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Sample records for carbon isotopic composition

  1. Carbon isotopic composition of Amazon shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Showers, W.J.; Angle, D.G.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of carbon isotopes in Amazon shelf sediment is controlled by the same processes that are forming the modern subaqueous delta. The terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) isotopic carbon signal observed in surficial sediments near the river mouth extends over 400 km northwest along the shelf. Terrestrial carbon is associated with areas of rapid sediment accumulation (topset and foreset regions). A sharp boundary between terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) and marine (-23 to -22 per thousand) isotopic carbon values in surficial sediments is associated with a change in depositional conditions (foreset to bottomset regions) and a decrease in sediment accumulation rate. POC water-column isotopic values (-27 per thousand) near the river mouth are similar to the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values, but POC water-column samples collected 20 km off the river mouth have marine carbon isotopic values (-22 to -19 per thousand) and differ from the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values. These water column observations are related to variations in turbidity and productivity. Down-core isotopic variation is only observed in cores taken in areas of lower sediment accumulation rates. These observations indicate that the organic carbon in Amazon shelf sediment is dominantly terrestrial in composition, and the location of deposition of this carbon is controlled by modern processes of sediment accumulation. The modern Amazon shelf is similar to large clinoform shale deposits of the Cretaceous in North America. Thus, the stratigraphic setting may help predict the isotopic variations of carbon in ancient deposits.

  2. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  3. Carbon isotope composition of Antarctic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, E. M.

    2000-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of Antarctic land plants are first reported. The most interesting feature is the isotope specificity of the species. For example Usnea antarctica from different locations shows relatively narrow range of the δ 13C-values from -22.44 to -21.29‰ (7 samples), Drepanocladus sp. from -24.86 to -23.49‰ (8 samples), and Andreaea depressincrvis from -23.87 to -23.23‰ (3 samples) etc. Usually, in inhabited lands and parts of the world with rich flora and developed soil, isotopic specificity of species is masked by variations of carbon isotope composition of CO 2. In Antarctic conditions influence of local sources of CO 2 on the isotope composition of CO 2 is appeared to be minimal. Therefore the δ 13C-variations inherent to individual plant physiology and biochemistry can be distinguished on the background of the stable level of the atmospheric CO 2 δ 13C-value. The latter is best to reflect the global state of the carbon cycle.

  4. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  5. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The δ13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  6. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  7. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Christopher H.; Schopf, J. William; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Coath, Christopher D.; Harrison, T. Mark; Stetter, Karl O.

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the ˜850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the ˜2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The δ13CPDB values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 ± 1.7‰ to -31.9 ± 1.2‰, and the δ13CPDB values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 ± 0.7‰ to -45.4 ± 1.2‰. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  8. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., <10%) in shells from aquatic organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions

  9. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; James, R. H.; Parkinson, I. J.; Connelly, D. P.; Fairchild, I. J.

    2013-11-01

    Chromium isotopes are fractionated during redox reactions and have the potential to provide a record of changes in the oxygenation levels of the oceans in the geological past. However, Cr is a trace metal in seawater and its low concentrations make isotopic measurements challenging. Here we report the first determinations of δCr53 for seawater from open ocean (Argentine Basin) and coastal (Southampton Water) settings, using a double-spike technique. The total chromium concentration in seawater from Southampton Water is 1.85 nM, whereas the Cr content of Argentine Basin samples is 5.8-6.6 nM. The δCr53 value of seawater from the Argentine Basin is 0.491-0.556‰ in intermediate and deep waters, and varies between 0.412 and 0.664‰ in surface waters (<150 m). The δCr53 value of Southampton Water seawater is 1.505‰, which may reflect in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). All of our seawater samples have higher δCr53 than crustal and mantle silicates, and mass balance modelling demonstrates that river water must also be enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, indicating that Cr isotopes are fractionated during weathering and/or during transport to the oceans. We also show that the Cr isotopic composition of modern non-skeletal marine carbonates (0.640- 0.745‰) encompasses the range that we measure for Argentine Basin seawater. Thus, fractionation of Cr isotopes during precipitation of these marine carbonates is likely to be small (<0.2‰), and they have the potential to provide a record of the Cr isotopic composition of ancient seawater. Phanerozoic carbonates are also characterised by heavy δCr53 and a correlation between δCr53 and Ce/Ce* suggests that the Cr and Ce cycles in the ocean are linked.

  10. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  11. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  12. Probing the Isotopic Composition of Surface Waters Across Isotopic Extremes of Cryogenian Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, T.; Matys, E. D.; Bird, L. R.; Macdonald, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Neoproterozoic carbonate strata record unusually large and positive carbon isotope values (δ13Ccarb from 4 to 10 per mil), and stratigraphically extensive large negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13Ccarb < -5 per mil). Mechanisms that account for the magnitude, the facies distribution and the global abundance of these isotopically extreme carbonates in Neoproterozoic successions remain poorly understood. Little is also known about organisms and metabolisms that cycled carbon in these carbonate strata, because they rarely contain well-preserved organic-rich fossils. To better understand the cycling of carbon during the deposition of the 715-635 Ma Tayshir member of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation, Mongolia, we analyzed δ13Cfossil of two types of organic fossils that occur in 13C- enriched carbonates (+ 5 to 9.9 per mil) and within 13C-depleted carbonates of the Tayshir anomaly (-3 to -6 per mil). Because these organic microfossils are remarkably similar to the tests of modern planktonic, herbivorous tintinnid ciliates and benthic macroscopic red algae, respectively, they can be used as tracers of organic matter production in surface waters. Fossil tests were extracted by acid maceration, cleaned and analyzed morphologically and microscopically. Their carbon isotopic composition was measured using a nano-scaled elemental analyzer inlet (nano-EA-IRMS), with ±1 per mil analytical precision. To date, we analyzed 12 samples of 100-150 organic tests, representing 3 different fossiliferous parts of the Tayshir anomaly (δ13Ccarb < -3 per mil) and 3 different strata predating the Tayshir anomaly (δ13Ccarb > +5 per mil), respectively. More samples, including those of fossil algae and tests from the carbonate strata overlying the Tayshir anomaly, are currently being analyzed. Initial data reveal a rather constant isotopic composition of organic carbon in fossil tests (δ13Cfossil), with values of -23 ±1 per mil both within 13C-enriched and 13C-depleted carbonates. The

  13. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  14. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  15. Genetic Effect on Carbon-Isotope Composition of a Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2005-05-01

    Stable carbon isotopes of organic sediments are potential tools in investigating a wide spectrum of geological problems. These include paleoclimate, paleoecology, and the origin of life. The quality of the information the tools provides depends largely on our knowledge on the factors determining the isotopic composition of a plant. This is because most biogenic organic sediments are derived from plants. The factors can be grouped into internal and external. The internal factors are ultimately attributable to the genetic make-up of a plant. The most well known internal factor is the photosynthetic pathway. Others include structure of the leave tissue and metabolic characteristics of a plant. External factors are concentration and the isotopic composition of the source CO2 and the physical and chemical conditions of the plant's growth environments. This study addresses primarily the genetic effect, the internal factors. Based on the results of two suites of natural plant samples, it is concluded that the difference in photosynthetic pathway entails about 20.0 % of spread in terms of ä13CPDB values. Genetic effect is also accountable for up to 7.0 to 8.0 % spread in ä13CPDB values within a single category of photosynthetic pathway (i.e. the Calvin cycle). With constrains from the relevant known knowledge, it is concluded that the ä13CPDB values of terrestrial plants are probably ranging from - 8.0 to equal or less than -44.9 %. This range of ä13CPDB values may also be considered the bio-signature of organic sediments of great antiquity.

  16. The carbon isotope composition of ancient CO2 based on higher-plant organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gröcke, Darren R

    2002-04-15

    Carbon isotope ratios in higher-plant organic matter (delta(13)C(plant)) have been shown in several studies to be closely related to the carbon isotope composition of the ocean-atmosphere carbon reservoir, and, in particular, the isotopic composition of CO(2). These studies have primarily been focused on geological intervals in which major perturbations occur in the oceanic carbon reservoir, as documented in organic carbon and carbonates phases (e.g. Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic boundary, Early Toarcian, Early Aptian, Cenomanian-Turonian boundary, Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)). All of these events, excluding the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary, record negative carbon isotope excursions, and many authors have postulated that the cause of such excursions is the massive release of continental-margin marine gas-hydrate reservoirs (clathrates). Methane has a very negative carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C, ca. 60 per thousand ) in comparison with higher-plant and marine organic matter, and carbonate. The residence time of methane in the ocean-atmosphere reservoir is short (ca. 10 yr) and is rapidly oxidized to CO(2), causing the isotopic composition of CO(2) to become more negative from its assumed background value (delta(13)C, ca. -7 per thousand ). However, to date, only the Early Toarcian, Early Aptian and PETM are well-constrained chronometric sequences that could attribute clathrate release as a viable cause to create such rapid negative delta(13)C excursions. Notwithstanding this, the isotopic analysis of higher-plant organic matter (e.g. charcoal, wood, leaves, pollen) has the ability to (i) record the isotopic composition of palaeoatmospheric CO(2) in the geological record, (ii) correlate marine and non-marine stratigraphic successions, and (iii) confirm that oceanic carbon perturbations are not purely oceanographic in their extent and affect the entire ocean-atmosphere system. A case study from the Isle of Wight, UK, indicates that the

  17. Modeling Environmental Controls on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Ecosystem Respired Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, T.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2006-12-01

    Our main objective was to test whether the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2 varied in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination. We developed an ecosystem-scale model that calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and chloroplast CO2 concentration separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers. The stomatal conductance model was linked to differences in water potential and resistances in the hydraulic pathway between the soil and the tree foliage. This part of the ecosystem model was validated by comparison to leaf-level gas exchange measurements and estimates of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis (GEP). The estimates of GEP were based on eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network standard protocol for partitioning NEE into GEP and total ecosystem respiration (TER). The carbon isotope composition of carbohydrate formed during photosynthesis was calculated based on the Farquhar model of isotope effects. Total ecosystem respiration was modeled, based on measured temperature and soil moisture, as the sum of four components (1) above-ground plant, (2) root, (3) litter, and (4) mineral soil. We applied a variety of techniques to allocate the contribution of these different components so that modeled TER was consistent with TER calculated from NEE measurements. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 released during above-ground plant and root respiration was calculated based on an assimilated-weighted average of carbohydrate fixed during a variable number of days previous to the day of respiration. The isotope composition of CO2 released by litter and mineral soil respiration was based on measurements of the δ13C values of these components (we assumed no isotope fractionation during respiration) and held constant in all calculations. The model was compared to

  18. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  19. Isotope composition of carbon in the carbonates of the Gumbeykan scheelite deposits in the southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.; Yarynych, O.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through investigations of the isotope composition of carbon of various generations and carbonates from marbles, skarns, and nested and vein scheelite orebodies, the probable source of carbon of these carbonates has been established as a mixture of sedimentary carbonates, carbon dioxide with carbonic acid that was formed by oxidation of the organic matter from sedimentary terrane (..delta..C/sup 13/ - 0.05 to -0.62%). In the calcite and dolomite phenocrysts of marble and the coarse-grained dolostone, containing scheelite, the carbon was lighter (..delta..C/sup 13/ from -0.60 to -0.87%). For the dolomite and ankerite from scheelite pockets of the Balkan deposit and quartz veins of the Buranovo, ..delta..C/sup 13/ varied from -0.44 to -0.87%. The lightest carbon found in strontianite (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.32%), located near the coating of the organic matter (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.26%) in fractures of the quartz vein of the Buranovo deposit. In the section through the orebodies and near-ore diffusion-metasomatic zones of the Balkan deposit, the lessening of carbon in the carbonates was observed, with increasing distance away from the fracture. ..delta..C/sup 13/ in the altered granitoids ranged from -0.44 to -1.03%; while in the diopside-wollastonite hornfels, from -0.89 to 1.13%. The lessening in weight of the carbon is explained by diffusional fractionation of the isotopes caused apparently by the differential movement of volatile mixtures of carbon during ore-forming processes and the formation of their diffusion-metasomatic zones.

  20. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h‑1 m‑2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in

  1. Soil drying effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opp...

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of stratospheric methane: 2. Two-dimensional model results and implications for kinetic isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Boering, K. A.; Rice, A. L.; Tyler, S. C.; Connell, P.; Atlas, E.

    2003-08-01

    New high-precision measurements of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of stratospheric CH4 made on whole air samples collected aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft are compared with results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model. Model runs incorporating sets of experimentally determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reactions of CH4 with each of the oxidants OH, O(1D), and Cl are examined with the goals of determining (1) how well the 2-D model can reproduce the observations for both the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions, (2) what factors are responsible for the observed increase in the apparent isotopic fractionation factors with decreasing methane mixing ratios, and (3) how sensitive the modeled isotopic compositions are to various experimentally determined KIEs. Bound by estimates of the effects of uncertainties in model chemistry and transport on isotopic compositions, we then examine the constraints the ER-2 observations place on values for the KIEs. For the carbon KIE for reaction of CH4 with O(1D), for example, the analysis of model results and observations favors the larger of the experimental values, 1.013, over a value of 1.001. These analyses also suggest that intercomparisons of results from different models using a given set of KIEs may be useful as a new diagnostic of model-model differences in integrated chemistry and transport.

  3. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping. PMID:26358051

  4. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    The carbon isotopic composition ( 13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the 13C of soil respiration, which suggests indir...

  5. Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Perry, E. C., Jr.; Galindo, C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; McKay, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    We report the C and O isotope composition of carbonate minerals that formed in two low-temperature environments. Results show an overall depletion of ^18O and ^13C as a function of the extent of meteoric diagenesis. These data are used as analogs to carbonates that have been found in ALH84001.

  6. The influence of kinetics on the oxygen isotope composition of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James M.; Nielsen, Laura C.; Ryerson, Frederick J.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-08-01

    Paleotemperature reconstructions rely on knowledge of the equilibrium separation of oxygen isotopes between aqueous solution and calcium carbonate. Although oxygen isotope separation is expected on theoretical grounds, the temperature-dependence remains uncertain because other factors, such as slow exchange of isotopes between dissolved CO2-species and water, can obscure the temperature signal. This is problematic for crystal growth experiments on laboratory timescales and for interpreting the oxygen isotope composition of crystals formed in natural settings. We present results from experiments in which inorganic calcite is precipitated in the presence of 0.25 μM dissolved bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA). The presence of dissolved CA accelerates oxygen isotope equilibration between the dissolved carbon species CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32- and water, thereby eliminating this source of isotopic disequilibrium during calcite growth. The experimental results allow us to isolate, for the first time, kinetic oxygen isotope effects occurring at the calcite-water interface. We present a framework of ion-by-ion growth of calcite that reconciles our new measurements with measurements of natural cave calcites that are the best candidate for having precipitated under near-equilibrium conditions. Our findings suggest that isotopic equilibrium between calcite and water is unlikely to have been established in laboratory experiments or in many natural settings. The use of CA in carbonate precipitation experiments offers new opportunities to refine oxygen isotope-based geothermometers and to interrogate environmental variables other than temperature that influence calcite growth rates.

  7. Measurement of natural carbon isotopic composition of acetone in human urine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keita; Ohishi, Kazuki; Gilbert, Alexis; Akasaka, Mai; Yoshida, Naohiro; Yoshimura, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    The natural carbon isotopic composition of acetone in urine was measured in healthy subjects using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-C-IRMS). Before applying the technique to a urine sample, we optimized the measurement conditions of HS-SPME-GC-C-IRMS using aqueous solutions of commercial acetone reagents. The optimization enabled us to determine the carbon isotopic compositions within ±0.2 ‰ of precision and ±0.3‰ of error using 0.05 or 0.2 mL of aqueous solutions with acetone concentrations of 0.3-121 mg/L. For several days, we monitored the carbon isotopic compositions and concentrations of acetone in urine from three subjects who lived a daily life with no restrictions. We also monitored one subject for 3 days including a fasting period of 24 h. These results suggest that changes in the availability of glucose in the liver are reflected in changes in the carbon isotopic compositions of urine acetone. Results demonstrate that carbon isotopic measurement of metabolites in human biological samples at natural abundance levels has great potential as a tool for detecting metabolic changes caused by changes in physiological states and disease. Graphical abstract The natural carbon isotopic composition of acetone in urine can be determined using HS-SPME-GCC-IRMS and can provide information on changes in the availability of glucose in the liver. PMID:26718914

  8. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry: Part 2. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of fossil ostracods are powerful tools to estimate past environmental and climatic conditions. The basis for such interpretations is that the calcite of the valves reflects the isotopic composition of water and its temperature of formation. However, calcite of ostracods is known not to form in isotopic equilibrium with water and different species may have different offsets from inorganic precipitates of calcite formed under the same conditions. To estimate the fractionation during ostracod valve calcification, the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of 15 species living in Lake Geneva were related to their autoecology and the environmental parameters measured during their growth. The results indicate that: (1) Oxygen isotope fractionation is similar for all species of Candoninae with an enrichment in 18O of more than 3‰ relative to equilibrium values for inorganic calcite. Oxygen isotope fractionation for Cytheroidea is less discriminative relative to the heavy oxygen, with enrichments in 18O for these species of 1.7 to 2.3‰. Oxygen isotope fractionations for Cyprididae are in-between those of Candoninae and Cytheroidea. The difference in oxygen isotope fractionation between ostracods and inorganic calcite has been interpreted as resulting from a vital effect. (2) Comparison with previous work suggests that oxygen isotope fractionation may depend on the total and relative ion content of water. (3) Carbon isotope compositions of ostracod valves are generally in equilibrium with DIC. The specimens' δ 13C values are mainly controlled by seasonal variations in δ 13C DIC of bottom water or variation thereof in sediment pore water. (4) Incomplete valve calcification has an effect on carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of ostracod valves. Preferential incorporation of CO32- at the beginning of valve calcification may explain this effect. (5) Results presented here as well as results from synthetic carbonate

  9. [Carbon Isotope Composition in Landscape Components and Its Changes under Different Ecological Conditions].

