filled with CO2. Furthermore, the composite material showed a linear absorption of CO2 as a function of the gas concentration inside the atmosphere-controlled chamber, thus paving the way for the possible use of these matrices for applications in the field of sensor devices for long-term evaluation of accumulated environmental CO2.

Terencio, Tercio Bezerra Correia; Bavastrello, Valter; Nicolini, Claudio

2012-01-01

294

Thermodynamical effects during carbon dioxide release  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pruess [1] investigated the risk of carbon dioxide leakage from shallow storage sites by modeling scenarios. Such a fluid release is associated with mechanical work performed by formation fluid against expansion without taking heat from ambient environment. Understanding of heat related to mechanical work is essential to predict the temperature at the leak. According to the first law of thermodynamics, internal energy of working fluid decreases with an amount which is equivalent to this work hence, working fluid lost its own heat. Such kind of heat loss depends strongly on whether the expansion process is adiabatic or isothermal. Isothermal expansion allows the working fluid to interact thermally with the solid matrix. Adiabatic expansion is an isenthalpic process that takes heat from the working fluid and the ambient environment remains unchanged. This work is part of the CLEAN research project [6]. In this study, thermodynamic effects of mechanical work during eventual carbon dioxide leakage are investigated numerically. In particular, we are interested to detect the temperature at leakage scenarios and its deviation with different thermodynamic processes. Finite element simulation is conducted with a two-dimensional rectangular geometry representing a shallow storage site which bottom was located at -300m below the land surface. A fully saturated porous medium is assumed where the pore space is filled completely with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide accumulated in the secondary trap at 30 Bar and 24 C is allowed to leak from top right point of rectangle with atmospheric pressure. With (i) adiabatic and (ii) isothermal compressibility factors, temperature around leakage area has been calculated which show a significant difference. With some simplification, this study detects leak temperature which is very close with [1]. Temporal evaluation at the leaky area shows that the working fluid temperature can be reduced to -20 C when the leakage scenario is performed under isothermal expansion. Under adiabatic expansion, further reduction in the working fluid temperature can be expected. The governing equations from mass and energy balance laws of porous media mechanics are used for problem description. Pressure and fluid phase temperature are chosen as the primary variables. Extended ideal gas law is used with super compressibility factor (SCF) to predict real gas density for large range of pressure and temperature [2]. Cubic equation based on Peng-Robinson equation of state was solved analytically for SCF [3]. Real fluid properties, such as dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity used in this study are density and temperature dependent. Analytical expression for the derivatives of SCF with respect to temperature and pressure are used. Subsequently, these derivatives are utilized to define isothermal compressibility, adiabatic compressibility and thermal expansion coefficient for the real gas. These parameters can influence heat loss due to thermodynamic effects significantly. The governing equations are discretized spatially within the Galerkin approach, whereas for the temporal discretization, we adopt generalized single step method [5]. The coupled system of governing equations is solved in a monolithic way with variable time stepping. The numerical module has been implemented within the open source object-oriented finite element code OpenGeoSys [4].

Singh, A. K.; Bttcher, N.; Grke, U.-J.; Kolditz, O.

2012-04-01

295

Calcium oxide matrices and carbon dioxide sensors.  

PubMed

Homogeneous matrices of calcium oxide (CaO) were prepared by mixing this material with polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as malleable inert support in order to obtain processable composites. Preliminary tests were carried out to assess the best concentration of CaO in the composite, individuated in the CaO/PEG weight ratio of 1/4. Experimental data highlighted that the composite was able to selectively detect carbon dioxide (CO(2)) via a nanogravimetric method by performing the experiments inside an atmosphere-controlled chamber filled with CO(2). Furthermore, the composite material showed a linear absorption of CO(2) as a function of the gas concentration inside the atmosphere-controlled chamber, thus paving the way for the possible use of these matrices for applications in the field of sensor devices for long-term evaluation of accumulated environmental CO(2). PMID:22778620

Terencio, Tercio Bezerra Correia; Bavastrello, Valter; Nicolini, Claudio

2012-01-01

296

Carbon dioxide-in-water microemulsions.  

PubMed

Liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide swell potassium carboxylate perfluoropolyether (PFPE-K) cylindrical micelles in water to produce novel CO(2)-in-water (C/W) microemulsions. The swelling elongates the micelles significantly from 20 to 80 nm as the molar ratio of CO(2) in the micelles to surfactant (R(CO2)) reaches approximately 8. As the micelles swell to form microemulsions, the solubility of pyrene increases by a factor of ca. 10. Fluorescence spectra suggest that pyrene resides primarily in the low-polarity micelle core rather than in the palisade region. The results illustrate the ability of C/W microemulsions to solubilize both lipophilic and fluorophilic substances simultaneously. PMID:12617686

Lee, C Ted; Ryoo, Won; Smith, P Griffin; Arellano, Jose; Mitchell, Daniel R; Lagow, Richard J; Webber, Stephen E; Johnston, Keith P

2003-03-12

297

Pulsed-discharge carbon dioxide lasers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose is to attempt a general introduction to pulsed carbon dioxide lasers of the kind used or proposed for laser radar applications. Laser physics is an excellent example of a cross-disciplinary topic, and the molecular spectroscopy, energy transfer, and plasma kinetics of the devices are explored. The concept of stimulated emission and population inversions is introduced, leading on to the molecular spectroscopy of the CO2 molecule. This is followed by a consideration of electron-impact pumping, and the pertinent energy transfer and relaxation processes which go on. Since the devices are plasma pumped, it is necessary to introduce a complex subject, but this is restricted to appropriate physics of glow discharges. Examples of representative devices are shown. The implications of the foregoing to plasma chemistry and gas life are discussed.

Willetts, David V.

1990-01-01

298

The Fluid Mechanics of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humans are faced with a potentially disastrous global problem owing to the current emission of 32 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually into the atmosphere. A possible way to mitigate the effects is to store CO2 in large porous reservoirs within the Earth. Fluid mechanics plays a key role in determining both the feasibility and risks involved in this geological sequestration. We review current research efforts looking at the propagation of CO2 within the subsurface, the possible rates of leakage, the mechanisms that act to stably trap CO2, and the geomechanical response of the crust to large-scale CO2 injection. We conclude with an outline for future research.

Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

2014-01-01

299

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01

300

Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI.  

PubMed

Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO2) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO2 transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO2 tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO2: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO2-II (refs 1,2) above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO2-V (refs 3-5) and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO2 (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO2 (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO2-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II (refs 1,2), III (refs 7,8) and IV (refs 9,10). The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P42/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp3 hybridization. PMID:17160005

Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

2007-01-01

301

Intraosseous Venography with Carbon Dioxide in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Carbon Dioxide Retention in Renal Veins  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of gas retention in the renal vein following carbon dioxide intraosseous venography in the prone position and, while citing references, to examine its onset mechanisms. All percutaneous vertebroplasties performed at our hospital from January to December 2005 were registered and retrospectively analyzed. Of 43 registered procedures treating 79 vertebrae, 28 procedures treating 54 vertebrae were analyzed. Vertebral intraosseous venography was performed using carbon dioxide as a contrast agent in all percutaneous vertebroplasty procedures. In preoperative and postoperative vertebral CT, gas retention in the renal vein and other areas was assessed. Preoperative CT did not show gas retention (0/28 procedures; 0%). Postoperative CT confirmed gas retention in the renal vein in 10 of the 28 procedures (35.7%). Gas retention was seen in the right renal vein in 8 procedures (28.6%), in the left renal vein in 5 procedures (17.9%), in the left and right renal veins in 3 procedures (10.7%), in vertebrae in 22 procedures (78.6%), in the soft tissue around vertebrae in 14 procedures (50.0%), in the spinal canal in 12 procedures (42.9%), and in the subcutaneous tissue in 5 procedures (17.9%). In conclusion, in our study, carbon dioxide gas injected into the vertebra frequently reached and remained in the renal vein.

Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: kome64@yo.rim.or.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Tokuda, Takanori; Nomura, Motoo; Terada, Jiro; Kamata, Minoru; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2008-11-15

302

Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rgen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate system of the solution was controlled by both, degassing and carbonate precipitation, still leading to an enrichment of the heavier carbon isotope in the residual DIC. The experimental results are evaluated for both periods, and the influence of salinity and pH is extracted. Acknowledgement: Parts of this study were supported by BMBF within the BIOACID project

Mller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Bttcher, M. E.

2012-04-01

303

Testing a Regenerative Carbon Dioxide and Moisture Removal Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration supported the development of a new vacuum-desorbed regenerative carbon dioxide and humidity control technology for use in short duration human spacecraft. The technology was baselined for use in the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Termed the Carbon Diox-ide And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS), the unit was developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and has undergone extensive testing at Johnson Space Center. The tests were per-formed to evaluate performance characteristics under range of operating conditions and human loads expected in future spacecraft applications, as part of maturation to increase its readiness for flight. Early tests, conducted at nominal atmospheric pressure, used human metabolic sim-ulators to generate loads, with later tests making us of human test subjects. During these tests many different test cases were performed, involving from 1 to 6 test subjects, with different activity profiles (sleep, nominal and exercise). These tests were conducted within the airlock portion of a human rated test chamber sized to simulate the Orion cabin free air volume. More recently, a test was completed that integrated the CAMRAS with a simulated suit loop using prototype umbilicals and was conducted at reduced atmospheric pressure and elevated oxygen levels. This paper will describe the facilities and procedures used to conduct these and future tests, and provide a summary of findings.

Barta, Daniel J.; Button, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Curley, Suzanne

304

An advanced carbon reactor subsystem for carbon dioxide reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An evaluation is presented of the development status of an advanced carbon-reactor subsystem (ACRS) for the production of water and dense, solid carbon from CO2 and hydrogen, as required in physiochemical air revitalization systems for long-duration manned space missions. The ACRS consists of a Sabatier Methanation Reactor (SMR) that reduces CO2 with hydrogen to form methane and water, a gas-liquid separator to remove product water from the methane, and a Carbon Formation Reactor (CFR) to pyrolize methane to carbon and hydrogen; the carbon is recycled to the SMR, while the produce carbon is periodically removed from the CFR. A preprototype ACRS under development for the NASA Space Station is described.

Noyes, Gary P.; Cusick, Robert J.

1986-01-01

305

HAND-HELD SENSOR FOR REMOTELY MAPPING CARBON DIOXIDE POLLUTION SOURCES - PHASE I  

EPA Science Inventory

In 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that carbon dioxide (CO2) is a pollutant under the federal Clean Air Act. The ruling allows the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate CO2 emissions. Such regulation will entail monitoring a wid...

306

The Effect of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Elevation on Plant Growth in Freshwater Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a dynamic model to investigate the effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) increase on plant growth in freshwater ecosystems. Steady-state simulations were performed to analyze the response of phytoplankton and submerged macrophytes to atmospheric CO 2 elevation from 350 to 700 ppm. We studied various conditions that may affect this response, such as alkalinity, the airwater exchange

Peter Schippers; Jan E. Vermaat; Jeroen de Klein; Wolf M. Mooij

2004-01-01

307

Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant; carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant; and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is, therefore, especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

Hagedorn, Norman H. (inventor)

1993-01-01

308

Carbon dioxide warming of the early Earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Svante Arrhenius' research in atmospheric physics extended beyond the recent past and the near future states of the Earth, which today are at the center of sociopolitical attention. His plan encompassed all of the physical phenomena known at the time to relate to the formation and evolution of stars and planets. His two-volume textbook on cosmic physics is a comprehensive synopsis of the field. The inquiry into the possible cause of the ice ages and the theory of selective wavelength filter control led Arrhenius to consider the surface states of the other terrestrial planets, and of the ancient Earth before it had been modified by the emergence of life. The rapid escape of hydrogen and the equilibration with igneous rocks required that carbon in the early atmosphere prevailed mainly in oxidized form as carbon dioxide, together with other photoactive gases exerting a greenhouse effect orders of magnitude larger than in our present atmosphere. This effect, together with the ensuing chemical processes, would have set the conditions for life to evolve on our planet, seeded from spores spreading through an infinite Universe, and propelled, as Arrhenius thought, by stellar radiation pressure.

Arrhenius, G.

