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Sample records for carbon ion-implanted diamond

  1. Friction and Wear Properties of As-Deposited and Carbon Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 keV ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions per cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40% relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and wear properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to lO(exp -8) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4) mm(exp 7) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implantation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, non-diamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp-1)). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the non-diamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6

  2. Friction and Wear Properties of As-deposited and Carbon Ion-implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1994-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 ke V ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2310(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40 percent relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and were properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to 10(exp -8)mm(exp 3)/N-m) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4)mm(exp 3/N-m) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implanation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine- and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7)mm(exp 3/N-m). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the nondiamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6)mm(exp 3)/N-m. Thus, the carbon ion-implanted, fine

  3. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  4. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  5. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  6. Ion implantation of diamond: Damage, doping, and lift-off

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L.; Hunn, J.D.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    In order to make good quality economical diamond electronic devices, it is essential to grow films and to dope these films to obtain n- and p- type conductivity. This review talk discuss first doping by ion implantation plus annealing of the implantation damage, and second flow to make large area single crystal diamonds. C implantation damage below an estimated Frenkel defect concentration of 7% could be recovered almost completely by annealing at 950C. For a defect concentration between 7 and 10%, a stable damage form of diamond (``green diamond``) was formed by annealing. At still higher damage levels, the diamond graphitized. To introduce p-type doping, we have co-implanted B and C into natural diamond at 77K, followed by annealing up to 1100C. The resulting semiconducting material has electrical properties similar to those of natural B-doped diamond. To create n-type diamond, we have implanted Na{sup +}, P+ and As{sup +} ions and have observed semiconducting behavior. This has been compared with carbon or noble element implantation, in an attempt to isolate the effect of radiation damage. Recently, in order to obtain large area signal crystals, we have developed a novel technique for removing thin layers of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial films. This method consists of ion implantation, followed by selective etching. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond buried at a controlled depth. This layer is graphitized and selectivity etched either by heating at 550C in an oxygen ambient or by electrolysis. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. The lift-off method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has potential for fabrication of large area single-crystal diamond sheets.

  7. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-10-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp{sup 3} bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp{sup 3} bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  8. Ion-Implanted Diamond Films and Their Tribological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Korenyi-Both, Andras L.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the physical characterization and tribological evaluation of ion-implanted diamond films. Diamond films were produced by microwave plasma, chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes (0.3 and 3 microns) and roughness (9.1 and 92.1 nm r.m.s. respectively) were implanted with C(+) (m/e = 12) at an ion energy of 160 eV and a fluence of 6.72 x 10(exp 17) ions/sq cm. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum (6.6 x 10(exp -7)Pa), dry nitrogen and humid air (40% RH) environments. The effects of C(+) ion bombardment on fine and coarse-grained diamond films are as follows: the surface morphology of the diamond films did not change; the surface roughness increased (16.3 and 135.3 nm r.m.s.); the diamond structures were damaged and formed a thin layer of amorphous non-diamond carbon; the friction coefficients dramatically decreased in the ultrahigh vacuum (0.1 and 0.4); the friction coefficients decreased slightly in the dry nitrogen and humid air environments.

  9. Bias in bonding behavior among boron, carbon, and nitrogen atoms in ion implanted a-BN, a-BC, and diamond like carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Genisel, Mustafa Fatih; Uddin, Md. Nizam; Say, Zafer; Bengu, Erman; Kulakci, Mustafa; Turan, Rasit; Gulseren, Oguz

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we implanted N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} ions into sputter deposited amorphous boron carbide (a-BC) and diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films in an effort to understand the chemical bonding involved and investigate possible phase separation routes in boron carbon nitride (BCN) films. In addition, we investigated the effect of implanted C{sup +} ions in sputter deposited amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) films. Implanted ion energies for all ion species were set at 40 KeV. Implanted films were then analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in the chemical composition and bonding chemistry due to ion-implantation were examined at different depths of the films using sequential ion-beam etching and high resolution XPS analysis cycles. A comparative analysis has been made with the results from sputter deposited BCN films suggesting that implanted nitrogen and carbon atoms behaved very similar to nitrogen and carbon atoms in sputter deposited BCN films. We found that implanted nitrogen atoms would prefer bonding to carbon atoms in the films only if there is no boron atom in the vicinity or after all available boron atoms have been saturated with nitrogen. Implanted carbon atoms also preferred to either bond with available boron atoms or, more likely bonded with other implanted carbon atoms. These results were also supported by ab-initio density functional theory calculations which indicated that carbon-carbon bonds were energetically preferable to carbon-boron and carbon-nitrogen bonds.

  10. Mechanical stresses and amorphization of ion-implanted diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelnitsky, R. A.; Dravin, V. A.; Tal, A. A.; Latushko, M. I.; Khomich, A. A.; Khomich, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Terentiev, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Scanning white light interferometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the mechanical stresses and structural changes in ion-implanted natural diamonds with different impurity content. The uniform distribution of radiation defects in implanted area was obtained by the regime of multiple-energy implantation of keV He+ ions. A modification of Bosia's et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 268 (2010) 2991) method for determining the internal stresses and the density variation in an ion-implanted diamond layer was proposed that suggests measuring, in addition to the surface swelling of a diamond plate, the radius of curvature of the plate. It is shown that, under multiple-energy implantation of He+, mechanical stresses in the implanted layer may be as high as 12 GPa. It is shown that radiation damage reaches saturation for the implantation fluence characteristic of amorphization of diamond but is appreciably lower than the graphitization threshold.

  11. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Sonoda, T.

    2013-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp3/(sp3+sp2) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  12. Ion implantation and diamond-like coatings of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Malaczynski, G.W.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Qiu, X.

    1997-04-01

    In an attempt to increase the wear resistance of some key automotive components, General Motors Research and Development Center initiated a study to determine the potential of surface modification as a means of improving the tribological properties of automotive parts, and to investigate the feasibility of mass producing such parts. This paper describes the plasma immersion ion implantation system that was designed for the study of various options for surface treatment, and it discusses bench testing procedures used for evaluating the surface-treated samples. In particular, both tribological and microstructural analyses are discussed for nitrogen implants and diamond-like hydrocarbon coatings of some aluminum alloys.

  13. Boron doping to diamond and DLC using plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Ikegami, T.; Grotjohn; Reinhard, D.; Asmussen, J.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling carriers in diamond by doping is important to realize diamond electronic devices with advanced electrical characteristics. As a doping method the Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been gathering attention due to its excellence in making shallow, highly doped regions over large areas, and its high dose rate, good dose controllability and isotropic doping properties. The authors have begun to investigate boron doping of diamond, silicon and diamond-like carbon films using PIII. As a doping source they use the plasma sputtering of a solid boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) target instead of toxic gas source like diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}). The B{sub 4}C target of 1-in. diameter and a substrate (Si, diamond or diamond-like carbon film) are located in the downtown region of an ECR plasma produced by the microwave plasma disc reactor (MPDR) filled with 1--5 mTorr Ar gas. In order to sputter the target a negative self bias from {minus}400V to {minus}700V is induced by applying RF (13.56 MHz) power of 50--200W to the target holder. For boron ion implantation, negative pulses of {minus}1kV to {minus}8kV, 1--5{micro}s pulse duration, 1--200Hz repetition rate are applied to the substrate holder using a voltage pulser which consists of high voltage capacitors and MOSFETs. After thermal treatment of the doped materials their electrical resistivity are measured using the four-probe method. Details of both the PIII source and substrate doping experimental results are shown at the meeting.

  14. Ion implantation induced defect formation and amorphization in the Group IV semiconductors: Diamond, silicon and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Diane P.

    Silicon, which has been the workhorse of the semiconductor industry for the past several decades, is now being enhanced with other Group IV elements, such as carbon (silicon carbide) and germanium (silicon-germanium strained channels in transistors), to accentuate properties of silicon for various nanoelectronic devices. However, there is little understanding of the relationship between ion implantation and defect evolution in two of the three corners of the Group IV phase diagram. In particular, the rod-like {311} defect is theorized to be unique to the diamond crystal structure elements. Due to its ability to affect dopant diffusion, the {311} defect is well studied in silicon. However, few studies of germanium and none of diamond have analyzed extended defect formation and evolution using transmission electron spectroscopy. Using ion implantation to induce amorphization is a technological process step in Si devices and potentially for diamond nano-electronics. Defects associated with crystal regrowth in Ge and diamond are not well known. My research studies the formation conditions of extended defects and amorphization in carbon and germanium after ion implantation. Ion implantation damage in diamond-cubic single-crystal silicon, germanium and diamond was produced by Si+ implantation at 1 MeV to a dose of 1 x 1014 cm-2 and 1 x 10 15 cm-2. Damage in Si and Ge was produced by Si + implantation at 40 keV to a dose of 1 x 1014 cm-2 and 1 x 1015 cm-2, and amorphizing damage in diamond was produced by Si+ implantation at 1 MeV to a dose of 3 and 7 x 1015 cm-2. All implants were carried out at room temperature. For non-amorphizing implants (1014 Si+ cm-2) into Ge, dot-like defects formed immediately upon implantation and were stable up to temperatures of 650°C. The activation energy of these defects was determined to be approximately 0.2 +/- 0.1 eV. For amorphizing implants (1015 Si+ cm-2) into Ge and upon solid-phase epitaxial regrowth, the same types of defects seen

  15. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  16. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  17. On carbon nitride synthesis at high-dose ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, E. A.; Bespalova, O. V.; Borisov, A. M.; Goryaga, N. G.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Sukharev, V. G.; Zatekin, V. V.

    1998-04-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used for the study of high dose 35 keV nitrogen ions implantation into graphites and glassy carbon. Quantitative data on depth profiles and its dependencies on irradiation fluence and ion beam density were obtained. The stationary dome-shaped depth profile with maximum nitrogen concentration 22-27 at.% and half-width more than twice exceeding projected range of ions is reached at fluence Φ ˜10 18 cm -2. The dependence of the maximum concentration in the profile on ion current density was studied. The largest concentration was obtained at reduced ion current density.

  18. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Possibilities and limitations of ion implantation in diamond, and comparison with other doping methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, V. S.

    1994-04-01

    Diamond is a crystal with extremely strong atomic bonds. It is characterised by very low equilibrium parameters of the solubility and diffusion coefficients of impurities. Ion implantation therefore represents a natural alternative doping method. The published experimental results show that p-type and p+-type layers can be formed by boron ion implantation. Implantation of Li+ and C+ produces n-type layers. Diamond films grown in the presence of phosphorus and sodium can also be electrically conducting. The efficiency of this method of introducing electrically active centres varies strongly with the temperature of diamond during implantation and with the conditions during the subsequent annealing.

  19. High density nitrogen-vacancy sensing surface created via He+ ion implantation of 12C diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinsasser, Ed E.; Stanfield, Matthew M.; Banks, Jannel K. Q.; Zhu, Zhouyang; Li, Wen-Di; Acosta, Victor M.; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Itoh, Kohei M.; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a promising method for creating high-density ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers with narrow spin-resonances for high-sensitivity magnetic imaging. Practically, narrow spin-resonance linewidths substantially reduce the optical and RF power requirements for ensemble-based sensing. The method combines isotope purified diamond growth, in situ nitrogen doping, and helium ion implantation to realize a 100 nm-thick sensing surface. The obtained 1017 cm-3 nitrogen-vacancy density is only a factor of 10 less than the highest densities reported to date, with an observed 200 kHz spin resonance linewidth over 10 times narrower.

  20. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo; Li, Zhuguo; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  1. Electrochemical patterning of amorphous carbon on diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Pehrsson, Pehr E.; Binari, Steven C.; Moses, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The ability to pattern ion-implantation damaged or other nondiamond carbon on a diamond substrate is useful for fabricating a variety of devices. We accomplished such patterning by an unmasked implantation into a diamond substrate followed by photolithography and a selective electrochemical etch. The use of a high resistivity medium coupled with applied biases over 50 V permitted etching without requiring contact between the substrate and an electrode. Many electrolytes gave etches that exhibit high selectivity for nondiamond carbon over both diamond and dielectrics such as photoresist. Optical, electrical, and Raman spectroscopic measurements elucidate the effects of the etch on the implanted diamond surface.

  2. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  3. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Kalpataru E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.08 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0 V/μm. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  4. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-15

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10{sup 17} or 2x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L{sub 1}) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L{sub 2}) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L{sub 3}) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  5. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, K. J.; Sundaravel, B.; Tai, N. H. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Lin, I. N. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm){sup −1}, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  6. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Sundaravel, B.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm)-1, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm2 (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  7. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  8. Haemocompatibility of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Kwok, S. C. H.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like-carbon has attracted much attention recently as a potential biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices. However, previous reports in this area have not adequately addressed the biocompatibility and acceptability of the materials in blood contacting applications. In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were fabricated on silicon wafers (1 0 0) using plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition. A series of a-C:H films with different structures and chemical bonds were fabricated under different substrate voltages. The results indicate that film graphitization is promoted at higher substrate bias. The film deposited at a lower substrate bias of -75 V possesses better blood compatibility than the films at higher bias and stainless steel. Our results suggest two possible paths to improve the blood compatibility, suppression of the endogenic clotting system and reduction of platelet activation.

  9. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-20

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO{sub 2}/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} onto the surface of the Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  10. Enhancing electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond films by copper ion implantation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Panda, K.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2014-02-14

    Copper ion implantation and subsequent annealing at 600 °C achieved high electrical conductivity of 95.0 (Ωcm){sup −1} for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films with carrier concentration of 2.8 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −2} and mobility of 6.8 × 10{sup 2} cm{sup 2}/V s. Transmission electron microscopy examinations reveal that the implanted Cu ions first formed Cu nanoclusters in UNCD films, which induced the formation of nanographitic grain boundary phases during annealing process. From current imaging tunneling spectroscopy and local current-voltage curves of scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements, it is observed that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the grain boundaries. Consequently, the nanographitic phases presence in the grain boundaries formed conduction channels for efficient electron transport, ensuing in excellent electron field emission (EFE) properties for copper ion implanted/annealed UNCD films with low turn-on field of 4.80 V/μm and high EFE current density of 3.60 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 8.0 V/μm.