    PubMed

    Kovda, I V; Morgun, E G; Gongalskii, K B; Balandin, S A; Erokhina, A I

    2016-01-01

    The composition of stable carbon isotopes in plants, plant litter, leaf litter, and soil organic matter was studied experimentally in the western part of the northern foothills of the Caucasus and mountainsides. It was found that the changes in carbon isotope composition depending on the vertical zonation do not exceed 8 per thousand and depend on the type of C3 plant communities, its presence in biogeocenosis components (living matter, plant litter, soil organic matter), and the degree of moistening of the plot studied. PMID:27396183

  10. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  11. Ca Cycle Constraints from the Ca Isotope Composition of Precambrian Sedimentary Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, C. L.; Higgins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The geochemical cycle of Ca in seawater is relatively straightforward - Ca is ultimately sourced from the weathering of silicates and largely removed as carbonates. Most of these carbonates are then recycled through subsequent uplift and weathering, but some are metamorphosed or returned to the mantle via subduction. Ca isotopes in sedimentary marine carbonates can provide new insights into the global Ca (and by corollary, C) cycle by constraining the flux and isotopic composition of the recycled and subducted Ca sinks on billion-year timescales. Precambrian applications of Ca isotopes have so far been limited to relatively small datasets which cover unusual, dynamic intervals of the Proterozoic. In order to address questions about long-timescale Ca cycling, Ca isotopes were measured on an extensive suite of Precambrian carbonates (n > 300) which represent environments, textures, and morphologies that are typical for their age, and whose carbon isotope values have been interpreted as reflecting precipitation from seawater. Because marine carbonates constitute the dominant geological sink for Ca, this representative sample set places specific limits on the evolution of the sedimentary and crustal Ca reservoirs and suggests further applications for Ca isotopes in Precambrian time.

  12. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  13. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  14. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  15. Oxygen isotope composition of modern pedogenic carbonate from the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.; Sharp, Z.; Newell, D.; Jessup, M.; Cottle, J.

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen-isotope paleoelevation estimates of large plateaus provide important geodynamic constraints on the teconic evolution of orogenic systems as well as offering insight into the dynamic feedbacks between surface uplift and regional- to global-scale climate systems. If the isotopic lapse rate (δ18O vs elevation) is known, then the oxygen isotope composition of ancient meteoric water can be used to estimate paleoelevation. The oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate preserved in paleosols has been used as a proxy for the oxygen isotope composition of soil water in order to reconstruct paleoelevation in a number of settings. Isotopic equilibrium between carbonate and water is assumed in order to calculate the δ18O value of soil water from measured δ18O values of pedogenic carbonate (δ18Opc). Uncertainties surrounding the temperature of isotopic equilibrium and the degree of evaporation of soil water limit the precision of elevation estimates from pedogenic carbonate. In this study, measurements of the oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate forming in modern soils from the Mt. Everest Region of Tibet are compared with modern meteoric water δ18O values (δ18Omw) to calibrate δ18Opc as a proxy for elevation. Pedogenic carbonate samples coating the underside of clasts were collected along depth profiles in soils at different elevations ranging from 3750 - 5200m on the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Incipient soils developing in the lowest and presumably youngest river terraces were chosen for δ18Opc measurements because these are the most likely to have formed under the influence of modern precipitation. The oxygen isotope composition of modern spring and stream waters along the Bhote Kosi and Arun River were also measured in this study and agree well with previously published elevation- δ18Omw relationships for the Himalayas. Average δ18Opc values below 50 cm in the modern soils were used to calculate equilibrium δ18Omw values

  16. Factors that control the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in an anoxic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M. J.; Blair, Neal E.; Albert, D. B.; Hoehler, T. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in anoxic marine sediment is controlled by four factors: (1) the pathway of methane formation, (2) the isotopic composition of the methanogenic precursors, (3) the isotope fractionation factors for methane production, and (4) the isotope fractionation associated with methane oxidation. The importance of each factor was evaluated by monitoring stable carbon isotope ratios in methane produced by a sediment microcosm. Methane did not accumulate during the initial 42-day period when sediment contained sulfate, indicating little methane production from 'noncompetitive' substrates. Following sulfate depletion, methane accumulation proceeded in three distinct phases. First, CO2 reduction was the dominant methanogenic pathway and the isotopic composition of the methane produced ranged from -80 to -94 per thousand. The acetate concentration increased during this phase, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria were unable to keep pace with acetate production. Second, acetate fermentation became the dominant methanogenic pathway as bacteria responded to elevated acetate concentrations. The methane produced during this phase was progressively enriched in C-13, reaching a maximum delta(C-13) value of -42 per thousand. Third, the acetate pool experienced a precipitous decline from greater than 5 mM to less than 20 micro-M and methane production was again dominated by CO2 reduction. The delta(C-13) of methane produced during this final phase ranged from -46 to -58 per thousand. Methane oxidation concurrent with methane production was detected throughout the period of methane accumulation, at rates equivalent to 1 to 8 percent of the gross methane production rate. Thus methane oxidation was too slow to have significantly modified the isotopic signature of methane. A comparison of microcosm and field data suggests that similar microbial interactions may control seasonal variability in the isotopic composition of methane

  17. Carbon isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G.; Blair, N.; Des Marais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions have been measured for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from the Murchison meteorite, a C2 carbonaceous chondrite which fell in Australia in 1969. With few exceptions, notably benzene, the volatile products are substantially isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts, signifying their extraterrestrial origin. For both classes of compounds, the ratio of C-13 to C-12 decreases with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic ratio than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with the kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues from lower ones. The results suggest the possibility that the production mechanisms for hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids may be similar, and impose constraints on the identity of the reactant species.

  18. New approach to global barium cycle understanding: barium isotopic composition of marine carbonates and seawater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Reynaud, Stéphanie; de Lange, Gert J.; Turpin, Mélanie; Immenhauser, Adrian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    In this communication we present the Ba isotope fractionation (delta137/134Ba) study on marine carbonates and seawater, initiated to gain a first order view of the marine Ba isotope cycle. A special focus is the question whether the nutrient type distribution of Ba in the water column, as well as different Ba sources, are reflected in Ba isotope ratios of carbonate archives. The approach ultimately aims to provide an improved Ba based paleonutrient proxy. The data set is composed of carbonates (micrites and limestone standard), coral skeleton and seawater (IAPSO standard and Mediterranean seawater). Part of the corals were cultured in monitored environments (CSM, Monaco) others originate from natural environments (shallow and warm water corals from the Bahamas/Florida and cold water corals from the Norwegian shelf). The analytical procedure includes the application of a 130Ba/135Ba double spike, a cation exchange column followed by isotope measurements on a Nu Instruments Multicollector ICP-MS. The Ba fractionation of the samples is compared to a Ba nitrate standard solution and a standard natural limestone BSC-CRM 393 (0.05 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM). No isotopic fractionation has been observed in the limestone standard and micrites (N=8) (-0.01 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM) compared to the Ba nitrate standard. On the contrary, coral skeletons show a significant positive fractionation (mean = 0.4 ± 0.05 ‰, 2 SEM). No significant difference was found between different cultured coral species. Thus no species-specific fractionation is identified within the same environmental conditions. Diagenetic influence on Ba isotopic composition was further tested on 5 natural samples with varying calcite to aragonite ratios (0 to 0.3). No significant effect was observed. Moreover, the Ba isotope composition seems independant from the Ba concentration in the studied coral skeleton, within our measurement resolution. Seawater isotopic composition (-0.05 ± 0.07 ‰, 2SD) is lighter than coral

  19. Determining terrestrial paleotemperatures using the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworkin, S. I.; Nordt, L.; Atchley, S.

    2005-08-01

    Quantifying terrestrial paleotemperatures has proven to be a challenging endeavor. This paper explores the use of the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic calcite for terrestrial paleotemperature reconstructions. We generate three paleotemperature equations, two of them derived by simultaneous solution of equations that describe the fractionation of oxygen isotopes in the exogenic cycle, while the third equation is derived using a linear regression through modern δ18Occ / MAT (oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic calcite versus mean annual temperature) data. We use the paleotemperature equations to evaluate climate change across the K-T boundary by analyzing the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates from a series of stacked paleosols in west Texas. The fabrics in the calcite nodules were evaluated in order to identify soil carbonate components that have the best chance of containing isotopic information that represents ancient pedogenic conditions. The average temperature for West Texas during the time period studied is 18+ / - 0.5 °C. Two temperature excursions are recognized prior to the K-T boundary in which terrestrial temperatures increase by about 4 °C for relatively short periods of time. These short greenhouse events documented in west Texas correlate with changes in marine temperatures as well as terrestrial temperatures in North Dakota during the same time period. Latitudinal temperature gradients generated using the West Texas and North Dakota data indicate that the spatial simultaneous solution yields the most reliable temperature reconstructions of the three equations considered in this study.

  20. Oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of gases respired by humans

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, S.; Zeiri, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Oxygen-isotope fractionation associated with respiration in human individuals at rest is linearly related to the fraction of the O{sub 2} utilized in the respiration process. The slope of this relationship is affected by a history of smoking, by vigorous exercise, and by the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratio of the inhaled gas. For patients who suffer anemia-related diseases, the slope of this relationship is directly proportional to their level of hemoglobin. These results introduce a new approach for studying the mechanisms of O{sub 2} consumption in human respiration and how they are affected by related diseases.

  1. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  2. Effects of diagenesis on strontium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen concentration and isotopic composition of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Bruce K.; Deniro, Michael J.; Schoeninger, Margaret J.; De Paolo, Donald J.; Hare, P. E.

    1986-09-01

    Paleodietary analysis based on variations in the trace element and stable isotopic composition of inorganic and organic phases in fossil bone depends on the assumption that measured values reflect in vivo values. To test for postmortem alteration, we measured 87Sr /86Sr , 13C /12C , 18O /16O and 15N /14N ratios and Sr concentrations in modern and prehistoric (610 to 5470 yr old) bones of animals with marine or terrestrial diets from Greenland. Bones from modern terrestrial feeders have substantially lower Sr concentrations and more radiogenic 87Sr /86Sr ratios than those from modern marine feeders. This contrast was not preserved in the prehistoric samples, which showed almost complete overlap for both Sr concentration and isotopic composition in bones from the two types of animals. Leaching experiments, X-ray diffraction analysis and infrared spectroscopy indicate that alteration of the Sr concentration and isotopic composition in prehistoric bone probably results from nearly complete exchange with groundwater. Oxygen isotope ratios in fossil apatite carbonate also failed to preserve the original discrimination between modern terrestrial and marine feeders. The C isotope ratio of apatite carbonate did not discriminate between animals with marine or terrestrial diets in the modern samples. Even so, the ranges of apatite δ 13C values in prehistoric bone are more scattered than in modern samples for both groups, suggesting alteration had occurred. δ 13C and δ 15N values of collagen in modern bone are distinctly different for the two feeding types, and this distinction is preserved in most of the prehistoric samples. Our results suggest that postmortem alteration of dietary tracers in the inorganic phases of bone may be a problem at all archaeological sites and must be evaluated in each case. While collagen analyzed in this study was resistant to alteration, evaluation of the possibility of diagenetic alteration of its isotopic composition in bones from other

  3. Carbon isotopic composition of fossil leaves from the Early Cretaceous sediments of western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Jana, B. N.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Robertson, I.

    2011-08-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of fossil leaves from the Bhuj Formation, western India was carried out to infer the prevailing environmental conditions. Compression fossil leaves such as Pachypteris indica, Otozamite kachchhensis, Brachyphyllum royii and Dictyozamites sp. were recovered from three sedimentary successions of the Bhuj Formation, Early Cretaceous in age. A chronology was established based on faunal assemblage and palyno-stratigraphy and further constrained by carbon isotope stratigraphy. The three sampling sites were the Karawadi river bank near Dharesi; the Chawad river bank near Mathal; and the Pur river section near Trambau village in Gujarat. The Dharesi sample was also analyzed to investigate intra-leaf δ 13C variability. The mean δ 13C of the leaf was - 24.6 ± 0.4‰ which implied negligible systematic change along the leaf axis. The Mathal sample was fragmented in nature and showed considerable variation in carbon isotopic composition. The Trambau sample considered to be the oldest, dating to the middle of Aptian ( ca. 116 Ma), shows the most depleted value in δ 13C among all of them. The overall δ 13C trend ranging from mid Aptian ( ca. 116 Ma) to early Albian ( ca. 110 Ma) shows a progressive increase in δ 13C from -26.8 to -20.5‰. Based on these measurements the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide of the Aptian-Albian period is estimated to be between -7.4 and -1.7‰. The ratio of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in leaf to that of the ambient atmosphere calculated based on a model is estimated to be similar to that of the modern plants. This indicates that the Early-Cretaceous plants adapted to the prevailing high carbon dioxide regime by increasing their photosynthetic uptake.

  4. Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Perry, Eugene C., Jr.; Galindo, Charles; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; McKay, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of carbonate minerals that formed in two low-temperature terrestrial environments. Field locations were chosen to represent environments where microcrystalline carbonates (caliches) form. Samples include caliche crusts collected from the tsekel zone of N. Yucatan, Mexico, as well as carbonate mud from the edge of a near-by salt pan, representing both ancient and modern-precipitated carbonates. Additional field samples of surface-coating caliche were collected from two volcanic fields in Arizona. Preliminary results indicate that there is an overall depletion of 18O and 13C as a function of the extent of meteoric diagenesis. These data are used as terrestrial analogs to gauge whether carbonates that have been found within Martian meteorites could possibly have formed under these or similar conditions on Mars.

  5. Carbon isotopic composition of deep carbon gases in an ombrogenous peatland, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, R. . Center for Groundwater Research and Wetlands Research Center); Warner, B.G. . Wetlands Research Center and Dept. of Geography); Charman, D.J. . Dept. of Geographical Sciences); Belyea, L.R. . School of Biological Sciences); Mathur, S.P. ); Dinel, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and carbon isotope analyses of deep peat and gases in a small ombrogenous peatland in northwestern Ontario reveals the presence of old gases at depth that are 1000-2000 yr younger than the enclosing peat. The authors suggest that the most likely explanation to account for this age discrepancy is the downward movement by advection of younger dissolved organic carbon for use by fermentation and methanogens bacteria. This study identifies a potentially large supply of old carbon gases in peatlands that should be considered in global carbon models of the terrestrial biosphere.

  6. Effect of photosynthetic light dosage on carbon isotope composition in the coral skeleton: Long-term culture of Porites spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omata, Tamano; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sato, Takanori; Minoshima, Kayo; Nomaru, Eriko; Murakami, Akio; Murayama, Shohei; Kawahata, Hodaka; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2008-06-01

    Whereas the oxygen isotope ratio of the coral skeleton is used for reconstruction of past information on seawater, the carbon isotope ratio is considered a proxy for physiological processes, principally photosynthesis and respiration. However, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonate such as coral skeleton is still unclear. We conducted a long-term culture experiment of Porites spp. corals at different light dosages (light intensity, 100, 300, or 500 μmol m-2 s-1; daily light period, 10 or 12 h) at 25 ± 0.6°C to examine the contribution of photosynthetic activity to skeletal carbon isotope composition. Corals were grown in sand-filtered seawater and not fed; thus, they subsisted from photosynthesis of symbiotic algae. As the daily dose of photosynthetically active radiation increased, the rate of annual extension also increased. Mean isotope compositions shifted; the carbon isotope compositions (δ13C) became heavier and the oxygen isotope compositions (δ18O) became lighter at higher radiation dose. Skeletal δ18O decrease coincided with increasing skeletal growth rate, indicating the influence of so-called kinetic isotope effects. The observed δ13C increase should be subject to both kinetic and metabolic isotope effects, with the latter reflecting skeletal δ13C enrichment due to photosynthesis by symbiotic algae. Using a vector approach in the δ13C-δ18O plane, we discriminated between kinetic and metabolic isotope effects on δ13C. The calculated δ13C changes from metabolic isotope effects were light dose dependent. The δ13C fractionation curve related to metabolic isotope effects is very similar to the photosynthesis-irradiance curve, indicating the direct contribution of photosynthetic activity to metabolic isotope effects. In contrast, δ13C fractionation related to kinetic isotope effects gradually increased as the growth rate increased. Our experiment demonstrated that the kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeleton

  7. Distribution, chemistry, isotopic composition and origin of diagenetic carbonates: Magnus Sandstone, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Macaulay, C.I.; Haszeldine, R.S. ); Fallick, A.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Diagenetic ferroan carbonates grew in the Upper Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield in porewaters which differed in composition across the field. These porewaters remained compositionally different and stratified for at least 35 M.y. Variations in carbonate chemistry across the field are attributable to these porewater variations, which resulted from displacement of marine depositional water from the crest of the field by meteoric water during late Cimmerian subaerial exposure. Original depositional facies and detrital mineralogy strongly influenced diagenetic carbonate distribution. The objective of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe the occurrence of burial diagenetic magnesian siderite and ankerite from the Magnus Sandstone, and (2) to show that variations in the elemental and isotopic geochemistry of siderite and ankerite relate to long-lived variations in the composition of the porewaters in the sandstone during diagenesis.