1997-01-01

309

Air Quality and Power Production in the United States: Emissions Trading and State-Level Initiatives in the Control of Acid-Producing Emissions, Mercury, and Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, the U.S. federal government has pursued a determined strategy toward increased energy production while paying little\\u000a heed to the impact of this strategy on air quality and failing to take effective measures to reduce emissions of pollutants\\u000a from the fossil-fueled power plants that dominate U.S. energy generation. While the evolution of the Clean Air Act and its\\u000a important amendmentsparticularly

Daniel Sosland

310

A miniaturized carbon dioxide gas sensor based on infrared absorption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A miniaturized sensor for measuring carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas concentration is developed based on infrared absorption. A novel space-double-beam optical probe is designed, which consists of an infrared source, an air chamber, an infrared receiving device, and two sapphire windows. The air chamber is modified by incorporating a parabolic-shaped receiving-light cone to effectively improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensor. Four rectangle holes are arranged around the air chamber, and diffusive sampling is adopted to collect gas into the air chamber. The infrared source works between ON and OFF states. The interference of background light is eliminated by subtracting the measured value in the ON state from the OFF state. The measurement model of the sensor is established based on the Lambert-Beer law and the working principle of the sensor. The partial least squares method is applied to calibrate the measurement model. The sensor has a volume of 80 mm ( L)78 mm ( W)35 mm ( H), a weight of 200 g, a power consumption of 1.5 W, and a response time of 2.5 s. The experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the sensor is 0.026% with a measurement range of 0-3% for CO 2 gas concentration.

Zhang, Guangjun; Li, Yaping; Li, Qingbo

2010-12-01

311

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOEpatents

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA; Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA

2010-11-09

312

Membranes for separation of carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

Methods for separating carbon dioxide from a fluid stream at a temperature higher than about 200.degree. C. with selectivity higher than Knudsen diffusion selectivity include contacting a porous membrane with the fluid stream to preferentially transport carbon dioxide. The porous membrane includes a porous support and a continuous porous separation layer disposed on a surface of the porous support and extending between the fluid stream and the porous support layer. The porous support comprises alumina, silica, zirconia, stabilized zirconia, stainless steel, titanium, nickel-based alloys, aluminum-based alloys, zirconium-based alloys or a combination thereof. Median pore size of the porous separation layer is less than about 10 nm, and the porous separation layer comprises titania, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, La.sub.2O.sub.3, CeO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, Y.sub.2O.sub.3, VO.sub.z, NbO.sub.z, TaO.sub.z, ATiO.sub.3, AZrO.sub.3, AAl.sub.2O.sub.4, A.sup.1FeO.sub.3, A.sup.1MnO.sub.3, A.sup.1CoO.sub.3, A.sup.1NiO.sub.3, A.sup.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.3 CeO.sub.3, Li.sub.2ZrO.sub.3, Li.sub.2SiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2TiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.4N.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, Y.sub.xN.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, La.sub.xN.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, HfN.sup.2.sub.yO.sub.z, or a combination thereof; wherein A is La, Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.1 is La, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.2 is Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.3 is Sr or Ba; A.sup.4 is Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ti or Zr; N.sup.1 is V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Si or Ge; N.sup.2 is V, Mo, W or Si; x is 1 or 2; y ranges from 1 to 3; and z ranges from 2 to 7.

Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung (Rexford, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Ramaswamy, Vidya (Niskayuna, NY); Willson, Patrick Daniel (Latham, NY); Gao, Yan (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-03-01

313

Temperature Dependences for Air-broadened Widths and Shift Coefficients in the 30013 - 00001 and 30012 - 00001 Bands of Carbon Dioxide near 1600 nm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearly 40 high resolution spectra of air-broadened CO2 recorded at temperatures between 215 and 294 K were analyzed using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique to determine temperature dependences of air-broadened half width and air-induced pressure shift coefficients in the 30013-00001 and 30012-00001 bands of 12CO2. Data were recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers (Kitt Peak FTS at the National Solar Observatory in Arizona and the Bomem FTS at NRC, Ottawa) with optical path lengths ranging between 25 m and 121 m. The sample pressures varied between 11 torr (pure CO2) and 924 torr (CO2-air) with volume mixing ratios of CO2 in air between ~ 0.015 and 0.11. To minimize systematic errors and increase the accuracy of the retrieved parameters, we constrained the multispectrum nonlinear least squares fittings to use quantum mechanical expressions for the rovibrational energies and intensities rather than retrieving the individual positions and intensities line-by-line. The results suggest minimal vibrational dependence for the temperature dependence coefficients.1 1 A. Predoi-Cross and R. Mckellar are grateful for financial support from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The research at the Jet Propulsion laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, was performed under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The support received from the National Science Foundation under Grant No. ATM-0338475 to the College of William and Mary is greatly appreciated. The authors thank Mike Dulick of the National Solar Observatory for his assistance in obtaining the data recorded at Kitt Peak.

Devi, M.; Predoi-Cross, A.; McKellar, R.; Benner, C.; Miller, C. E.; Toth, R. A.; Brown, L. R.

2008-12-01

314

REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

315

Atmospheric response to deep-sea injections of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possibility of controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide accumulation and attendant climatic effects from fossil-fuel burning by diverting a fraction of the combustion product and injecting it into the deep-ocean, as proposed by Marchetti, is analyzed using an atmosphere\\/mixed layer\\/diffusive deep-ocean model for the carbon cycle. The model includes the nonlinear buffering of CO2 at the air\\/sea interface, and considers the

Martin I. Hoffert; Yeong-Cherng Wey; Andrew J. Callegari; Wallace S. Broecker

1979-01-01

316

The oxygen and carbon dioxide balance in the earth's atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle is described in detail, and steps which are sensitive to perturbation or instability are identified. About half of the carbon dioxide consumption each year in photosynthesis occurs in the oceans. Phytoplankton, which are the primary producers, have been shown to assimilate insecticides and herbicides. The impact of such materials on phytoplankton photosynthesis, both direct and as the indirect result of detrimental effects higher up in the food chain, cannot be assessed. Net oxygen production is very small in comparison with the total production and occurs almost exclusively in a few ocean areas with anoxic bottom conditions and in peat-forming marshes which are sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. The carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is increasing at a relatively rapid rate as the result of fossil fuel combustion. Increases in photosynthesis as the result of the hothouse effect may in turn reduce the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, leading to global cooling.

Johnson, F. S.

1975-01-01

317

Allowable Exposure Limits for Carbon Dioxide during Extravehicular Activity.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The intent was to review the research pertaining to human exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) and to recommend allowable exposure limits for extravehicular activity (EVA). Respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal systems may be adversely affected by chronic ...

A. J. Seter

1993-01-01

318

Hiilidioksiditoimikunnan mietintoe. (Report of the carbon dioxide commission).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Commission was entrusted with investigating alternative strategies and measures for limiting and reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. It was to study both technical and structural means of reducing these emissions. The ...

J. Routti

1991-01-01

319

Role of Carbon Dioxide in Inert Gas Narcosis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role of carbon dioxide and oxygen in high pressure narcosis was studied by exposing animals to hyperbaric conditions while maintaining them normoxic and normocapnic. Chickens were the experimental animals. Heated, humidified gas entered the lung via a...

H. S. Weiss

1977-01-01

320

Role of Carbon Dioxide in Inert Gas Narcosis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role of carbon dioxide and oxygen in high pressure narcosis was studied by exposing animals to hyperbaric conditions while maintaining them normoxic and normocapnic. Chickens were the experimental animal used. The unanaesthetized restrained birds were...

H. S. Weiss L. W. Torley

1975-01-01

321

Numerical analysis of a carbon dioxide SFUR laser.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Within the framework of the ENEA (Italian Commission for Alternative Energy Sources) project on optical and electro-optical technologies, a TEA carbon dioxide laser was developed based upon a Self Filtering Unstable Resonator (SFUR). It delivers high ener...

R. Barbini, F. Colao, A. Petri

1989-01-01

322

Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures  

DOEpatents

A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

2013-01-29

323

Effect of helium in helium headspace carbon dioxide cylinders on packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography.  

PubMed

Supercritical fluid chromatography of PAHs was performed with pure carbon dioxide and helium headspace carbon dioxide at various cylinder fill levels. The retention times of the PAHs increased when helium headspace carbon dioxide was used as a carrier fluid relative to pure carbon dioxide. The increased retention times were affected by the level of the liquid phase present in the helium headspace carbon dioxide cylinder. As more liquid phase was removed from the cylinder, the effect of helium on the solvating power of CO(2) was reduced because the relative amount of helium dissolved in the liquid phase decreased. Furthermore, the effect of helium headspace carbon dioxide was investigated with methanol-modified carbon dioxide mobile phases for the analysis of steroids. We observed that the relative solubility of helium in carbon dioxide resulted in longer retention times when compared to pure carbon dioxide as the liquid level of carbon dioxide decreased. PMID:21619186

Leichter, E; Strode, J T; Taylor, L T; Schweighardt, F K

1996-03-01

324

Decorating catalytic palladium nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen reduction of a Pd(II)-b-diketone precursor in supercritical carbon dioxide produces palladium nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes that exhibit promising catalytic properties for hydrogenation of olefins in carbon dioxide as well as electro-reduction of oxygen in fuel cell applications.

Ye, Xiang-Rong; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, C M.

2003-02-25

325

Effect of carbon dioxide on fuel stability under storage conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Carbon dioxide, when used as an inert gas medium for filling the free space in tanks and reservoirs, limits the sediment formation, wards off the formation of oxidation products and existent gum, and stabilizes the acid number and cloud point of the fuel.2.The favorable stabilizing effect of carbon dioxide on fuel oxidation in storage is retained at gas-phase CO2 concentrations

V. N. Zrelov; V. M. Shagin; N. V. Avdeev; T. S. Merzlova; N. A. Afanas'eva; V. V. Bulavin

1973-01-01

326

Rapid determination of carbon dioxide in silicate rocks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the development of rapid methods for silicate rock analysis, a simpler and faster means was needed for the determination of carbon dioxide than the conventional "train" procedures. With the method presented here, which involves measurement of the volume of carbon dioxide evolved, the time required for a determination is about 5 minutes per sample. It provides a saving of 30 to 40 minutes for each determination without significant loss of accuracy.

Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W. W.

1955-01-01

327

Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

All of the technical goals of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) field program which were supported under the Department of Energy research grant ''Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' (DE-FG03-90ER60981) have been met. This has included the measurement of the partial pressures of carbon dioxide (C0) and nitrous oxide (NO) in both the surface ocean

1998-01-01

328

Precipitation of food protein using high pressure carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

High pressure carbon dioxide has been applied to precipitate soy protein. The method is suitable for effective precipitation of soy proteins and prevents local pH overshoot, which usually occurs in case of using mineral acids for the precipitation processes. It was possible to achieve 68.3wt% of soy protein precipitate using 30bars of pressurized carbon dioxide, at pH of 5.60 and

Nawal Khorshid; M. M. Farid

2007-01-01

329

Carbon dioxide in the ocean surface: The homogeneous buffer factor  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The amount of carbon dioxide that can be dissolved in surface seawater depends at least partially on the homogeneous buffer factor, which is a mathematical function of the chemical equilibrium conditions among the various dissolved inorganic species. Because these equilibria are well known, the homogeneous buffer factor is well known. Natural spatial variations depend very systematically on sea surface temperatures, and do not contribute significantly to uncertainties in the present or future carbon dioxide budget. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

Sundquist, E. T.; Plummer, L. N.; Wigley, T. M. L.