  11. Voltage dependence of cluster size in carbon films using plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Tarrant, R. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Pearce, G.; Marks, N. A.; McCulloch, D. G.; Lim, S. H. N.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon films were prepared using a cathodic arc with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Using Raman spectroscopy to determine cluster size, a comparison is made between cluster sizes at high voltage and a low duty cycle of pulses with the cluster sizes produced at low voltage and a higher duty cycle. We find that for ion implantation in the range 2-20 kV, the cluster size depends more on implantation energy ( E) than implantation frequency ( f), unlike stress relief, which we have previously shown [M.M.M. Bilek, et al., IEEE Trans. in Plasma Sci., Proceedings 20th ISDEIV 1-5 July 2002, Tours, France, Cat. No. 02CH37331, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, p. 95] to be dependent on the product Ef. These differences are interpreted in terms of a model in which the ion impacts create thermal spikes.

  12. Influence of sputter rate and crystal orientation on the distribution of carbon in polycrystalline copper surfaces treated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Flege, S.; Kraft, G.; Bruder, E.; Ensinger, W.; Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    2009-07-15

    The sputter rate influences the resulting thickness of the carbon containing layer within a surface that was treated by plasma immersion ion implantation. Choosing a polycrystalline substrate with rather large crystals and a material with an inherent high sputter rate, inhomogeneous distributions of carbon over the substrate area due to different thicknesses of the incorporated carbon can be detected. A correlation of three factors namely the carbon x-ray intensity in electron probe microanalysis, the thickness of the carbon layer, and the sputter rate in depth profiling measurements via secondary ion mass spectrometry can be shown. Essential for these factors is the crystal orientation that is visualized by mapping via electron backscatter diffraction. The differences in carbon content due to the orientation are most likely one of the reasons that the adhesion of diamond-like carbon films on copper does not improve with an interlayer of implanted carbon.

  13. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakudo, N.; Shinohara, T.; Amaya, S.; Endo, H.; Okuji, S.; Ikenaga, N.

    2006-01-01

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  14. Mossbauer effect in the ion-implanted iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration dependence of Mossbauer effect in four carbon ion-implanted iron absorbers, which contain carbon as the solute atoms, has been investigated over the range of concentration 0.05 through 1 atomic percent. The specimens were prepared by implanting carbon atoms on each reference iron foil with four different bombarding energies of 250 keV, 160 keV, 140 keV and 80 keV, respectively. Thus, the specimen contains a uniform dosage of carbon atoms which penetrated up to 3,000 A depth of the reference iron. In the measurement of Mossbauer spectra, the backscattering conversion electron counting geometry was used. Typical results of Mossbauer parameters of iron-carbon alloys show that the isomer shift, quadrupole shift, the effective hyperfine splitting of Fe-57, and the intensity ratio exhibit a large variation with the increase of carbon concentration in the environment of iron atoms.

  15. Mechanical properties of nickel ion-implanted with titanium and carbon and their relation to microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Dugger, M.T.

    1998-02-01

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon into nickel was shown to produce an amorphous layer with exceptionally high strength and hardness and substantially improved tribological properties. Indentation testing at submicrometer penetrations combined with finite-element modeling permitted quantification of the intrinsic elastic and plastic properties of the amorphous layer, which was found to have a yield strength near 5 GPa. During unlubricated sliding contact with a steel pin, the implantation treatment reduced friction, suppressed adhesion-and-fracture wear, and reduced wear depth. These tribological effects may enhance the performance and lifetime of microelectromechanical systems constructed from nickel.

  16. Irradiation effect of carbon negative-ion implantation on polytetrafluoroethylene for controlling cell-adhesion property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommani, Piyanuch; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the irradiation effect of negative-ion implantation on the changes of physical surface property of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for controlling the adhesion property of stem cells. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PTFE sheets at fluences of 1 × 10 14-1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 and energies of 5-20 keV. Wettability and atomic bonding state including the ion-induced functional groups on the modified surfaces were investigated by water contact angle measurement and XPS analysis, respectively. An initial value of water contact angles on PTFE decreased from 104° to 88° with an increase in ion influence to 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2, corresponding to the peak shifting of XPS C1s spectra from 292.5 eV to 285 eV with long tail on the left peak-side. The change of peak position was due to decrease of C-F 2 bonds and increase of C-C bonds with the formation of hydrophilic oxygen functional groups of OH and C dbnd O bonds after the ion implantation. After culturing rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for 4 days, the cell-adhesion properties on the C --patterned PTFE were observed by fluorescent microscopy with staining the cell nuclei and their actin filament (F-actin). The clear adhesion patterning of MSCs on the PTFE was obtained at energies of 5-10 keV and a fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. While the sparse patterns and the uncontrollable patterns were found at a low fluence of 3 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and a high fluence of 3 × 10 15 ions/cm 2, respectively. As a result, we could improve the surface wettability of PTFE to control the cell-adhesion property by carbon negative-ion implantation.

  17. Narrow-Linewidth Homogeneous Optical Emitters in Diamond Nanostructures via Silicon Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ruffin E.; Sipahigil, Alp; Sukachev, Denis D.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-04-01

    The negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV-) center in diamond is a bright source of indistinguishable single photons and a useful resource in quantum-information protocols. Until now, SiV- centers with narrow optical linewidths and small inhomogeneous distributions of SiV- transition frequencies have only been reported in samples doped with silicon during diamond growth. We present a technique for producing implanted SiV- centers with nearly lifetime-limited optical linewidths and a small inhomogeneous distribution. These properties persist after nanofabrication, paving the way for the incorporation of high-quality SiV- centers into nanophotonic devices.

  18. Carbon plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Poon, R W Y; Yeung, K W K; Liu, X Y; Chu, P K; Chung, C Y; Lu, W W; Cheung, K M C; Chan, D

    2005-05-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys possess super-elasticity in addition to the well-known shape memory effect and are potentially suitable for orthopedic implants. However, a critical concern is the release of harmful Ni ions from the implants into the living tissues. We propose to enhance the corrosion resistance and other surface and biological properties of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Our tribological tests show that the treated surfaces are mechanically more superior and cytotoxicity tests reveal that both sets of plasma-treated samples favor adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts. PMID:15585228

  19. Optical properties of K9 glass waveguides fabricated by using carbon-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Wei, Wei; Fu, Li-Li; Zhu, Xu-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao

    2016-07-01

    K9 glass is a material with promising properties that make it attractive for optical devices. Ion implantation is a powerful technique to form waveguides with controllable depth and refractive index profile. In this work, optical planar waveguide structures were fabricated in K9 glasses by using 6.0-MeV C3+-ion implantation with a fluence of 1.0 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effective refractive indices of the guided modes were measured by using a prism-coupling system. The refractive index change in the ion-irradiated region was simulated by using the intensity calculation method. The modal intensity profile of the waveguide was calculated and measured by using the finite difference beam propagation method and the end-face coupling technique, respectively. The transmission spectra before and after the implantation showed that the main absorption band was not influenced by the low fluence dopants. The optical properties of the carbon-implanted K9 glass waveguides show promise for use as integrated photonic devices.

  20. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  1. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  2. Neuron attachment properties of carbon negative-ion implanted bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2002-05-01

    Modification of a bioabsorbable polymer of poly-lactic acid (PLA) by negative carbon ion implantation was investigated with resect to radiation effects on surface physical properties and nerve-cell attachment properties. Carbon negative ions were implanted to PLA at energy of 5-30 keV with a dose of 10 14-10 16 ions/cm 2. Most C-implanted PLA samples showed contact angles near 80° and almost same as that of unimplanted PLA, although a few samples at 5 keV and less 3×10 14 ions/cm 2 had contact angles larger than 90°. The attachment properties of nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) in vitro were studied. PC-12h cells attached on the unimplanted region in C-implanted PLA samples at 5 and 10 keV. On the contrary, the nerve cells attached on only implanted region for the C-implanted PLA sample at 30 keV and 1×10 15 ions/cm 2.

  3. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  4. Effects of carbon dioxide plasma immersion ion implantation on the electrochemical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy in physiological environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruizhen; Yang, Xiongbo; Zhang, Xuming; Wang, Mei; Li, Penghui; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is conducted to improve the intrinsically poor corrosion properties of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. Carbon dioxide is implanted into the samples and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to characterize the materials. The corrosion properties are systematically studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests in two simulated physiological environments, namely simulated body fluids and cell culture medium. The plasma-implanted materials exhibit a lower initial corrosion rate. Being a gaseous ion PIII technique, conformal ion implantation into an object with a complex shape such as an orthopedic implant can be easily accomplished and CO2 PIII is a potential method to improve the biological properties of magnesium and its alloys in clinical applications.

  5. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam; Pacheco, Jose L.; Aguirre, Brandon Adrian; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Bielejec, Edward S.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. In conclusion, the ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantationmore » process.« less

  7. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. B. S.; Aguirre, B. A.; Pacheco, J. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Bielejec, E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. The ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantation process.

  8. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, M.; Takagi, T.

    2002-05-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (~10 μs pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron microscopy, and its structure characteristics are examined by XPS and laser Raman spectroscopy. Subsequent processing using acetylene or acetylene and Ar (20%) produced thin carbon layers that are confirmed to be graphite-dominated DLC. Also, this PSII method is employed in order to deposit the DLC layer on the inside surface of the PET bottle and to reduce oxygen permeation rate by 40%.

  9. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-07-01

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  10. Fabrication of silicon carbide nanowires/carbon nanotubes heterojunction arrays by high-flux Si ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaping; Cheng, Guo-An; Liang, Changlin; Zheng, Ruiting

    2008-06-18

    An array of silicon carbide nanowire (SiCNW)-carbon nanotube (CNT) heterojunctions was fabricated by high-flux Si ion implantation into a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) array with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. Under Si irradiation, the top part of a CNT array was gradually transformed into an amorphous nanowire array with increasing Si dose while the bottom part still remained a CNT structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the SiC compound was produced in the nanowire part even at the lower Si dose of 5 × 10(16) ions cm(-2), and the SiC amount increased with increasing the Si dose. Therefore, the fabrication of a SiCNW-CNT heterojunction array with the MEVVA technique has been successfully demonstrated. The corresponding formation mechanism of SiCNWs was proposed. PMID:21825818

  11. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  12. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  13. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate.

  14. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J A

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  15. Formation of amorphous carbon on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by helium plasma based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, A.; Veres, M.; Kereszturi, K.; Mohai, M.; Bertóti, I.; Szépvölgyi, J.

    2011-08-01

    The surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) by helium plasma based ion implantation (He PBII) was studied. The effect of the main process parameters (acceleration voltage, fluence and fluence rate) on the alterations of the surface chemical composition and structure were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. According to SRIM calculations, at ion energies above 2 keV the stopping power of PET for He + ions is dominated by the electronic component and the contribution of the nuclear component is relatively small. Degradation of the ester group and carbonisation were observed by XPS due to elimination of O-rich fragments. The total C-content of the modified layer increased with the increase of fluence rate and acceleration voltage of particles, enabling the purposeful alteration of the surface composition. A strong broadening was detected in the Raman spectrum between 1000 and 1700 cm -1, testifying to the intense formation of amorphous carbon. The area ratio of the D (˜1410 cm -1) to G (˜1570 cm -1) band increased with the increase of particle fluence and the increase of acceleration voltage, offering the possibility of tailoring the chemical structure of the amorphous carbon layer created by the He PBII treatment.

  16. In-situ observation of sputtered particles for carbon implanted tungsten during energetic isotope ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Y.; Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Okuno, K.; Ashikawa, N.; Sagara, A.; Yoshida, N.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is a candidate for plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors. During DT plasma operations, carbon as an impurity will bombard tungsten, leading to the formation of tungsten-carbon (WC) layer and affecting tritium recycling behavior. The effect of carbon implantation for the dynamic recycling of deuterium, which demonstrates tritium recycling, including retention and sputtering, has been investigated using in-situ sputtered particle measurements. The C{sup +} implanted W, WC and HOPG were prepared and dynamic sputtered particles were measured during H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation. It has been found that the major hydrocarbon species for C{sup +} implanted tungsten is CH{sub 3}, while for WC and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) it is CH{sub 4}. The chemical state of hydrocarbon is controlled by the H concentration in a W-C mixed layer. The amount of C-H bond and the retention of H trapped by carbon atom should control the chemical form of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and the desorption of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2} are due to chemical sputtering, although that for CH is physical sputtering. The activation energy for CH{sub 3} desorption has been estimated to be 0.4 eV, corresponding to the trapping process of hydrogen by carbon through the diffusion in W. It is concluded that the chemical states of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for W is determined by the amount of C-H bond on the W surface. (authors)

  17. A preparation approach of exploring cluster ion implantation: from ultra-thin carbon film to graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Based on the extensive application of 2 × 1.7MV Tandetron accelerator, a low-energy cluster chamber has been built to explore for synthesizing graphene. Raman spectrum and atomic force microscopy (AFM) show that an amorphous carbon film in nanometer was deposited on the silicon by C4 cluster implantation. And we replaced the substrate with Ni/SiO2/Si and measured the thickness of Ni film by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Combined with suitable anneal conditions, these samples implanted by various small carbon clusters were made to grow graphene. Results from Raman spectrum reveal that few-layer graphene were obtained and discuss whether IG/I2D can contribute to explain the relationship between the number of graphene layers and cluster implantation dosage. PMID:24910570

  18. Surface modification of poly(propylene carbonate) by oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jizhong; Kang, Jiachen; Hu, Ping; Meng, Qingli

    2007-04-01

    Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) was implanted by oxygen ion with energy of 40 keV. The influence of experimental parameters was investigated by varying ion fluence from 1 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. XPS, SEM, surface roughness, wettability, hardness, and modulus were employed to investigate structure and properties of the as-implanted PPC samples. Eight chemical groups, i.e., carbon, C sbnd H, C sbnd O sbnd C, C sbnd O, O sbnd C sbnd O, C dbnd O, ?, and ? groups were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted samples. The species and relative intensities of the chemical groups changed with increasing ion fluence. SEM images displayed that irradiation damage was related strongly with ion fluence. Both surface-recovering and shrunken behavior were observed on surface of the PPC sample implanted with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. As increasing ion fluence, the surface roughness of the as-implanted PPC samples increased firstly, reached the maximum value of 159 nm, and finally decreased down the minimum value. The water droplet contact angle of the as-implanted PPC samples changed gradually with fluence, and reached the minimum value of 70° with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The hardness and modulus of the as-implanted PPC samples increased with increasing ion fluence, and reached their corresponding maximum values with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The experimental results revealed that oxygen ion fluence closely affected surface chemical group, morphology, surface roughness, wettability, and mechanical properties of the as-implanted PPC samples.