  8. Microscale determination of the spectral characteristics and carbon-isotopic compositions of porphyrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.; Boreham, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Molar extinction coefficients for band III of Ni porphyrins are calculated from results of spectrophotometric and manometric analyses of individual etioporphyrins, DPEP, cyclic, and diDPEP porphyrins known to initially be pure from mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and analytical HPLC studies. A method for determining carbon-isotopic compositions and purity of micromolar quantities of individual porphyrins using combined spectrophotometric and manometric techniques is presented.

  9. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Eder, W.; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, K-U.; Hayes, J. M.; DesMarais, D. J.; Cady, S. L.; Hope, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a study of lipid biomarker composition and carbon isotopic fractionation in cultured Aquificales and natural analogues from Yellowstone National Park. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Carbon Isotopic Composition Of Earlydiagenetic Methane: Variations With Sediments Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrysek, Mariusz Orion; Hałas, Stanisław; Pieńkos, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the annual cycle of methane in fresh sediments of two lakes - Moszne (E Poland) and Skrzynka (W Poland). The vertical gradient in δ13C(CH4) values varied widely from about -4.5‰/(-1 m) in late summer 1993 to about +2.5‰/(-1 m) in late winter, in the uppermost sediment profiles of about 3-meters in length. These vertical variations apparently are not due to oxidation or temperature changes, but rather to the higher gradient of the downward decrease of production rates via the acetic acid fermen-tation pathway rather than via the CO2-H2 pathway. The production of methane and δ13C(CH4) values are the highest during summer while the lowest during winter, reflect-ed especially during surface sampling. The downward gradient of δ13C in winter, late autumn and, at greater depths, in late summer results from isotope enrichment of the residual pool of precursors of methane, predominantly CO2.

  11. Stable isotope composition of calcite fossils and bulk carbonate as a proxy for the reconstruction of Jurassic marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, A. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in global ocean productivity may be studied by means of carbon isotope analyses of marine carbonates. The analyses of the isotopic composition of carbonate oxygen are a basis for seawater temperature reconstructions, which are indicative of environmental and climatic changes. In this study we use carbon and oxygen isotope composition for the evaluation of the environmental changes in the Pieniny Klippen Basin (PKB) during the Jurassic. PKB is a narrow and long structure separating the Outer and Central Carpathians. The sample set includes the stratigraphically well-dated bulk carbonates and calcite fossils from several outcrops in Polish, Slovakian and Ukrainian parts of the PKB. Sample screening for the state of preservation was conducted using cathodoluminescence microscopy and optical emission spectrometry method. The aims of the project are: (i) to reconstruct the evolution of sea water temperatures using the oxygen isotope composition and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of the belemnite rostra; (ii) to trace the secular changes in the carbonate carbon isotope composition in order to present temporal variations in δ13C values of Jurassic bulk carbonates and belemnite rostra; (iii) to compare the obtained δ13C curves with the previously reported records of the isotope composition of carbonate carbon. Preliminary results of the study show that: (i) a negative excursion of the bulk carbonate δ13C curve during the Toarcian may correspond to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event; (ii) high Middle Oxfordian δ13C values of bulk carbonate and calcite fossils correspond to the global positive isotope excursion in carbonate carbon; (iii) for Upper Jurassic belemnite δ18O values range from -0.8 to 0.4 ‰VPDB what implies temperatures of 13 ± 2°C.

  12. Variable Carbon Isotopes in ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains a small amount of carbonate that was deposited from aqueous fluids on the Martian surface approximately 3.9 Ga.. McKay et al. (1996) proposed evidence for the existence of life preserved within the carbonate grains. In order to determine the nature of the ancient Martian aqueous system we have combined previously collected oxygen isotopic data with new carbon isotopic measurements performed on the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at Arizona State University. Isotopic measurements were made at high mass resolution with a spot size of 10 microns. The measured carbon isotopic values range from 29.2‰ to 64.5‰ (PDB) with an average uncertainty of +/-1.6‰ (1σ ). These data agree very well with previous acid dissolution and stepped combustion experiments which range from a δ13C of +32‰ to +41‰ . As observed with the oxygen isotopic data, the carbon isotopic composition is correlated with the chemical composition of the carbonates. This allows us to establish that the earliest (Ca-rich) carbonates had the lightest carbon isotopic composition while the latest forming (Mg-rich) carbonates had the heaviest carbon isotopic composition. The large range of carbon isotopic compositions measured in this study cannot be explained by previously proposed models. Temperature change or a Rayleigh distillation process caused by progressive carbonate precipitation are insufficient to create the observed carbon isotopic compositions. Furthermore, processes such as evaporation or photosynthesis will not produce large carbon isotopic variations due to rapid isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. We propose two possible models for the formation of the ALH84001 carbonates consistent with the isotopic data collected thus far. Carbonates could have formed from an evolving system where the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates reflects a mixing between magmatic hydrothermal fluids and fluids in equilibrium with an isotopically

  13. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  14. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in ureilitic fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, H.; Abernethy, F. A. J.; Smith, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Grady, M. M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study characterizes carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopic compositions in ureilitic fragments of Almahata Sitta. Ureilites are carbon-rich (containing up to 7 wt% C) and were formed early in solar system history, thus the origin of carbon in ureilites has significance for the origin of solar system carbon. These samples were collected soon after they fell, so they are among the freshest ureilite samples available and were analyzed using stepped combustion mass spectrometry. They contained 1.2-2.3 wt% carbon; most showed the major carbon release at temperatures of 600-700 °C with peak values of δ13C from -7.3 to +0.4‰, similar to literature values for unbrecciated ("monomict") ureilites. They also contained a minor low temperature (≤500 °C) component (δ13C = ca -25‰). Bulk nitrogen contents (9.4-27 ppm) resemble those of unbrecciated ureilites, with major releases mostly occurring at 600-750 °C. A significant lower temperature release of nitrogen occurred in all samples. Main release δ15N values of -53 to -94‰ fall within the range reported for diamond separates and acid residues from ureilites, and identify an isotopically primordial nitrogen component. However, they differ from common polymict ureilites which are more nitrogen-rich and isotopically heavier. Thus, although the parent asteroid 2008TC3 was undoubtedly a polymict ureilite breccia, this cannot be deduced from an isotopic study of individual ureilite fragments. The combined main release δ13C and δ15N values do not overlap the fields for carbonaceous or enstatite chondrites, suggesting that carbon in ureilites was not derived from these sources.

  15. Skeletal and isotopic composition and paleoclimatic significance of late Pleistocene carbonates, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Taviani, M. ); Reid, D.E.; Anderson, J.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Carbonates cover an extensive area of the northwestern Ross Sea continental shelf. Radiocarbon dates yield late Pleistocene (stage 3) ages for these deposits, hence the carbonates appear to be correlative with widespread tills and glacial marine deposits in the region. Four carbonate facies are recognized on the basis of skeletal composition: a barnacle/foraminifer facies, a muddy bryozoan facies, a bryozoan/barnacle/pelecypod/foraminifer facies, and a planktonic foraminiferal facies. These deposits occur on the shelf and upper slope, while carbonate turbidities derived from them occur on the adjacent continental slope and rise. Compositional analyses of Ross Sea carbonates lend support to previously recognized criteria for identifying cold water carbonates. These include: (1) the presence of an associated ice-rafted component (including dropstones); (2) a dominance of calcite relative to other carbonate minerals (the remaining fraction consists solely of aragonite); (3) allochems that are entirely skeletal; and (4) heavy oxygen isotopic compositions (in the range of +3.0 to +5.1% PDB).

  16. Recent planktic foraminifers in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean): carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pados, T.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Bauch, D.; Meyer, H.; Segl, M.

    2012-12-01

    In paleoceanographic reconstructions the carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of fossil foraminifers refer to, e.g., paleoproductivity and stratification, while oxygen isotopic (δ18O) records provide information about variations in sea surface temperatures and salinities in the past. However, for a correct interpretation of the fossil data it is important to improve our understanding of the correlation between recent oceanic variability and the composition of shells of living calcareous microorganisms. For this, the upper water column and sediment surface in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean, 78°50'N, 5°W-8°E) were sampled for planktic foraminifer species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin.) and Turborotalita quinqueloba with a large-diameter multinet and a multicorer, respectively. The δ13C and δ18O values of the shells are compared to the stable isotope composition of the ambient water and to equilibrium calcite values to define the preferred calcification depths of the foraminifers and to determine the factors controlling the isotopic signature of these calcareous microorganisms. The study area was chosen because of its high oceanographic variability: in the eastern Fram Strait the northward flowing West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries Atlantic Water, with a thin mixed layer on top, while in the west the upper 200 m consists of cold, low-saline Arctic outflow waters of the East Greenland Current (EGC) and warmer, saline waters of Atlantic origin underneath. Despite this variable oceanographic regime along the studied transect, the stable carbon isotope ratios of the shells do not show major differences according to their horizontal but to their vertical distribution: the δ13C values of N. pachyderma (sin.) from plankton tow samples vary roughly between -1 and -0.1‰ depending on the water depth, while the δ18O values of the tests differ more between the stations.

  17. Stable isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate in soils of Minusinsk Hollow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'chuk, Jessica; Krechetov, Pavel; Budantseva, Nadine; Chizhova, Julia; Vasil'chuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the research is to characterize the isotopic composition of carbonate neoformations in soils and estimate its correlation with isotopic composition of water and parent material. The study site is located in the Minusinsk Hollow that is situated among Kuznetsk Alatau and Sayan Mountains. Three key-sites with in different parts of hollow, under mainly steppe vegetation with calciphilic grasses and diverse parent material were studied including: 1) Kazanovka Khakass state national reserve in foothills of Kuznetsk Alatau 2) Hankul salt lake that is considered as natural monument 3) region of Sayanogorsk aluminum smelter on a left bank of the Yenisei river. The samples of pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates as well as water samples were analyzed using the Delta-V mass spectrometer with a standard option of a gas bench according to standard methods. Carbonate coatings (also called pendants or cutans) is one of the most common types of carbonate neoformations occurring in the region. Fine coatings' layers one over another usually can be found on the bottom sides of rubble and gravel inside the soil profile colour varies from white to brownish and yellowish (probably depending on the impurities of organic matter). In Petric Calcisols, Chernozems and Kastanozems δ18O values of coatings vary in a rather small range from ‑ 8.9 to ‑ 10.1 ‰ PDB. This probably shows that their forming took place approximately in the same climatic conditions. While δ18O values of carbonate parent rocks are close to them and are vary from ‑ 11.1 to ‑ 11.9 ‰ PDB. Also, δ13C values of coatings strongly decrease from inner (older) to outer (younger) layers, that can indicate differences connected with the diffusion of organic material. River waters' δ18O values also show a small range from ‑ 16.62 to ‑ 17.66‰ SMOW, while salt lakes' waters due to the fractionation evaporation effects demonstrate much heavier values from ‑ 4.73 to ‑ 9.22‰ SMOW. The

  18. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  19. Carbon Isotope Composition of Mysids at a Terrestrial-Marine Ecotone, Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkins, L. M.; Jelinski, D. E.; Karagatzides, J. D.; Carr, A.

    2002-04-01

    The relative contribution of summertime terrestrial versus marine carbon to an estuary on coastal British Columbia, Canada was explored using stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C values) analysis of mysid crustaceans (Malacostraca: Peracarida: Mysidacea). We hypothesized that landscape linkages between the forested upland and adjacent inshore marine waters, via river, groundwater and overland flows, may influence carbon content and metabolism in the coastal zone. We sampled 14 stations spatially distributed in a grid and found δ 13C compositions of mysids ranged from -15·2 to -18·4‰. There was, however, no obvious spatial distribution of δ 13C values relative to the estuarine gradient in Cow Bay. Heavy tidal mixing is suggested to disperse marine and terrestrial carbon throughout the entire bay. From a temporal perspective however, mysid δ 13C signatures became enriched over the sampling period (mid-July to mid-August), which is representative of a stronger marine influence. This may arise because mysids are exposed to greater marine-derived carbon sources later in the summer, a decrease in freshwater input (and hence terrestrial carbon), changes in phytoplankton or macrophyte community structure, or that mysids preferentially feed on marine food sources. Overall, the recorded isotopic values are characteristic of marine organic carbon signatures suggesting that in summer, despite the proximity to shore, little or no terrestrial carbon penetrates the food web at the trophic level of mysids. This notwithstanding we believe there is a strong need for additional study of carbon flows at the marine-terrestrial interface, especially for disturbed watersheds.

  20. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of alkyl porphyrins from the Triassic Serpiano oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicarelli, M. I.; Hayes, J. M.; Popp, B. N.; Eckardt, C. B.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of seven of the most abundant alkylporphyrins from the Serpiano oil shale (marine, Triassic) were determined. For the C31 and C32 butanoporphyrins, values of delta 13CPDB and delta 15NAIR averaged -24.0% and -3.1%. In contrast, the C31 and C32 methylpropanoporphyrins, DPEP, and a C30 13-nor etioporphyrin had delta 13C and delta 15N values averaging -27.5 and -3.3%, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic values for kerogen averaged -30.8 and -0.9, whereas those for total extract averaged -31.6, and -4.0%. The butanoporphyrins apparently derive from a biological source different from that giving rise to the other porphyrins, their 13C enrichment not being related to carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic reactions. The delta 15N values for all the porphyrins indicate that the depletion of 15N observed in the kerogen is of primary origin. Consistent with the very high abundance of hopanoids and methyl hopanoids in the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction, it is suggested that cyanobacterial fixation of N2 may have been the main cause of 15N depletion.

  1. Environmental inputs that can influence carbon isotopic compositions of hot spring biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, J. L.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The carbon isotopic compositions of hydrothermal biofilms are influenced by microbial carbon cycling, and can be correlated with the presence or absence of specific genes in environmental genomic analyses (Havig et al., 2011, JGR). Additional isotopic data on potential environmental sources of carbon will enable further tests of the specific pathways of carbon assimilation and cycling throughout hydrothermal ecosystems. Hot springs at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are often located in open meadows or forested areas with varying amounts of vegetation and exposed soil surrounding the pools. These pools are open systems which have the potential to accumulate allochthonous materials via physical and biogenic processes. These inputs may affect the δ13C signatures of the hot spring waters and the biofilms associated with them. In the YNP hot springs we have studied since 2003, biofilms range in δ13C from -1.2 to -30.7%. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in coexisting fluids ranges from 4.3 to -3.9%. The heaviest biofilms typically show minimal isotopic fractionation from the DIC in coexisting fluids. DIC values are strongly influenced by inputs from magma degassing, water-rock reactions in the hydrothermal system, and the atmosphere. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) values for the coexisting fluids range from -16.5 to -26.8%, which are within the range of biofilm δ13C values. DOC values will also be affected by diverse processes as precipitation infiltrates, reacts, and eventually returns to the surface as hydrothermal fluids, but may also be influenced by biologically derived inputs from the local environments where hot springs occur. In an effort to characterize the environmental context of hot springs, we have collected isotopic data on lodgepole pine needles, grasses, soils, insects and bison feces. Of these, the δ13C data for bison feces (-27.7 to -29.6%) are lighter than any of the DOC data. Pine needles (-26.3 to -29.1%) and soils (-24.8 to -27.1%) overlap with

  2. Factors controlling the temporal variability of ecosystem respiration and its carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Griffis, T. J.; Baker, J. M.; Erickson, M.; Billmark, K.; Smith, J.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem respiration (FR ) is the major pathway for carbon loss from terrestrial ecosystems. Stable carbon isotope analyses have been used to improve our understanding of the processes controlling ecosystem respiration. In particular, 13CO2 has been used to partition the autotrophic (Fa) and heterotrophic (Fh) contributions to FR. Further, there has been some concern in the literature regarding the temporal variability of the isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration (δR) and its potential influence on ecosystem flux partitioning based on isotope methods. In this study, we used an automated chamber and tunable diode laser system to measure soil respiration (FRs) and its isotopic composition (δRs) in an agricultural ecosystem under a C3/C4 crop rotation. Further, we used the same chamber-TDL system in a climate controlled greenhouse facility with C3/C4 treatments to examine the main factors causing variability in δRs and δR. The chamber data revealed strong diurnal patterns in the isotopic composition of Fh in the agricultural soil plots before crop emergence and in the greenhouse experiments involving bare soils. The diurnal pattern consisted of a sharp enrichment of up to 6‰ from 0700 to 1200 hr followed by a gradual depletion throughout the afternoon and evening. The diurnal signals of FR and soil temperature closely resembled the diurnal signal of δh, but consistently lagged δh by 3 to 4 hours. During peak corn growth, diurnal variation in δRs was strongly influenced by the isotopic composition of root respiration (δas), which enriched nighttime δRs by as much as 7‰ and daytime δRs by as much as 3‰. Chamber and flux-gradient data also indicated considerable seasonal variation in δR during corn growing seasons, ranging from -25‰ at the time of planting to -11‰ during peak growth. Less variation in δR was observed during soybean seasons, with values ranging from -26 to -21‰. Major shifts in δR during corn seasons were consistently