1979-01-01

330

Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and deacidification of rice bran oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined pilot-scale extraction and lab-scale deacidification of rice bran oil by using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Two purest gamma-oryzanols (?-oryzanols) (>98wt%) were initially obtained by preparative reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction at 300bar and 313K from 1.03kg powdered rice bran indicated a total yield of oil of 15.7% with a free fatty acids content of

Chao-Rui Chen; Chih-Hung Wang; Ling-Ya Wang; Zih-Hao Hong; Shuo-Hsiu Chen; Wai-Jane Ho; Chieh-Ming J. Chang

2008-01-01

331

Feasibility of Metalworking Fluids Delivered in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new method to lubricate, cool, and evacuate chips in metalworking operations using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). Water-based and straight oil metalworking fluids (MWFs) are currently being used to perform these functions even though they are characterized by high economic, occupational health, and environmental costs. Carbon dioxide above its critical temperature and pressure is a finely tunable

Andres F. Clarens; Kim F. Hayes; Steven J. Skerlos

2006-01-01

332

Methanolysis of seed oils in flowing supercritical carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The direct methanolysis of triglycerides in flowing supercritical carbon dioxide by an immobilized lipase is described. The\\u000a reaction system consists of two syringe pumps for substrate addition and another two syringe pumps for delivering CO2 at 24.1 MPa. Corn oil is pumped into the carbon dioxide stream at a rate of 4 ?L\\/min, and methanol is pumped at 5 ?L\\/min

Michael A. Jackson; Jerry W. King

1996-01-01

333

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation,

William K. OConnor; David C. Dahlin; David N. Nilsen; Richard P. Walters; Paul C. Turner

2000-01-01

334

Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement. This response is mediated by a cGMP signaling pathway that includes the cGMP-gated heteromeric channel TAX-2/TAX-4. CO2 avoidance is modulated by multiple signaling molecules, including the neuropeptide Y receptor NPR-1 and the calcineurin subunits TAX-6 and CNB-1. Nutritional status also modulates CO2 responsiveness via the insulin and TGFbeta signaling pathways. CO2 response is mediated by a neural circuit that includes the BAG neurons, a pair of sensory neurons of previously unknown function. TAX-2/TAX-4 function in the BAG neurons to mediate acute CO2 avoidance. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans senses and responds to CO2 using multiple signaling pathways and a neural network that includes the BAG neurons and that this response is modulated by the physiological state of the worm. PMID:18524955

Hallem, Elissa A; Sternberg, Paul W

2008-06-10

335

Miniaturized Amperometric Solid Electrolyte Carbon Dioxide Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A miniaturized electrochemical carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor using Na3Z r2Si2PO12 (NASICON) as a solid electrolyte has been fabricated and de monstrated. Microfabrication techniques were used for sensor fabricat ion to yield a sensing area around 1.0 mm x 1.1 mm. The NASICON solid electrolyte and the Na2CO3/BaCO3 (1:1.7 molar ratio) auxiliary elect rolyte were deposited by sputtering in between and on top of the inte rdigitated finger-shaped platinum electrodes. This structure maximize s the length of the three-phase boundary (electrode, solid electrolyt e, and auxiliary electrolyte), which is critical for gas sensing. The robust CO2 sensor operated up to 600 C in an amperometric mode and a ttempts were made to optimize sensor operating parameters. Concentrat ions of CO2 between 0.02% and 4% were detected and the overall sensor performance was evaluated. Linear response of sensor current output to ln[CO2 concentration] ranging from 0.02% to 1% was achieved.

Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, C. C.; Hammond, J. W.; Ward, B.; Lukco, D.; Lampard, P.; Artale, M.; Androjna, D.

2006-01-01

336

Rat aversion to isoflurane versus carbon dioxide  

PubMed Central

Some experts suggest that sedation of laboratory rodents with isoflurane before euthanasia with carbon dioxide (CO2) is a humane alternative to euthanasia with CO2 alone, but little research has compared aversion with these agents. Albino rats were tested in a lightdark box where they had the choice between remaining in a dark compartment filling with isoflurane or CO2, or escaping to a lit compartment. Experiment 1 validated the procedure by confirming that rats responded to agent and light intensity. In experiment 2, 9/16 and 0/16 rats remained in the dark compartment until recumbent when initially exposed to isoflurane and CO2, respectively. In experiment 3, more rats remained in the dark compartment until recumbent during initial (10/16) versus re-exposure (1/16) to isoflurane. These results indicate that initial exposure to CO2 is more aversive than isoflurane, and that re-exposure to isoflurane is more aversive than initial exposure. We conclude that sedation with isoflurane is a refinement over euthanasia with CO2 alone for rats that have not been previously exposed to inhalant anaesthetics.

Wong, Devina; Makowska, I. Joanna; Weary, Daniel M.

2013-01-01

337

Zenker's Diverticulum: Carbon Dioxide Laser Endoscopic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Nowadays endoscopic diverticulotomy is the surgical approach of the first choice in treatment of Zenker's diverticulum. We report our experience with this procedure and try to sum up recent recommendations for management of surgery and postoperative care. Data of 34 patients with Zenker's diverticulum, treated by endoscopic carbon dioxide laser diverticulotomy at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic, were prospectively stored and followed in relatively short period from May 2009 to December 2013. The average length of diverticulum was 32?mm. The average duration of surgery was 32?min. The patients were fed via feeding tube for 6.1 days and antibiotics were administered for 7 days. Mean hospitalization time was 7.4 days. We observed one transient recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis and no other serious complications. Recurrence rate was 3%. We recommend complete transection of the diverticular septum in one procedure, systemic antibiotic treatment and exclusion of transoral intake for minimally 5 days, and contrast oesophagogram before resumption of oral intake to exclude fistula. Open diverticulectomy should be reserved for cases with inadequate endoscopic exposure and for revision surgery for multiple recurrences from endoscopic diverticulotomies.

Plzak, Jan; Zabrodsky, Michal; Lukes, Petr

2014-01-01

338

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct aqueous mineral carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide sequestration by an ex-situ, direct aqueous mineral carbonation process has been investigated over the past two years. This process was conceived to minimize the steps in the conversion of gaseous CO2 to a stable solid. This meant combining two separate reactions, mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation, into a single unit operation. It was recognized that the conditions favorable for one of these reactions could be detrimental to the other. However, the benefits for a combined aqueous process, in process efficiency and ultimately economics, justified the investigation. The process utilizes a slurry of water, dissolved CO2, and a magnesium silicate mineral, such as olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. These minerals were selected as the reactants of choice for two reasons: (1) significant abundance in nature; and (2) high molar ratio of the alkaline earth oxides (CaO, MgO) within the minerals. Because it is the alkaline earth oxide that combines with CO2 to form the solid carbonate, those minerals with the highest ratio of these oxides are most favored. Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride additions to the solution, and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Future studies are intended to investigate various mineral pretreatment options, the carbonation solution characteristics, alternative reactants, scale-up to a continuous process, geochemical modeling, and process economics.

O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

2000-01-01

339

Cycling Carbon: Seeing How Plants Use Carbon Dioxide in the Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity discusses the nature of carbon, the different types of compounds in which it exists (e.g. charcoal, glucose, carbon dioxide), the biochemical reactions in which it takes part (photosynthesis and respiration), the range of processes that carbon and carbon compounds are involved in on Earth, and how these link together to form the carbon cycle. This activity demonstrates the uptake of carbon dioxide by plants, using Elodea as the example. Students are reminded that Elodea is a pond plant that lives below the water surface and thus extracts dissolved carbon dioxide from the water rather than directly from the atmosphere as terrestrial plants do. The students will discover that the carbon exchange between living things and the atmosphere mostly happens through photosynthesis and respiration. During the growing season leaves take up carbon dioxide and carbon is then stored in the living biomass.

340

Carbon dioxide insufflation during colonoscopy in deeply sedated patients  

PubMed Central

AIM: To compare the impact of carbon dioxide (CO2) and air insufflation on patient tolerance/safety in deeply sedated patients undergoing colonoscopy. METHODS: Patients referred for colonoscopy were randomized to receive either CO2 or air insufflation during the procedure. Both the colonoscopist and patient were blinded to the type of gas used. During the procedure, insertion and withdrawal times, caecal intubation rates, total sedation given and capnography readings were recorded. The level of sedation and magnitude of patient discomfort during the procedure was assessed by a nurse using a visual analogue scale (VAS) (0-3). Patients then graded their level of discomfort and abdominal bloating using a similar VAS. Complications during and after the procedure were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 142 patients were randomized with 72 in the air arm and 70 in the CO2 arm. Mean age between the two study groups were similar. Insertion time to the caecum was quicker in the CO2 group at 7.3 min vs 9.9 min with air (P = 0.0083). The average withdrawal times were not significantly different between the two groups. Caecal intubation rates were 94.4% and 100% in the air and CO2 groups respectively (P = 0.012). The level of discomfort assessed by the nurse was 0.69 (air) and 0.39 (CO2) (P = 0.0155) and by the patient 0.82 (air) and 0.46 (CO2) (P = 0.0228). The level of abdominal bloating was 0.97 (air) and 0.36 (CO2) (P = 0.001). Capnography readings trended to be higher in the CO2 group at the commencement, caecal intubation, and conclusion of the procedure, even though this was not significantly different when compared to readings obtained during air insufflation. There were no complications in both arms. CONCLUSION: CO2 insufflation during colonoscopy is more efficacious than air, allowing quicker and better cecal intubation rates. Abdominal discomfort and bloating were significantly less with CO2 insufflation.

Singh, Rajvinder; Neo, Eu Nice; Nordeen, Nazree; Shanmuganathan, Ganesananthan; Ashby, Angelie; Drummond, Sharon; Nind, Garry; Murphy, Elizabeth; Luck, Andrew; Tucker, Graeme; Tam, William

2012-01-01

341

Can fast-growing plantation trees escape biochemical down-regulation of photosynthesis when grown throughout their complete production cycle in the open air under elevated carbon dioxide?  

PubMed

Poplar trees sustain close to the predicted increase in leaf photosynthesis when grown under long-term elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]). To investigate the mechanisms underlying this response, carbohydrate accumulation and protein expression were determined over four seasons of growth. No increase in the levels of soluble carbohydrates was observed in the young expanding or mature sun leaves of the three poplar genotypes during this period. However, substantial increases in starch levels were observed in the mature leaves of all three poplar genotypes grown in elevated [CO2]. Despite the very high starch levels, no changes in the expression of photosynthetic Calvin cycle proteins, or in the starch biosynthetic enzyme ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), were observed. This suggested that no long-term photosynthetic acclimation to CO2 occurred in these plants. Our data indicate that poplar trees are able to 'escape' from long-term, acclimatory down-regulation of photosynthesis through a high capacity for starch synthesis and carbon export. These findings show that these poplar genotypes are well suited to the elevated [CO2] conditions forecast for the middle of this century and may be particularly suited for planting for the long-term carbon sequestration into wood. PMID:17080946

Davey, P A; Olcer, H; Zakhleniuk, O; Bernacchi, C J; Calfapietra, C; Long, S P; Raines, C A

2006-07-01

342

Fixation and activation of carbon dioxide on aluminum porphyrin. Catalytic formation of carbamic ester from carbon dioxide, amine, and epoxide  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is trapped by (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphinato) aluminum acetate in the presence of a secondary amine in the form of an aluminum carbamate on the opposite side to the acetate group with respect to the porphyrin plane. Carbon dioxide thus trapped by aluminum porphyrin is activated enough to undergo a catalytic reaction involving secondary amine and epoxide to afford dialkylcarbamic ester under atmospheric pressure at room temperature. 15 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Kojima, F.; Aida, T.; Inoue, S.

1986-02-05

343

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-07-01

344

Effects of large-scale Amazon forest degradation on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and isoprene.  

PubMed

Loss of large areas of Amazonian forest, through either direct human impact or climate change, could exert a number of influences on the regional and global climates. In the Met Office Hadley Centre coupled climate-carbon cycle model, a severe drying of this region initiates forest loss that exerts a number of feedbacks on global and regional climates, which magnify the drying and the forest degradation. This paper provides an overview of the multiple feedback process in the Hadley Centre model and discusses the implications of the results for the case of direct human-induced deforestation. It also examines additional potential effects of forest loss through changes in the emissions of mineral dust and biogenic volatile organic compounds. The implications of ecosystem-climate feedbacks for climate change mitigation and adaptation policies are also discussed. PMID:18267906

Betts, Richard; Sanderson, Michael; Woodward, Stephanie

2008-05-27

345

Impact of cement renders on airborne ozone and carbon dioxide concentrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The uptake of pollutants by building surfaces can potentially improve both indoor and outdoor air quality. Cement renders provide a unique opportunity for passive pollutant removal because they can cover large surface areas. This study investigated the passive removal of carbon dioxide and ozone by cement renders having varied binder compositions and curing durations. The results from this study demonstrated shorter curing durations resulted in greater pollutant uptake. However, the use of the supplementary cementitious material, metakaolin, in the cement render increased the carbon dioxide ingress while decreasing the ozone uptake. Therefore, the adaptation of the render composition for the best effective application may result in valuable indoor air quality or carbon savings consequences.