  19. Update on diamond and diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviewed the infrared uses of diamond-like carbon thin films and the potential uses of synthetic diamond layers. Diamond-like carbon is used widely as a protective anti-reflection coating for exposed germanium infrared windows and lenses and as thin protective coatings for front surface aluminium mirrors. This material is also used in protective anti-reflective coatings for zinc sulphide as the outer thin film in multi-layer designs incorporating variable index intermediate layers of germanium carbide. The maximum thickness of diamond-like carbon that can be used is often limited by the stress induced in the layer through the method of deposition and by the absorption present in the basic material. This stress and absorption can be far lower in synthetic diamond layers but there are now problems associated with the high substrate temperatures, difficulties in coating large areas uniformly and problems arising from surface scattering and low deposition rates.

  20. Transport Anomalies and Possible High Tc Superconductivity in interconnected multiwall carbon nanotube sheets doped by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Howard, Austin; Cornell, Nicholas; Goskun, Ulas; Salamon, Myron; Baughman, Ray; Bykova, Julia; Mayo, Nathanael; Wang, Xuemei; Galstyan, Eduard; Freyhardt, Herbert; Kan Chu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Ion implantation offers an alternative doping method. In searching for superconductivity,we describe here the ion-implantation doping of MWCNT interconnected networks by boron and other dopants (phosphorous, sulfur, arsenic) and report transport anomalies in oriented networks of ion implanted MWCNT sheets as compared to cross coated (non-oriented multilayer MWCNT sheets). The strong drop of resistance R(T) with temperature decrease starting at Tc1= 50-60 K and even at higher T is reminiscent of inhomogeneous superconducting islands appearing in the non-SC matrix. An unusual anomaly of the 4-terminal resistance is observed in many samples, R(T) becoming negative at lower T< Tc2 ˜ 10-20 K, This negative resistance is found to be associated with unusual I-V curves with s-shape at low T < Tc2 and R(T) shows nonlinear dependence on excitation current and other features that are studied carefully in MWCNTs with different lengths and densities. This negative-resistance behavior gives a hint for the possible incorporation of superconducting areas and can be explained in terms of an imbalanced resistance bridge.

  1. Plasma, photon, and beam synthesis of diamond films and multilayered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.P.H.

    1992-09-01

    In the area of nucleation, it was discovered that C{sub 70} thin films are perfect substitutes for diamond seeds in the growth of diamond films. This research, along with a careful study of diamond growth on carbon ion implanted single crystal copper, have clearly demonstrated that structured carbon is the best precursor for nucleation and growth of diamond films on non-diamond surfaces. In addition, by using fluorine chemistry during diamond growth, it has been shown that diamond films can grow on carbide substrates without the pretreatment of diamond seeding. The growth rates are higher and the film adhesion is much improved.

  2. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer "bulk". Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ˜2 × 1011 cm-3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  3. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  4. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  5. Plasma, photon, and beam synthesis of diamond films and multilayered structures. Progress report, July 1, 1990--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.P.H.

    1992-09-01

    In the area of nucleation, it was discovered that C{sub 70} thin films are perfect substitutes for diamond seeds in the growth of diamond films. This research, along with a careful study of diamond growth on carbon ion implanted single crystal copper, have clearly demonstrated that structured carbon is the best precursor for nucleation and growth of diamond films on non-diamond surfaces. In addition, by using fluorine chemistry during diamond growth, it has been shown that diamond films can grow on carbide substrates without the pretreatment of diamond seeding. The growth rates are higher and the film adhesion is much improved.

  6. Ion enhanced deposition by dual titanium and acetylene plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Tian, X. B.; Chu, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) offers a non-line-of-sight fabrication method for various types of thin films on steels to improve the surface properties. In this work, titanium films were first deposited on 9Cr18 (AISI440) stainless bearing steel by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIII-D) using a titanium vacuum arc plasma source. Afterwards, carbon implantation and carbon film deposition were performed by acetylene (C2H2) plasma immersion ion implantation. Multiple-layered structures with superior properties were produced by conducting Ti MePIII-D + C2H2 PIII successively. The composition and structure of the films were investigated employing Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the mixing for Ti and C atoms is much better when the target bias is higher during Ti MePIII-D. A top diamond-like carbon layer and a titanium oxycarbide layer are formed on the 9Cr18 steel surface. The wear test results indicate that this dual PIII-D method can significantly enhance the wear properties and decrease the surface friction coefficient of 9Cr18 steel.

  7. Films Composed Of Diamond And Diamondlike Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han

    1995-01-01

    Proposed films composed of diamond and diamondlike carbon useful as wear-resistant and self-lubricating protective and tribological coats at extreme temperatures and in corrosive and oxidizing environments. Films have wide variety of industrial applications.

  8. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  9. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  10. Sources of carbon in inclusion bearing diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2009-11-01

    The carbon isotopic composition ( δ13C) of diamonds containing peridotitic, eclogitic, websteritic and ultra-deep inclusions is re-evaluated on a detailed level. Applying a binning interval of 0.25‰, the previously recognized mode of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds at about - 5‰ is shown to reflect at least two subpopulations with abundance peaks at ˜ - 5.75 to - 4.75‰ and ˜ - 4.50 to - 3.50‰. Within the peridotitic suite, diamonds with lherzolitic inclusions overall show higher δ13C values. Evolution away from a δ13C value of ˜ - 5‰, towards both 13C depleted and enriched compositions, is accompanied by decreasing maximum nitrogen contents of peridotitic diamonds. In combination with data on diamonds synthesized under reducing (metal melts) and more oxidizing conditions (carbonate-silicate interactions), this is taken to indicate that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond that becomes depleted in the growth medium during progressive diamond precipitation. The observed co-variations of nitrogen content and δ13C around - 5‰ can then be modelled as reflecting closed system Rayleigh fractionation during crystallization of diamond from fluids/melts that are both reducing (i.e. methane bearing; evolution from ˜ - 5 to - 10‰) and oxidizing (i.e. CO 32- bearing; evolution from starting points varying between ˜ - 9 to - 5‰ and extending to about 0‰). Lherzolitic diamonds are believed to be mainly derived from diamond forming events subsequent to precipitation of predominantly Mesoarchean harzburgitic diamonds. The shift of lherzolitic diamonds towards higher δ13C values thus may relate to a temporal evolution, with carbonate bearing fluids with an initial isotopic composition ranging between about - 5.5 and - 1.5‰, derived from subducting oceanic crust, becoming increasingly important subsequent to the Mesoarchean. Devolatilization of marine carbonates ( δ13C ˜ 0‰) drives their isotopic composition towards mantle like values and

  11. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  12. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  13. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  14. Carbon stardust: From soot to diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of carbon dust in the outflow from stars and the subsequent evolution of this so called stardust in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The chemical and physical processes that play a role in carbon stardust formation are very similar to those occurring in sooting flames. Based upon extensive laboratory studies of the latter, the structure and physical and chemical properties of carbon soot are reviewed and possible chemical pathways towards carbon stardust are discussed. Grain-grain collisions behind strong interstellar shocks provide the high pressures required to transform graphite and amorphous carbon grains into diamond. This process is examined and the properties of shock-synthesized diamonds are reviewed. Finally, the interrelationship between carbon stardust and carbonaceous meteorites is briefly discussed.

  15. Catalysis by diamonds and other forms of carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Kaufman, P.B.; Lavin, J.G.

    1996-10-01

    Some activated carbons and carbon blacks are known to be good catalysts for a variety of liquid phase reactions such as selective carbon-carbon cleavage and dehalogenation of halogenated hydrocarbons. We will present data on the catalytic activity of well characterized, relatively simple forms of carbons such as diamonds and diamond-graphite composites. Both industrial and natural diamonds have been used. TEM provided detailed information on the nature of the carbons at the surface of the carbon materials used as catalysts. Clean surfaces of natural diamond particles are active catalysts in reactions such as debromination of 1-Br-naphthalene and 1-Br-adamantane.

  16. Corrosion behavior of titanium alloy Beta-21S coated with diamond like carbon in Hank's solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, L.; Anandan, C.; Grips, V. K. William

    2012-06-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings posses high hardness and low friction coefficient and also biocompatible, hence, they are of interest for enhancing the wear and corrosion resistance of bio-implant materials. Beta stabilized titanium alloys are attractive for biomedical applications because of their high specific strength and low modulus. In this work Beta-21S alloy (Ti-15Mo-3Nb-3Al-0.2Si) was implanted with carbon ions by plasma immersion ion implantation using methane and hydrogen gas mixture followed by DLC deposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The implanted layers enabled deposition of adherent diamond-like carbon coatings on the titanium alloy which was otherwise not possible. The corrosion behavior of the treated and untreated samples was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization studies in simulated body fluid (Hank's solution). XPS, micro Raman and EDAX investigation of the samples showed the formation of a thin oxide layer on the treated samples after corrosion experiments. Corrosion resistance of the DLC coated sample is comparable with that of the untreated samples. Electrochemical impedance data of the substrate and implanted samples were fitted with two time constant equivalent circuits and that of DLC coated samples with two-layer model.

  17. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  18. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  19. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  20. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  1. Stiff diamond/buckypaper carbon hybrids.

    PubMed

    Holz, T; Mata, D; Santos, N F; Bdikin, I; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M

    2014-12-24

    Given the specific properties of each carbon allotrope such as high electrical/thermal conductivity of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and extreme hardness and high inertness of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), the integration of both carbon phases is highly desirable. Therefore, in the present work, buckypapers were produced from MWCNT suspensions and were used as free-standing substrates to be coated with NCD by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The integration of both allotropes was successfully achieved, the CNTs being preserved after diamond growth as confirmed by μ-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, a good linkage was observed, the CNTs remaining embedded within the NCD matrix, thus reinforcing the interface of the resulting hybrid structure. This was corroborated by bending tests in a modified nanohardness tester. The increase of the Young's modulus from 0.3 to 300 GPa after NCD growth enables the use of this material in a wide range of applications including microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Additionally, a highly anisotropic electrical resistivity behavior was confirmed: low in-plane values were found for the CNT layer (1.39 × 10(-2) Ω.cm), while high transverse ones were measured for both the NCD coated and uncoated CNT buckypapers (8.13 × 10(5) and 6.18 × 10(2) Ω.cm, respectively). PMID:25412196

  2. Buckled diamond-like carbon nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Matti; Isacsson, Andreas; Oksanen, Mika; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2015-09-21

    We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp(2)-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators. PMID:26284626

  3. Properties of buried SiC layers produced by carbon ion implantation in (100) bulk silicon and silicon-on-sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golecki, I.; Kroko, L.; Glass, H. L.

    1987-09-01

    Buried layers of SiC were formed in (100) single-crystal bulk silicon and silicon-on-sapphire by ion implantation of 125 180 keV, (0.56-1.00) × 1018 C/cm2 at 30 40 μA/ cm2 into samples held at 450-650° C. The as-implanted and 950° C annealed samples were characterized by differential infra-red absorbance and reflectance, Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, four-point probe measurements, Dektak profilometry, I-V measurements, spreading resistance measurements and secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  4. Ion implantation to reduce wear on polyethylene prosthetic devices. Rept. for Aug 89-Jan 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Researchers studied the use of ion implantation to improve the wear performance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). UHMWPE samples were implanted with high energy ions, tested for wear performance, and compared to unimplanted control samples. Surface friction and hardness measurements, Raman scattering, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), water contact angle, and film transfer tests were performed to characterize the surface property changes of implanted UHMWPE samples. Results indicated a 90% reduction in wear on implanted UHMWPE disks. Implantation increased surface microhardness and surface energy. The Raman spectrum revealed a diamond-like signature, indicting carbon bonds of a different nature than those found in unimplanted polyehtylene. Photographic analysis of pins used in wear testing revealed differences between implanted and unimplanted samples in the polyethylene film transferred in the initial stages of wear from the disk to the pin.

  5. Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition of DLC coating for modification of orthodontic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarat, W.; Sarapirom, S.; Aukkaravittayapun, S.; Jotikasthira, D.; Boonyawan, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to use the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) technique to form diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on orthodontic magnets to solve the corrosion problem. To search for the optimal material modification effect, PIII-D conditions including gases, processing time, and pulsing mode were varied. The formation of DLC films was confirmed and characterized with Raman spectra. The intensity of the remnant magnetic field of the magnets and the hardness, adhesion and thickness of the thin films were then measured. A corrosion test was carried out using clinic dental fluid. Improved benefits including a satisfying hardness, adhesion, remnant magnetic strength and corrosion resistance of the DLC coating could be achieved by using a higher interrupting time ratio and shorter processing time.

  6. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  7. Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Barrier to Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Baker, N.P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-10-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a non line of sight process for implanting complex shaped targets without the need for complex fixturing. The breakdown initiation of materials coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by PSII occurs at defects in the DLC which expose the underlying material. To summarize these findings, a galvanic couple is established between the coating and exposed material at the base of the defect. Pitting and oxidation of the base and metal leads to the development of mechanical stress in the coating and eventually spallation of the coating. This paper presents our current progress in attempting to mitigate the breakdown of these coatings by implanting the parent material prior to coating with DLC. Ideally one would like to implant the parent material with chromium or molybdenum which are known to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials with PSII are not yet available. Here we report on the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and boron implantation on the susceptibility of PSII-DLC coated mild steel to breakdown.

  8. Formation mechanism of diamond nanocrystal from catalysed carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Li, Tingju; Dong, Chuang; Zhang, Xingguo; Yao, Shan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dehe; Ji, Shouhua; Jin, Junze

    2004-10-01

    Recently, our group has synthesized nanocrystal n-diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) from catalysed carbon black. Based on the results of XRD, TGA and DTA, a formation mechanism has been proposed to explain the phase transformation from carbon black to diamond nanocrystal. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, agr-Fe, ggr-Fe, then liquid iron. When the carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, DLC or graphite separates out of the liquid iron. With decrease of temperature, the carbon in ggr-Fe is separated out, and n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

  9. Contamination Control in Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, R.; Doi, D.; Santos, I.; Wriggins, W.

    2011-01-07

    The investigation and elimination or control of metallic contamination in ion implanters has been a leading, continuous effort at implanter OEMs and in fabs/IDMs alike. Much of the efforts have been in the area of control of sputtering through material and geometry changes in apertures, beamline and target chamber components. In this paper, we will focus on an area that has not, heretofore, been fully investigated or controlled. This is the area of lubricants and internal and external support material such as selected cleaning media. Some of these materials are designated for internal use (beamline/vacuum) only while others are for internal and/or external use. Many applications for selected greases, for example, are designated for or are used for platens, implant disks/wheels and for wafer handling components. We will present data from popular lubricants (to be unnamed) used worldwide in ion implanters. This paper will review elements of concern in many lubricants that should be tracked and monitored by all fabs.Proper understanding of the characteristics, risks and the control of these potential contaminants can provide for rapid return to full process capability following major PMs or parts changes. Using VPD-ICPMS, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography (IC) data, we will review the typical cleaning results and correlation to ''on wafer'' contamination by elements of concern--and by some elements that are otherwise barred from the fab.