  3. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  4. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  5. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  6. Analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition of formic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xinqing; Zhang, Like; Huang, Daikuan; An, Ning; Yang, Fang; Jiang, Wei; Fang, Bin

    2013-05-15

    Formic and acetic acids are ubiquitous in the environment and in many biological processes. Analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of formic and acetic acids is important to understanding their biogeochemical cycles. However, it has been faced with poor accuracy and high detection limits due to their low carbon number, high hydrophilicity, and semi-volatility. Here we developed an analytical technique by needle trap and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). The organic acids in aqueous solution were extracted using a NeedlEx needle through purge-and-trap and were analyzed by GC-IRMS for δ(13)C. The procedures incur no isotope fractionation. Defined as the point at which the mean δ(13)C is statistically the same as the given value and the analytical error starts rising, the method's detection limits are 200 and 100 mg/L for formic and acetic acids, respectively, with an uncertainty of approximately 0.5‰ in direct extraction and analysis. They were lowered to 1 mg/L with precision of 0.9‰ after samples were subjected to preconcentration. The method was successfully applied to natural samples as diverse as precipitation, vinegars, ant plasma, and vehicle exhaust, which vary considerably in concentration and matrix of the organic acids. It is applicable to the organic acids in not only aqueous solution but also gaseous phase. PMID:23395975

  7. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  8. Selective recharge and isotopic composition of shallow groundwater within temperate, epigenic carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Lee J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper considers the variation of δ18O and δ2H (VSMOW) in precipitation and shallow groundwater from carbonate aquifers that lend insight into the source and timing of recharge within temperate, epigenic karst. The shallow groundwater collected during 2010 and 2011 at Stream Cave (SC) and Natural Bridge Caverns (NBC) represent one input to and the primary output from the Redmond Creek karst aquifer in the Cumberland Plateau of southeast Kentucky, respectively. These data are compared with the isotopic composition of concurrent samples of precipitation from the same watershed that covers some 1900 ha. Values of δ18O and δ2H at SC and NBC are statistically similar and cluster at the midpoint of the local meteoric water line. These values remain surprisingly constant despite seasonal changes in temperature regimens and discharge. Samples in 2012 from regional springs that include Redmond Creek are more depleted in the heavier isotope and similarly stable despite coming from aquifers of a range of sizes and physical characteristics. Applying a Priestly-Taylor model for daily values of potential evapotranspiration, only 43% of the 1.10 m of precipitation in the 2010-2011 dataset remains as potential recharge, primarily during cooler months with lower solar insolation. Weighting δ18O and δ2H values of precipitation by potential recharge creates a better match with the isotopic composition of shallow groundwater than by weighting by precipitation amount. The isotopic composition and deuterium excess of precipitation samples are directly and inversely proportional to temperature, respectively. Deuterium excess in this study and displays intra- and inter-annual variation that ranges from a minimum of +11.1‰ to a maximum of +29.5‰ that demonstrate the higher-than-average deuterium excess in greater Appalachia and the shifting latitude of moisture sources, including a significant winter component of re-evaporated, continental moisture.

  9. Stable isotope composition of land snail body water and its relation to environmental waters and shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A.; Magaritz, M.; Gat, J.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Day-to-day and within-day (diel) variations in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O of the body water of the land snail, Theba pisana, were studied at a site in the southern coastal plain of Israel. Three phases of variation, which relate to isotopic changes in atmospheric water vapor, were distinguished. The isotopic variations can be explained by isotopic equilibration with atmospheric water vapor and/or uptake of dew derived therefrom. During the winter, when the snails are active, there is only very minor enrichment in {sup 18}O relative to equilibrium with water vapor or dew, apparently as a result of metabolic activity. But this enrichment becomes pronounced after long periods of inactivity. Within-day variation in body water isotopic composition is minor on non-rain days. Shell carbonate is enriched in {sup 18}O by ca. 1-2% relative to equilibrium with body water. In most regions, the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor (or dew) is a direct function of that of rain. Because the isotopic composition of snail body water is related to that of atmospheric water vapor and the isotopic composition of shell carbonate in turn is related to that of body water, land snail shell carbonate {sup 18}O should provide a reliable indication of rainfall {sup 18}O. However, local environmental conditions and the ecological properties of the snail species must be taken into account.

  10. Effects of Land Use on Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in Southeastern US Piedmont Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon isotopic composition (delta 13C) and concentrations of DOC and DIC were measured in stream water samples collected monthly in 15 headwater streams from an area with extensive poultry and cattle production and a rapidly growing human population. Linear regression te...

  11. Carbon-isotope composition of the carbonatites and a probable source for their material

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.

    1980-12-01

    The ..delta..C/sup 13/ values in carbonatites of different composition and origin from the Maymecha-Kotuy province of Polar Siberia, the East Sayan province of Eastern Siberia, and the Karelia-Kola province, vary within very narrow limits: from -0.46% for the high-temperature calcitic generations up to -0.24% for the low-temperature dolomitic and ankerite-dolomitic generations of carbonatites. From an analysis of the ..delta..C/sup 13/ values obtained and their comparison with values for deep-seated carbon dioxide (average -0.7%) and carbon dioxide of marine carbonates (average approx. 0.0%), on the one hand, and also allowing for the thermodynamic isotope effect in the system CO/sub 2/ == CO/sub 3//sup -2/, on the other, it follows that the source of the carbon dioxide for the carbonatites may have been a mixture of deep-seated and sedimentary-carbonate CO/sub 2/. Judging by the ..delta..C/sup 13/ values for the high-temperature calcitic carbonatites (0.45/-0.46%), deep-seated carbon dioxide predominated in the original mixture. (JMT)

  12. Thermodynamic Control of the Isotope Composition of Divalent Metal Cations in Aqueous Solutions and in Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, J.; Mavromatis, V.; Pearce, C. R.; Fujii, T.; Oelkers, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very contrasting steric and electronic properties of divalent metals dramatically affect the reactivity and composition of their aqueous species and their partitioning between fluids and minerals. These contrasting properties result also in very distinct kinetic and thermodynamic trends of their isotopic composition in aqueous fluids and carbonate minerals. For example, if alkaline earths in calcite are all enriched in light isotopes, only Mg exhibits a decrease of its isotope fractionation with increasing calcite growth rate. Moreover, the Mg2+ aquo ion is the only alkaline earth ion whose isotopic composition is markedly affected by the presence in solution of inorganic ligands like bicarbonate, carbonate or sulfate. The distinct behavior of Mg stems from the reduced lability of water molecules in its coordination sphere and from the reduction of its aquo ion coordination sphere when it coordinates to HCO3- and CO32-. Ab initio calculations show that the preferred four hydration number of Mg in stable Mg bicarbonate and Mg carbonate monomers results in a strong enrichment in 26Mg of these species compared to Mg(H2O)62+ (i.e. 1000lnβ26/24MgCO3°-1000lnβ26/24Mg2+ = 5.16 ‰; Fujii, personal communication). The analysis of recent experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between carbonate crystals and solution using density functionnal theory estimation of lnβ values from Fujii i) confirm the marked impact of carbonate and bicarbonate ligands on the isotope composition of Mg in calcite and magnesite and ii) allow to reconcile First-principles and experimental estimates of equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation in carbonate crystals. Recent experiments also confirm that the strong affinity of Zn2+ or Cu2+ for RO- ligands results in a marked impact of fluid pH, ΣCO2(aq) and/or carboxylic ligands concentrations on the isotope composition of these metals in carbonate minerals. These observations provide new insights into the parameters controlling the isotope

  13. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  14. Carbon isotope composition of sugars in grapevine, an integrated indicator of vineyard water status.

    PubMed

    Gaudillère, Jean-Pierre; Van Leeuwen, Cornelius; Ollat, Nathalie

    2002-04-01

    Photosynthetic carbon isotope composition (delta(13)C) was measured on sugars in mature fruits from field-grown grapevines. Sugar delta(13)C and summer predawn leaf water potential were significantly correlated. The survey of different vineyards during four growing seasons showed that sugar delta(13)C in must at harvest varied from -20 per thousand to -26 per thousand when conditions during berry maturation varied from dry to wet. This range allows a very sensitive detection of grapevine water status under natural conditions. However, local differences due to soil capacity to supply water to grapevines are maintained, whatever the annual water balance. Leaf nitrogen content variations of field-grown grapevines did not change delta(13)C values. Genetic variability of delta(13)C between 31 grapevine varieties for delta(13)C was observed. Must sugar delta(13)C can be used to characterize vineyards for their soil structural capacity to provide water to grapevines. It was concluded that isotope carbon composition in grapevine measured on sugars at harvest can be applied to compare the capacities of vineyard soils and canopy management to induce mild water stress in order to produce premium wines. PMID:11886896

  15. The carbon-isotopic composition of Proterozoic carbonates: Riphean successions from northwestern Siberia (Anabar Massif, Turukhansk Uplift)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Kaufman, A. J.; Semikhatov, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Thick carbonate-dominated successions in northwestern Siberia document secular variations in the C-isotopic composition of seawater through Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic (Early to early Late Riphean) time. Mesoproterozoic dolomites of the Billyakh Group, Anabar Massif, have delta 13C values that fall between 0 and -1.9 permil versus PDB, with values in the upper part of the succession (Yusmastakh Formation) consistently higher than those of the lower (Ust'-Il'ya and Kotuikan formations). Consistent with available biostratigraphic and radiometric data, delta 13C values for Billyakh carbonates compare closely with those characterizing early Mesoproterozoic carbonates (about 1600-1200 Ma) worldwide. In contrast, late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic limestones and dolomites in the Turukhansk Uplift exhibit moderate levels of secular variation. Only the lowermost carbonates in the Turukhansk succession (Linok Formation) have delta 13C values that approximate Billyakh values. Higher in the Turukhansk succession, delta 13C values vary from -2.7 to +4.6 permil (with outliers as low as -5.0 permil interpreted as diagentically altered). Again, consistent with paleontological and radiometric data, these values compare well with isotopic values from 1200 to 850 Ma successions elsewhere. Five sections measured in different parts of the Turukhansk basin show nearly identical patterns of variation, confirming that carbonate delta 13C correlates primarily with time and not facies. The Siberian sections illustrate the potential of integrated biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic data in the intra- and interbasinal correlation of Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks.

  16. Carbon isotopes and lignin composition of POC in a small river in Bekanbeushi Moor, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Seki, Osamu; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    Carbon isotope and lignin phenol compositions were investigated to assess particulate organic carbon (POC) in a small river from the Bekanbeushi Moor in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan. Suspended solids were collected 5 times at a fixed station during July 2004-April 2008. The δ 13C values of the riverine POC are almost constant: -29.1‰ to -28.7‰. In contrast, the POC shows wide variations in Δ 14C values from -103‰ during the snowmelt event to +9 ± 16‰ during summer and winter. The cinnamyl over vanillyl phenol ( C/ V) ratios indicate a predominance of nonwoody materials and no seasonal variation, suggesting that the wetland river transports older POC from the riverbank during the spring snowmelt. The river also transports newly produced and stored soil organic matter as riverine POC from the low moor in times of low flow conditions.

  17. Unusual carbon isotope compositions of biomarker hydrocarbons in a Permian tasmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Schoell, Martin; Dias, Robert F.; de Aquino Neto, F. Radler

    1993-09-01

    The Permian oil shale sample of this study is from a deposit in Tasmania in which the only recognizable structures are large, thick-walled, unicellular specimens of the green alga Tasmanites. The fossils are so densely packed that this shale is termed tasmanite. The carbon isotopic composition of bulk kerogen carbon ( δC13Corg = -16.6%., vs. PDB) is unusually enriched in 13C compared to marine Permian organic carbon (-25 to -30%.). This 13C enrichment suggests specific environmental conditions (CO 2 draw down) and/or physiological specialties (cell size and growth rate) of Tasmanites which, in modern environments, are known to cause 13C enrichment in marine phytoplankton. Isotope signatures of extractable organic species, unlike in normal immature oil shales, are considerably enriched in 13C compared to the kerogen. The bitumen (-10.9%.) is composed predominantly of extended saturated C 18-C 25 tricyclic terpane hydrocarbons (-9.9 to -12.2%. total range, with an average of -10.8%.). These tricyclics are not only found as free lipids in the extract but also in pyrolysates with similar isotopic signatures and are therefore likely biosynthesis products of Tasmanites. The monoaromatic and diaromatic tricyclic terpane hydrocarbons (C 17-C 19) have similar isotopic signatures (-9.3 to -12.8%. total range, with an average of -10.6%.). Two monoaromatic tetracyclic hydrocarbons (C 23 and C 24), a quantitatively minor but biogenetically interesting group, average at -10.2%.. In contrast, pristane and phytane, as well as n-alkanes (-18 to -22%.), are depleted in 13C compared to kerogen carbon. The isotopic similarity of all the cyclic terpanes in this sample, together with their occurrence in the free lipids and kerogen, suggests that they have a common origin and are biosynthesis products of the marine unicellular green algae Tasmanites. The tetracyclic terpanes, therefore, are not des-A-oleananes derived from land plants but are possibly monoaromatic des-A-gammaceranes or

  18. Controls on Pore Fluid Mg Isotopic Composition in Carbonate-rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, P.; Fantle, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Mg isotopic composition (δ26MgDSM3) of pore fluids and bulk carbonates from ODP Sites 762B, 807A, and 806B are presented. The objective of this study is to elucidate the major controls on marine pore fluid δ26Mg, specifically the effect of authigenic clay precipitation in carbonate-rich sediments. Such studies are important for quantifying the leverage that exists in carbonate section to drive diagenetic alteration, and also for identifying geochemical reactions occurring in deep marine sediments that may impact the global geochemical cycles of elements such as Ca and Mg. The general pore fluid δ26Mg trend at each of the three sites is a systematic increase with depth. In the upper ~108 m sections of all three sites, the pore fluid δ26Mg gradually increases from the modern seawater value (-0.80 ± 0.04 ‰) to -0.54 ± 0.08 ‰ (807A and 806B) and -0.39± 0.04 ‰ (762B). Below ~110 mbsf at both 807A and 762B, pore fluid δ26Mg decreases noticeably by ~ 0.1‰, while pore fluids at 806B exhibit a continual, gradual increase in δ26Mg to -0.17‰ at 679.9 mbsf. Simple reactive transport modeling suggests that the general increase in pore fluid δ26Mg with depth is likely explained by diffusion and calcite recrystallization. However, diffusive communication with an isotopically distinct lower boundary alone cannot explain the observed shifts of -0.1‰ in pore fluid δ26Mg at depth, unless there is an increase in fractionation factor (from 0.9960 to 0.9995) associated with reaction between the sediment and pore fluid. Mineralogical evidence from Site 762B indicates that the Mg isotopic shift in the pore fluids occurs at a depth interval (between 106.8 mbsf and 135.3 mbsf) where clay (mainly illite and smectite) content increases from 3% to 11%, CaCO3 content decreases from 92% to 86%, and porosity decreases by ~20%. The isotopic and mineralogical data are consistent with the formation of secondary clays that preferentially sequesters isotopically heavy Mg

  19. Stable carbon isotope composition of secondary organic aerosol from β-pinene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Rebeka; Spahn, Holger; Wegener, Robert; Hohaus, Thorsten; Brasse, Gregor; Wissel, Holger; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Koppmann, Ralf; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    A chamber study was carried out to investigate the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from ozonolysis of β-pinene. β-Pinene (600 ppb) with a known δ13C value (-30.1‰) and 500 ppb ozone were injected into the chamber in the absence of light and the resulting SOA was collected on preheated quartz fiber filters. Furthermore, δ13C values of the gas-phase β-pinene and one of its oxidation products, nopinone, were measured using a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS). β-Pinene was progressively enriched with the heavy carbon isotope due to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE). The KIE of the reaction of β-pinene with ozone was measured to be 1.0026 ? 2.6 ± 1.5‰). The δ13C value of total secondary organic aerosol was very similar to that of its precursor (average = -29.6 ± 0.2‰) independent of experiment time. Nopinone, one of the major oxidation products of β-pinene, was found in both the gas and aerosol phases. The gas-phase nopinone was heavier than the initial β-pinene by 1.3‰ but lighter than the corresponding aerosol-phase nopinone. On average, the gas-phase nopinone was lighter by 2.3‰ than the corresponding aerosol-phase nopinone. The second product found in the SOA was detected as acetone, but it desorbed from the filter at a higher temperature than nopinone, which indicates that it is a pyrolysis product. The acetone showed a much lower δ13C (-36.6‰) compared to the initial β-pinene δ13C.

  20. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiaping; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ(13)C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ(13)CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83±14.11% and 86.84±12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17±14.11% and 13.16±12.27%, respectively. The δ(13)C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing. PMID:26363727

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  2. Pyrogenic carbon from tropical savanna burning: production and stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, G.; Wynn, J. G.; Wurster, C. M.; Goodrick, I.; Nelson, P. N.; Bird, M. I.