Taylor-Lange, Sarah C.; Juenger, Maria C. G.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

2013-05-01

346

Carbon dioxide catastrophes: Past and future menace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbon dioxide is important in its role as coupler of the terrestrial biosphere to inorganic chemical processes and as the principal greenhouse gas controlling Earth's surface temperature. The hypothesis that atmospheric CO2 levels have diminished with time, with the resulting cooling effect offsetting an increase in the solar constant, seems firmly established, and it is shown that feedback mechanisms exist which can maintain the terrestrial surface in a relatively narrow temperature range over geological time. Of the factors involved in such CO2 variation, the oceanic reservoir appears the most important. Surface waters are probably in approximate equilibrium with regard to CO2 exchange with the ambient atmosphere in most regions, but data from deep-ocean water sampling indicates that such waters are somewhat undersaturated in the sense that they would tend to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere if brought to the surface without change in composition or temperature. If major impacts into the ocean can result in loss of a substantial portion of the atmospheric CO2 reservoir, then any such future event could imperil the continuation of most higher forms of life on Earth. The most likely candidate for an inverse Nyos global event in previous Earth history is the Cretaceous-Tertiary terminal extinction event. The Cretaceous was characterized by warm, equable temperatures presumably indicative of relatively high CO2 levels and an intense greenhouse heating. Cooling of the oceans in absence of massive transfer of CO2 to the oceanic reservoir in itself would promote a condition of CO2 undersaturation in abyssal waters, and this is made even more extreme by the pattern of ocean water circulation. It is possible to envision a situation in which deep ocean waters were at least occasionally profoundly undersaturated with regard to CO2. Turnover of a major fraction of such an ocean would then remove, on a very short time scale, as much as 90 percent of the atmospheric CO2 inventory.

Baur, Mario E.

1988-01-01

347

Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The Equator Principle is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

2010-12-01

348

The metabolism of skin grafts stored with excess carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

In Japan, the long-term storage of cereals and foods in the presence of excess carbon dioxide is already a practical reality. The present study was conducted to assess the metabolic changes in skin grafts during storage in the presence and absence of excess carbon dioxide, with the aim of seeking a simple and effective method to prolong skin-graft viability during storage. In experiment 1, 120 male Wistar rats weighing 250 to 300 gm were used. A split-thickness skin graft 450 microns in thickness was harvested from the back of each rat with a dermatome and was divided into two pieces for separate storage. One piece was stored in normal air at 4 degrees C (control grafts), and the other was stored in a gas mixture composed of 20% O2, 20% CO2, and 60% N2 at 4 degrees C (CO2 grafts). Metabolic changes in the skin grafts during storage were investigated by ATP and glucose assays. In experiment 2, 60 male Wistar rats were used. Collection and storage of the split-thickness skin grafts were performed as in experiment 1. In both groups, skin grafts were stored for 1, 2, or 3 weeks, and the oxygen consumption rate of each graft was determined. Experiment 3 used 80 male Wistar rats and the same procedure as in experiment 1; split-thickness skin grafts were harvested, divided into two pieces, and stored for 1, 2, or 3 weeks. In both groups, the stored skin grafts were regrafted onto the backs of the same donor rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1584873

Hira, M; Tajima, S; Yamamoto, Y

1992-06-01

349

Carbon dioxide effects on crop energy balance: Testing ecosys with a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) experiment  

SciTech Connect

Elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations (C{sub e}) have been observed to decrease short-term plant water use under controlled conditions by increasing stomatal resistance. The extent to which this decrease occurs over a growing season in the field is uncertain, however, because stomatal resistance is only one of many mechanisms that control water use. In this study, we tested the ecosystem simulation model ecosys, which reproduces an hourly energy balance through soil-vegetation systems under defined atmospheric boundary conditions, using energy exchange data measured as part of the Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) experiment at C{sub e}=550 vs. 370 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}. The model reproduced reductions in measured upward latent heat fluxes that varied from -10 to +40 W m{sup -2}, depending on atmospheric conditions. In the model, the primary effect of elevated C{sub e} on latent heat fluxes was through canopy stomatal conductance. This effect was largely offset by secondary effects through canopy temperature that enabled the model to reproduce measured changes in sensible heat fluxes. The total effect simulated by ecosys of C{sub e}=550 vs. 370 {mu}mol mol{sup -1} on evapotranspiration during the entire FACE experiment was a reduction of 7%. This reduction compares with one of 11% estimated from accumulated daily measurements of latent heat flux. In the model, the different effects of C{sub e} on plant water use depend on atmosphere and soil boundary conditions, and are highly dynamic. Consequently the simulated C{sub e}-water use relationship is likely to be site-specific. The use of models such as ecosys allows site-specific boundary conditions to be considered in the study of C{sub e} effects on plant growth and water use. 51 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Grant, R.F. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Kimball, B.A.; Pinter, P.J. [Water Conservation Lab., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1995-05-01

350

Removal of organic impurities from liquid carbon dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of a high velocity stream of carbon dioxide snowflakes to clean large optics is well known, and has gained widespread acceptance in the astronomical community as a telescope maintenance technique. Ultimately, however, the success of carbon dioxide snow cleaning depends on the availability of high purity carbon dioxide. The higher the purity of the carbon dioxide, the longer will be the time interval between required mirror washings. The highest grades of commercially produced liquid carbon dioxide are often not available in the more remote regions of the world - such as where major astronomical observatories are often located. Furthermore, the purity of even the highest grades of carbon dioxide are only nominal, and wide variations are known to occur from tank to tank. Occasionally, visible deposits of organic impurities are left behind during cleaning with carbon dioxide that is believed to be 99.999% pure. A zeolite molecular sieve based filtration system has proven to be very effective in removing these organic impurities. A zeolite is a complex alumino-silicate. One example has an empirical formula of Na2O(Al2O3)(SiO2)2yH2O, where y=0 to 8. The zeolites have an open crystal structure and are capable of trapping impurities like 8-methylheptadecane (an oil) and 2,6-octadine-1-ol,3,7- dimethyl-,(E)- (a fatty acid). In fact, a zeolite can trap 29.5% of its own weight in SAE 20 lubricant at 25 degree(s)C. After filtration of liquid CO2 through zeolites, the concentration of measured impurities was below the detection limit for state-of-the-art gas chromatography systems.

Zito, Richard R.

2002-09-01

351

Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Carbon Dioxide Research Progress Report, fiscal year 1979  

SciTech Connect

Research on the global carbon cycle and the effects of increased carbon dioxide on the global climate system is reported. Environmental and societal effects related to CO/sub 2/ and environmental control technology for CO/sub 2/ are also discussed. Lists of research projects and reports and publications of the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program are included. An expanded CO/sub 2/ monitoring network is providing increased coverage for interpretation of patterns of sources and sinks seasonal variability, and documentation of the global growth of CO/sub 2/. Modeling studies emphasized that knowledge of the transport and mixing of surface ocean waters is important in understanding deep oceanic circulation. Initial studies in the equatorial Pacific are helping quantify estimates of the amount of outgassing CO/sub 2/ from tropical waters. During fiscal year 1979, there was a substantial increase in appreciation of the role of the ocean in controlling not only atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations but also the climatic response to changes in concentration. Model simulations of the effect of doubled CO/sub 2/ concentration carried out with fixed ocean temperatures a situation that is possible during perhaps the next 20 years, showed relatively small summer heating over land areas. On the other hand, simulations in which the oceanic temperatures could come into instantaneous equilibrium with atmospheric conditions continued to show global temperature increases of 3 +- 1.5/sup 0/C, accentuated at high latitudes. To improve understanding of possible regional climate changes, there were increased efforts to reconstruct regional climatic patterns prevailing during past warm periods that might serve as analogs of future climatic conditions. Particular attention was directed to the climates of the United States and other countries bordering the North Atlantic Ocean during the warm period 5000 to 7000 years ago.

Dahlman, R.C.; Gross, T.; Machta, L.; Elliott, W.; MacCracken, M.

1980-04-01

352

Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with

Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

2009-01-01

353

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-01-01

354

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2001-01-01

355

Mechanisms of Neutralization of Bauxite Residue by Carbon Dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bauxite residue red mud, an alkaline slurry from alumina refining, is produced in large volumes and disposed of in large surface impoundments. The objectives of this study were to measure the extent of neutralization of bauxite residue by carbon dioxide as a function of CO2 partial pressure and to determine the geochemical reactions responsible for carbon sequestration. Bauxite residue was

Sameer Khaitan; David A. Dzombak

2009-01-01

356

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30

357

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOEpatents

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmount, IL)

1993-01-01

358

Electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions at metal electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The quantities of carbon stored in the form of atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2} in the hydrosphere and carbonates in the terrestrial environment substantially exceed those of fossil fuels. In spite of this the industrial use of carbon dioxide as a source of chemical carbon is presently limited to preparation of urea and certain carboxylic acids as well as organic carbonates and polycarbonates. However, the situation is expected to change in the future, if effective catalytic systems allowing to activate carbon dioxide will become available. In this connection, the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}, requiring only an additional input of water and electrical energy, appears as an attractive possibility. For more than 100 years formic acid and formates of alkali metals were considered as the only significant products of the electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The highest current efficiencies, exceeding 90 %, were obtained either with mercury or with amalgam electrodes. The only comprehensive study regarding kinetics of CO{sub 2} reduction in aqueous solution has been performed by Eyring et al. using a mercury cathode. This paper describes electrolysis studies.

Augustynski, J.; Jermann, B.; Kedzierzawski, P. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

1996-12-31

359

Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.  

PubMed

Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20?mol% carbon dioxide (20-40?wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents. PMID:24892923

Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

2014-01-01

360

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The method of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with DIMP (diisopropyl methylphosphonate) from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well (NO. 23-120) water was investigated. A laboratory-based adsorption/regen...

R. M. O'Brien R. P. de Filippi C. E. Smith D. G. Hager

1982-01-01

361

Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

1972-01-01

362

What Are the Human-Caused Sources of Carbon Dioxide?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity presents a digital interactive where students identify anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide and their relative contribution to carbon enrichment of the atmosphere. Students then obtain a photograph pair of a scene in their community, and identify sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide that did not exist in the earlier photograph. Alternatively, they can interview community members to obtain the same information. This activity is supported by a textbook chapter, How is the Atmosphere Changing?, part of the unit, Climate Change, in Global Systems Science (GSS), an interdisciplinary course for high school students that emphasizes how scientists from a wide variety of fields work together to understand significant problems of global impact.

363

Measurements of carbon dioxide in an Oregon metropolitan region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region for the late July through December, 2009 period. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located 30 km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO 2 at each site average 403-408 ppm and show considerable variability at each site (360-610 ppm) due to CO 2 sources, sinks and meteorological variability. Within this variability, a marked 20-30 ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO 2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6 ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/ 12C ratio of CO 2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO 2 is dominated by petroleum sources (75-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO 2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO ( r2 = 0.80 and 0.77), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO 2 concentrations.

Rice, Andrew; Bostrom, Gregory

2011-02-01

364

The phase relation between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using data series on atmospheric carbon dioxide and global temperatures we investigate the phase relation (leads/lags) between these for the period January 1980 to December 2011. Ice cores show atmospheric CO2 variations to lag behind atmospheric temperature changes on a century to millennium scale, but modern temperature is expected to lag changes in atmospheric CO2, as the atmospheric temperature increase since about 1975 generally is assumed to be caused by the modern increase in CO2. In our analysis we use eight well-known datasets: 1) globally averaged well-mixed marine boundary layer CO2 data, 2) HadCRUT3 surface air temperature data, 3) GISS surface air temperature data, 4) NCDC surface air temperature data, 5) HadSST2 sea surface data, 6) UAH lower troposphere temperature data series, 7) CDIAC data on release of anthropogene CO2, and 8) GWP data on volcanic eruptions. Annual cycles are present in all datasets except 7) and 8), and to remove the influence of these we analyze 12-month averaged data. We find a high degree of co-variation between all data series except 7) and 8), but with changes in CO2 always lagging changes in temperature. The maximum positive correlation between CO2 and temperature is found for CO2 lagging 11-12 months in relation to global sea surface temperature, 9.5-10 months to global surface air temperature, and about 9 months to global lower troposphere temperature. The correlation between changes in ocean temperatures and atmospheric CO2 is high, but do not explain all observed changes.

Humlum, Ole; Stordahl, Kjell; Solheim, Jan-Erik

2013-01-01

365

Carbon dioxide separation from high temperature fuel cell power plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High temperature fuel cell technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs), are considered for their potential application to carbon dioxide emission control. Both technologies feature electrochemical oxidisation of natural gas reformed fuels, avoiding the mixture of air and fuel flows and dilution with nitrogen and oxygen of the oxidised products; a preliminary analysis shows how the different mechanism of ion transport attributes each technology a specific advantage for the application to CO 2 separation. The paper then compares in the first part the most promising cycle configurations based on high efficiency integrated SOFC/gas turbine "hybrid" cycles, where CO 2 is separated with absorption systems or with the eventual adoption of a second SOFC module acting as an "afterburner". The second part of the paper discusses how a MCFC plant could be "retrofitted" to a conventional fossil-fuel power station, giving the possibility of draining the majority of CO 2 from the stack exhaust while keeping the overall cycle electrical efficiency approximately unchanged.