  10. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    When the main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m, respectively, carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond and DLC ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the requirements regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  11. Ion Implantation into Presolar Grains: A Theoretical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    A numerical model for ion implantation into spherical grains in free space has been developed. It can be applied to single grains or collections of grains with known grain-size distributions. Ion-scattering effects were taken into account using results of computer simulations. Possible isotope and element fractionation of the implanted species was investigated using this model. The astrophysical significance of the model lies in the possible identification of energetically different components (such as noble gases) implanted into presolar grains (such as diamond and SiC) and in establishing implantation energies of the components.

  12. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  13. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp3 (75%-85%) with the rest being threefold sp2 bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g-1. From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing growth times as needed

  14. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Jagdish Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-12-07

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp{sup 3} (75%–85%) with the rest being threefold sp{sup 2} bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g{sup −1}. From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing

  15. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  16. Ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three ion implantation and laser annealing projects have been performed by ORNL through the DOE sponsored Seed Money Program. The research has contributed toward improving the characteristics of wear, hardness, and corrosion resistance of some metals and ceramics, as well as the electrical properties of semiconductors. The work has helped to spawn related research, at ORNL and elsewhere, concerning the relationships between microstructure and materials properties. ORNL research has resulted in major advances in extended life and non-corrosive artificial joints (hip and knee), high performance semiconductors, failure resistant ceramics (with potential energy applications), and solar cells. The success of the seed money projects was instrumental in the formation of ORNL's Surface Modification and Characterization Facility (SMAC). More than 60 universities and companies have participated in SMAC programs.

  17. Diamond turning of steel in a carbon-saturated atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1982-06-02

    The wear of diamond tools when machining steels under carbon dioxide and methane gases is investigated. It is shown that diamond tool wear on steels appears to be significantly reduced due to the effects of the methane gas atmosphere. Applicable literature is reviewed and an explanation for the effectiveness of a gas rich in carbon is given. A description of the experimental apparatus and procedure is given along with results of experiments with two types of steel.

  18. Morphological analysis and cell viability on diamond-like carbon films containing nanocrystalline diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. N.; Ramos, B. C.; Da-Silva, N. S.; Pacheco-Soares, C.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Lobo, A. O.; Marciano, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    The coating of orthopedic prostheses with diamond like-carbon (DLC) has been actively studied in the past years, in order to improve mechanical, tribological properties and promote the material's biocompatibility. Recently, the incorporation of crystalline diamond nanoparticles into the DLC film has shown effective in combating electrochemical corrosion in acidic medias. This study examines the material's biocompatibility through testing by LDH release and MTT, on in vitro fibroblasts; using different concentrations of diamond nanoparticles incorporated into the DLC film. Propounding its potential use in orthopedics in order to increase the corrosion resistance of prostheses and improve their relationship with the biological environment.

  19. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  20. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  1. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ˜25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  2. In vitro evaluation of diamond-like carbon coatings with a Si/SiC x interlayer on surgical NiTi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. L.; Chu, Paul K.; Yang, D. Z.

    2007-04-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced with a Si/SiCx interlayer by a hybrid plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition process to improve the adhesion between the carbon layer and surgical NiTi alloy substrate. The structure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the coatings were evaluated in vitro by Raman spectroscopy, pin-on-disk tests, potentiodynamic polarization tests and simulated fluid immersion tests. The DLC coatings with a Si/SiCx interlayer of a suitable thickness have better adhesion, lower friction coefficients and enhanced corrosion resistance. In the simulated body fluid tests, the coatings exhibit effective corrosion protection and good biocompatibility as indicated by PC12 cell cultures. DLC films fabricated on a Si/SiCx interlayer have high potential as protective coatings for biomedical NiTi materials.

  3. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricant Diamond Films and Coatings. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films and coatings toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. Friction mechanisms and solid lubrication mechanisms of CVD diamond are stated. Effects of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon on CVD diamond, an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by carbon and nitrogen ion implantation, and a materials combination of cubic boron nitride and CVD diamond on the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum are described. How surface modification and the selected materials couple improved the tribological functionality of coatings, giving low coefficient of friction and good wear resistance, is explained.

  4. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  5. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  6. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  7. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  8. Vibrational Raman characterization of hard carbon and diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, J.W. III; Veirs, D.K.; Cho, Namhee; Rosenblatt, G.M. ); Marchon, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous hard carbon'' and microcrystalline diamond films are being investigated and characterized using high-sensitivity and spatial-profiling Raman spectroscopy. The hard carbon'' films have broad Raman spectra with no diamond line while higher quality diamond films show only a single sharp diamond line. Features in the Raman spectra of the amorphous hard carbon'' films correlate with the rates of specific types of wear. Changes in the relative intensity of the Raman band near 1570 cm{sup {minus}1} (G-band) compared to the band near 1360 cm{sup {minus}1} (D-band) are related to the rate of abrasive wear. Shifts in the frequency of the G-band are related to the rate of tribochemical wear. The results are consistent with a structural model of amorphous carbon films in which small (<20{Angstrom}) graphitic microcrystals comprised of sp{sup 2} bonded domains are cross-linked by sp{sup 3} carbon atoms. Profiles of Raman frequency and linewidth obtained from spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy across CVD-grown diamond thin films show that the Raman frequency and position are correlated in these films and that both change in regions of poorer film quality. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Diamond and diamond-like carbon films for advanced electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Aim of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop diamond and/or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for electronic applications. Quality of diamond and DLC films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is not adequate for electronic applications. Nucleation of diamond grains during growth typically results in coarse films that must be very thick in order to be physically continuous. DLC films grown by CVD are heavily hydrogenated and are stable to temperatures {le} 400{degrees}C. However, diamond and DLC`s exceptional electronic properties make them candidates for integration into a variety of microelectronic structures. This work studied new techniques for the growth of both materials. Template layers have been developed for the growth of CVD diamond films resulting in a significantly higher nucleation density on unscratched or unprepared Si surfaces. Hydrogen-free DLC with temperature stability {le} 800{degrees}C has been developed using energetic growth methods such as high-energy pulsed-laser deposition. Applications with the largest system impact include electron-emitting materials for flat-panel displays, dielectrics for interconnects, diffusion barriers, encapsulants, and nonvolatile memories, and tribological coatings that reduce wear and friction in integrated micro-electro-mechanical devices.

  10. Improving Sustainability of Ion Implant Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor fabs have long been pressured to manage capital costs, reduce energy consumption and increasingly improve efforts to recycle and recover resources. Ion implant tools have been high-profile offenders on all three fronts. They draw such large volumes of air for heat dissipation and risk reduction that historically, they are the largest consumer of cleanroom air of any process tool—and develop energy usage and resource profiles to match. This paper presents a documented approach to reduce their energy consumption and dramatically downsize on-site facilities support for cleanroom air manufacture and abatement. The combination produces significant capital expenditure savings. The case entails applying SAGS Type 1 (sub-atmospheric gas systems) toxic gas packaging to enable engineering adaptations that deliver the energy savings and cost benefits without any reduction in environmental health and safety. The paper also summarizes benefits as they relate to reducing a fabs carbon emission footprint (and longer range advantages relative to potential cap and trade programs) with existing technology.

  11. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  12. Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David James; Coates, Don Mayo; Archuleta, Thomas Arthur; Barbero, Robert Steven

    2000-01-01

    A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

  13. Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Coates, D.M.; Archuleta, T.A.; Barbero, R.S.

    2000-03-14

    A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

  14. In-situ deposition of sacrificial layers during ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Brown, I.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    The retained dose of implanted ions is limited by sputtering. It is known that a sacrificial layer deposited prior to ion implantation can lead to an enhanced retained dose. However, a higher ion energy is required to obtain a similar implantation depth due to the stopping of ions in the sacrificial layer. It is desirable to have a sacrificial layer of only a few monolayers thickness which can be renewed after it has been sputtered away. We explain the concept and describe two examples: (i) metal ion implantation using simultaneously a vacuum arc ion source and filtered vacuum arc plasma sources, and (ii) Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID). In MePIIID, the target is immersed in a metal or carbon plasma and a negative, repetitively pulsed bias voltage is applied. Ions are implanted when the bias is applied while the sacrificial layer suffers sputtering. Low-energy thin film deposition - repair of the sacrificial layer -- occurs between bias pulses. No foreign atoms are incorporated into the target since the sacrificial film is made of the same ion species as used in the implantation phase.

  15. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  16. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Li, J L; Liu, P; Yang, G W

    2014-12-21

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called "new diamond" because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions. PMID:25369973

  17. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  18. Panel 2 - properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Clausing, R.E.; Ajayi, O.O.; Liu, Y.Y.; Purohit, A.; Bartelt, P.F.; Baughman, R.H.; Bhushan, B.; Cooper, C.V.; Dugger, M.T.; Freedman, A.; Larsen-Basse, J.; McGuire, N.R.; Messier, R.F.; Noble, G.L.; Ostrowki, M.H.; Sartwell, B.D.; Wei, R.

    1993-01-01

    This panel attempted to identify and prioritize research and development needs in determining the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films (D/DLCF). Three specific goals were established. They were: (1) To identify problem areas which produce concern and require a better knowledge of D/DLCF properties. (2) To identify and prioritize key properties of D/DLCF to promote transportation applications. (3) To identify needs for improvement in properties-measurement methods. Each of these goals is addressed subsequently.

  19. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  20. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  1. Kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in K-Na-Mg-Ca-Carbonate-Carbon melt-solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solopova, N. A.; Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Nekrasov, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    The kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in multicomponent K-Na-Mg-Ca-carbonate-carbon system have been studied in conditions of diamond stability at 1500-1800°C and 7.5-8.5 GPa. It has been established that the diamond phase nucleation density at a fixed temperature of 1600°C decreases from 1.3 × 105 nuclei/mm3 at 8.5 GPa to 3.7 × 103 nuclei/mm3 at 7.5 GPa. The fluorescence spectra of obtained diamond crystals contain peaks at 504 nm ( H3-defect), 575 nm (NV-center), and 638 nm (NV-defect), caused by the presence of nitrogen impurity. In the cathodoluminescence spectra, an A-band with the maximum at 470 nm is present. The obtained data make it possible to assign the synthesized diamonds in the carbonate-carbon system to the mixed Ia + Ib type.

  2. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  3. Classroom Demonstration: Combustion of Diamond to Carbon Dioxide Followed by Reduction to Graphite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyauchi, Takuya; Kamata, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    An educational demonstration shows the combustion of carbon to carbon dioxide and then the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon. A melee diamond is the source of the carbon and the reaction is carried out in a closed flask. The demonstration helps students to realize that diamonds are made of carbon and that atoms do not change or vanish in…

  4. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  5. Frictional and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon-coated orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Muguruma, Takeshi; Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Nakagaki, Susumu; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on frictional and mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets. DLC films were deposited on stainless steel brackets using the plasma-based ion implantation/deposition (PBIID) method under two different atmospheric conditions. As-received metal brackets served as the control. Two sizes of stainless steel archwires, 0.018 inch diameter and 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions, were used for measuring static and kinetic friction by drawing the archwires through the bracket slots, using a mechanical testing machine (n = 10). The DLC-coated brackets were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Values of hardness and elastic modulus were obtained by nanoindentation testing (n = 10). Friction forces were compared by one-way analysis of variance and the Scheffé test. The hardness and elastic modulus of the brackets were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. SEM photomicrographs showed DLC layers on the bracket surfaces with thickness of approximately 5-7 μm. DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 2 showed significantly less static frictional force for the stainless steel wire with 0.017 × 0.025 inch cross-section dimensions than as-received brackets and DLC-coated brackets deposited under condition 1, although both DLC-coated brackets showed significantly less kinetic frictional force than as-received brackets. The hardness of the DLC layers was much higher than that of the as-received bracket surfaces. In conclusion, the surfaces of metal brackets can be successfully modified by the PBIID method to create a DLC layer, and the DLC-coating process significantly reduces frictional forces. PMID:21934113

  6. Ion-implantation doping of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.; Edwards, A.; Rao, M.V.; Papanicolaou, N.; Kelner, G.; Holland, O.W.

    1997-10-01

    Because of their commercial availability in bulk single crystal form, the 6H- and 4H- polytypes of SiC are gaining importance for high-power, high-temperature, and high-frequency device applications. Selective area doping is a crucial processing step in integrated circuit manufacturing. In Si technology, selective area doping is accomplished by thermal diffusion or ion-implantation. Because of the low diffusion coefficients of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is indispensable in SiC device manufacturing. In this paper the authors present their results on donor, acceptor, and compensation implants in 6H-SiC.

  7. Apparatus for producing diamond-like carbon flakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A vacuum arc from a spot at the face of a graphite cathode to a graphite anode produces a beam of carbon ions and atoms. A carbon coating from this beam is deposited on an ion beam sputtered target to produce diamond-like carbon flakes. A graphite tube encloses the cathode, and electrical isolation is provided by an insulating sleeve. The tube forces the vacuum arc spot to be confined to the surface on the outermost end of the cathode. Without the tube the arc spot will wander to the side of the cathode. This spot movement results in low rates of carbon deposition, and the properties of the deposited flakes are more graphite-like than diamond-like.

  8. Amorphous diamond: A high-pressure superhard carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho Kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp³-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp²-to-sp³ bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  9. Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

  10. Onion-like carbon from ultra-disperse diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir L.; Chuvilin, Andrey L.; Butenko, Yuri V.; Mal'kov, Igor Yu.; Titov, Vladimir M.

    1994-05-01

    A new material containing macroscopic quantities of onion-like carbon (OLC) particles is produced by heat treatment of ultra-disperse diamond (UDD) powder (2-6 nm). Annealing products (characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy) are presented by; (a) quasi-spherical particles with closed concentric graphite shells, (b) polyhedron particles with closed shells, (c) elongated particles with linked external graphite-like layers and closed quasi-spherical internal shells. The intermediates of UDD transformation have been registered. The structural transformation of UDD begins from the surface of the diamond particles towards a crystal bulk. The transformation rate of (111) diamond planes to graphite-like sheets is higher than that of other planes.

  11. Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui

    2012-07-02

    We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 4} at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

  12. RBS and ERDA determinations of depth distributions of high-dose carbon ions implanted in silicon for silicon carbide synthesis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Hallén, A.; Yu, L. D.; Janson, M. S.; Thongleum, C.; Possnert, G.; Singkarat, S.