    2015-03-01

    Widespread burning of mixed tree-grass ecosystems represents the major natural locus of pyrogenic carbon (PyC) production. PyC is a significant, pervasive and yet poorly understood "slow-cycling" form of carbon present in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, soils and sediments. We conducted 16 experimental burns on a rainfall transect through northern Australian savannas with C4 grasses ranging from 35 to 99% of total biomass. Residues from each fire were partitioned into PyC and further into recalcitrant (HyPyC) components, with each of these fluxes also partitioned into proximal components (>125 μm), likely to remain close to the site of burning, and distal components (<125 μm), likely to be transported from the site of burning. The median (range) PyC production across all burns was 16.0 (11.5) % of total carbon exposed (TCE), with HyPyC accounting for 2.5 (4.9) % of TCE. Both PyC and HyPyC were dominantly partitioned into the proximal flux. Production of HyPyC was strongly related to fire residence time, with shorter duration fires resulting in higher HyPyC yields. The carbon isotope (δ13C) compositions of PyC and HyPyC were generally lower by 1-3‰ relative to the original biomass, with marked depletion up to 7‰ for grasslands dominated by C4 biomass. δ13C values of CO2 produced by combustion were computed by mass balance and ranged from ~0.4 to 1.3‰. The depletion of 13C in PyC and HyPyC relative to the original biomass has significant implications for the interpretation of δ13C values of savanna soil organic carbon and of ancient PyC preserved in the geologic record, as well as for global 13C isotopic disequilibria calculations.

  3. Pyrogenic carbon from tropical savanna burning: production and stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, G.; Wynn, J. G.; Wurster, C. M.; Goodrick, I.; Nelson, P. N.; Bird, M. I.

    2014-10-01

    Widespread burning of mixed tree-grass ecosystems represents the major natural locus of pyrogenic carbon (PyC) production. PyC is a significant, pervasive, and yet poorly understood "slow-cycling" form of carbon present in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, soils and sediments. We conducted sixteen experimental burns on a rainfall transect in northern Australian savannas with C4 grasses ranging from 35 to 99% of total biomass. Residues from each fire were partitioned into PyC and further into recalcitrant (HyPyC) components, with each of these also partitioned into proximal (> 125 μm) and distal (< 125 μm) fluxes. The median [range] PyC production across all burns was 16.0 [11.5]% of total carbon exposed (TCE), with HyPyC accounting for 2.5 [4.9]% of TCE. Both PyC and HyPyC were dominantly partitioned into the proximal flux, likely to remain (initially) close to the site of production. Production of HyPyC was strongly related to fire residence time, with shorter duration fires resulting in higher HyPyC yields. The carbon isotope (δ13C) compositions of PyC and HyPyC were generally lower by 1-3‰ relative to the original biomass, with marked depletion up to 7 ‰ for grasslands dominated by C4 biomass. δ13C values of CO2 produced by combustion was computed by mass balance and ranged from ~0.4 to 1.3‰. The depletion of 13C in PyC and HyPyC relative to the original biomass has significant implications for the interpretation of δ13C values of savanna soil organic carbon and of ancient PyC preserved in the geologic record, and for global 13C isotopic disequilibria calculations.

  4. Unusual carbon isotope compositions of biomarker hydrocarbons in a Permian tasmanite

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Schoell, M.; Dias, R.F. ); De Aquino Neto, F.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The Permian oil shale sample of this study is from a deposit in Tasmania in which the only recognizable structures are large, thick-walled, unicellular specimens of the green algae Tasmanites. The fossils are so densely packed that this shale is termed tasmanite. The carbon isotopic composition of bulk kerogen carbon ([sigma]C[sup 13]C[sub org] = [minus]16.6[per thousand], vs. PDB) is unusually enriched in [sup 13]C compared to marine Permian organic carbon ([minus]25 to [minus]30[per thousand]). This [sup 13]C enrichment suggests specific environmental conditions (CO[sub 2] draw down) and/or physiological specialties (cell size and growth rate) of Tasmanites which, in modern environments, are known to cause [sup 13]C enrichment in marine phytoplankton. Isotope signatures of extractable organic species, unlike in normal immature oil shales, are considerably enriched in [sup 13]C compared to the kerogen. The isotopic similarity of all the cyclic terpanes in the sample, together with their occurrence in the free lipids and kerogen, suggests that they have a common origin and are biosynthesis products of the marine unicellular green algae Tasmanites. The tetracyclic terpanes, therefore, are not des-A-oleananes derived from land plants but are possibly monoaromatic des-A-gammaceranes or other des-A-triterpenoids derived from marine sources. The unusual enrichment in [sup 13]C in the cyclic hydrocarbons is hypothesized to result from the special growth conditions of the algae. Isoprenoids and n-alkanes are also likely biosynthesis products of Tasmanites, possibly during the spore formation stage when physiological and environmental conditions were different than during planktonic biosynthesis.

  5. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  6. The carbon isotopic composition of catalytic gas: A comparative analysis with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Elrod, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Tee idea that natural gas is the thermal product of organic decomposition has persisted for over half a century. Crude oil is thought to be an important source of gas, cracking to wet gas above 150 C, and dry gas above 200 C. But there is little evidence to support this view. For example, crude oil is proving to be more stable than previously thought and projected to remain intact over geologic time at typical reservoir temperature. Moreover, when oil does crack, the products do not resemble natural gas. Oil to gas could be catalytic, however, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sediments. This would explain the low temperatures at which natural gas forms, and the high amounts of methane. This idea gained support recently when the natural progression of oil to dry gas was duplicated in the laboratory catalytically. The authors report here the isotopic composition of catalytic gas generated from crude oil and pure hydrocarbons between 150 and 200 C. {delta}{sup 13}C for C{sub 1} through C{sub 5} was linear with 1/n (n = carbon number) in accordance with theory and typically seen in natural gases. Over extended reaction, isobutane and isopentane remained lighter than their respective normal isomers and the isotopic differentials were constant as all isomers became heavier over time. Catalytic methane, initially {minus}51.87{per_thousand} (oil = {minus}22.5{per_thousand}), progressed to a final composition of {minus}26.94{per_thousand}, similar to the maturity trend seen in natural gases: {minus}50{per_thousand} to {minus}20{per_thousand}. Catalytic gas is thus identical to natural gas in molecular and isotopic composition adding further support to the view that catalysis by transition metals may be a significant source of natural gas.

  7. [Investigations on Sulfur and Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Potential Polluted Sources in Atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing Region].

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Guo, Zhao-bing; Jiang, Wen-juan; Rui, Mao-ling; Zeng, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Potential pollution sources of atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region were collected, and sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions were determined by EA-IRMS synchronously. The results showed that δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values ranged from 1.8‰-3.7‰ and -25.50‰- -23.57‰ in coal soot particles; 4.6‰-9.7‰ and -26.32‰- -23.57‰ in vehicle exhaust; 5.2‰-9.9‰ and -19.30‰- -30.42‰ in straw soot particles, respectively. Besides, the δ¹³C value of dust was -13.45‰. It can be observed that sulfur isotopic compositions in coal soot were lower, while the carbon isotopic composition in dust was higher. Comparing with δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values in domestic and foreign polluted sources, we found that sulfur and carbon isotopes in atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region presented an obvious regional characteristics. Therefore, the source spectrum of sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions in Nanjing region might provide an insight into source apportionment of atmospheric PM₂.₅. PMID:27078936

  8. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  9. Factors controlling carbon isotopic composition of land snail shells estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Naizhong; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate is widely applied in reconstructing the C3/C4 vegetation distribution of paleo-environment, which is considered to reflect variations of some environmental parameters [1][2][3]. Land snail shell carbon has three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested carbonate (limestone) [4]. However, their relative contributions to shell carbonate have not been understood well yet [4][5][6][7][8]. More researches are necessary before we could apply this tool in paleo-environment reconstruction, especially inter-lab culturing experiment. A kind of land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, was collected at Yokohama, Japan and cultured under suitable environment to lay eggs. The second generations were growing up from eggs to adults around 6-12 months at the temperature of 20°, 25° and 30°, respectively. All of the snails at 25° and 30° and most of those at 20° were fed by cabbage (C3 plant) during their life span while others were fed by corn (C4 plant). To investigate the effect of ingested carbonate, some of them were fed by Ca3(PO4)2 powder while others were fed by CaCO3 powder. δ13C of shells were analyzed by an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Thermo Finnigan MAT 253); δ13C of food and snail tissue were measured by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (Picarro G1121-i). At the same time, δ13C of eggshell and new born snails were analyzed by a Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GasBench II). We confirmed that diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone could be important sources controlling shell δ13C values. And the temperature could affect shell carbonate δ13C values, too. A simple but credible frame was raised to discuss the mechanism of how each possible source and environmental parameter could affect shell carbonate δ13C values based on previous works [4][6][8] and this study. According to this frame and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the

  10. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate fluorapatite in the Monterey Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Leather, J.M.; Emanuele, G.; Kastner, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Studies from organic-rich continental margins have indicated that carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) forms at or just below the sediment surface and, therefore, may record paleoceanography. To investigate this possibility, CFA from the Miocene Monterey Formation in the Santa Maria (SM) and Santa Barbara (SB) basins was analyzed for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} in the lattice-bound carbonate ion and for {delta}{sup 18}O{sub P} in the phosphate ion. In contrast to modern continental margins, these sections are characterized by low sedimentation rates, but contain high (<5 to >20%) organic carbon contents (possibly related to anoxic bottom-water conditions ). The CFA isotopic data display a more restricted range than the data for dolomites from the same sections. The SM CFA {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} ({minus}6.7 to {minus}3.4% PDB) and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} ({minus}7.8 to {minus}3.5% PDB) values are more depleted than the SB CFA {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} ({minus}2.5 to 1.8% PDB) and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} ({minus}2.9 to 0.9% PDB) values. The {delta}{sup 18}O{sub p} values (15.4 to 20.9 % SMOW) are strongly correlated with the {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} values and suggest that both record the same diagenetic environment. The content of lattice-bound carbonate in SM CFA (2 {plus minus} 1%) is also lower than in SB CFA (3.5 {plus minus} 1%). The CFA data suggest an early paleoenvironmental or diagenetic signal overprinted by later deeper burial diagenesis, especially in the SM basin where deeper burial and/or greater geothermal gradients were experienced. In addition, within each site there are inverse relationships between {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and {delta}{sup 18}o{sub c} and between {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and the amount of lattice-bound carbonate that allow various diagenetic environments to be distinguished.

  11. Constraints on Phanerozoic paleotemperature and seawater oxygen isotope evolution from the carbonate clumped isotope compositions of Late Paleozoic marine fossils (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing geoscience controversy has been the interpretation of the observed several per mil increase in the oxygen isotope compositions of marine calcites over the Phanerozoic Eon. Explanations for this trend have included decreasing seawater paleotemperatures, increasing seawater oxygen isotope values, and post-depositional calcite alteration. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a useful geochemical tool to test these hypotheses because of its lack of dependence on the bulk isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate precipitated. This technique is increasingly applied to ancient marine invertebrate shells, which can be screened for diagenesis using chemical and microstructural approaches. After several years of clumped isotope analysis of these marine carbonates in a handful of laboratories, a long-term temperature and isotopic trend is emerging, with the results pointing to relatively invariant seawater δ18O and generally decreasing seawater temperatures through the Phanerozoic. Uncertainties remain, however, including the effects of reordering of primary clumped isotope compositions via solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice at elevated burial temperatures over hundred million year timescales. To develop a quantitative understanding of such reordering, we present data from laboratory heating experiments of late Paleozoic brachiopod calcite. When combined with kinetic models of the reordering reaction, the results of these experiments suggest that burial temperatures less than ~120 °C allow for preservation of primary brachiopod clumped isotope compositions over geological timescales. Analyses of well-preserved Carboniferous and Permian brachiopods reinforce these results by showing that shells with apparent clumped isotope temperatures of ~150 °C are associated with deep sedimentary burial (>5 km), whereas those with putatively primary paleotemperatures in the 10-30 °C range experienced no more than ~1.5 km

  12. Temporal variations in the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane emitted from Minnesota peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cheryl A.; Dise, Nancy B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1992-09-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of methane (δ13C) emitted from two peatland sites in the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota was investigated during the snow-free season of 1989-1990. A seasonal range in δ13C values of 13‰ was seen for a forested bog with heavier (13C enriched) methane emitted during the wanner summer months. This shift was correlated with water table level suggesting control by microbial oxidation. Methane from a nearby poor fen transitional to bog dominated by Carex oligosperma showed a similar temporal trend but with a much smaller range of 5‰ during the same time period and with no water table level correlation. The methane emitted from the fen was consistently heavier than that emitted by the bog.

  13. Carbon Isotope Composition of Caribbean Sea Surface Waters: Response to the Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. E.; Thunell, R.; Wejnert, K. E.; Astor, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels and deforestation have significantly increased atmospheric CO2 levels, from ~280 ppm prior to the industrial revolution to the present value of ~390 ppm. Suess (1955) was the first to show that the carbon isotopic composition of the atmosphere is changing in response to the anthropogenic input of radiocarbon-dead, 13C depleted CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. While biological processes may be the primary mechanism controlling the δ13C of marine carbon, air-sea gas exchange should allow for the transfer of the so-called 13C Suess effect (Keeling, 1979) from the atmosphere to the surface ocean. The first measurements of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon of ocean surface waters were made in 1970 (Kroopnick, 1974) and serve as a baseline for assessing how the carbon isotopic composition of the oceans have changed in response to the invasion of fossil fuel CO2 over the last 40 years. However, in order to gain a longer and more complete picture of the marine δ13C Suess effect, we must rely on indirect measures of changes in surface water δ13C, most notably those preserved in carbonate secreting marine organisms. The Cariaco Basin is one of the rare locations where one can directly compare sediment records with modern instrumental data. Here we report a high resolution planktonic foraminiferal δ13C record from the basin for the last 300 years that clearly resolves the timing and magnitude of the marine 13C Suess effect associated with the oceanic uptake of anthropogenically derived CO2. Cariaco Basin sediment trap and upper-most box core sediment δ13C match both the trend and magnitude of observed δ13C changes in atmospheric CO2 over the last 15 years. The longer sediment record suggests the marine Suess effect to be -0.75 % from pre-industrial values, with most of the change occurring since 1950, coincident with the rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 noted in ice core and instrumental data. If the current anthropogenic CO2 emission

  14. Speleothems as proxy for the carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, M.; Krishnamurthy, R.V. |

    1993-12-01

    We have measured the stable isotope ratios of carbon in a suite of recent cave deposits (less than 200 years) from the San Saba County, Texas, USA. The methodology for dating these deposits using excess Pb-210 was recently established (Baskaran and Iliffe, 1993). The carbon isotope ratios of these samples, spanning the time period approximately 1800-1990 AD, reflect the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric CO2 for the same period. The pathways by which the delta C-13 of atmospheric CO2 is imprinted on these speleothems can be explained using a model developed by Cerling (1984). The results suggest that the carbon isotope ratios of speleothems can be used to develop long-term, high-resolution chronologies of the delta C-13 of atmospheric CO2 and, by implication, the concentration of the atmospheric CO2.

  15. Correction of ground-water chemistry and carbon isotopic composition for effects of CO2 outgassing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, F.J., Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Plummer, L.N.

    1978-01-01

    Direct Pco2 measurements on water samples from several CO2-charged warm springs are significantly higher than Pco2 values calculated from field pH and alkalinity (and other constituents). In addition, calcite saturation indices calculated from field pH and solution composition indicated supersaturation in samples which, on the basis of hydrogeologic concepts, should be near saturation or undersaturated. We attribute these discrepancies to uncertainties in field pH, resulting from CO2 outgassing during pH measurement. Because samples for direct Pco2 measurement can be taken with minimal disturbance to the water chemistry, we have used the measured Pco2 to back calculate an estimate of the field pH and the carbon isotopic composition of the water before outgassing. By reconstructing water chemistry in this way, we find generally consistent grouping of ??13C, pH, and degree of calcite saturation in samples taken from the same source at different times, an observation which we expect based on our understanding of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the ground-water systems. This suggests that for very careful geochemical work, particularly on ground-waters much above ambient temperature, Pco2 measurements may provide more information on the system and a better estimate of its state of saturation with respect to carbonate minerals than can field measurements of pH. ?? 1978.