Campanari, Stefano

366

Economic Effects of Using Carbon Taxes to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Major OECD Countries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A tax on fossil fuels designed to obtain a 20 percent reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide by the year 2020 would lower output among major OECD nations by 1 to 3 1/2 percent. The tax required to achieve a 20% reduction in emissions of carbon dioxide b...

1992-01-01

367

Hedging Carbon Risk: Protecting Customers and Shareholders from the Financial Risk Associated with Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Utilities and regulators are recognizing the imprudence of assuming that carbon dioxide emissions will not cost anything over the long lifetime of new investments. Several utilities have begun to protect their customers and shareholders from this financial risk by integrating an estimated cost of carbon dioxide emissions into their evaluation of resource options, and selecting the overall least-cost portfolio of resources.

Bokenkamp, Karl; LaFlash, Hal; Singh, Virinder; Bachrach Wang, Devra

2005-07-01

368

Natural Methane and Carbon Dioxide Hydrates in the Earth System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both CH4 and CO2 are abundant volatiles in the earth's crust. Methane hydrates occur in permafrost regions and continental slopes of oceans. It is currently estimated that the energy stored in CH4 hydrate reserves totals more than twice the global reserves of all conventional oil, gas, and coal deposits combined. This means that methane hydrate could prove to be a very important source of energy in the future. Pressure versus temperature phase diagrams for methane and carbon dioxide define characteristic stability fields for gas, fluid and hydrates states. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in the earths crust and production of methane hydrate reservoirs are critically dependent on knowledge of the in situ elastic moduli of natural hydrates. The physical properties of simple methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are similar [1]. Our compilation of experimental data confirms high compressional wave velocities and elastic moduli for CH4 and CO2 hydrates and low compressional wave velocities for the fluid and gas phases. As methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are stable over similar pressure-temperature ranges, the two types of hydrates form in similar settings in the earth's crust. For example, temperature and pressure conditions in deepwater marine environments require both CO2 and CH4 to be in hydrate phase. However, not much is known about the origin, distribution and total volume of natural carbon dioxide hydrates stored in the earth's crust. For a number of tectonic/geological settings, CO2-rich fluids from deep crustal reservoirs must be considered: rifted margins, volcanic arcs, deepwater vents [2], mud volcanoes and mud diapirs [3]. Both methane and carbon dioxide hydrates work to cement sea floors in similar ways. Slope failure, a phenomenon usually taken as a hallmark of the presence of methane hydrate, could also be attributed to the existence of carbon dioxide hydrates. Perhaps most critically, many of the estimations of the amounts of methane hydrates are based on seismic imaging. However, since carbon dioxide hydrate can also form gas traps and subsequently bottom simulating reflections (a prime indicator of methane hydrate reserves), we speculate that some of the global estimated methane hydrate may in fact be natural carbon dioxide hydrate. References: [1] Sivaraman, R., Gas TIPS, 9, 4-7, 2003;[2] Sakai, H. et al., Science, 248, 1093-1096, 1990; [3] Mueller, C. et al., World Oil, 222, 60-67, 2001

Research Team; Milkereit, B.

2004-05-01

369

Interpretation of carbon dioxide observations in SE England on different time-scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High frequency (5 min) and high-precision (0.1 ppm) measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide have been made from 2000 to 2011 at the Royal Holloway University of London (Egham, Surrey) sub-urban site west of Lon-don using a non-dispersive infrared analyser calibrated against NOAA standards. Carbon dioxide concentrations measured vary on hourly, weekly, seasonal and annual time-scales. Differences in diurnal cycles are related to sun-rise time, which enhances net vegetative uptake of carbon dioxide, and to vertical mixing following the break-up of the inversion. Influences of anthropogenic emissions were more pronounced during weekdays than weekends. Seasonal cycles of carbon dioxide are driven by changes in biological activity and in emissions from combustion sources. They exhibit winter maxima and summer minima, with a range of amplitudes, that are influenced strongly by meteorology, of between 14.0 ppm in 2000 and 35.3 ppm in 2007. Analyses of 8 wind sectors of 45 for wind speeds greater than 0.1 m/s showed that the highest carbon dioxide values were from air masses from the east or southeast. The cleanest sector was the south which is considered as the background sector. The greatest rate of annual increase was for the north sector with 3.20 ppm/yr whereas the northeast has the smallest increase of 2.73 ppm/yr. A linear increasing trend for all data of 2.54 ppm/yr was calculated (R2>0.95) with Makesens 1.0, which is comparable with the global estimated mean annual increase of 1.98 ppm/yr for 2000-2011. We suggest that major emissions from combustion sources increase atmospheric carbon dioxide, and that the weather conditions produce large variations within the time-scales analysed.

Yassmany Hernndez Paniagua, Ivn; Lowry, Dave; Nisbet, Euan; Clemitshaw, Kevin

2013-04-01

370

A regional and global analysis of carbon dioxide physiological forcing and its impact on climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration has both a radiative (greenhouse) effect and a physiological effect on climate. The physiological effect forces climate as plant stomata do not open as wide under enhanced CO2 levels and this alters the surface energy balance by reducing the evapotranspiration flux to the atmosphere, a process referred to as `carbon dioxide physiological forcing'. Here the climate impact of the carbon dioxide physiological forcing is isolated using an ensemble of twelve 5-year experiments with the Met Office Hadley Centre HadCM3LC fully coupled atmosphere-ocean model where atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are instantaneously quadrupled and thereafter held constant. Fast responses (within a few months) to carbon dioxide physiological forcing are analyzed at a global and regional scale. Results show a strong influence of the physiological forcing on the land surface energy budget, hydrological cycle and near surface climate. For example, global precipitation rate reduces by ~3% with significant decreases over most land-regions, mainly from reductions to convective rainfall. This fast hydrological response is still evident after 5 years of model integration. Decreased evapotranspiration over land also leads to land surface warming and a drying of near surface air, both of which lead to significant reductions in near surface relative humidity (~6%) and cloud fraction (~3%). Patterns of fast responses consistently show that results are largest in the Amazon and central African forest, and to a lesser extent in the boreal and temperate forest. Carbon dioxide physiological forcing could be a source of uncertainty in many model predicted quantities, such as climate sensitivity, transient climate response and the hydrological sensitivity. These results highlight the importance of including biological components of the Earth system in climate change studies.

Andrews, Timothy; Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Boucher, Olivier; Forster, Piers M.

2011-02-01

371

SCORR - supercritical carbon dioxide resist removal.  

SciTech Connect

SCORR, short for supercritical carbon dioxide resist removal, is a new technology that could continue to enable the technological development of photolithography processes in industry. SCORR is based upon the physical properties of supercritical fluids (SCFs). These special properties enable SCFs to remove coatings, residues, and particles froin high-aspect-ratio structures in integrated circuits (ICs). SCORR also eliminates rinsing and drying steps presently used in IC manufacture, thereby eliminating the generation of millions of gallons of water per fab per day. Fabricating integrated circuits relies heavily on photolithography to define the shape and pattern of individual components. Once a single stage of a silicon wafer's topography has been completed, the hardened resist must be removed. Conventional processes generates more waste than any single step in the IC manufacturing process, and the production of a complete IC can involve many photolithography iterations. The cost associated with the treatment and disposal of this waste, as well as employee health and safety considerations, are driving a search for a1 ternative, environmentally benign, cost-effective solutions. In addition, photoresist stripping is confronting finer architectures and higher aspect ratios, as well as new low-k materials that are highly sensitive to post-etch residue. Low-k dielectrics and low-resistivity conductors such as copper are necessary for meeting industry's need for faster and smaller chips. Further, each low-k choice requires different plasma-etching processes, or chemistries, to etch structures into the low-k material; therefore, the nature of the residues can be different. No one product can meet all copper/low-k applications, and existing chemistries are not tunable - or even desirable - for the new processes. We have developed a new process - known as SCORR - that removes photoresist and post-ash, -etch, and -CMP (particulate) residue from semiconductor wafers. As IC feature sizes become smaller, the need for ensuring particle removal will increase. With feature sizes of less than 0.18{micro}m, it will become imperative that all particles greater than about 0.1 micron be removed from the semiconductor wafer. Existing cleaning technologies (such as liquid or high-pressure jet scrubbing) cannot remove particles on the order of 0.1 micron because of surface boundary layer constraints. Because of the low viscosities of supercritical fluids (SCFs), these constraints are virtually eliminated.

Jacobson, G. B. (Gunilla B.); Williams, L. L. (Laurie L.); Hollis, W. K. (William K.); Barton, Jerome C.; Taylor, C. M. (Craig M.)

2002-01-01

372

Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2013-11-14

373

Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records  

Microsoft Academic Search

A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model

Haroon S. Kheshgi; Atul K. Jain; Donald J. Wuebbles

1999-01-01

374

Helium enrichment during convective carbon dioxide dissolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by observed variations of the CO2/He ratios in natural carbon dioxide (CO2) reservoirs, such as the Bravo Dome field in northeastern New Mexico, we have performed laboratory experiments equilibrating gas mixtures containing Helium (He) and CO2 with water, at close to ambient conditions in a closed system. The experimental design allows for continuous measurement of headspace pressure as well as timed interval measurements of the CO2/He ratios and the ?13C value of CO2 in the headspace. Results from three dissolution experiments are reported: 1) pure Helium system, 2) 98% CO2 + 2% Nitrogen system, and 3) 97% CO2 and 3% Helium. Final equilibrated experimental results are compared to theoretical results obtained using Henry's Law relationships. The evolution of the amount of dissolved CO2 computed from gas pressure and gas compositions are in good agreement with Henry's Law relationships. For example, the CO2 + N2 system was initially pressurized with pure CO2 to 1323 mbar and after six days it equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 596 mbar. This compares very well with a calculated equilibrium headspace pressure of 592 mbar for this system. The CO2 + He system was pressurized to 1398 mbar CO2 and after six days equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 397 mbar. This measured pressure is slightly higher than the predicted equilibrated headspace pressure of 341 mbar, indicating a possible leak in the system during this particular experiment. In both experiments the initial pH of the water was 9.3 and the final equilibrated pH was 5.4. The ?13C value of equilibrated headspace CO2 was within 0.25 of its starting ?13C value, demonstrating insignificant carbon isotope fractionation at low pH. Measured Helium/ CO2 ratios throughout the CO2+Helium experiment preserve a non-linear trend of increasing He/ CO2 ratios through time that correlate very well with the measured pressure drop from CO2 dissolution. This indicates that gas composition, in particular the He/ CO2-ratio, can be used to infer the amount of dissolved CO2 in the field where pressure evolution is not available. Our experiments show that the rate of dissolution is determined by convective mass transfer in the brine. Convective transport is driven by the increase of water density with increasing CO2 saturation. However, unlike previous experiments with analog systems we do not observe a constant dissolution rate. This is due to the continued drop in gas pressure that continuously reduces the equilibrium aqueous CO2 concentration and with it the driving force for convection. This feed back may significantly reduce the magnitude of solubility trapping that can be expected during geological CO2 storage.

Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

2013-12-01

375

A study of nitrogen and carbon dioxide chemisorption on platinum black  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between sites responsible for nitrogen chemisorption and sites responsible for stronger adsorption of carbon dioxide on platinum black is reported. A 2 to 1 ratio has been found between molecules of more strongly adsorbed carbon dioxide and molecules of nitrogen chemisorbed on individual samples. This relationship has allowed us to deduce the structure of chemisorbed carbon dioxide. Carbon

E. F. Rissmann; J. M. Parry

1992-01-01

376

Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE  

SciTech Connect

All of the technical goals of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) field program which were supported under the Department of Energy research grant ''Measurements of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' (DE-FG03-90ER60981) have been met. This has included the measurement of the partial pressures of carbon dioxide (C0{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) in both the surface ocean and the atmosphere on 24 separate shipboard expedition legs of the WOCE Hydrographic Programme. These measurements were made in the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans over a six-and-a-half year period, and over a distance of nearly 200,000 kilometers of ship track. The total number of measurements, including ocean measurements, air measurements and standard gas measurements, is about 136,000 for each gas, or about 34,000 measurements of each gas in the ocean and in the air. This global survey effort is directed at obtaining a better understanding of the role of the oceans in the global atmospheric budgets of two important natural and anthropogenic modulators of climate through the ''greenhouse effect'', CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O, and an important natural and anthropogenic modulator of the Earth's protective ozone layer through catalytic processes in the stratosphere, N{sub 2}O. For both of these compounds, the oceans play a major role in their global budgets. In the case of CO{sub 2}, roughly half of the anthropogenic production through the combustion of fossil fuels has been absorbed by the world's oceans. In the case of N{sub 2}O, roughly a third of the natural flux to the atmosphere originates in the oceans. As the interpretation of the variability in the oceanic distributions of these compounds improves, measurements such as those supported by this research project are playing an increasingly important role in improving our understanding of natural and anthropogenic influences on climate and ozone. (B204)

Weiss, R.F.