    2006-08-01

    For ion beam synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC), a knowledge of the depth distribution of implanted carbon ions in silicon is crucial for successful development. Based on its simplicity and availability, we selected Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) as an analysis technique for this purpose. A self-developed computer program dedicated to extract depth profiles of lighter impurities in heavier matrix is established. For control, calculated results are compared with an other ion beam analysis (IBA) technique superior for studying lighter impurity in heavier substrate i.e. elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The RBS was performed with a 1.7-MV Tandetron accelerator using He2+ as the probe ions. The ERDA was performed with a 5-MV Pelletron accelerator using I8+ as the probe ions. This work shows that the RBS-extracted data had no significant deviations from those of ERDA and simulations by SRIM2003 and SIIMPL computer codes. We also found that annealing at temperatures as high as 1000 °C had quite limited effect on the redistribution of carbon in silicon.

  13. Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

  14. Comparative surface and nano-tribological characteristics of nanocomposite diamond-like carbon thin films doped by silver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han-Shen; Endrino, Jose L.; Anders, Andre

    2008-07-10

    In this study we have deposited silver-containing hydrogenated and hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanocomposite thin films by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition methods. The surface and nano-tribological characteristics were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-scratching experiments. The silver doping was found to have no measurable effect on sp2-sp3 hybridization of the hydrogenated DLC matrix and only a slight effect on the hydrogen-free DLC matrix. The surface topography was analyzed by surface imaging. High- and low-order roughness determined by AFM characterization was correlated to the DLC growth mechanism and revealed the smoothing effect of silver. The nano-tribological characteristics were explained in terms of friction mechanisms and mechanical properties in correlation to the surface characteristics. It was discovered that the adhesion friction was the dominant friction mechanism; the adhesion force between the scratching tip and DLC surface was decreased by hydrogenation and increased by silver doping.

  15. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  16. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  17. Antibacterial efficacy of titanium-containing alloy with silver-nanoparticles enriched diamond-like carbon coatings.

    PubMed

    Harrasser, Norbert; Jüssen, Sebastian; Banke, Ingo J; Kmeth, Ralf; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; Stritzker, Bernd; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Silver ions (Ag(+)) have strong bactericidal effects and Ag-coated medical devices proved their effectiveness in reducing infections in revision total joint arthroplasty. We quantitatively determined the antimicrobial potency of different surface treatments on a titanium alloy (Ti), which had been conversed to diamond-like carbon (DLC-Ti) and doped with high (Ag:PVP = 1:2) and low (Ag:PVP = 1:10 and 1:20) concentrations of Ag (Ag-DLC-Ti) with a modified technique of ion implantation. Bacterial adhesion and planktonic growth of clinically relevant bacterial strains (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) on Ag-DLC-Ti were compared to untreated Ti by quantification of colony forming units on the adherent surface and in the growth medium as well as semiquantitatively by determining the grade of biofilm formation by scanning electron microscopy. (1) A significant (p < 0.05) antimicrobial effect could be found for all Ag-DLC-Ti samples (reduced growth by 5.6-2.5 logarithmic levels). (2) The antimicrobial effect was depending on the tested bacterial strain (most for P. aeruginosa, least for S. aureus). (3) Antimicrobial potency was positively correlated with Ag concentrations. (4) Biofilm formation was decreased by Ag-DLC-Ti surfaces. This study revealed potent antibacterial effects of Ag-DLC-Ti. This may serve as a promising novel approach to close the gap in antimicrobial protection of musculoskeletal implants. PMID:26646789

  18. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  19. Multiple Ion Implantation Effects on Wear and Wet Ability of Polyethylene Based Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2004-10-01

    Polyethylene based polymers were ion implanted with multiple irradiations of different ions (N+, Ar+ and Kr+) at energies between 30 keV and 300 keV and doses ranging between 1013 and 1016 ions/cm2. The ion implantation dehydrogenises the polyethylene inducing cross-link effects in the residual polymer carbons. At high doses the irradiated surface show properties similar to graphite surfaces. The depth of the modified layers depends on the ion range in polyethylene at the incident ion energy. The chemical modification depends on the implanted doses and on the specie of the incident ions. A "pin-on-disc" machine was employed to measure the polymer wear against AISI-316 L stainless steel. A "contact-angle-test" machine was employed to measure the wet ability of the polymer surface for 1 μl pure water drop. Measurements demonstrate that the multiple ion implantation treatments decrease the surface wear and the surface wetting and produce a more resistant polymer surface. The properties of the treated surfaces improves the polymer functionality for many bio-medical applications, such as those relative to the polyethylene friction discs employed in knee and hip prosthesis joints. The possibility to use multiply ion implantations of polymers with traditional ion implanters and with laser ion sources producing plasmas is investigated.

  20. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon <100>substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  1. Stretchable diamond-like carbon microstructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Ryan; Narayan, Roger J.; Aggarwal, Ravi; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2009-09-01

    Designing, fabricating, and evaluating stretchable electronics is a growing area of materials research. Electronic devices have traditionally been fabricated using rigid, inorganic substrates (e.g., silicon) with metallic components and interconnections. Conventional electronic devices may face limitations when placed in environments that are dominated by stretchable or three-dimensional structures, including those within the human body. This paper describes the use of pulsed laser deposition to create diamond-like carbon microstructures on polydimethylsiloxane. The viability of human epidermal keratinocyte cells on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces coated with arrays of diamond-like carbon islands was similar to that on unmodified polydimethylsiloxane surfaces, which are commonly used in medical devices. It is anticipated that stretchable electronic devices may be incorporated within novel medical devices and prostheses that interface with stretchable or three-dimensional structures in the human body.

  2. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  3. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Li, J. L.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions.The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond

  4. Ion implantation processing for high-speed GaAs JFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Shul, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    GaAs Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFETs) offer a higher gate turn-on voltage, resulting in a better noise margin and reduced power dissipation, than the more widely employed GaAs MESFET. The primary reason the JFET has not been more widely used is the speed penalty associated with the gate/channel junction and corresponding gate length broadening. We present the ion implantation processes used for a self-aligned, all ion-implanted, GaAs JFET that minimizes the speed penalty for the JFET while maintaining the advantageous higher gate turn-on voltage. Process characterization of the p{sub +}-gate implant done with either Mg, Zn, or Cd along with the co-implantation of P is presented. In addition, a novel backside channel confinement technology employing ion-implanted carbon is discussed. Complete JFET device results are reported.

  5. Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Surfaces of Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    In humid air and dry nitrogen, as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films and polished, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m). In an ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa), however, they have high steady-state coefficients of friction (greater than 0.6) and high wear rates (greater than or equal to 10(exp -4) mm(exp 3)/N-m). Therefore, the use of as-deposited, fine-grain and polished, coarse-grain diamond films as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings must be limited to normal air or gaseous environments such as dry nitrogen. On the other hand, carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films and nitrogen-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m) in all three environments. These films can be effectively used as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in an ultrahigh vacuum as well as in normal air and dry nitrogen.

  6. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  7. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  8. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  9. Electrocatalysis on ion-implanted electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, W E; Wolf, G K

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation of formic acid and methanol has been stuidied on electrodes prepared by ion implanting Pt in RuO/sup 2/. Formic acid was found to oxidize readily on this catalyst without poisoning the surface. In the case of methanol no reaction was found to take place. Using XPS techniques, Pt was shown to have a lower binding energy than bulk Pt. This suggests that there is excess charge on this form of Pt which changes its reactivity.

  10. Carbon isotope fractionation during experimental crystallisation of diamond from carbonate fluid at mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutsky, Vadim; Borzdov, Yuri; Palyanov, Yuri; Sokol, Alexander; Izokh, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We report first results of a systematic study of carbon isotope fractionation in a carbonate fluid system under mantle PT conditions. The system models a diamond-forming alkaline carbonate fluid using pure sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the starting material, which decomposes to carbonate, CO2 and elementary carbon (graphite and diamond) involving a single source of carbon following the reaction 2Na2C2O4 → 2Na2CO3 + CO2 + C. Near-liquidus behaviour of carbonate was observed at 1300 °C and 6.3 GPa. The experimentally determined isotope fractionation between the components of the system in the temperature range from 1300 to 1700 °C at 6.3 and 7.5 GPa fit the theoretical expectations well. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with diamond crystallisation from the carbonate fluid at 7.5 GPa decreases with an increase in temperature from 2.7 to 1.6 ‰. This trend corresponds to the function ΔCarbonate fluid-Diamond = 7.38 × 106 T-2.

  11. Diffractive Optical Elements based in Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparvoli, M. Marina; Mansano, Ronaldo D.

    2008-04-01

    In this work was developed a Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) based in amorphous hydrogenated carbon (Diamond Like Carbon) films. DOEs can be built in large scale with high reproducibility and eliminating almost stages used in optical elements tradicional fabrication, as abrasion and burnishing. These devices had been built by the etching of DLC deposited by sputtering process. The characterizations of these devices are realized by optical analyzes with a 633 nm HeNe laser. The DLC films roughness and etch rate after process were measured by high step meter.

  12. Environmental effects on friction and wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural diamond flat, diamond film, and low and high density diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in contact with pin specimens of natural diamond and silicon nitride (Si3N4) both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. The results indicated that for natural diamond pin contacts the diamond films and the natural diamond flat were not susceptible to moisture but that moisture could increase both the coefficient of friction and the wear factors of the DLC films. The coefficients of friction and wear factors of the diamond films were generally similar to those of the natural diamond flat both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. In dry nitrogen the coefficients of friction of the high density DLC films in contact with pin specimens of both diamond and Si3N4 were generally low (about 0.02) and similar to those of the natural diamond flat and the diamond films. The wear factors of the materials in contact with both natural diamond and Si3N4 were generally in the ascending order of natural diamond flat, diamond film, high density DLC film, and low density DLC film. The moisture in the environment increased the coefficients of friction for Si3N4 pins in contact with all the materials. This increase in friction is due to the silicon oxide film produced on the surface of Si3N4 pins in humid air.

  13. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  14. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described. PMID:26932065

  15. Amorphous Diamond: A High-Pressure Superhard Carbon Allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho-kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-12-09

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp{sup 3}-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp{sup 2}-to-sp{sup 3} bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  16. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  17. Mutagenesis of Arabidopsis Thaliana by N+ Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genfa; Shi, Xiaoming; Nie, Yanli; Jiang, Shan; Zhou, Hongyu; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2006-05-01

    Ion implantation, as a new biophysically mutagenic technique, has shown a great potential for crop breeding. By analyzing polymorphisms of genomic DNA through RAPD-based DNA analysis, we compared the frequency and efficiency of somatic and germ-line mutations of Arabidopsis thaliana treated with N+ ion implantation and γ-rays radiation. Our data support the following conclusions: (1) N+ ion implantation can induce a much wider spectrum of mutations than γ-rays radiation does; (2) Unlike the linear correlation between the doses and their effect in γ-rays radiation, the dose-effect correlation in N+ ion implantation is nonlinear; (3) Like γ-rays radiation, both somatic and germ-line mutations could be induced by N+ ion implantation; and (4) RAPD deletion patterns are usually seen in N+ ion implantation induced mutation.

  18. Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pern, Fu-Jann; Touryan, Kenell J.; Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos; Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich

    2008-12-02

    Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

  19. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated. PMID:24681781

  20. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated. PMID:24681781

  1. Carbonate-silicate composition of diamond-forming media of fibrous diamonds from the Snap Lake area (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Pokhilenko, N. P.; Griffin, W. L.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents new data on the compositions of microinclusions in fibrous diamonds from the Snap Lake area in the eastern part of the Slave Craton (Canada). The compositional trends of diamond microinclusions are consistent with those of diamond-forming media ranging continuously between a highly carbonatitic endmember and a highly silicic endmember. The microinclusions exhibit general enrichment of most incompatible elements, which is probably indicative of their crystallization during partial melting of mantle peridotites and eclogites. Our results also suggest that the diamond analyzed in this study may have formed as a result of interaction between carbonate-silicate melts and peridotitic wall-rocks at the base of a thick lithospheric mantle at depths below 300 km. The trace element distributions in the studied diamond microinclusions show a general similarity to those previously found in the parental kimberlites and carbonatites. These data suggest that diamonds may have crystallized either directly from a kimberlitic/carbonatitic melt or from a proto-kimberlitic fluid/melt, which was derived from a source also common to kimberlites. This is supported by differences in the major element compositions of diamond-forming fluids/melts and kimberlites.

  2. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications: Tribological behaviors of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon-coated titanium alloy against medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzong

    An extensive and detailed investigation of tribological behaviors of vacuum arc carbon coated Ti6Al4V against medical grade ultra high molecular weight polyethylene were conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications. Further, the gas plasma sterilization and surface modification technique were evaluated as an alternative to the currently used gamma-radiation technique which has previously shown degradation effects on the mechanical properties of the UHMWPE. In addition, an emerging polymer surface modification technique using high-energy ion-implantation is explored to modify the surface of the UHMWPE for improved wear performance. The experiments were performed using a standard pin-on-disk wear tester under both dry and distilled water lubricated condition. The evolution of friction and wear processes are interpreted in the context of in situ recorded coefficient of friction and microscopic images of worn surfaces. Sliding wear tests demonstrated the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes which comprise physically different dominant mechanisms: an adhesive and abrasive mechanism activated early in the run-in stage, followed by fatigue processes which developed later microscopically in the (quasi) steady-state sliding stage. The effects of surface roughness, distilled water lubricant, coating structure, polymer sterilization and surface modification on the tribological behaviors are presented and discussed in light of these results. Explanations based on theories of sliding contact stress fields, temperature profiles, as well as lubrication and coating fracture mechanics are presented to discuss and support the experimental results. It is revealed that, largely depending on material structures and surface roughness of both articulating components, significantly improved friction and wear performance can be achieved by optimal design of their process

  3. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  4. Plasma immersion ion implantation for silicon processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankov, Rossen A.; Mändl, Stephan

    2001-04-01

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a technology which is currently widely investigated as an alternative to conventional beam line implantation for ultrashallow doping beyond the 0.15 m technology. However, there are several other application areas in modern semiconductor processing. In this paper a detailed discussion of the PIII process for semiconductors and of actual as well as future applications is given. Besides the well known advantages of PIII - fast process, implantation of the whole surface, low cost of ownership - several peculiarities - like spread of the implantation energy due to finite rise time or collisions, no mass separation, high secondary electron emission - must be mentioned. However, they can be overcome by adjusting the system and the process parameters. Considering the applications, ultrashallow junction formation by PIII is an established industrial process, whereas SIMOX and Smart-Cut by oxygen and hydrogen implantation are current topics between research and introduction into industry. Further applications of PIII, of which some already are research topics and some are only investigated by conventional ion implantation, include seeding for metal deposition, gettering of metal impurities, etch stop layers and helium implantation for localized lifetime control.