  16. The Hydrological Cycle on Mars as Inferred from the Multi O-isotopic Composition of Carbonates in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Chong, K.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals provide valuable record of the atmosphere in which they are formed. This work utilizes C and O triple isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals found in ALH84001 to explore the interaction between atmosphere-hydrosphere and lithosphere. The origin of carbonates found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 (<1%) is heavily debated with low temperature aqueous precipitation, biogenic production, evaporative processes, high temperature reactions, and impact induced melting and reprecipitation are all candidate processes. These carbonates are heterogeneous chemically (Mg, Ca and Fe-Mn rich) and isotopically (δ13CPDB = +27 to 46 %; δ18OVSMOW = +9.5 to 20.6%) on micrometer scales. Our stepped phosphoric acid dissolution experiments released CO2 from multiple phases of Martian carbonate in the rock (12h acid digestion at 25o C for Ca rich phase and 3h acid digestion at 150oC for Mg rich phase). Both Ca and Mg rich phases showed 0.7% excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52δ18O) in contrast to terrestrial carbonate minerals formed by surficial weathering of the meteorite with no oxygen isotopic anomaly Δ17O ≈ 0 (one hour acid digestion at 25o C). The newly identified Ca-rich carbonate phase is 18O enriched (δ18O = +25%) in contrast to all of the other Ca-rich carbonates previously described. It also contains excess 17O (Δ17O = 0.7%) indicating incorporation of oxygen from an atmospheric source of Martian origin. These oxygen isotope characteristics differentiate this phase from the more commonly described carbonate globules or rosettes and suggest formation from separate aqueous event. This is confirmed by the carbon isotope composition of this new carbonate phase (δ13C= +20%) which differs from the other Martian carbonates in the meteorite and from terrestrial sources. This difference may be an evidence of the long term evolution of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere of Mars. The discovery of highly enriched (O isotopes) Ca-rich phase of Martian

  17. Carbon isotopic composition of Ambrosia and Artemisia pollen: assessment of a C₃-plant paleophysiological indicator.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David M

    2012-09-01

    There is limited evidence on how shifts in plant physiological performance influence vegetation variations in the paleorecord. To evaluate δ¹³C of pollen from C₃ plants as an indicator of community-level physiology, small quantities (10-30 grains) of untreated pollen and sporopollenin from herbarium specimens of Ambrosia (A. tomentosa and A. psilostachya) and Artemisia (A. frigida, A. ludoviciana and A. dracunculus), genera abundant in grassland pollen profiles, were isolated by micromanipulation. Their δ¹³C values were measured using a spooling-wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. Leaf δ¹³C was also measured. Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) for untreated pollen, sporopollenin and leaves was compared with historic records of seasonal precipitation amount, vapor pressure deficit and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). Each species showed positive correlations between Δ of untreated pollen and sporopollenin. Sporopollenin Δ was most strongly correlated with PDSI. Correlations among leaf Δ and moisture indicators were stronger for Ambrosia than Artemisia. These results suggest that sporopollenin Δ indicates the level of moisture stress in C₃ plants. Therefore, δ¹³C analysis of pollen promises to help address important paleoecological questions, such as how community-level physiology contributes to shifts in vegetation composition. PMID:22742492

  18. [Isotope compositions of elemental carbon in the smoke and ash from crop straw combustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiu-Hai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Six genotypes of straws for rice, maize and wheat, respectively, were combusted under flaming and smoldering conditions, and the isotope compositions for elemental carbon ( EC) in the straw smoke and ash were investigated with an isotopic mass spectrometer. The results showed that the mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of rice straw were - 28. 3 per thousand and - 28.7 per thousand, with depletions of 2.7 per thousand and 3. 0 per thousand relative to that of total carbon (TC) in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of wheat straw were -28.5 per thousand and - 28. 0 per thousand, with a depletion of 0. 1 per thousand and enrichment of 0. 4 per thousand comparing to TC in the straw, respectively. The average values in two types of maize straw smoke were -17.2 per thousand and - 13. 6 per thousand,with a depletion of 3.4 per thousand and an enrichment of 0. 2 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C ratios for EC in the flaming and smoldering ash of rice straw were -27. 5 per thousand and -27. 3 per thousand, with depletions of 1.8 per thousand and 1. 6 per thousand comparing with TC in the straw, respectively. In the flaming and smoldering ash of wheat straw, the mean ratios were -27.4 per thousand and -26.0 per thousand, with enrichments of 0. 9 per thousand and 2. 4 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. In the two types of ash for maize straw, the average delta13 C values for EC were - 15. 0 per thousand and - 14. 8 per thousand,which were 1. 2 per thousand and 1.0 per thousand lighter than those of the straw TC. In general, evident isotope fractionations occur between EC in both smoke and ash and TC in the corresponding straws, especially for rice and maize straws. The isotopic ratios may be useful in identifying and estimating the contribution of EC from straw combustion to ambient aerosol. PMID:25055653

  19. Stable isotopic investigations of early development in extant and fossil chambered cephalopods I. Oxygen isotopic composition of eggwater and carbon isotopic composition of siphuncle organic matter in Nautilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Kimberley C.; DeNiro, Michael J.; Ward, Peter D.

    1985-12-01

    Eggwaters from the chambered cephalopod Nautilus are depleted in both 18O and deuterium relative to ambient seawater. Eggwaters from six other species, including the related chambered cephalopod Sepia, do not show such depletion. These observations indicate that the previously observed step towards more positive δ 18O values in calcium carbonate laid down after Nautilus hatches, relative to carbonate precipitated prior to hatching, can be explained by equilibration of the carbonate with water in the egg before hatching and with seawater after hatching. The presence of an oxygen isotope difference between eggwater and seawater for Nautilus and its absence for Sepia suggest that hatching will be recorded in the δ 18O values of shell carbonates for some but not all extinct and extant chambered cephalopods. The δ 13C values of the organic fraction of the siphuncle in Nautilus do not show any consistent pattern with regard to the time of formation before or after hatching. This observation suggests that the minimum in δ 13C values previously observed for calcium carbonate precipitated after Nautilus hatches is not caused by a change in food sources once the animal becomes free-swimming, as has been suggested.

  20. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen of suprabenthic fauna in the NW Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurell, T.; Fanelli, E.; Cartes, J. E.

    Stable isotope (δ 13C and δ 15N) analyses were performed on suprabenthic fauna collected in the western Mediterranean (NW Balearic Islands), at depths ranging between 350 and 780 m. Samples were collected seasonally at bi-monthly intervals during six cruises performed between August 2003 and June 2004, using a Macer-GIROQ suprabenthic sledge (0.5 mm mesh size). Twenty-four separate species (5 mysids, 12 amphipods, 2 cumaceans, 2 isopods, 1 euphausiid, 1 decapod and 1 fish) and bulk copepods were analyzed on a seasonal basis for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 15N) ranged from 2.3‰ (the amphipod Lepechinella manco in September 2003) to 13.0‰ (the amphipod Rhachotropis caeca in August 2003). δ 13C values ranged from - 24.2 (the cumacean Campylaspis sulcata in June 2004) to - 16.1 (the amphipod Bruzelia typica in November 2006). Both δ 13C and δ 15N values suggest that there are three trophic levels within the suprabenthic community. However, considering the bathymetric range of the species, the results suggest that the deepest assemblage supported only two trophic levels. The stable isotope ratios of suprabenthic fauna displayed a continuum of values and confirmed a wide spectrum of feeding types (from filter-feeders to predators). In general, and in spite of the poor knowledge about diets available for most suprabenthic species, higher δ 15N were found for carnivorous amphipods (e.g. Rhachotropis spp., Nicippe tumida) consuming copepods. Low overlap for δ 13C and δ 15N values was observed, though δ 15N values where less variable than δ 13C, which suggests high resource partitioning in this assemblage. Seasonal variations in isotopic composition for both δ 13C and δ 15N were low (less than 1‰ and 3‰, respectively) and variable depending on species. Low correlations between δ 13C and δ 15N of suprabenthic fauna were found for all periods studied, though increasing from February 2004 to June 2004 (after the

  1. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  2. Bulk and stable isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals in Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001: no proof of high formation temperature.

    PubMed

    Treiman, A H; Romanek, C S

    1998-07-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at >650 degrees C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH84001. PMID:11543073

  3. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: -26.2‰ to -23.5‰, avg. -25.2 ± 0.9‰), approaching those of the airborne pollen (-28.0‰) collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C). Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  4. Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20 ppm nitrogen (N) that is fully aggregated as B centres. Internal structures in several diamonds revealed using cathodoluminescence (CL) are unlike those normally observed in lithospheric samples. The majority of the diamonds are composed of isotopically light carbon, and the collection has a unimodal distribution heavily skewed towards δ13C ~ -25 ‰. Individual diamonds can display large carbon isotope heterogeneity of up to ~15 ‰ and predominantly have isotopically lighter cores displaying blue CL, and heavier rims with green CL. The light carbon isotopic compositions are interpreted as evidence of diamond growth from abiotic organic carbon added to the oceanic crust during hydrothermal alteration. The bulk isotopic composition of the oceanic crust, carbonates plus organics, is equal to the composition of mantle carbon (-5 ‰), and we suggest that recycling/mixing of subducted material will replenish this reservoir over geological time. Several exposed, syngenetic inclusions have bulk compositions consistent with former eclogitic magnesium silicate perovskite, calcium silicate perovskite and NAL or CF phases that have re-equilibrated during their exhumation to the surface. There are multiple occurrences of majoritic garnet with pyroxene exsolution, coesite with and without kyanite exsolution, clinopyroxene, Fe or Fe-carbide and sulphide minerals alongside single occurrences of olivine and ferropericlase. As a group, the inclusions have eclogitic affinity and provide evidence for diamond formation at pressures extending to Earth's deep transition zone and possibly the lower mantle. It is observed that the major element composition of inclusions and isotopic compositions of host Juina-5 diamonds are not correlated. The diamond and inclusion compositions are

  5. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  6. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  7. [Dissolved inorganic carbon and its carbon isotope composition in cascade reservoir of the Maotiao River during summer and autumn].

    PubMed

    Li, Gan-rong; Liu, Cong-qiang; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Bao-li; Li, Jun; Li, Si-liang; Liu, Xiao-long; Wang, Fu-shun

    2009-10-15

    Water samples along water column in the front of dams and samples at 0.5 m below surface water from tributary rivers were collected in July and October, 2007. The water chemistry, concentrations of dissolve inorganic carbon and its carbon isotopic compositions were determined, in order to investigate the geochemical behavior of carbon in the Maotiao River. This study aimed to understand the variations of the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and delta13 C(DIC) during its transport along the cascade reservoirs and river system. The results showed that DIC concentrations in summer were lower than that in autumn. In summer, the DIC concentrations were 1.35-2.84 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.12 mmol/L; and in autumn they fell into 2.03-3.98 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.67 mmol/L. The delta13 CD1 in surface water along Maotiao River ranged from -10.3% per hundred to -5.1% per hundred in summer, with a value of -8.6% per hundred in average, and in autumn, delta3 C(DIC) became more negative, and had a range from -13.0% per hundred to -6.9% per hundred, with an average value of -9.0% per hundred. Generally, DIC in surface water showed a trend to decrease from the upper reaches to lower reaches along Maotiao River, and t3 Cc1 gradually becam me more negative downstream. On the water column, DIC concentrations were higher in hypolimnion, while a delta13 C(DIC) had a reverse trend with higher values occurred in epilimnion. The results indicated that the hydrochemistry of river could be significantly changed by river damming processes. As for carbon, reservoir should be an important place for the transformation among the different carbon species. PMID:19968103

  8. Factors controlling shell carbon isotopic composition of land snail Acusta despecta sieboldiana estimated from laboratory culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Yamada, K.; Suzuki, N.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-10-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate derives from three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested carbonate (limestone). However, their relative contributions remain unclear. Under various environmental conditions, we cultured one land snail subspecies, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, collected from Yokohama, Japan, and confirmed that all of these sources affect shell carbonate δ13C values. Herein, we consider the influences of metabolic rates and temperature on the carbon isotopic composition of the shell carbonate. Based on results obtained from previous works and this study, a simple but credible framework is presented to illustrate how each source and environmental parameter affects shell carbonate δ13C values. According to this framework and some reasonable assumptions, we estimated the contributions of different carbon sources for each snail individual: for cabbage-fed (C3 plant) groups, the contributions of diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested limestone vary in the ranges of 66-80, 16-24, and 0-13%, respectively. For corn-fed (C4 plant) groups, because of the possible food stress (less ability to consume C4 plants), the values vary in the ranges of 56-64, 18-20, and 16-26%, respectively. Moreover, according to the literature and our observations, the subspecies we cultured in this study show preferences towards different plant species for food. Therefore, we suggest that the potential food preference should be considered adequately for some species in paleoenvironment studies. Finally, we inferred that only the isotopic exchange of the calcite-HCO3--aragonite equilibrium during egg laying and hatching of our cultured snails controls carbon isotope fractionation.

  9. Factors controlling shell carbon isotopic composition of land snail Acusta despecta sieboldiana estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Yamada, K.; Suzuki, N.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-05-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate derives from three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested carbonate (limestone). However, their relative contributions remain unclear. Under various environmental conditions, we cultured one land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana collected from Yokohama, Japan, and confirmed that all of these sources affect shell carbonate δ13C values. Herein, we consider the influences of metabolic rates and temperature on the carbon isotopic composition of the shell carbonate. Based on previous works and on results obtained in this study, a simple but credible framework is presented for discussion of how each source and environmental parameter can affect shell carbonate δ13C values. According to this framework and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the contributions of different carbon sources for each snail individual: for cabbage (C3 plant) fed groups, the contributions of diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone respectively vary as 66-80%, 16-24%, and 0-13%. For corn (C4 plant) fed groups, because of the possible food stress (lower consumption ability of C4 plant), the values vary respectively as 56-64%, 18-20%, and 16-26%. Moreover, we present new evidence that snails have discrimination to choose C3 and C4 plants as food. Therefore, we suggest that food preferences must be considered adequately when applying δ13C in paleo-environment studies. Finally, we inferred that, during egg laying and hatching of our cultured snails, carbon isotope fractionation is controlled only by the isotopic exchange of the calcite-HCO3--aragonite equilibrium.

  10. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in Florida Everglades soils and fractionation during its transport to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chanton, J.P.; Pauly, G.G.; Martens, C.S.; Blair, N.E.; Dacey, J.W.H. )

    1988-09-01

    The delta-C{sup 13} stable carbon isotopic composition of methane collected in bubbles from the submerged soils of specific environments within the Everglades wetland in southern Florida varied from {minus}70{per thousand} to {minus}63{per thousand} across the system while organic carbon in the soils and dominant plants varied from {minus}28{per thousand} to {minus}25{per thousand}. A methane isotopic budget based upon the soil bubble isotope data and published methane flux measurements predicted a flux of isotopic composition {minus}65{per thousand}, a value 5-10{per thousand} more depleted in C{sup 13} than the isotopic composition of methane emanating to the atmosphere. Emergent aquatic plants, which are known to be active methane transporters between soil and atmosphere in this ecosystem, were found to transport methane of delta-C{sup 13} content up to 12{per thousand} different from the delta-C{sup 13} content of the soil methane bubble reservoir. Methane C{sup 13} content at one site was determined to be 108.6% modern (delta-C{sup 13} = 83 + or{minus}10{per thousand}). 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Scott, F.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2003-02-28

    Pearson, S.F., D.J. Levey, C.H. Greenberg, and C.M. del Rio. 2003. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird. Oecologia. 135:516-523. The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine d15N and d13C turnover rates for blood, d15N and d13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for d13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for d15N. Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for d13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7.3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by 1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures

  12. Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Irving; Hardcastle, Kenneth G.; Gleason, Jim D.

    1974-01-01

    Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples was determined by use of a newly constructed combustion line that yields low blanks for CO2 and H2. The results from combustion of fines and breccia from Apollo 14 lunar samples and of fines, breccia, and basalt from Apollo 15 were compared with data obtained by heating samples in vacuo to over 1,350°C. The two techniques gave similar results. Total carbon in the fines ranged from 51 to 110 p/m with a C13 of +12 to -8 per mil (parts per thousand) PDB. The breccias contain 22 to 50p/mcarbon with a C13 of -21 to -25 per mil. The crystalline rock (sample 15555) has a carbon content of about 7 p/m and a C13 of -28 per mil. The total hydrogen in the fines ranges from 66 to 120 p/m with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 39 to 90. The breccias contain 8 to 38p/mH2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 103 to 144. The crystalline rock contains about 2 p/m H2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of about 140. Arguments are presented to show that the contamination by earth materials is not as serious a problem as has been proposed by previous authors.