1998-10-15

377

Modeling carbon dioxide, pH, and un-ionized ammonia relationships in serial reuse systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In serial reuse systems, excretion of metabolic carbon dioxide has a significant impact on ambient pH, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia concentrations. This impact depends strongly on alkalinity, water flow rate, feeding rate, and loss of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A reduction in pH from metabolic carbon dioxide can significantly reduce the un-ionized ammonia concentration and increase the carbon

John Colt; Barnaby Watten; Michael Rust

2009-01-01

378

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

2002-04-01

379

Carbonic Acid as a Reserve of Carbon Dioxide on Icy Moons: The Formation of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in a Polar Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ?3 band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO2 band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H2O)-carbon dioxide (CO2) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ?3 band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

2014-06-01

380

Buckling of block copolymer lamellae in supercritical carbon dioxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) swells many kinds of polymers. In particular polymers containing fluorine are highly swollen. Therefore, block copolymers having fluorinated blocks are expected to be swollen selectively in scCO2 due to the higher affinity of scCO2 toward the fluorinated blocks. We studied the phase behavior of fluorinated block copolymers swollen in scCO2 and found multiple order-to-order transitions as a function of pressure. In addition, the swollen structures could be frozen by reducing temperature and subsequently carbon dioxide was removed without disturbing the swollen morphologies. As a result, the volume occupied with carbon dioxide was converted to empty space, and hence a variety of nanoporous structures were successfully formed. In particular we found that swollen lamellae in scCO2 becomes undulated lamellae with a large wavelength, which is similar to ''egg cartoon'' often observed in unbinding membranes of surfactants.

Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Masateru; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kozo; Sugiyama, Kenji

2010-03-01

381

Exposures to carbon dioxide in the poultry processing industry  

SciTech Connect

The use of dry ice has increased dramatically in poultry processing plants because of changes in the fast food industry. Concentrations of carbon dioxide in four such plants were measured and were found to exceed the Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health Level (50,000 ppm) inside holding coolers where ventilation is poor. In other areas, where dry ice is delivered to poultry packages, time-weighted average exposures can exceed the threshold limit value of 5000 ppm by substantial margins, even if local exhaust ventilation systems are present. Reports of adverse health effects from carbon dioxide exposure and various control measures are reviewed. Recommendations regarding sampling and analytical techniques also are presented. Operators of poultry plants where dry ice is used need to recognize the occupational hazards of exposure to carbon dioxide.

Jacobs, D.E.; Smith, M.S.

1988-12-01

382

Cleaning of ITO glass with carbon dioxide snow jet spray  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ITO glass cleaning is LCD, OLED and other flat panel display industry's key technologies. At present, the usual wet cleaning technology consumes large amount of water and chemicals, and produces a large amount of contaminant venting. CO2 snow jet spray cleaning has been successfully applied to cleaning the surface of semiconductor chip, vacuum devices and space telescopes. Surface cleaning of indium tin oxide (ITO) film was carried out with carbon dioxide snow jet treatment .Based on the measurements of the contact angles, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) ,the influence of carbon dioxide snow jet treatment on surface cleaning of indium tin Oxide film was investigated and compared with the samples of low frequency immersion ultrasonic cleaning. Experimental data show that the carbon dioxide snow jet treatment effectively removes particulate and hydrocarbon on ITO surface.

Li, Jun-jian; Qi, Tong; Li, Shu-lin; Zhao, Guang

2007-12-01

383

A minichamber device for maintaining a constant carbon dioxide in ari atmosphere during prolonged culture of cells on the stage of an inverted microscope  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryConstruction details are described for a minichamber device that maintains a localized atmosphere of carbon dioxide in air\\u000a over the stage of an innerted microscope. This device is easily constructed, from Plexiglas and its specifications can be\\u000a adjusted to fit virtually any inverted microscopy. A flow of warm, humidified carbon dioxide in air gas mixture can be directed\\u000a over a

Barry D. Bavister

1988-01-01

384

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from the Yukon River system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions are important, but poorly quantified, components of riverine carbon (C) budgets. This is largely because the data needed for gas flux calculations are sparse and are spatially and temporally variable. Additionally, the importance of C gas emissions relative to lateral C exports is not well known because gaseous and aqueous fluxes are not commonly measured on the same rivers. We couple measurements of aqueous CO2 and CH4 partial pressures (pCO2, pCH4) and flux across the water-air interface with gas transfer models to calculate subbasin distributions of gas flux density. We then combine those flux densities with remote and direct observations of stream and river water surface area and ice duration, to calculate C gas emissions from flowing waters throughout the Yukon River basin. CO2 emissions were 7.68 Tg C yr-1 (95% CI: 5.84 -10.46), averaging 750 g C m-2 yr-1 normalized to water surface area, and 9.0 g C m-2 yr-1 normalized to river basin area. River CH4 emissions totaled 55 Gg C yr-1 or 0.7% of the total mass of C emitted as CO2 plus CH4 and 6.4% of their combined radiative forcing. When combined with lateral inorganic plus organic C exports to below head of tide, C gas emissions comprised 50% of total C exported by the Yukon River and its tributaries. River CO2 and CH4 derive from multiple sources, including groundwater, surface water runoff, carbonate equilibrium reactions, and benthic and water column microbial processing of organic C. The exact role of each of these processes is not yet quantified in the overall river C budget.

Striegl, Robert G.; Dornblaser, M. M.; McDonald, C. P.; Rover, J. R.; Stets, E. G.

2012-12-01

385

Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

Luxmoore, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baldocchi, D.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-09-01

386

Electricity Load and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Effects of a Carbon Price in the Short Term  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at acceptable levels will require a dramatic de-carbonization of the electric generation sector in the U.S. One increasingly discussed way to meet this policy goal is to put an explicit price on carbon emissions, either through a tax or a trading scheme. Increasing demand response has also been discussed as a way to reduce carbon

Adam Newcomer; Seth Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan

2008-01-01

387

42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and...Apparatus § 84.97 Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in...

2010-10-01

388

42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and...Apparatus § 84.97 Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in...

2009-10-01

389

Cerebrovascular reactivity to carbon dioxide in Alzheimer's disease. A review  

PubMed Central

There is growing evidence that cerebrovascular reactivity to carbon dioxide (CVRCO2) is impaired in Alzheimers disease (AD). Preclinical and animal studies suggest chronic hypercontractility in brain vessels in AD. We review (a) preclinical studies of mechanisms for impaired CVRCO2 in AD; (b) clinical studies of cerebrovascular function in subjects with AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and normal cognition. Although results of clinical studies are inconclusive, an increasing number of reports reveal an impairment of vascular reactivity to carbon dioxide in subjects with AD, and possibly also in MCI. Thus, CVRCO2 may be an attractive means to detect an early vascular dysfunction in subjects at risk.

Glodzik, Lidia; Randall, Catherine; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.

2013-01-01

390

Inhibitory effect of carbon dioxide on bacterial cellulose production by Acetobacter in agitated culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to study the inhibitory effect of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) on bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Acetobacter xylinum subsp. sucrofermentans BPR3001A, the BC concentration, oxygen consumption rate, viable cell concentration, and ATP content of the cells were investigated during cultivation in a 50-l jar fermentor sparged with air containing 10% (v\\/v) CO2. A high pCO2

Tohru Kouda; Takaaki Naritomi; Hisato Yano; Fumihiro Yoshinaga

1998-01-01

391

Turbulent heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide in square cross-sectional duct flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulations are performed to develop a new heat transfer coefficient correlation applicable to the gas cooler design\\u000a of a trans-critical carbon dioxide air-conditioner. Thermodynamic and transport properties of the supercritical gas cooling\\u000a process change dramatically and significantly vary heat transfer coefficients to be much different from those of single or\\u000a two phase flows. In the present study, the elliptic

Seong Ho Han; Young Don Choi; Jong Keun Shin; Young Chan Kim; Min Soo Kim

2008-01-01

392

Initial efficiencies of air cleaners for the removal of nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this research was to measure the initial effective cleaning rates (ECRs) of selected air cleaners for removing nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and six representative volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air. Four portable air cleaners, representing different principles of particle removal and incorporating activated carbon, were investigated. Experiments were conducted in a closed room-size environmental chamber using analyte concentrations similar to those reported in residences. Effects of relative humidity, temperature, filter particle loading and saturation of the adsorbents on the ECRs were not investigated in this preliminary study. However, the effect of extended usage was investigated for one air cleaner. Two of the air cleaners were found to be reasonably effective initially in removing NO 2 and five of the six VOC. These two devices had relatively high flow rates and the greatest amounts of activated carbon. None of the devices removed dichloromethane, the VOC with the highest vapor pressure. One air cleaner emitted 1,1,1-trichloroethane and formaldehyde. After being used in a residence for 150 h, the ECRs for the air cleaner which had the highest initial values decreased to 50% or less of the initial ECRs. This use was only about 15% of the recommended filter lifetime. Conversion of NO 2 to NO was also observed for this device but only after it had been used in the residence.

Daisey, J. M.; Hodgson, A. T.

393

COCAP - A compact carbon dioxide analyser for airborne platforms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne platforms are a valuable tool for atmospheric trace gas measurements due to their capability of movement in three dimensions, covering spatial scales from metres to thousands of kilometres. Although crewed research aircraft are flexible in payload and range, their use is limited by high initial and operating costs. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have the potential for substantial cost reduction, but require lightweight, miniaturized and energy-efficient scientific equipment. We are developing a COmpact Carbon dioxide analyser for Airborne Platforms (COCAP). It contains a non-dispersive infrared CO2sensor with a nominal full scale of 3000 ?mol/mol. Sampled air is dried with magnesium perchlorate before it enters the sensor. This enables measurement of the dry air mole fraction of CO2, as recommended by the World Meteorological Organization. During post-processing, the CO2 measurement is corrected for temperature and pressure variations in the gas line. Allan variance analysis shows that we achieve a precision of better than 0.4 ?mol/mol for 10 s averaging time. We plan to monitor the analyser's stability during flight by measuring reference air from a miniature gas tank in regular intervals. Besides CO2, COCAP measures relative humidity, temperature and pressure of ambient air. An on-board GPS receiver delivers accurate timestamps and allows georeferencing. Data is both stored on a microSD card and simultaneously transferred over a wireless serial interface to a ground station for real-time review. The target weight for COCAP is less than 1 kg. We deploy COCAP on a commercially available fixed-wing UAV (Bormatec Explorer) with a wingspan of 2.2 metres. The UAV has high payload capacity (2.5 kg) as well as sufficient space in the fuselage (80x80x600 mm3). It is built from a shock-resistant foam material, which allows quick repair of minor damages in the field. In case of severe damage spare parts are readily available. Calculations suggest that the UAV can reach a maximum altitude of 2000 metres. COCAP will aid in interpreting ground-based trace gas measurements by profiling the lower troposphere. In addition, transport modelling around measurement sites can be improved by assimilating the profiles-derived mixed layer height. Furthermore, COCAP is a promising tool for the identification of CO2 point sources, e.g. leaking carbon storage sites.