  5. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  6. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  7. Flame annealing of ion implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, J.; Young, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The authors investigated flame annealing of ion implantation damage (consisting of amorphous layers and dislocation loops) in (100) and (111) silicon substrates. The temperature of a hydrogen flame was varied from 1050 to 1200/sup 0/C and the interaction time from 5 to 10 seconds. Detailed TEM results showed that a defect-free annealing of amorphous layers by solid-phase-epitaxial growth could be achieved up to a certain concentration. However, dislocation loops in the region below the amorphous layer exhibited coarsening, i.e., the average loop size increased while the number density of loops decreased. Above a critical loop density, which was found to be a function of ion implantation variables and substrate temperature, formation of 90/sup 0/ dislocations (a cross-grid of dislocation in (100) and a triangular grid in (111) specimens) were observed. Electrical (Van der Pauw) measurements indicated nearly a complete electrical activation of dopants with mobility comparable to pulsed laser annealed specimens. The characteristics of p-n junction diodes showed a good diode perfection factor of 1.20-1.25 and low reverse bias currents.

  8. Low Energy Sputter Yields for Diamond, Carbon-Carbon Composite, and Molybdenum Subject to Xenon Ion Nombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, J.; Goodwin, D.; Garner, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter yields have been measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to bombardment with xenon. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150 - 750 eV and profilometry based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material.

  9. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  10. Can diamond nanowires grow inside carbon nano-tubes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David; Feng, Yanquan

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of templated growth of diamond nanowires from functionalized diamondoid molecules enclosed in a carbon nanotube (CNT). Our ab initio density functional theory studies identify suitable candidate molecules and conditions, under which such molecules may fuse to narrow diamond nanowires with C8H8 or C7H8 unit cells inside a CNT. We find that the unique environment inside a narrow carbon nanotube, which can be suitably represented by a cylindrical potential, subjects enclosed molecules to a high pressure, caused by ``capillary'' forces, and orients them in a suitable way favoring fusion and constraining the resulting structure. Based on total energy calculations, we find that fusion of C10H16 adamantane molecules requires additional energy, whereas fusion of C14H18(COOH)2 diamantane di-acid molecules in hydrogen atmosphere occurs as an exothermic reaction. Our canonical molecular dynamics calculations at elevated temperatures indicate likely intermediate products occurring during this reaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement #EEC-0832785, titled ``NSEC: Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing''.

  11. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  12. Carbon and nitrogen in Type 2 supernova diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Eleid, Mounib; Brown, Lawrence E.

    1993-01-01

    Abundant diamonds found in meteorites seem either to have condensed within supernova interiors during their expansions and coolings or to have been present around those explosions. Either alternative allows implantation of Xe-HL prior to interstellar mixing. A puzzling feature is the near normalcy of the carbon isotopes, considering that the only C-rich matter, the He-burning shell, is pure C-12 in that region. That last fact has caused many to associate supernova carbon with C-12 carbon, so that its SUNOCONS have been anticipated as very C-12-rich. We show that this expectation is misleading because the C-13-rich regions of Type 2's have been largely overlooked in this thinking. We here follow the idea that the diamonds nucleated in the C-12-rich He shell, the only C-rich site for nucleation, but then attached C-13-rich carbon during turbulent encounters with overlying C-13-rich matter. That is, the initial diamonds continued to grow during the same collisional encounters that cause the Xe-HL implantation. Instead of interacting with the small carbon mass having 13/12 = 0.2 in the upper He zone, however, we have calculated the remnants of the initial H-burning core, which left behind C-13-rich matter as it receded during core hydrogen burning. Howard et al. described why the velocity mixing would be essential to understanding the implantation of both the Xe-H and Xe-L components. Velocity mixing is now known to occur from the X-ray and gamma-ray light curves of supernova 1987A. Using the stellar evolution code developed at Goettingen, we calculated at Clemson the evolution of a grid of massive stars up to the beginning of core He burning. We paid attention to all H-burning reactions throughout the star, to the treatment of both convection and semiconvection, and to the recession of the outer boundary of the convective H-burning core as the star expands toward a larger redder state. This program was to generate a careful map of the CNO isotope distribution as He

  13. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  14. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, Rolf H.; Zhang, Shengtao

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  15. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Jagdish Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-10-01

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals.

  16. Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550.degree. C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture.

  17. Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

    1995-09-26

    A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

  18. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  19. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  20. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  1. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  2. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  3. Surface mechanical properties - effects of ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herbert

    1981-05-01

    Ion implantation has been used to modify the mechanical properties of a wide range of metals and alloys. The affected properties which have been studied include friction and wear, erosion and fatigue. Both BCC and FCC systems have been examined, with the major effort being directed at the former, due to the strong influence of interstitial implantants on mechanical properties of BCC and because of the industrial utility of these alloys. In seeking the microstructural origins of these sometimes dramatic effects, researchers have employed numerous surface analysis techniques, including backscattering and electron spectroscopy, TEM, SEM, X-ray and Mössbauer analysis and internal friction measurements. The interactions of surface dislocation structures with implantation-induced imperfections, surface alloying, and precipitation phenomena are discussed. A review is given of the current status of activities as represented by a number of research groups.

  4. Surface modification of sapphire by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    The range of microstructures and properties of sapphire (single crystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that are produced by ion implantation are discussed with respect to the implantation parameters of ion species, fluence, irradiation temperature and the orientation of the ion beam relative to crystallographic axes. The microstructure of implanted sapphire may be crystalline with varying concentrations of defects or it may be amorphous perhaps with short-range order. At moderate to high fluences, implanted metallic ions often coalesce into pure metallic colloids and gas ions form bubbles. Many of the implanted microstructural features have been identified from studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering-channeling. The chemical, mechanical, and physical properties reflect the microstructures.

  5. Versatile high current metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    A metal ion implantation facility has been developed with which high current beams of practically all the solid metals of the periodic table can be produced. A multi-cathode, broad beam, metal vapor vacuum arc ion source is used to produce repetitively pulsed metal ion beams at an extraction voltage of up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion-charge state multiplicity, and with a beam current of up to several amperes peak pulsed and several tens of mA time averaged delivered onto a downstream target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we summarize some of the features of the ion source and the implantation facility that has been built up around it. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  7. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions associated with diamonds in deeply subducted carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakov, Andrey V.; Hermann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Deeply subducted carbonate rocks from the Kokchetav massif (Northern Kazakhstan) recrystallised within the diamond stability field (P = 4.5-6.0 GPa; T ≈ 1000 °C) and preserve evidence for ultra high-pressure carbonate and silicate melts. The carbonate rocks consist of garnet and K-bearing clinopyroxene embedded in a dolomite or magnesian calcite matrix. Polycrystalline magnesian calcite and polyphase carbonate-silicate inclusions occurring in garnet and clinopyroxene show textural features of former melt inclusions. The trace element composition of such carbonate inclusions is enriched in Ba and light rare earth elements and depleted in heavy rare earth elements with respect to the matrix carbonates providing further evidence that the inclusions represent trapped carbonate melt. Polyphase inclusions in garnet and clinopyroxene within a magnesian calcite marble, consisting mainly of a tight intergrowth of biotite + K-feldspar and biotite + zoisite + titanite, are interpreted to represent two different types of K-rich silicate melts. Both melt types show high contents of large ion lithophile elements but contrasting contents of rare earth elements. The Ca-rich inclusions display high REE contents similar to the carbonate inclusions and show a general trace element characteristic compatible with a hydrous granitic origin. Low SiO2 content in the silicate melts indicates that they represent residual melts after extensive interaction with carbonates. These observations suggest that hydrous granitic melts derived from the adjacent metapelites reacted with dolomite at ultra high-pressure conditions to form garnet, clinopyroxene - a hydrous carbonate melt - and residual silicate melts. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions contain diamond, providing evidence that such an interaction promotes diamond growth. The finding of carbonate melts in deeply subducted crust might have important consequences for recycling of trace elements and especially C from the slab to the

  8. Carbon K edge spectroscopy of internal interface and defect states of chemical vapor deposited diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandam, J.; Rife, J.C. ); Windischmann, H. )

    1992-01-06

    We have made carbon {ital K} edge reflectivity and absorption measurements using synchrotron radiation on diamond crystals and chemical vapor deposited diamond films to determine their electronic structures. Our spectra of diamond films show that both {ital sp}{sup 2} and {ital sp}{sup 3} bonded carbon atoms are formed during initial nucleation and growth. Transmission spectra of a diamond film with 30 nm diameter cystallites show striking features below the carbon {ital sp}{sup 3} {ital K} edge due to internal interface states and/or defects. We compare these absorption features to x-ray absorption spectra of clean diamond (111) surface, graphite, and hydrocarbon gases to understand surface chemistry involved in the deposition process.

  9. Sulfide inclusion chemistry and carbon isotopes of African diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter; Harris, J. W.

    1995-08-01

    Significant differences in the composition of sulfide mineral inclusions among diamond suites from Koffiefontein, Orapa, Premier, Roberts Victor, Jagersfontein, Sierra Leone, Star, and Mwadui have been found. The mode of the Ni content of the monosulfide (mss) inclusions lies between 8 and 10 wt%, i.e., between the means for mss from Siberian diamonds with inclusion of the eclogitic (3 wt% Ni) and peridotitic (23 wt% Ni) paragenesis. Considering the Ni/Fe ratios of the diamond mss inclusions and mantle olivines, together with experimental and naturally observed Ni/Fe distribution coefficients, we conclude that less than 20% of the mss inclusions of the African diamonds (mostly from Koffiefontein) could have been in chemical equilibrium with mantle olivine. This observation is in sharp contrast with the reported relative abundance of silicate inclusions in Koffiefontein diamonds (93% peridotitic, 7% eclogitic) and lends support to the proposal that a separate sulfide diamond paragenesis should be recognized. The δ 13C distributions of sulfide containing diamonds differs among kimberlites, however, for each kimberlite sulfide and silicate inclusion containing diamonds cover the same δ 13C range. Sulfides with high Ni concentrations can occur in diamonds of low as well as high 13C content. The current observations, in conjunction with other chemical properties of diamonds suggest that fluid reactions rather than silica melt equilibria may be important in diamond formation. A dominance of fluid processes would have significant implications for the interpretation of the chemical and geochronological record of diamond inclusions.

  10. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  11. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system. PMID:26478422

  12. Laser Patterning of Diamond. Part II. Surface Nondiamond Carbon Formation and its Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, J.; Jaye, C; Bohon, J; Rao, T; Fischer, D

    2009-01-01

    As diamond becomes more prevalent for electronic and research applications, methods of patterning diamond will be required. One such method, laser ablation, has been investigated in a related work. We report on the formation of surface nondiamond carbon during laser ablation of both polycrystalline and single-crystal synthetic diamonds. Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to confirm that the nondiamond carbon layer formed during the ablation was amorphous, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to estimate the thickness of this layer to be {approx} 60 nm. Ozone cleaning was used to remove the nondiamond carbon layer.

  13. Proceedings of the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference (ADC/FCT 2003). Supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakawa, M. (Editor); Miyoshi, K. (Editor); Koga, Y. (Editor); Schaefer, L. (Editor); Tzeng, Y. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains 2 reports which were presented at the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference. The topics discuss the formation of C-N nanofibers as well as the characterization of diamond thin films.

  14. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  15. Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, Burrell E.; Myers, David R.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

  16. Ion implantation of solar cell junctions without mass analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D.; Tonn, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a summary of an investigation to determine the feasibility of producing solar cells by means of ion implantation without the use of mass analysis. Ion implants were performed using molecular and atomic phosphorus produced by the vaporization of solid red phosphorus and ionized in an electron bombardment source. Solar cell junctions were ion implanted by mass analysis of individual molecular species and by direct unanalyzed implants from the ion source. The implant dose ranged from 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm and the energy per implanted atom ranged from 5 KeV to 40 KeV in this study.

  17. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  18. Annealing of ion implanted gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.H.; Williams, J.S.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Zolper, J.C.; Stall, R.A.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper, we examine Si and Te ion implant damage removal in GaN as a function of implantation dose, and implantation and annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that amorphous layers, which can result from high-dose implantation, recrystallize between 800 and 1100{degree}C to very defective polycrystalline material. Lower-dose implants (down to 5{times}10{sup 13}cm{sup {minus}2}), which are not amorphous but defective after implantation, also anneal poorly up to 1100{degree}C, leaving a coarse network of extended defects. Despite such disorder, a high fraction of Te is found to be substitutional in GaN both following implantation and after annealing. Furthermore, although elevated-temperature implants result in less disorder after implantation, this damage is also impossible to anneal out completely by 1100{degree}C. The implications of this study are that considerably higher annealing temperatures will be needed to remove damage for optimum electrical properties. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry.

  20. All-ion-implantation process for integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    Simpler than diffusion fabrication, ion bombardment produces complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor / silicon-on-sapphire (CMOS/SOS) circuits that are one-third faster. Ion implantation simplifies the integrated circuit fabrication procedure and produces circuits with uniform characteristics.

  1. Dynamic effects in the production of diamond from solid-solution carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V.V.; Didyk, R.P.; Merezhko, Y.I.; Skidanenko, A.I.; Slobodskoi, V.Y.

    1984-03-01

    The authors examine the scope for diamond to grow at atmospheric pressure in iron alloys. For the purpose of this investigation, diamond nuclei were produced in a cast-iron specimen by a dynamic pressure of 80-90GPa. The mass proportion of diamond polycrystals of maximum size 40-50 ..mu..m did not exceed 1%. The largest diamond content occurred in the fraction 0.1-5 ..mu..m and constituted about 80%. The studies show that: the presence of diamond inclusions in a metal matrix substantially influences the structural transformations during isothermal heating and slow cooling; the solid-solution carbon, the carbon compounds, and the graphite inclusions can serve as sources of carbon in the growth of diamond crystals in the metastable region; and dynamic pressures generate numerous defects in cast-iron specimens, which are sources of vacancies, which facilitate the diffusion of the carbon to the growing diamond crystals and the removal of iron from them.

  2. Photochemical functionalization of diamond films using a short carbon chain acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Huang, Nan; Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Diamond is recognized as a promising semiconductor material for biological applications, because of its high chemical stability and biocompatibility. Here, we report an acid with only three carbon chain, acrylic acid (AA), for the functionalization of H-terminated diamond film via photochemical method. The successfully modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle analyzer. Our functionalization approach was proven to be simple and facile, which shows a new potential opportunity for the photochemical modification of diamond surface with short carbon chain acid.