  13. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Knoll, A. H.; Germs, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of carbonates and organic carbon in the late Proterozoic Damara Supergroup of Namibia, including the Nama, Witvlei, and Gariep groups on the Kalahari Craton and the Mulden and Otavi groups on the Congo Craton, has been investigated as an extension of previous studies of secular variations in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Subsamples of microspar and dolomicrospar were determined, through petrographic and cathodoluminescence examination, to represent the "least-altered" portions of the rock. Carbon-isotopic abundances in these phases are nearly equal to those in total carbonate, suggesting that 13C abundances of late Proterozoic fine-grained carbonates have not been significantly altered by meteoric diagenesis, although 18O abundances often differ significantly. Reduced and variable carbon-isotopic differences between carbonates and organic carbon in these sediments indicate that isotopic compositions of organic carbon have been altered significantly by thermal and deformational processes, likely associated with the Pan-African Orogeny. Distinctive stratigraphic patterns of secular variation, similar to those noted in other, widely separated late Proterozoic basins, are found in carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Nama and Otavi groups. For example, in Nama Group carbonates delta 13C values rise dramatically from -4 to +5% within a short stratigraphic interval. This excursion suggests correlation with similar excursions noted in Ediacaran-aged successions of Siberia, India, and China. Enrichment of 13C (delta 13C> +5%) in Otavi Group carbonates reflects those in Upper Riphean successions of the Akademikerbreen Group, Svalbard, its correlatives in East Greenland, and the Shaler Group, northwest Canada. The widespread distribution of successions with comparable isotopic signatures supports hypotheses that variations in delta 13C reflect global changes in the isotopic composition of late

  14. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M; Knoll, A H; Germs, G J

    1991-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of carbonates and organic carbon in the late Proterozoic Damara Supergroup of Namibia, including the Nama, Witvlei, and Gariep groups on the Kalahari Craton and the Mulden and Otavi groups on the Congo Craton, has been investigated as an extension of previous studies of secular variations in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Subsamples of microspar and dolomicrospar were determined, through petrographic and cathodoluminescence examination, to represent the "least-altered" portions of the rock. Carbon-isotopic abundances in these phases are nearly equal to those in total carbonate, suggesting that 13C abundances of late Proterozoic fine-grained carbonates have not been significantly altered by meteoric diagenesis, although 18O abundances often differ significantly. Reduced and variable carbon-isotopic differences between carbonates and organic carbon in these sediments indicate that isotopic compositions of organic carbon have been altered significantly by thermal and deformational processes, likely associated with the Pan-African Orogeny. Distinctive stratigraphic patterns of secular variation, similar to those noted in other, widely separated late Proterozoic basins, are found in carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Nama and Otavi groups. For example, in Nama Group carbonates delta 13C values rise dramatically from -4 to +5% within a short stratigraphic interval. This excursion suggests correlation with similar excursions noted in Ediacaran-aged successions of Siberia, India, and China. Enrichment of 13C (delta 13C> +5%) in Otavi Group carbonates reflects those in Upper Riphean successions of the Akademikerbreen Group, Svalbard, its correlatives in East Greenland, and the Shaler Group, northwest Canada. The widespread distribution of successions with comparable isotopic signatures supports hypotheses that variations in delta 13C reflect global changes in the isotopic composition of late

  15. Distribution and Carbon-Isotope Composition of Lipid Biomarkers in Lake Sediments on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuo, J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Jiang, H.; Dong, H.; Zhang, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the carbon source and microbial community structure in different lake environments on the Tibetan Plateau using carbon isotopes and lipid biomarkers. Microbial mats and sediments were collected from Erhai-, Qinghai-, Gahai-, and Chaka-lakes, which have different pHs (7.4-9.5) and salinities (0.1-21%). Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) have different distribution patterns in algal mats, sandy mud, and salt deposits, which may reflect changes in microbial community structure in different environments. For example, terminally branched fatty acids reflect heterotrophic bacteria and varied from less than 1% in a brown algal mat in Lake Gahai to 23% in a salt deposit in Lake Chaka. The cyclopropyl fatty acids may reflect stress conditions under different salinities. These compounds varied from 0% in algal mats living on the bank of the lake, which received freshwater run off, to 12% in grey mud in the saline lake water. On the other hand, long-chain n-alkanes in these samples reflect contributions of a mixture of epicuticular waxes of higher plants and submerged or floating aquatic macrophytes. Carbon isotopes of lipid biomarkers indicate different sources of organic carbon in different lake sediments. For example, carbon isotopes of total organic carbon and lipid biomarkers averaged -23.9 ± 1.5‰ (n = 2) and -26.0 ± 3.1‰ (n = 18), respectively, in Lake Erhai, and averaged -30.0 ± 1.5‰ (n = 4) and -33.5 ± 3.3‰ (n = 92), respectively, in Lake Gahai. These results suggest that a relatively heavy carbon source is going into Lake Erhai compared to carbon sources going into Lake Gahai. This study indicates that the distribution patterns of the lipid biomarkers and theirs carbon-isotope compositions can be used to evaluate the community structure and the source of carbon that supports microbial growth in lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau.

  16. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  17. Carbon Isotope Composition of Ecosystem Respired Carbon Dioxide in Three Boreal Forest Ecosystems: Measurements and Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, T.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2007-12-01

    We conducted measurements of seasonal and inter-annual variation in the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2 (δR) in aspen, black spruce and jack pine dominated ecosystems in northern Saskatchewan during 2004-2006 as part of the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network. All three sites showed relatively small variation (approximately -26 to -29 per mil) in δR values during the entire study. The measurements were strongly correlated with modeled δ13C values of ecosystem respired CO2. The model calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and chloroplast CO2 concentration separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers, and, therefore, allowed us to estimate canopy photosynthetic 13C discrimination. All three sites showed variation in canopy 13C discrimination in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies. Specifically, 13C discrimination was positively correlated with soil moisture and negatively correlated with photon flux density, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit. As a consequence a strong diurnal pattern was observed for 13C discrimination. The measured δR values also varied in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination, but with a dampened response caused by the contribution of heterotrophic respiration, which had a constant δ13C value. These results indicate that the stable isotope composition of respired CO2 is a useful ecosystem-scale tool to study constraints to photosynthesis and acclimation of ecosystems to environmental stress.

  18. Isotopic composition of gases from mud volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Valysaev, B.M.; Erokhin, V.E.; Grinchenko, Y.I.; Prokhorov, V.S.; Titkov, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the isotopic composition of the carbon in methane and carbon dioxide, as well as hydrogen in the methane, in the gases of mud volcanoes, for all main mud volcano areas in the USSR. The isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in methane shows that the gases resemble those of oil and gas deposits, while carbon dioxide of these volcanoes has a heavier isotopic composition with a greater presence of ''ultraheavy'' carbon dioxide. By the chemical and isotopic composition of gases, Azerbaidzhan and South Sakhalin types of mud volcano gases have been identified, as well as Bulganak subtypes and Akhtala and Kobystan varieties. Correlations are seen between the isotopic composition of gases and the geological build of mud volcano areas.

  19. Springtime carbon episodes at Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate the carbon episodes at Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia during spring of 2007 and 2008, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The carbon episodes at the Gosan site were categorized as long-range transported anthropogenic pollutant (LTP) from Asian continent, Asian dust (AD) accompanying with LTP, and local pollen episodes. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during the pollen episodes (range: -26.2 ‰ to -23.5 ‰, avg.: -25.2 ± 0.9 ‰), followed by the LTP episodes (range: -23.5 ‰ to -23.0 ‰, avg.: -23.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and the AD episodes (range: -23.3 to -20.4 %, avg.: -21.8 ± 2.0 ‰). The δ13CTC of the airborne pollens (-28.0 ‰) collected at the Gosan site showed value similar to that of tangerine fruit (-28.1 ‰) produced from Jeju Island. Based on the carbon isotope mass balance equation and the TN and TC regression approach, we found that ∼40-45 % of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollens from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. The δ13C of citric acid in the airborne pollens (-26.3 ‰) collected at the Gosan site was similar to that in tangerine fruit (-27.4 ‰). The negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC were obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollens and then transported to the Gosan site. Based on the thermal evolution pattern of organic aerosols during the carbon episodes, we found that organic aerosols originated from East China are more volatile on heating and are more likely to form pyrolized organic carbon than the pollen-enriched organic aerosols and organic

  20. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  1. Organic-looking' carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions in mantle derived diamondites: Mantle fractionation vs. re-worked crustal organics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Sami; Dubosi, Gabor; Verchovsky, Sahsa; Jones, Adrian; Kurat, Gero

    2010-05-01

    Diamondites are fragments of polycrystalline diamond and intergrowths of silicates (mostly garnet ± cpx; however they do not contain olivine). Open cavities lined with euhedral diamonds imply the presence of fluids during crystallisation. It can be demonstrated that silicates and diamonds very likely grew synchronously from the same fluid (1, 2). It has been suggested that these "polycrystalline diamonds" should be regarded as rocks, termed diamondites (1, 2); this nomenclature has been followed herein. ‘Organic-like' carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions, in this study, corresponds to carbon isotope compositions of < -10 ‰ and nitrogen isotope compositions of > +3 ‰. Several studies have used isotopic compositions of both diamond and silicates in polycrystalline diamonds to unravel the clues as to their petrogenesis. Noble gas analyses of framesite have yielded low 3He/4He ratios, indicating little contribution from primordial mantle-derived 3He (3), they have shown ‘crustal-like' nucleogenic Ne (high 21Ne/22Ne) (4), isotopically light carbon (~ -20‰) (5), isotopically heavy nitrogen (positive values) (6, 7) and unradiogenic Nd coupled with heavy oxygen isotope compositions in eclogitic garnets (> +5 ‰) (8). On the basis of this evidence one could postulate a crustal origin for the carbon and nitrogen; either remobilisation of the lower cratonic lithosphere shortly before kimberlite eruption (8, 9) or subducted crust containing crustal/organic carbon and nitrogen (3, 4). When focusing on their coexisting garnet trace element geochemistry (1, 2, 10) and the trace element composition in the diamond itself (11) it has been argued that there is no crustal component involved in their petrogenesis (using the same sample set as this study). Here we present a study of coupled carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions and nitrogen contents of diamondites that have previously been studied in detail for their garnet geochemistry (10) and carbon isotope

  2. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wiegel, Aaron A.; Cole, Amanda S.; Hoag, Katherine J.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2013-01-01

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in 17O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone–CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non–mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the 17O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O(1D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of 17O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2. PMID:23940331

  3. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, Aaron A; Cole, Amanda S; Hoag, Katherine J; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Boering, Kristie A

    2013-10-29

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in (17)O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone-CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the (17)O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O((1)D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of (17)O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2. PMID:23940331

  4. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  5. Triple Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Carbonates: A Novel Technique to Identify Heterogeneous Chemistry on Aerosol Surfaces in Polluted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Masterson, A.; Ivanov, A. V.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    In the ambient atmosphere, the physical and chemical properties of aerosol vary greatly between location and time due to various heterogeneous and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. In polluted urban environments, the aerosol and gaseous mixtures interact to produce new compounds and particulates; consequently humans are exposed to many as yet undetected species. Studies of actual chemically-active, airborne particulates can better address the interaction of complex particulate and gaseous pollutant mixtures, however, it is notoriously difficult to measure chemical transformations of aerosols. Here we describe a new technique that can be used to understand the chemical transformation occurring on the surface of aerosols and thus to quantify the interaction of gaseous species and aerosol in the atmosphere. Fine and coarse aerosol samples were collected on filter papers in La Jolla, CA, USA for one week. The aerosol samples were digested with phosphoric acid and CO2 released was purified chromatographically and analyzed for 13 C. To obtain independent measurements of oxygen isotopes, the CO2 was fluorinated and oxygen gas obtained was analyzed using Mat253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The data indicated an excess 17O (0.6 to 4‰) in atmospheric carbonates. The oxygen isotope anomaly in atmospheric carbonates has been observed for the first time and it showed a highly significant correlation (r2 = 0.90) with urban index; an indirect measure of ozone chemistry. The δ13C in atmospheric carbonates was found to vary from -18 to -40‰. Controlled laboratory experiments to understand the origin and variation in the C and O isotopic composition of atmospheric carbonates were conducted using various mineral surfaces. Isotopic measurements of in-situ formed carbonated on CaOH, CaO, MgO, SiO2,Cu, CuO, Ni and Fe2O3 due to chemisorbed CO2 in the presence of thin water films were performed and we found that the δ13C in these carbonates ranged from -12 to -24

  6. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of ureilites Implications for their genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Swart, P. K.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1985-04-01

    Stepped combustion is used to determine C and N isotopic compositions in 14 and 5 ureilites, respectively. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Relatively constant values of delta-(C-13) are found at 500-1000 C in each meteorite, indicating that the diamond components formed from the graphite components under conditions such as impact which did not cause isotopic fractionation. Among the ureilites, two groups with delta-(C-13) near -10 and -2 per mil are identified and found to correspond to the groups identified by Berkley et al. (1980) on the basis of the Fe content of their olivine components; this finding suggests formation from more than one ureilite parent body. Wide variations are found in the N isotopic compositions, with N abundances ranging from 25 to 150 ppm and much lower C/N ratios than in carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Variability in the carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in plant proteins from different sources: 1 Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Anthony H; Kruger, Nicholas J; Hedges, Robert E M; McCullagh, James S O

    2016-05-01

    The natural carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids from plant leaf proteins has been measured to establish potential sources of variability. The plant leaves studied, taken from a range of plant groups (forbs, trees, grasses, and freshwater aquatic plants), showed no significant influence of either season or environment (water and light availability) on their Δδ(13)C values. Plant groups did, however, differ in carbon isotope composition, although no consistent differences were identified at the species level. A discriminant analysis model was constructed which allowed leaves from (1) nettles, (2) Pooideae, (3) other Poales, (4) trees and (5) freshwater higher plants to be distinguished from each other on the basis of their natural abundance (13)C/(12)C ratios of individual amino acids. Differences in carbon isotope composition are known to be retained, to some extent, in the tissues of their consumers, and hence an understanding of compound-specific variation in (13)C/(12)C fractional abundance in plants has the potential to provide dietary insights of value in archaeological and ecological studies. PMID:26948983

  8. Carbon Isotopic Composition of Cypress Tress from South Florida and Changing Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. T.; Sternberg, L. S.; Pinzon, M. C.; Gann-Troxler, T.; Childers, D. L.; Duever, M.

    2005-12-01

    Carbon isotope values were determined from cypress tree rings from two different study areas in South Florida. One site is located in the South Eastern Everglades Marsh where pond cypress was sampled from tree islands (annual tree rings from 1970 to 2000). Bald cypress trees were sampled at the other site located along the Loxahatchee River in a coastal wetland (decadal tree rings from 1830 to 1990). The isotopic time-series from both sites display different, location-specific information. The pond cypress isotopic time-series has a positive correlation with the total amount of annual precipitation, while the bald cypress data from Loxahatchee River study area had two different records dependent on the level of saltwater stress. Typically terrestrial trees growing in a temperate environment, water stress causes an increase in water-use-efficiency resulting in a relative 13C enrichment. However, trees growing in wetland settings in some cases do not respond in the same manner. We propose a conceptual model on changes in carbon assimilation and isotopic fractionation as controlled by differences in stomatal resistance (water stress) and mesophyll resistance (biochemical and nutrient related) to explain the isotopic records from both sites. With further work and longer time-series, our approach may be tested, and used to reconstruct change in hydroperiods further back in time.

  9. Carbon isotopic compositions of 28,30-bisnorhopanes and other biological markers in a Monterey crude oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoell, M.; McCaffrey, M. A.; Fago, F. J.; Moldowan, J. M.

    1992-03-01

    An immature, tar-like oil (API~3°, δ 13C = -23.6‰ vs. PDB) from the Miocene Monterey Formation offshore California was selected for a study of carbon isotopic signatures of individual biomarkers. The three principal stereoisomers of 28,30-bisnorhopane (C 28) have, within analytical precision, identical carbon isotopic compositions (average δ 13C = -32.3 ± 0.4‰ ) and are considerably depleted in 13C compared to the whole oil. These 28,30-bisnorhopanes (BNH) differ isotopically from C 29 and C 30 17α(H)-hopanes (-25.8%. and -26.1%.) and C 31-C 35 extended hopanes ( δ 13C = -27.7‰ ) and suggest different precursors for the C 28 hopanes than for C 29-C 35 hopanes. The relative depletion of BNH of almost 9‰ compared to the isotopic composition of the whole oil suggests that these hopanes derive from chemoautotrophic bacteria, possibly not yet identified H 2S oxidizers, which utilize 13C-depleted substrates. The C 29 and C 30 hopanes are, within analytical precision, isotopically identical (~ -26‰) and similar to algal-derived compounds, e.g., C 27 steranes (~ -25.9‰), which is consistent with a cyanobacterial source for these hopanes. An archaebacterial biomarker, 1,1'-biphytane ( δ 13C = -25.5‰ ), likely derived from methanogens, is also isotopically similar to C 27 sterane. Norpristane, pristane, and phytane, liberated by desulfurization of the aromatic and polar maltene fractions, show isotopic compositions similar to the same isoprenoids in the free lipids of the bitumen (total range from -24.5 to -27.5‰). This isotopic similarity supports a common origin for the free and sulfur-bound forms of these isoprenoids. This origin could be algal and/or archaebacterial lipids, which both show isotopic compositions within the range of the C 18-C 20 isoprenoids. Like other marine-derived organic matter, this Monterey oil does not show the strong 13C depletion typical for methylotroph-derived compounds characteristically found in organic matter of

  10. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  11. The formation of weathering products on the LEW 85320 ordinary chondrite - Evidence from carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions and implications for carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1989-03-01

    Isotopic analysis of nesquehonite recovered from the surface of the LEW 85320 H5 ordinary chondrite shows that the delta C-13 and delta O-18 values of the two generations of bicarbonate (Antarctic and Texas) are different: delta C-13 = + 7.9 per mil and + 4.2 per mil; delta O-18 = + 17.9 per mil and + 12.1 per mil, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are consistent with equilibrium formation from atmospheric carbon dioxide at - 2 + or - 4 C (Antarctic) and + 16 + or - 4 C (Texas). Oxygen isotopic data imply that the water required for nesquehonite precipitation was derived from atmospheric water vapor or glacial meltwater which had locally exchanged with silicates, either in the meteorite or in underlying bedrock. Although carbonates with similar delta C-13 values have been identified in the SNC meteorites EETA 79001 and Nakhla, petrographic and temperature constraints argue against their simply being terrestrial weathering products.