Kunz, Martin; Lavri?, Jot V.; Jeschag, Wieland; Bryzgalov, Maksym; Hk, Bertil; Heimann, Martin

2014-05-01

394

Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O to produce syngas (CO/H2 mixture) is identified as a promising method. High temperature electrolysis makes very efficient use of electricity and heat (near-100% electricity-to-syngas efficiency), provides high reaction rates, and the syngas produced can be catalytically converted to hydrocarbons in well-known fuel synthesis reactors (e.g. Fischer-Tropsch). The experimental studies of high temperature electrolysis are made at different scales -- at the cell level, electrode level, and in materials and microstructure development. The results include cell performance and durability, insight into electrode reaction mechanisms, and new high-performance electrode materials. The experimental studies make extensive use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and systematic variation of test conditions to examine the electrochemical phenomena. Variation of the material composition itself within families of related materials was an additional parameter used in the electrode level and materials studies that revealed more information than studying a single material would have. Using full cells, the performance and durability of a solid oxide cell applied for co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O was investigated. High initial performance was observed but the long-term durability needs to be improved. Based on these results, an analysis of the energy balance and economics of an electrolysis-based synthetic fuel production process, including CO2 air capture and Fischer-Tropsch fuel synthesis, determined that the system can feasibly operate at 70% electricity-to-liquid fuel efficiency (higher heating value basis) and that the price of electricity needed to produce competitive synthetic gasoline (at USD2/gal, or 0.53/L, wholesale) is 2-3 U.S. cents per kWh. For 3/gal (0.78/L) gasoline, 4-5 cents per kWh is needed. Fuel production may already be economical in some regions that have inexpensive renewable electricity, such as Iceland. The dominant costs of the process are the electricity cost and the capital cost of the electrolyzer, and this capital cost is si

Graves, Christopher Ronald

395

Experimental Comparison of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide Oil Displacement in Carbonate Cores  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of nitrogen and carbon dioxide flooding is being investigated experimentally as possible enhanced oil recovery processes in Iranian carbonate oil fields. Laboratory tests were conducted on a tight permeability sample of an Iranian oil field. Three flooding tests were conducted at back pressures of 1,000, 2,000, and 2,500 psi for both nitrogen and carbon dioxide separately. All tests

M. Ghasemi; S. R. Shadizadeh

2011-01-01

396

Carbon nanotube-coated surface acoustic wave sensor for carbon dioxide sensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon dioxide gas sensors have been fabricated by self-assembling single-wall nanotube films on a surface acoustic wave delay line operating at 286MHz. Polymer functionalization was used to enhance the sensitivity of the carbon nanotubes to carbon dioxide. A pulse radar-type interrogation system was used to monitor the conductivity of the nanotube film by measuring the attenuation of the surface acoustic

S. Sivaramakrishnan; R. Rajamani; C. S. Smith; K. A. McGee; K. R. Mann; N. Yamashita

2008-01-01

397

Classroom Demonstration: Combustion of Diamond to Carbon Dioxide Followed by Reduction to Graphite  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An educational demonstration shows the combustion of carbon to carbon dioxide and then the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon. A melee diamond is the source of the carbon and the reaction is carried out in a closed flask. The demonstration helps students to realize that diamonds are made of carbon and that atoms do not change or vanish in

Miyauchi, Takuya; Kamata, Masahiro

2012-01-01

398

Electrochemical cell for obtaining oxygen from carbon dioxide atmospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For manned missions to Mars to become a reality, an efficient and reliable means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere will be required. Otherwise, the high cost of transporting the oxygen needed to sustain the astronauts will severely restrict the expedition to the martian surface. Recently, the use of electrochemical devices has been explored as a means of obtaining oxygen from the carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. In these devices, oxygen ions diffuse through solid oxide membranes, thus, separating oxygen from the other gases presented. This phenomenon has only recently been explored as a means of obtaining large quantities of oxygen from toxic atmospheres, although first observed by Walter nernst in 1899. Nernst observed that stabilized zirconia will conduct oxygen ions when an electrical potential is applied across metallic electrodes applied to the ceramic membrane. Diatomic oxygen molecules are dissociated at the positive electrode/electrolyte interface. The oxygen ions enter the ceramic body due to the ion density gradient which is produced by the electrical potential across the electrolytic membrane. Once the ions have diffused through the membrane, they reform diatomic oxygen molecules at the anode. The separation of oxygen from carbon dioxide is achieved by the combination of thermal and electrochemical processes. The thermal decomposition of carbon dioxide (at 1000 C) results in the production of carbon monoxide and oxygen by the reaction.

Hooker, M. W.; Rast, H. E.; Rogers, D. K.

1989-01-01

399

Evaluation of a transportable capnometer for monitoring end-tidal carbon dioxide.  

PubMed

We compared a small and transportable Capnometer (EMMA) with a reference capnometer, the Siesta i TS Anaesthesia. During air-breathing through a facemask, both the EMMA (nine modules) and reference capnometer sampled expired gas simultaneously. A wide range of end-tidal carbon dioxide values were obtained during inhalation of carbon dioxide and voluntary hyperventilation. The median IQR [range] difference between all sets of carbon dioxide values (EMMA - reference) was -0.3 (-0.6 to 0.0 [-1.7 to 1.6] kPa; n = 297) using new batteries, which was statistically significant (p = 0.04) and located to two of the nine EMMAs tested. Using batteries with reduced voltage did not influence the measurements. The 95% CI of the medians of the differences were -0.4 to -0.2. We conclude that the EMMA can slightly under-read the end-tidal carbon dioxide but is generally comparable with a free-standing monitor. The precision of the EMMAs was similar whether new batteries or batteries with reduced voltage were used. PMID:21198468

Hildebrandt, T; Espelund, M; Olsen, K S

2010-10-01

400

Carbon dioxide adsorption in graphene sheets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Control over the CO2 emission via automobiles and industrial exhaust in atmosphere, is one of the major concerns to render environmental friendly milieu. Adsorption can be considered to be one of the more promising methods, offering potential energy savings compared to absorbent systems. Different carbon nanostructures (activated carbon and carbon nanotubes) have attracted attention as CO2 adsorbents due to their

Ashish Kumar Mishra; Sundara Ramaprabhu

2011-01-01

401

40 CFR 180.1049 - Carbon dioxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide; exemption from...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD...Tolerances § 180.1049 Carbon dioxide; exemption...

2010-07-01

402

40 CFR 180.1049 - Carbon dioxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-07-01 false Carbon dioxide; exemption from...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD...Tolerances § 180.1049 Carbon dioxide; exemption...

2009-07-01

403

27 CFR 27.42a - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 27.42a Section 27...and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE...27.42a Still wines containing carbon dioxide. Still wines may...

2010-04-01

404

27 CFR 27.42a - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 false Still wines containing carbon dioxide. 27.42a Section 27...and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE...27.42a Still wines containing carbon dioxide. Still wines may...

2009-04-01

405

46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide and clean agent alarms....

2013-10-01

406

Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Reduction - Oxygen Generation System Having Only Liquid Waste Products.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide has been investigated as a means of simplifying the disposal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen from a submarine atmospheric regeneration unit. Ejection of these materials as organic liquid wastes is preferable ...

F. H. Meller

1968-01-01

407

21 CFR 179.43 - Carbon dioxide laser for etching food.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.43 Carbon dioxide laser for etching...food under the following conditions: (a) The radiation source consists of a carbon dioxide laser...

2013-04-01

408

The streaming potential of liquid carbon dioxide in Berea sandstone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here, for the first time, evolution of the streaming potential coupling coefficient as liquid carbon dioxide infiltrates Berea sandstone. Using 125 ?-m tap water, the coupling coefficient determined before and after each CO2 flood of five samples averaged approximately -30 mV/0.1 MPa. After liquid CO2 passed through the specimens displacing all mobile pore water, trapped water remained and the coupling coefficient was approximately -3 mV/0.1 MPa. A bound water limit of the coupling coefficient for liquid CO2 flow was found using an air-dried sample to be -0.02 mV/0.1 MPa. For initially water-saturated samples, bulk resistivity varied during CO2 invasion from 330 ?-m, to 150 ?-m during CO2/water mixing, to a final value of 380 ?-m. Results suggest that trapped and bound water control electrical conduction and the electrokinetic response. Applications include monitoring CO2 injectate in subsurface reservoirs using the self potential method.

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.; Morrison, H. Frank; Hoversten, G. Michael

2004-09-01

409

ARTICLES: Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Data of Carbon Dioxide+Methyl Propionate and Carbon Dioxide+Propyl Propionate Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the binary systems of methyl propionate+carbon dioxide and propyl propionate+carbon dioxide were measured at pressure from 1.00 MPa to 12.00 MPa and temperature in the range from 313 K to 373 K. Experimental results were correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state with the two-parameter van der Waals mixing rule. At the same time, the Henry's coefficient, partial molar enthalpy change and partial molar entropy change of CO2 during dissolution at different temperature were also calculated.

Xu, Wei; Xie, Chuan-xin; Li, Hong-ling; Tian, Yi-ling

2010-06-01

410

Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum  

SciTech Connect

The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

1986-01-01

411

Effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bioleaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate  

SciTech Connect

The effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied in continuous-flow reactors. Steady-state operation with two feed slurry densities, 6 wt% and 16wt% solids, were tested for the effect of carbon dioxide concentration. Bacterial growth rates were estimated via the measurement of carbon dioxide consumption rates. Aqueous-phase carbon dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 mg/L were found to be inhibitory to bacterial growth.

Nagpal, S.; Dahlstrom, D. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)); Oolman, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

1993-02-20

412

Effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bioleaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied in continuous-flow reactors. Steady-state operation with two feed slurry densities, 6 wt% and 16wt% solids, were tested for the effect of carbon dioxide concentration. Bacterial growth rates were estimated via the measurement of carbon dioxide consumption rates. Aqueous-phase carbon dioxide concentrations in excess

Soumitro Nagpal; Donald Dahlstrom; Timothy Oolman

1993-01-01

413

Somewhere beyond the sea? The oceanic - carbon dioxide - reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In correlation to climate change and CO2 emission different campaigns highlight the importance of forests and trees to regulate the concentration of carbon dioxide in the earths' atmosphere. Seeing millions of square miles of rainforest cut down every day, this is truly a valid point. Nevertheless, we often tend to forget what scientists like Spokes try to raise awareness for: The oceans - and foremost deep sea sections - resemble the second biggest deposit of carbon dioxide. Here carbon is mainly found in form of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The carbonates are needed by corals and other sea organisms to maintain their skeletal structure and thereby to remain vital. To raise awareness for the protection of this fragile ecosystem in schools is part of our approach. Awareness is achieved best through understanding. Therefore, our approach is a hands-on activity that aims at showing students how the carbon dioxide absorption changes in relation to the water temperature - in times of global warming a truly sensitive topic. The students use standard syringes filled with water (25 ml) at different temperatures (i.e. 10C, 20C, 40C). Through a connector students inject carbon dioxide (25ml) into the different samples. After a fixed period of time, students can read of the remaining amount of carbon dioxide in relation to the given water temperature. Just as with every scientific project, students need to closely monitor their experiments and alter their setups (e.g. water temperature or acidity) according to their initial planning. A digital template (Excel-based) supports the analysis of students' experiments. Overview: What: hands-on, minds -on activity using standard syringes to exemplify carbon dioxide absorption in relation to the water temperature (Le Chatelier's principle) For whom: adjustable from German form 11-13 (age: 16-19 years) Time: depending on the prior knowledge 45-60 min. Sources (extract): Spokes, L.: Wie Ozeane CO2 aufnehmen. Environmental Sciences. University of East Anglia, Norwich 2007. Von Borstel, G. und Bhm, A.: Le Chatelier einmal anders, Gleichgewichtsverschiebungen am Kontext Sprudelwasser. Naturwissenschaft im Unterricht Chemie 6 (2006) H. 96, S. 34-37

Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

2014-05-01

414

Soil carbon dioxide partial pressure and dissolved inorganic carbonate chemistry under elevated carbon dioxide and ozone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global emissions of atmospheric CO 2 and tropospheric O 3 are rising and expected to impact large areas of the Earths forests. While CO 2 stimulates net primary production, O 3 reduces photosynthesis, altering plant C allocation and reducing ecosystem C storage. The effects of multiple air pollutants can alter belowground C allocation, leading to changes in the partial pressure

N. J. Karberg; K. S. Pregitzer; J. S. King; A. L. Friend; J. R. Wood

2005-01-01

415

Thermodynamics of the carbon dioxide system in the oceans  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the next ten years, a number of studies on the carbonate system are planned as part of the JGOFS\\/WOCE programs. The carbon dioxide system will be studied by measuring at least two of the controlling parameters; pH, total alkalinity (TA), total inorganic CO2 (TCO2), and the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2). The other parameters can be calculated using thermodynamic relations.