  3. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Asokan, K.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was investigated. g-C3N4 was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C3N4 pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C3N4 and Si ions in the g-C3N4 network.

  4. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  5. Formation of graphite and diamond in carbonate-rich magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, I.; Kogarko, L.; Turkov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Compositions of co-existing minerals from graphite bearing carbonatites were obtained by the EPMA analysis for beforsites from Chernigovsky complex (Ukraine), Pogranichnoe dolomite-rich carbonatites (Doroshkevich, Wall, and Ripp, 2007 Magmatic graphite in dolomite carbonatite at Pogranichnoe, North Transbaikalia, Russia. CMP 153, 339-353), Chagaday carbonatites, Uzbekistan, Khibina alkaline igneous complex, which includes carbonatites and graphite-bearing rocks (Kola Peninsula), and carbonatites of Gremyakha-Vyrmes magmatic complex (Kola Peninsula). In all cases graphite-bearing rocks contain magnetite. Sometimes late magnetite and graphite form intimate intergrowths. Thermodynamic analysis of equilibria between magnetite, silicate minerals, carbonates and graphite permitted to estimate temperatures and oxygen fugacities prevailing during the formation of the investigated rocks. Chagaday graphite-bearing carbonatites, in which several grains of diamond were also reported, contain calcite, apatite, magnetite, clinopyroxene, albite and K-feldspar. Temperatures of equilibrium for mineral clinopyroxene+calcite+ titanomagnetite+titanite+graphite + albite + nepheline depending on titanomagnetite compositions were calculated using equilibrium constants of the following reaction: 4 CaFeSi2O6+3CaCO3+7 Fe2TiO4+0.5NaAlSiO4=7 CaTiSiO5+6 Fe3O4+3C+0.5NaAlSi3O8 These calculations demonstrated that for a given magnetite composition decrease in temperature causes formation of graphite together with magnetite. Therefore, appearance of graphite in carbonatites may be caused by cooling, and graphite may crystallize from melt, it may form by solid-state reactions, or precipitate from cooling aqueous fluid. fO2 values were estimated from the equilibrium constant of the reaction 6CaFeSi2O6+6CaCO3+12Fe2TiO4=12CaTiSiO5+10Fe3O4+6C+O2 Calculated fO2 values are 0.5 to 1 log units below QMF buffer. Similar values of oxygen fugacities were estimated for other investigated graphite

  6. Formation of diamond in carbon onions under MeV ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, P.; Lyutovich, Y.; Banhart, F.; Carstanjen, H. D.; Kronmüller, H.

    1997-10-01

    Spherical carbon onions are generated by irradiating graphitic carbon soot with Ne+ ions of 3 MeV energy. Under continued irradiation, a transformation of their cores to cubic diamond crystals is observed. In comparison to earlier electron irradiation experiments, the yield of diamond is much higher. The output of the irradiation experiment is characterized by electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Knock-on displacements of carbon atoms by Ne+ ions are assumed to be responsible for a self-compression of the onions, leading to the nucleation of diamond in their cores. The increased diamond yield is explained by the higher displacement cross-section, the higher energy transfer, and the higher total beam current on the specimen.

  7. Formation of diamond in carbon onions under MeV ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, P.; Lyutovich, Y.; Banhart, F.; Carstanjen, H.D.; Kronmueller, H.

    1997-10-01

    Spherical carbon onions are generated by irradiating graphitic carbon soot with Ne{sup +} ions of 3 MeV energy. Under continued irradiation, a transformation of their cores to cubic diamond crystals is observed. In comparison to earlier electron irradiation experiments, the yield of diamond is much higher. The output of the irradiation experiment is characterized by electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Knock-on displacements of carbon atoms by Ne{sup +} ions are assumed to be responsible for a self-compression of the onions, leading to the nucleation of diamond in their cores. The increased diamond yield is explained by the higher displacement cross-section, the higher energy transfer, and the higher total beam current on the specimen. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  9. Fluctuation microscopy studies of medium-range ordering in amorphous diamond-like carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Sullivan, J. P.; Friedmann, T. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Cedarville Univ.; SNL

    2004-04-12

    In this letter, we report fluctuation microscopy studies of medium-range ordering in amorphous diamond-like carbon films and the effect of annealing on this ordering. Annealed and unannealed diamond-like carbon films have almost identical short-range order. Our fluctuation microscopy results, however, indicate the presence of medium range order or clustering in the films on a lateral length scale that exceeds 1 nm. Within the clustered regions, the dominant local ordering appears to be diamond-like, and graphite-like ordering is not observed. Thermal annealing up to 600 {sup o}C leads to an increase in diamond-like clustering with no onset of graphite-like clustering. However, after high temperature annealing up to 1000 {sup o}C, graphite-like clustering becomes apparent as a result of the conversion of diamond-like carbon to graphite-like carbon. The results on the as-deposited films and films annealed up to 600 {sup o}C suggest that a spontaneous medium range ordering process occurs in diamond-like carbon films during and subsequent to film growth, and this may play an important role in stress relaxation.

  10. Bioactivity of Mg-ion-implanted zirconia and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Wan, Y. Z.; He, F.; Huang, Y.; Xu, J. D.; Li, J. M.; Wang, Y. L.; Zhao, Z. G.

    2007-01-01

    Titanium and zirconia are bioinert materials lacking bioactivity. In this work, surface modification of the two typical biomaterials is conducted by Mg-ion-implantation using a MEVVA ion source in an attempt to increase their bioactivity. Mg ions were implanted into zirconia and titanium with fluences ranging from 1 × 10 17 to 3 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at 40 keV. The Mg-implanted samples, as well as control (unimplanted) samples, were immersed in SBF for 7 days and then removed to identify the presence of calcium and phosphate (Ca-P) coatings and to characterize their morphology and structure by SEM, XRD, and FT-IR. SEM observations confirm that globular aggregates are formed on the surfaces of the Mg-implanted zirconia and titanium while no precipitates are observed on the control samples. XRD and FT-IR analyses reveal that the deposits are carbonated hydroxyapatite (HAp). Our experimental results demonstrate that Mg-implantation improves the bioactivity of zirconia and titanium. Further, it is found that the degree of bioactivity is adjustable by the ion dose. Mechanisms are proposed to interpret the improvement of bioactivity as a result of Mg implantation and the difference in bioactivity between zirconia and titanium.

  11. Hydrophilic property by contact angle change of ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chan Young; Kil, Jae Keun

    2008-02-15

    In this study, ion implantation was performed onto a polymer, polycarbonate (PC), in order to investigate surface hydrophilic property through contact angle measurement. PC was irradiated with N, Ar, and Xe ions at the irradiation energy of 20-50 keV and the dose range of 5x10{sup 15}, 1x10{sup 16}, 7x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The contact angle of water was estimated by means of the sessile drop method and was reduced with increasing fluence and ion mass but increased with increasing implanted energy. The changes of chemical and structural properties are discussed in view of Furier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which shows increasing C-O bonding and C-C bonding. The surface roughness examined by atomic force microscopy measurement changed smoothly from 3.59 to 2.22 A as the fluence increased. It is concluded that the change in wettability may be caused by surface carbonization and oxidation as well as surface roughness.

  12. Deposition And Characterization Of Ultra Thin Diamond Like Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomcik, B.

    2010-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated and/or nitrogenated carbon films, a-C:H/a-C:N, in overall thickness up to 2 nm are materials of choice as a mechanical and corrosion protection layer of the magnetic media in modern hard disk drive disks. In order to obtain high density and void-free films the sputtering technology has been replaced by different plasma and ion beam deposition techniques. Hydrocarbon gas precursors, like C2H2 or CH4 with H2 and N2 as reactive gases are commonly used in Kaufman DC ion and RF plasma beam sources. Optimum incident energy of carbon ions, C+, is up to 100 eV while the typical ion current densities during the film formation are in the mA/cm2 range. Other carbon deposition techniques, like filtered cathodic arc, still suffer from co-deposition of fine nanosized carbon clusters (nano dust) and their improvements are moving toward arc excitation in the kHz and MHz frequency range. Non-destructive film analysis like μ-Raman optical spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR and optical surface analysis are mainly used in the carbon film characterization. Due to extreme low film thicknesses the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pre-deposited layer of Au can reduce the signal collection time and minimize photon-induced damage during the spectra acquisition. Standard approach in the μ-Raman film evaluation is the measurement of the position (shift) and area of D and G-peaks under the deconvoluted overall carbon spectrum. Also, a slope of the carbon spectrum in the 1000-2000 cm-1 wavenumber range is used as a measure of the hydrogen intake within a film. Diamond like carbon (DLC) film should possess elasticity and self-healing properties during the occasional crash of the read-write head flying only couple of nanometers above the spinning film. Film corrosion protection capabilities are mostly evaluated by electrochemical tests, potentio-dynamic and linear polarization method and by business environmental method. Corrosion mechanism

  13. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  14. Biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings: a review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ritwik Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2007-10-01

    Owing to its superior tribological and mechanical properties with corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and hemocompatibility, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has emerged as a promising material for biomedical applications. DLC films with various atomic bond structures and compositions are finding places in orthopedic, cardiovascular, and dental applications. Cells grew on to DLC coating without any cytotoxity and inflammation. DLC coatings in orthopedic applications reduced wear, corrosion, and debris formation. DLC coating also reduced thrombogenicity by minimizing the platelet adhesion and activation. However, some contradictory results (Airoldi et al., Am J Cardiol 2004;93:474-477, Taeger et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2003;34:1094-1100) were also reported that no significant improvement was observed in the performance of DLC-coated stainless stent or DLC-coated femoral head. This controversy should be discussed based on the detailed information of the coating such as atomic bond structure, composition, and/or electronic structure. In addition, instability of the DLC coating caused by its high level of residual stress and poor adhesion in aqueous environment should be carefully considered. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are thus required to confirm its use for medical devices. PMID:17285609

  15. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pujada, B. R.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Arnoldbik, W. M.; Sloof, W. G.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.

    2009-02-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whereas composition and energy distribution functions of positive ions were obtained by electron probe microanalyzer, elastic recoil detection analysis, and mass-energy analyzer (MEA). It has been observed that the compressive stress decreases with increasing acetylene partial pressure, showing an abrupt change from -5.0 to -1.6 GPa at an acetylene partial pressure of 0.012 Pa. TEM micrographs show that by increasing the acetylene partial pressure in the plasma from 0 to 0.012 Pa, the microstructure of the coating changes from polycrystalline to amorphous. MEA results show that the most probable energy of positive ions bombarding the substrate during deposition in pure argon and argon/acetylene atmosphere is the same. Based on the results, it is concluded that the huge variation in the compressive stress at low acetylene partial pressures is due to a change in the microstructure of the coating from polycrystalline to amorphous and not to the energy of positive ions bombarding the film.

  16. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting “solid” carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder “solid” carbon nanofibers → well crystallined carbon nanofibers → bent graphitic sheets → onion-liked rings → diamond single crystal → the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale. PMID:26351089

  17. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting “solid” carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder “solid” carbon nanofibers → well crystallined carbon nanofibers → bent graphitic sheets → onion-liked rings → diamond single crystal → the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale.

  18. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting "solid" carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder "solid" carbon nanofibers→well crystallined carbon nanofibers→bent graphitic sheets→onion-liked rings→diamond single crystal→the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale. PMID:26351089

  19. Carbon nanotunnels form from single-walled carbon nanotubes interacting with a diamond (100)-(2 X 1) surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, D. A.; Sternberg, M.; Zapol, P.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2011-08-01

    A quantum chemical study of the interaction of (5,5), (7,7), (9,9) and (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes with a clean (100)-(2 x 1) diamond surface is reported. Stable structures with covalent bonds at the interface were found for carbon nanotubes oriented parallel or perpendicular to the dimer rows on the reconstructed (100) surface. The binding energy of the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure is 1.7 eV/{angstrom}, and is attributed to strong covalent bonds formed between the carbon nanotube and the diamond surface. The structure of the nanotube is distorted by adsorption on the surface such that it adopts a tunnel-like geometry. Two other nanotunnel geometries were found for the (5,5) nanotube, with binding energies of 1.39 and 1.09 eV/{angstrom}. In the most stable (5,5) nanotube-diamond structure the interaction between the nanotube and the diamond surface produces a 0.6 eV band gap near the Fermi level, but the metallic character of the nanotube is maintained in the two other, less strongly bound nanotunnel structures. No charge transfer occurs between the diamond surface and the nanotunnels in any of the three orientations. Binding energies decrease with increases in tube diameter, to the extent that one of the three nanotunnel structures is not formed by (9,9) carbon nanotubes.

  20. Carbon atom, dimer and trimer chemistry on diamond surfaces from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies of various atmospheres appearing in diamond film synthesis suggest evidence for carbon atoms, dimers, or trimers. Molecular dynamics simulations with the Brenner hydrocarbon potential are being used to investigate the elementary reactions of these species on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) surface. In principle these types of simulations can be extended to simulations of growth morphologies, in the 1-2 monolayer regime presently.

  1. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe+ ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, B.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe+ ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe+ at a fluence of 2  ×  1017 cm-2, followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe+ ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon.

  2. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe⁺ ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Alves, E; Colaço, R

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe(+) ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe(+) at a fluence of 2  ×  10(17) cm(-2), followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe(+) ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon. PMID:26931630

  3. [Use of meshendoprostheses with diamond-like carbon coating in abdominal hernias surgery].