Frank J. Millero

1995-01-01

416

Carbon dioxide fluxes over bermudagrass, native prairie, and sorghum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bowen ratio\\/energy balance (BREB) method was used to measure 30min water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes over three fields dominated by different C4 grasses (bermudagrass, tallgrass native prairie, and sorghum) at the Blackland Research Center, Temple, TX. Fluxes were related to biotic and abiotic phenomena. Carbon accumulation rates calculated from BREB measurements were compared with those determined from

W. A Dugas; M. L Heuer; H. S Mayeux

1999-01-01

417

Chinese Carbon Dioxide Satellite (TanSat) Status and Plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chinese carbon dioxide observation satellite (TanSat) project is the national high technology research and development program. It is funded by the ministry of science and technology of the people's republic of China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The TanSat will be launched in 2015, which is going to monitor the carbon dioxide in Sun-Synchronous orbit. The object of TanSat is to monitor XCO2 from space with precision of 1~4ppm. Two instruments will be onboard the TanSat, the main instrument is a high resolution grating spectrometer that measure reflected sunlight with the 0.76 ?m O2 A-band and two CO2 bands at 1.61 and 2.06 ?m, an airborne prototype of main instrument will be built and tested in the aircraft experiment. The second instrument is the Cloud and Aerosol Polarization Imager (CAPI), which is a wide field of view moderate resolution imaging spectrometer, it include 0.38, 0.67, 0.87, 1.375 and 1.64?m channels, with two polarization channels in 0.67?m and 1.64?m. A full physical optimal estimation method has being developed to retrieve the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2), and the data from CAPI will be used to correct cloud and aerosol interference. Currrently, the GOSAT data have been applied in the XCO2 retrieval system and reasonable results have been obtained. Global and regional surface CO2 flux will be derived from XCO2 observations with inverse modeling. Ground based validation stations are being established around China to observe CO2, Aerosol and Cloud. The CO2 observation consist of 3 Bruker IFS125 and 3 Optical Spectrum Analyzer over Beijing, Shenzhen, Shangdong, Inner Mongol, and Hainan Island, etc. Four phases of TanSat development is scheduled: design phase from Jan. 2011 to Aug. 2012, initial prototypes phase from Sept. 2012 to Sept. 2013, final prototypes phase from Oct. 2013 to Oct. 2014, launching and on-board testing phase from Nov. 2014 to June 2015.

Liu, Y.; Duan, M.; cai, Z.; Yang, D.; Lu, D.; Yin, Z.; Zheng, Y.; Yan, C.; Yang, Z.

2012-12-01

418

The Concentration of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide at and near Mauna Loa Ob- servatory, Hawaii, is reported for the first six years (1958-1963) of a long-term program to document the effects of the combustion of coal and petroleum on the distribution of COs gas in the atmosphere and in the world's oceans. The majority of the measurements reported here were obtained

Jack C. Pales; Charles D. Keeling

1965-01-01

419

Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Embolism for Endoscopic Saphenous Vein Harvesting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The endoscopic saphenous vein harvest- ing (EVH) introduced in coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is associated with less wound complication and postoperative pain. Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation is used during EVH to facilitate the procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of CO2 embolism during EVH with CO2 insufflation could be reduced with lower

Kuan-Ming Chiu; Tzu-Yu Lin; Ming-Jiuh Wang; Shu-Hsun Chu

2006-01-01

420

Endoscopic vein harvesting with the aid of carbon dioxide insufflation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endoscopic harvesting of the long saphenous vein has been introduced to decrease the morbidity of obtaining venous conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting. Herein is described an endoscopic method using carbon dioxide insufflation into the tissues around the vein. This has several advantages; improved vision, no physical retraction required, easier development of tissue planes, and improved hemostasis.

Malcolm J. R Dalrymple-Hay; Aiman Alzetani; Robert Costa; Sunil K Ohri

2001-01-01

421

Negative results - Coronary Carbon dioxide embolism during endoscopic vein harvesting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endoscopic vein harvesting (EVH) is becoming common for the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Using carbon dioxide insufflations during the vein harvest can produce rare but catastrophic CO embolism. We report a case of massive right atrial CO embolism 2 2 due to femoral vein injury which occurred during the performance of a routine EVH procedure. 2008 Published by

Muhammed Tamim; Maher Omrani; Adel Tash; Ahmed El Watidy

2010-01-01

422

Optimization of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of Passiflora seed oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates extraction of Passiflora seed oil by using supercritical carbon dioxide. Artificial neural network (ANN) and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied for modeling and the prediction of the oil extraction yield. Moreover, process optimization were carried out by using both methods to predict the best operating conditions, which resulted in the maximum extraction yield of the Passiflora

Gholamreza Zahedi; Abbas Azarpour

2011-01-01

423

New analytical technique for carbon dioxide absorption solvents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The densities and refractive indices of two binary systems (water + MEA and water + MDEA) and three ternary systems (water + MEA + CO, water + MDEA + CO, and water + MEA + MDEA) used for carbon dioxide (CO) capture were measured over the range of compositions of the aqueous alkanolamine(s) used for CO absorption at temperatures from

Fatemeh Pouryousefi; Raphael O. Idem

2008-01-01

424

Biodiversity and biological impact of ocean disposal of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Five major characteristics of deep-sea organisms that are relevant to the carbon dioxide ocean sequestration are pointed out. They are (1) low biological activities, (2) long life span, (3) high sensitivity to the environmental disturbance, (4) high species diversity, and (5) low density. These characteristics suggest the deep-sea species are sensitive to the environmental disturbance, and once they are damaged, they may easily become extinct or it might take a long time to recover. To get public acceptance for ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide, the authors need a reliable assessment of its affects on the deep-sea ecosystem based on an accurate model. For a better modeling, data regarding the long-term (chronic) effect of slightly increased concentration of carbon dioxide on the deep-sea organisms are prerequisite. Precise data regarding such biological characteristics can be obtained only from in-situ experiments. To develop a system for ecophysiological in-situ experiments of deep-sea organisms is thus as important as solving the technological problems related to the ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide.

Shirayama, Yoshihisa [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1998-07-01

425

Ethanol as Fuel: Energy, Carbon Dioxide Balances, and Ecological Footprint  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major amtrihtitor to global wanning is considered to he the high levels of greenhouse gas emissions, especially carbon dioxide (COJ, caused by the burtiing of fossil fuel. Thus, to mitigate CO^ emissions, renewable energy sources such as ethanol have been seen as a promising alternative to fossil fuel consumption. Brazil was the world's first nation to run a large-scale

MARCELO E. DIAS DE OLIVEIRA; BURTON E. VAUGHAN; EDWARD J. RYKIEL JR

2005-01-01

426

Diffusion of D-alpha-tocopherol (1); carbon dioxide (2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Brnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) D-alpha-tocopherol; (2) carbon dioxide

Winkelmann, J.

427

Diffusion of DL-alpha-tocopherol (1); carbon dioxide (2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Brnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) DL-alpha-tocopherol; (2) carbon dioxide

Winkelmann, J.

428

Raising the Level of Carbon Dioxide in Your Blood  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity (on page 146 of the PDF), learners will explore the effects of increased carbon dioxide in the bloodstream. This activity can be enhanced by sharing the "Astronaut's Sleep" Podcast with learners (see related resource link). This resource guide includes background information and sample evaluation questions. Note: learners with respiratory ailments should not participate as subjects.

Macleish, Marlene Y.; Mclean, Bernice R.

2013-05-15

429

Synthesis of epoxy ferrite nanocomposites in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of epoxy ferrite nanocomposites (EFNCs) was synthesised through dispersing ferrite nanoparticles (5.0 phr, parts per hundred of resin) into diglycidylether of bisphenol A (0.1 mol) in supercritical carbon dioxide at 85 1C, 1600 psi over 1 h followed by curing with triethylene tetramine (15 phr) at 40 1C. For this purpose, ferrite nanoparticles were synthesised through

M. G. H. Zaidi; P. L. Sah; S. Alam; A. K. Rai

2009-01-01

430

A Discovery Experiment: Carbon Dioxide Soap Bubble Dynamics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The observation of soap bubbles in a beaker of carbon dioxide gas helps students to feel the pleasure that comes from understanding nature, from applying that understanding to real problems, and from making unexpected discoveries that yield to analysis. (Author/BB)

Millikan, Roger C.

1978-01-01

431

Carbon Dioxide Measurement from Breath Gas Using Blind Source Separation  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many approaches which use breath gas to diagnose disease such as lung cancer, breast cancer and diabetes. But, it has not been used in medical field because of low accuracy by low concentration of target component (ppt, ppb level). According to previous study, end-tidal concentrations of volatile organic component (VOC) correlated with carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. So, we

Jongyoun Lee; Jing Bai; Inyoung Kim

2008-01-01

432

Regression analysis study on the carbon dioxide capture process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on amine-based carbon dioxide (CO) capture has mainly focused on improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the CO capture process. The objective of our work is to explore relationships among key parameters that affect the CO production rate. From a survey of relevant literature, we observed that the significant parameters influencing the CO production rate include the reboiler heat

Q. Zhou; Christine W. Chan; P. Tontiwachiwuthikul

2008-01-01

433

End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring in the prehospital setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring is an exciting technology and has the potential to become a very useful tool in the prehospital setting. It can be useful in verifying endotracheal tube position and during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the field. Recent reports of misplaced endotracheal tubes in the prehospital setting make it important to ensure that paramedics learn correct techniques of

Mananda S. Bhende; David C. LaCovey

2001-01-01

434

Extraction of ginger flavor with liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ginger flavor, containing both aromatic and pungent components, was extracted by high pressure carbon dioxide from the rhizome of dried ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe). However, the effects of extraction conditions on yield and quality of the ginger flavor have not yet been elucidated. In this study, the extract yield and the composition of the extract were studied using a semi-batch

Chiaki Yokoyama; H HINATA; R YOSHIDA; Y SHIMIZU

1995-01-01

435

Energy requirements of ammoniacarbon dioxide forward osmosis desalination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy requirements of ammoniacarbon dioxide forward osmosis (FO) desalination are predicted by the use of chemical process modeling software (HYSYS). The FO process is modeled using single or multiple distillation columns to separate draw solution solutes from the product water for solute recycling within the FO system. Thermal and electrical energy requirements of the process are calculated, as well

Robert L. McGinnis; Menachem Elimelech

2007-01-01

436

Carbon dioxide supersaturation in the surface waters of lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO) in the surface waters from a large number of lakes (1835) with a worldwide distribution show that only a small proportion of the 4665 samples analyzed (less than 10 percent) were within {+-}20 percent of equilibrium with the atmosphere and that most samples (87 percent) were supersaturated. The mean partial pressure

J. J. Cole; N. F. Caraco; G. W. Kling; T. K. Kratz

1994-01-01

437

Electrochemical Approaches to the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbon dioxide reduction requires the input of energy or a high energy reductant to drive the reaction. Two possible energy sources which can be used in this capacity are electro-chemical potential and light. Approaches ot CO2 reduction by direct and indi...

C. O'Connell R. Eisenberg S. I. Hommeltoft

1986-01-01

438

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Using the Mole Concept.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an application of quantitative chemistry concepts in the context of motor vehicle emissions. Shows how carbon dioxide emissions from cars may be reduced by up to 25% by reducing motorway speeds from 70-75 mph to 60 mph. (Author/MM)

Myers, Alan

2002-01-01

439

Distribution, origin and prediction of carbon dioxide in petroleum reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

High concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO) in petroleum reservoirs can significantly reduce the value of the discovery, by diluting any hydrocarbons, and by increasing production costs because of the increased likelihood of corrosion and scale formation. Huge volumes of CO have been found, for example in the Indonesian Natuna d-Alpha structure (estimated 240 tcf gas, of which around 70% is

J. Thrasher; A. J. Fleet

1995-01-01

440

Environmental Challenges: Radon and Carbon Dioxide in School Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many school buildings with high radon levels also exhibit high carbon dioxide levels that starve the minds of students for oxygen. Administrators must realize that the world's best educator cannot teach minds made dysfunctional by their environment. This article describes Environmental Protection Agency testing results and offers radon monitoring

Krueger, James

1991-01-01

441

Carbon dioxide laser oral safety parameters for teeth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The carbon dioxide laser is used in the oral cavity for a variety of procedures. Although the procedures may not involve the teeth directly, precaution should be exercised to preserve their integrity. The results of this study indicate that the most limiting parameter for oral use of the CO laser is damage to the enamel surface, which could be inflicted

G. Lynn Powell; Brian K. Whisenant; Thomas H. Morton

1990-01-01

442

SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

443

Transporting carbon dioxide recovered from fossil-energy cycles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Transportation of carbon dioxide (CO(sub 2)) for enhanced oil recovery is a mature technology, with operating experience dating from the mid-1980s. Because of this maturity, recent sequestration studies for the US Department of Energy's National Energy Te...

R. Doctor J. Molburg J. Brockmeier

2000-01-01

444