    PubMed

    Kulikovskiĭ, V F; Soloshenko, A V; Iarosh, A L; Dolzhikov, A A; Kolpakov, A Ia; Karpachev, A A; Bitenskaia, E P; Molchanova, A S

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the results of implantation of meshendoprostheses with and without carbon coating for surgical treatment of abdominal hernias in experiment and clinical practice. It was shown that diamond-like carbon coating minimizes primary tissue reaction against foreign material and provides complete implant's biological integration into subcutaneous connective tissue as are active encapsulation with connective tissue. Suggested meshendoprostheses with diamond-like carbon coating decrease local inflammatory reaction in operated area and thereby reduce number of exudative complications in early postoperative period. PMID:26031953

  4. Durable diamond-like carbon templates for UV nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Ramachandran, S; Nelson, C T; Lin, M; Overzet, L J; Goeckner, M; Lee, G; Willson, C G; Wu, W; Hu, W

    2008-03-12

    The interaction between resist and template during the separation process after nanoimprint lithography (NIL) can cause the formation of defects and damage to the templates and resist patterns. To alleviate these problems, fluorinated self-assembled monolayers (F-SAMs, i.e. tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,tetrahydrooctyl trichlorosilane or FDTS) have been employed as template release coatings. However, we find that the FDTS coating undergoes irreversible degradation after only 10 cycles of UV nanoimprint processes with SU-8 resist. The degradation includes a 28% reduction in surface F atoms and significant increases in the surface roughness. In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were investigated as an alternative material not only for coating but also for direct fabrication of nanoimprint templates. DLC films deposited on quartz templates in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system are shown to have better chemical and physical stability than FDTS. After the same 10 cycles of UV nanoimprints, the surface composition as well as the roughness of DLC films were found to be unchanged. The adhesion energy between the DLC surface and SU-8 is found to be smaller than that of FDTS despite the slightly higher total surface energy of DLC. DLC templates with 40 nm features were fabricated using e-beam lithography followed by Cr lift-off and reactive ion etching. UV nanoimprinting using the directly patterned DLC templates in SU-8 resist demonstrates good pattern transfer fidelity and easy template-resist separation. These results indicate that DLC is a promising material for fabricating durable templates for UV nanoimprint lithography. PMID:21817695

  5. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  6. A novel method for effective sodium ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Qiuyuan; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-15

    Although sodium ion implantation is useful to the surface modification of biomaterials and nano-electronic materials, it is a challenging to conduct effective sodium implantation by traditional implantation methods due to its high chemical reactivity. In this paper, we present a novel method by coupling a Na dispenser with plasma immersion ion implantation and radio frequency discharge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling reveals that sodium is effectively implanted into a silicon wafer using this apparatus. The Na 1s XPS spectra disclose Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} bonds and the implantation effects are confirmed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Our setup provides a feasible way to conduct sodium ion implantation effectively.

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Guidi, Vincenzo Mazzolari, Andrea; Paternò, Gianfranco; Lanzoni, Luca

    2015-08-10

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams.

  9. High density amorphous carbon films and the preparation of diamond membranes for X-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Jerome J.; Doyle, J. P.; Pappas, David L.; Saenger, Katherine L.; Guarnieri, C. R.; Whitehair, S. J.

    Trends in recently reported data on high sp exp 3 fraction (up to 85 percent), nonhydrogenated amorphous diamond-like carbon films deposited by ion beam sputtering and laser vaporization are examined. The degree of diamond-like film character is found to depend upon the deposition technique as well as the substrate temperature and thermal diffusivity. The combination of incident particle kinetic energy and surface accommodation determine the physical properties of the film. A model is proposed for the condensation of energetic carbon atoms into diamond-like films in which a quench-type surface accommodation mechanism is operative. Diamond membranes are being developed for X-ray lithographic masks; these 1-3 micron thick membranes are deposited onto Si substrates using microwave-driven plasmas. To obtain smooth films with uniform tensile stress, spray and electrophoretic deposition of 0.1 micron diamond seeds were used to control the initial nucleation and growth of the diamond films. The films have a biaxial modulus of 800 GPa. X-ray lithography masks have been made and used to print patterns with X-rays from a synchrotron source.

  10. Diamond and diamondlike carbon as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited fine-grain diamond, polished coarse-grain diamond, and as-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in humid air at a relative humidity of approximately 40 percent and in dry nitrogen is reviewed. Two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes are used to deposit diamond films on silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates: microwave-plasma and hot-filament. Ion beams are used to deposit DLC films of Si3N4 substrates. The diamond and DLC films in sliding contact with hemispherical bare Si3N4 pins have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.2) and low wear rates (less than 10(exp -7) mm(exp 2)/N-m), and thus, can be used effectively as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for Si3N4 in the aforementioned two environments.

  11. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Phillips, K.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of interest for use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhension of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements and nanoindentation.

  12. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and interest for hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings which are relevant to its use as a protective coating. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhesion of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements, and nanoindentation.

  13. The structure and tribological properties of gradient layers prepared by plasma-based ion implantation on 2024 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J. X.; Xia, L. F.; Sun, M. R.; Liu, W. M.; Xu, T.; Xue, Q. J.

    2004-02-01

    Using plasma-based ion implantation, two types of gradient layers have been prepared on 2024 Al alloy. One is prepared by N-implantation then C-deposition, the other adds an interlayer composed of a Ti layer and a Ti-N layer between N-implantation and C-deposition. C-deposition is carried out at various implanting voltages or C2H2/H2 ratios. The composition depth profiles of these layers were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The structure, morphologies and microstructure of the C layers were studied using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The surface hardness was measured with a Knoop tester and a mechanical property microprobe. The dry ball-on-disc wear tests were performed in ambient air. The gradient layer without interlayer is composed of an N-implanted layer rich in AlN and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) layer (film), and the two layers are connected with a C-Al transition layer containing Al4C3. The Ti layer rich in agr -Ti and the N-implanted layer are connected by a Ti-Al transition layer containing TiAl3, while the Ti-N layer rich in TiN and the DLC film are connected by a C-Ti transition layer containing TiC, TiCN, etc. Thus, the gradient layer with interlayers has optimized the gradient structure. DLC films are compact and amorphous, contain high sp3/sp2 ratios and depend on the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio. Similarly, these gradient layers exhibit significant improvement in morphologies, surface hardness and tribological properties; the interlayer, the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio all have prominent effects on these properties.

  14. Micron-scale coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance variations in diamonds: Evidence for episodic diamond formation beneath the Siberian Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Bulanova, G. P.; De Corte, K.; Pearson, D. G.; Craven, J. A.; Davies, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    The internal structure and growth history of six macro-diamonds from kimberlite pipes in Yakutia (Russia) were investigated with cathodoluminescence imaging and coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance analyses along detailed core to rim traverses. The diamonds are characterised by octahedral zonation with layer-by-layer growth. High spatial resolution SIMS profiles establish that there is no exchange of the carbon isotope composition across growth boundaries at the μm scale and that isotopic variations observed between (sub)zones within the diamonds are primary. The macro-diamonds have δ13C values that vary within 2‰ of -5.3‰ and their nitrogen contents range between 0-1334 at. ppm. There are markedly different nitrogen aggregation states between major growth zones within individual diamonds that demonstrate Yakutian diamonds grew in multiple growth events. Growth intervals were punctuated by stages of dissolution now associated with <10 μm wide zones of nitrogen absent type II diamond. Across these resorption interfaces carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen contents record shifts between 0.5-2.3‰ and up to 407 at. ppm, respectively. Co-variation in δ13C value-nitrogen content suggests that parts of individual diamonds precipitated in a Rayleigh process from either oxidised or reduced fluids/melts, with two single diamonds showing evidence of both fluid types. Modelling the co-variation establishes that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond relative to its growth medium and that the nitrogen partition coefficient is different between oxidised (3-4.1) and reduced (3) sources. The reduced sources have δ13C values between -7.3‰ and -4.6‰, while the oxidised sources have higher δ13C values between -5.8‰ and -1.8‰ (if grown from carbonatitic media) or between -3.8‰ and +0.2‰ (if grown from CO2-rich media). It is therefore concluded that individual Yakutian diamonds originate from distinct fluids/melts of variable compositions. The

  15. Applications of ion implantation for high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation is utilized for the dopant introduction processes necessary to fabricate a silicon solar cell. Implantation provides a versatile powerful tool for development of high efficiency cells. Advantages and problems of implantation and the present status of developmental use of the technique for solar cells are discussed.

  16. Software for goniometer control in the Triple Ion Implantation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    A computer program is described tat controls the goniometer employed in the ion scattering chamber of the Triple Ion Implantation Facility (TIF) in the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Details of goniometer operation and its incorporation into the ion scattering setup specific to the TIF are also discussed.

  17. Cathodoluminescence characterization of ion implanted GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, M. L.

    1980-03-01

    The unique properties of GaAs make it possible to construct integrated circuit devices that are impossible in Si. The Air Force Avionics Laboratory/AADR has been developing this technology for a number of years. The difficulty of introducing dopants by diffusion has lead ion implantation to play an increasing role in the fabrication process. The present production technique for high performance devices is to fabricate large quantities and select those few that meet the desired specifications. Having a nondestructive technique that can be used to characterize the implantation process during fabrication of the device so as to reject faulty device structures can save valuable time as well as money. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence is a process that can be used for this purpose. This research develops and verifies a model of cathodoluminescence in ion implanted GaAs. This model can now be used as a tool for further study of ion implanted GaAs. This is the first step in developing cathodoluminescence as a tool for deducing the shape of the ion implanted depth profile in semiconductor materials.

  18. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; de Maeztu, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-01

    Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40-80 keV), fluence (1-2 e17 ion/cm2) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted surfaces, without surface chemistry modification, are in the same range and that such modifications, in certain conditions, do have a statistically significant effect on bone tissue forming cell adhesion.

  19. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  20. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  1. Silicon solar cells by ion implantation and pulsed energy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.; Shaughnessy, T. S.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    A new method for fabrication of silicon solar cells is being developed around ion implantation in conjunction with pulsed electron beam techniques to replace conventional furnace processing. Solar cells can be fabricated totally in a vacuum environment at room temperature. Cells with 10% AM0 efficiency have been demonstrated. High efficiency cells and effective automated processing capabilities are anticipated.

  2. Making CoSi(2) Layers By Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namavar, Fereydoon

    1994-01-01

    Monolithic photovoltaic batteries containing vertical cells include buried CoSi(2) contact layers. Vertical-junction photovoltaic cells in series fabricated in monolithic structure. N- and p-doped silicon layers deposited epitaxially. The CoSi(2) layers, formed by ion implantation and annealing, serve as thin, low-resistance ohmic contacts between cells.

  3. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  4. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Diamond Films and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films vary with the environment, possessing a Jekyll-and-Hyde character. CVD diamond has low coefficient of friction and high wear resistance in air but high coefficient of friction and low wear resistance in vacuum. Improving the tribological functionality of materials (such as achieving low friction and good wear resistance) was an aim of this investigation. Three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of CVD diamond have shown that its friction and wear are significantly reduced in ultrahigh vacuum. The main criteria for judging whether diamond films are an effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating material were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which must be less than 0.1 and on the order of 10(exp 6) cu mm/N(dot)m, respectively. In the first study the presence of a thin film (less than 1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon (hydrogenated carbon, also called diamondlike carbon or DLC) on CVD diamond greatly decreased the coefficient of friction and the wear rate. Therefore, a thin DLC film on CVD diamond can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating in ultrahigh vacuum. In the second study the presence of an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by ion implantation significantly reduced the coefficient of friction and the wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. Therefore, such surface layers are acceptable for effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant applications of CVD diamond. In the third study CVD diamond in contact with cubic boron nitride exhibited low coefficient of friction in ultra high vacuum. Therefore, this materials combination can provide an effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant couple in ultrahigh vacuum.

  5. Synthesis of Diamond Nanoplatelets/Carbon Nanowalls on Graphite Substrate by MPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lyu, Jilei; Lin, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Jinfeng; Man, Weidong; Jiang, Nan

    2015-07-01

    The films composed of carbon nanowalls and diamond nanoplatelets, respectively, can be simultaneously formed on graphite substrate by controlling the hydrogen etching rate during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. To modulate the etching rate, two kinds of substrate design were used: a bare graphite plate and a graphite groove covered with a single crystal diamond sheet. After deposition at 1200°C for 3 hours, we find that dense diamond nanoplatelets were grown on the bare graphite, whereas carbon nanowalls were formed on the grooved surface, indicating that not only reaction temperature but also etching behavior is a key factor for nanostructure formation. supported by the Public Welfare Technology Application Projects of Zhejiang Province, China (No. 2013C33G3220012)

  6. Stability of the graphite and diamond phases of finite carbon cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F; Winter, N W

    1998-08-28

    The stability of particulate carbon formed in the detonation of high explosives has been investigated with first principles and semiempirical molecular orbital calculations carried out on carbon clusters. The dangling surface bonds were capped wit/r hydrogen atoms and the surface contributions to the cohesive energy were removed by extrapolation as a function of the cluster size. Comparison of the calculated heat of formation of graphite and diamond particles as a function of size predicts that the graphite phase becomes more stable for IO4 -10 carbon atoms. Calculations were also carried out on geometry optimized carbon clusters without capping atoms, resulting in reconstructed cluster surfaces that may be a more realislic model for particulate carbon formed under the extreme conditions of detonation. The calculated energy barrier for tbe conversion of a graphitic cluster to the cubic diamond structure was in good agreement with calculations on b

  7. Diamond crystallization in a CO2-rich alkaline carbonate melt with a nitrogen additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Nechaev, Denis V.

    2016-09-01

    Diamond crystallization was experimentally studied in a CO2-bearing alkaline carbonate melt with an increased content of nitrogen at pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperature of 1500 °C. The growth rate, morphology, internal structure of overgrown layers, and defect-impurity composition of newly formed diamond were investigated. The type of growth patterns on faces, internal structure, and nitrogen content were found to be controlled by both the crystallographic orientation of the growth surfaces and the structure of the original faces of diamond seed crystals. An overgrown layer has a uniform structure on the {100} plane faces of synthetic diamond and a fibrillar (fibrous) structure on the faceted surfaces of a natural diamond cube. The {111} faces have a polycentric vicinal relief with numerous twin intergrowths and micro twin lamellae. The stable form of diamond growth under experimental conditions is a curved-face hexoctahedron with small cube faces. The nitrogen impurity concentration in overgrown layers varies depending on the growth direction and surface type, from 100 to 1100 ppm.

  8. Optical image storage in ion implanted PLZT ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.; Land, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Optical images can be stored in transparent lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) ceramics by exposure to near-uv light with photon energies greater than the band gas energy of approx. 3.35 eV. The image storage process relies on optically induced changes in the switching properties of ferroelectric domains (photoferroelectric effect). Stored images are nonvolatile but can be erased by uniform uv illumination and simultaneous application of an electric field. Although high quality images, with contrast variations of greater than or equal to 100:1 and spatial resolution of approx. 10 ..mu..m, can be stored using the photoferroelectric effect, relatively high exposure energies (approx. 100 mJ/cm/sup 2/) are required to store these images. This large exposure energy severely limits the range of possible applications of nonvolatile image storage in PLZT ceramics. It was found in H, He, and Ar implanted PLZT that the photosensitivity can be significantly increased by ion implantation into the surface to be exposed. The photosensitivity after implantation with 5 x 10/sup 14/ 500 keV Ar/cm/sup 2/ is increased by about three orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. The image storage process and the effect of ion implantation is presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and ion implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage with light intensity for ion implanted PLZT.

  9. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  10. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.