  12. The formation of weathering products on the LEW 85320 ordinary chondrite - Evidence from carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions and implications for carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of nesquehonite recovered from the surface of the LEW 85320 H5 ordinary chondrite shows that the delta C-13 and delta O-18 values of the two generations of bicarbonate (Antarctic and Texas) are different: delta C-13 = + 7.9 per mil and + 4.2 per mil; delta O-18 = + 17.9 per mil and + 12.1 per mil, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are consistent with equilibrium formation from atmospheric carbon dioxide at - 2 + or - 4 C (Antarctic) and + 16 + or - 4 C (Texas). Oxygen isotopic data imply that the water required for nesquehonite precipitation was derived from atmospheric water vapor or glacial meltwater which had locally exchanged with silicates, either in the meteorite or in underlying bedrock. Although carbonates with similar delta C-13 values have been identified in the SNC meteorites EETA 79001 and Nakhla, petrographic and temperature constraints argue against their simply being terrestrial weathering products.

  13. Wich Parameter of the Carbonate System Influences the Boron Isotopic Composition and the Boron Calcium Ratio in Foraminiferal Tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, K.; Nehrke, G.; Horn, I.; Langer, G.; Misra, S.; Bijma, J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed culture experiments with the benthic symbiont bearing foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii in order to determine which parameter of the marine carbonate system influences the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and the boron calcium ratio (B/Ca) in the test. A. lessonii grew for two months in treatments of culture media with decoupled pH-carbonate chemistry. We measured δ11B and B/Ca simultaneously on single tests using a recently new developed mass spectrometric technique. Our results show a clear pH dependence on δ11B. The B/Ca in the shell show a positive correlation with aqueous B(OH)4-/HCO3-.

  14. Stable carbon isotope composition and concentrations of CO 2 and CH 4 in the deep catotelm of a peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmann, Philipp; Eilrich, Bernd; Leuenberger, Markus; Burns, Stephen J.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical profiles of concentration and C-isotopic composition of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide were observed over 26 months in the catotelm of a deep (6.5 m) peat bog in Switzerland. The dissolved concentrations of these gases increase with depth while CO 2 predominates over CH 4 (CO 2 ca. 5 times CH 4). This pattern can be reproduced by a reaction-advection-ebullition model, where CO 2 and CH 4 are formed in a ratio of 1:1. The less soluble methane is preferentially lost via outgassing (bubbles). The isotopic fractionation between CO 2 and CH 4 also increases with depth, with αC values ranging from 1.045 to 1.075. The isotopic composition of the gases traces the passage of respiration-derived CO 2 (from the near surface) through a shallow zone with methanogenesis of low isotopic fractionation (splitting of fermentation-derived acetate). This solution then moves through the catotelm, where methanogenesis occurs by CO 2 reduction (large isotopic fractionation). In the upper part of the catotelm the C-13-depleted respiration-derived CO 2 pool buffers the isotopic composition of CO 2; the δ 13C of CO 2 increases only slowly. At the same time strongly depleted CH 4 is formed as CO 2 reduction consumes the depleted CO 2. In the lower part of the catotelm, the respiration-derived CO 2 and shallow CH 4 become less important and CO 2 reduction is the dominant source of CO 2 and CH 4. Now, the δ 13C values of both gases increase until equilibrium is reached with respect to the isotopic composition of the substrate. Thus, the δ 13C values of methane reach a minimum at intermediate depth, and the deep methane has δ 13C values comparable to shallow methane. A simple mixing model for the isotopic evolution is suggested. Only minor changes of the observed patterns of methanogenesis (in terms of concentration and isotopic composition) occur over the seasons. The most pronounced of these is a slightly higher rate of acetate splitting in spring.

  15. Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Soil and Shell from an Archeological Site in Kimble County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, K. K.; Paul, D.; Skrzypek, G.; Tomka, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    We report stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition of inorganic carbonates, soil organic matter (SOM), and terrestrial gastropod shells present in a 130cm soil profile (radiocarbon date of 2340-2120 B.P) recovered from archeological site 41KM69, Kimble County, Texas. Prior to soil carbonate and SOM analyses, samples were treated with 5% sodium hypochlorite to remove organic matter and treated with 4% HCl to remove inorganic carbonate, respectively. Isotopic compositions of samples were obtained utilizing a Gasbench II (for carbonate-acid reaction technique) and a CHNS Elemental Analyzer (for SOM) coupled with a DeltaPlus XP Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer in continuous-flow. δ13C of carbonates in the soil profile varies in the range -2.15 to -4.63 ‰. δ18O of carbonates (ranging from -3.22 to -3.92‰) show little variation within the profile. δ13C of SOM (-25.61‰ to -22.83‰) suggests that C3 plants were predominant in the study area. There is ~3‰ enrichment in 13C of SOM at the bottom of profile relative to the top. Previous studies have shown that δ13C of modern soil carbonates are higher by 14-16‰ than SOM, whereas our results show about 20‰ difference. δ13C of land snail shells ( Rabdotus, Polygyra, Helicina) recovered from the soil show strong linear correlation with depth (R2= 0.88): -9.46‰ at 60cm to -5.4‰ at 112cm. δ18O of shells show no correlation with depth and range from - 3.34‰ to 0.62‰. Excluding one shell analysis, δ13C of shells and SOM exhibit good correlation (R2= 0.80). Previous studies of variation in δ13C in land snail shell document that carbon isotopic composition in shell are primarily a function of snail diet. Balakrishnan et al. (2005) have shown that δ13C of shells in C3 vegetation regimes range from -10.0‰ to -8.8‰, which is consistent with our results. Although, the interpretation of δ18O values in land snails is not straightforward, values are probably related to several different

  16. Contribution of Organic Material to the Stable Isotope Composition of Some Terrestrial Carbonates as Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the isotopic geochemistry of terrestrial carbonate formation is essential to understanding the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, hydrosphere, and potential biosphere. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments, as illustrated by the carbonates present in ALH84001 [1]. Models for the history of Mars suggest that the planet was warmer, wetter, and possessed a greater atmospheric pressure within the first billion years as compared to present conditions [2],[3],[4], and likely had an active hydrologic cycle. Morse and Marion [5] point out that associated with this hydrologic cycle would be the active chemical weathering of silicate minerals and thus consumption of atmospheric CO2 and deposition of carbonate and silica. It is during this warmer and wetter period of Martian history that surface and/or near-surface conditions would be most favorable for harboring possible microbiological life. Carbonates within ALH84001 offer evidence that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [6]. A more through understanding of the effects of aqueous weathering and the potential contribution of organic compounds on the isotopic composition of Martian carbonate minerals can be gained by studying some terrestrial occurrences of carbonate rocks.

  17. Carbon isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.C. ); Fry, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The {sup 11}C, {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations.

  18. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in lunar fines 15012 and 15013 - Abundances, distributions and isotopic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Lawless, J.; Romiez, M.; Kaplan, I. R.; Petrowski, C.; Sakai, H.; Smith, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar fines 15012,16 and 15013,3 were analyzed by stepwise pyrolysis and acid hydrolysis as well as complete combustion in oxygen to determine carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. In addition, hydrogen was analysed during pyrolysis as well as during hydrolysis. By comparison of the distribution frequencies of C, N, S, H2 and Fe with He-4, considered to have arisen from solar wind contribution, it is concluded that nitrogen and hydrogen have largely a solar origin. Carbon has a significant solar contribution, and metallic iron may have resulted from solar wind interaction with ferrous minerals on the lunar surface. Sulfur probably has a predominantly lunar origin. There is no direct evidence for meteorotic contribution to these samples. Solar wind interaction also has a marked effect on the stable isotope distribution of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and S-34/S-32. In all cases, the heavy isotope was most enriched in the smallest grain-size fraction.

  19. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  20. Processes for the "vital effect" of Porites corals as revealed by microanalysis of oxygen, carbon and boron isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Chaussidon, M.; France-Lanord, C.

    2003-04-01

    Since the discovery by Knutson et al. (1972) of annual banding in massive corals, they have intensively been used to provide paleoclimate reconstructions. The oxygen isotopic composition (18O) of coral aragonite skeletons is a function of sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) through the 18O of the seawater in which the carbonate precipitates and pH of the calcifying fluid. Carbon cycle in hermatypic corals is relatively complex because of the interaction between symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and coral (Goreau, 19777). Coral 13C seems to be under influence of the ratio between algae photosynthesis and algae and coral respiration (Swart, 1983). The carbonate deposited by some foraminifera and scleractinian corals is depleted 13C and 18O relative to isotope equilibrium with ambient seawater. This deviation of the biogenic carbonate - water fractionation from the inorganic fractionation is called the "vital effect" (Urey et al., 1951). Different explanations for the vital effect are proposed: (1) McConnaughey (1989) attributes the coral disequilibria to kinetic effects. (2) Spero et al. (1997) and Zeebe (1999) consider that the carbonate depletion in 18O is due to [CO32-] or pH variations. The carbon isotopic disequilibrium would be due, in this case, to 13C depleted metabolic DIC incorporation coming from the respiration. The micrometer scale analysis by ion microprobe of B, C and O isotopic compositions can allow to better understand responsible process(es) of the vital effect and the existence of a great diversity in 18O - SST calibrations for differents colonies of the same species. These analyses show that 11B and 18O of coral skeleton have a great variability at micrometer scale (10 and 12 , respectively), whereas 13C have no so important variations and that all the values are in the range of 13C measured by "classical" method (acid digestion and mass spectrometry). Thus the in

  1. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  2. An updated estimation of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of automobile CO emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Hachisu, Yosuke; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Gamo, Toshitaka; Akiyama, Ken-ichi

    We estimate up-to-date values of the average isotopic compositions of CO emitted from automobiles. In the estimation, we determined the isotopic compositions of CO in tail pipe exhaust for four gasoline automobiles and two diesel automobiles under varying conditions of both idling and running. While the dependence on the automobile manufacturer is little, each automobile equipped with functional catalytic converter exhibits a large temporal δ13C and δ18O variation. They tend to show 13C and 18O enrichment in accordance with the reduction of CO in exhaust, suggesting that the functional catalytic converter in engines enhances the δ13C and δ18O values of CO from tail pipes through a kinetic isotope effect during CO destruction. Assuming that automobiles run a modeled driving cycle, we estimated the average δ13C and δ18O of CO to be -23.8±0.8‰ PDB and +25.3±1.0‰ SMOW, respectively, for recent gasoline automobiles, and -19.5±0.7‰ PDB and +15.1±1.0‰ SMOW, respectively, for recent diesel automobiles. While the δ13C and δ18O values of recent gasoline automobiles coincide well with the isotopic compositions of source CO in present trunk road atmosphere estimated in this study, those are +4-+6‰ ( δ13C) and +1-+3‰ ( δ18O) higher than those reported previously and also those emitted from old, non-catalyst automobiles determined in this study. Recent improvements in functional catalytic converters have enhanced and will enhance the δ13C and δ18O values of CO from automobiles.

  3. Temperature dependence of the stable carbon isotope composition of gas- and particle phase components of β-pinene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensch, Iulia; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Kammer, Beatrix; Laumer, Werner; Steitz, Bettina; Wegener, Robert; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2010-05-01

    The AIDA SOA09 campaign took place from 2-27 November 2009 in the AIDA aerosol and cloud simulation chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with the goal to investigate mechanistic aspects of the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene as well as the partitioning of semivolatile reaction products. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range between 243 K and 303 K at atmospheric pressure utilizing cyclohexane as OH scavenger. During all β-pinene experiments, gas-phase samples were collected in parallel with aerosol samples to subsequently analyze their stable carbon isotope composition. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis was performed with a GC-IRMS system. From the temporal behaviour of the δ13C of β-pinene a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.00339 was derived, in agreement with literature data at 303 K. Furthermore, the KIE was found to intensify with decreasing temperature. Nopinone, the major oxidation product of β-pinene was found in both the gas- and particle phase. The temperature dependence of the isotopic fractionation of nopinone between the phases will be discussed together with possible applications of the results in atmospheric studies of secondary organic aerosol formation.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope composition of carbonates from an L6 chondrite: Evidence for terrestrial weathering from the Holbrook meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Karlsson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Terrestrial weathering in meteorites is an important process which alters pristine elemental and isotopic abundances. The Holbrook L6 chondrite fell in 1912. Material was recovered at the time of the fall, in 1931, and 1968. The weathering processes operating on the freshly fallen meteorite in a semi-arid region of northeastern Arizona have been studied after a ground residence of 19 and 56 years. It has been shown that a large portion of the carbonate material in 7 Antarctic ordinary chondrites either underwent extensive isotopic exchange with atmospheric CO2, or formed recently in the Antarctic environment. In fact it has been demonstrated that hydrated Mg-carbonates, nesquehonite and hydromagnesite, formed in less than 40 years on LEW 85320. In order to help further constrain the effects of terrestrial weathering in meteorites, the carbon and oxygen isotopes extracted from carbonates of three different samples of Holbrook L6: a fresh sample at the time of the fall in 1912, a specimen collected in 1931, and a third specimen collected at the same site in 1968.

  5. Soils at the hyperarid margin: The isotopic composition of soil carbonate from the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quade, Jay; Rech, Jason A.; Latorre, Claudio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Gleeson, Erin; Kalin, Mary T.K.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of exceptionally sparse plant cover (0–20%) and rainfall (2–114 mm/yr) on the stable carbon and oxygen composition of soil carbonate along elevation transects in what is among the driest places on the planet, the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. δ13C and δ18O values of carbonates from the Atacama are the highest of any desert in the world. δ13C (VPDB) values from soil carbonate range from -8.2% at the wettest sites to +7.9% at the driest. We measured plant composition and modeled respiration rates required to form these carbonate isotopic values using a modified version of the soil diffusion model of [Cerling (1984) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.71, 229–240], in which we assumed an exponential form of the soil CO2 production function, and relatively shallow (20–30 cm) average production depths. Overall, we find that respiration rates are the main predictor of the δ13C value of soil carbonate in the Atacama, whereas the fraction C3 to C4 biomass at individual sites has a subordinate influence. The high average δ13C value (+4.1%) of carbonate from the driest study sites indicates it formed&mdahs;perhaps abiotically—in the presence of pure atmospheric CO2. δ18O (VPDB) values from soil carbonate range from -5.9% at the wettest sites to +7.3% at the driest and show much less regular variation with elevation change than δ13C values. δ18O values for soil carbonate predicted from local temperature and δ18O values of rainfall values suggest that extreme (>80% in some cases) soil dewatering by evaporation occurs at most sites prior to carbonate formation. The effects of evaporation compromise the use of δ18O values from ancient soil carbonate to reconstruct paleoelevation in such arid settings.

  6. Origin of epigenetic calcite in coal from Antarctica and Ohio based on isotope compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faure, G.; Botoman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium of calcite cleats in coal seams of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Tuscarawas County, Ohio, contain a record of the conditions a the time of their formation. The Antarctic calcites (?? 18O(SMOW) = +9.14 to +11.82%0) were deposited from waters enriched in 16O whose isotopic composition was consistent with that of meteoric precipitation at low temperature and high latitude. The carbon of the calcite cleats (?? 13C(PDB) = -15.6 to -16.9%0) was derived in part from the coal (?? 13C(PDB) = -23.5 to -26.7%0) as carbon dioxide and by oxidation of methane or other hydrocarbon gases. The strontium ( 87Sr 86Sr = 0.71318-0.72392) originated primarily from altered feldspar grains in the sandstones of the Beacon Supergroup. Calcite cleats in the Kittaning No. 6 coal seam of Ohio (?? 18O(SMOW) = +26.04 to +27.79%0) were deposited from waters that had previously exchanged oxygen, possibly with marine carbonate at depth. The carbon (?? 13C(PDB) = 0.9 to +2.4%0) is enriched in 13C even though that cleats were deposited in coal that is highly enriched in 12C and apparently originated from marine carbonates. Strontium in the cleats ( Sr 87 0.71182-0.71260) is not of marine origin but contains varying amounts of radiogenic 87Sr presumably derived from detrital Rb-bearing minerals in the adjacent sedimentary rocks. The results of this study suggest that calcite cleats in coal of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were deposited after the start of glaciation in Cenozoic time and that those in Ohio precipitated from formation waters derived from the underlying marine carbonate rocks, probably in the recent geologic past. ?? 1984.

  7. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide. PMID:25046753

  8. Variation in the Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Plants and Soil along a Precipitation Gradient in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian-Ying; Sun, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Fa-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Water availability is the most influential factor affecting plant carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope composition in arid and semi-arid environments. However, there are potential differences among locations and/or species in the sensitivity of plant δ13C and δ15N to variation in precipitation, which are important for using stable isotope signatures to extract paleo-vegetation and paleo-climate information. We measured δ13C and δ15N of plant and soil organic matter (SOM) samples collected from 64 locations across a precipitation gradient with an isotherm in northern China. δ13C and δ15N for both C3 and C4 plants decreased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation (MAP). The sensitivity of δ13C to MAP in C3 plants (-0.6±0.07‰/100 mm) was twice as high as that in C4 plants (−0.3±0.08‰/100 mm). Species differences in the sensitivity of plant δ13C and δ15N to MAP were not observed among three main dominant plants. SOM became depleted in 13C with increasing MAP, while no significant correlations existed between δ15N of SOM and MAP. We conclude that water availability is the primary environmental factor controlling the variability of plant δ13C and δ15N and soil δ13C in the studied arid and semi-arid regions. Carbon isotope composition is useful for tracing environmental precipitation changes. Plant nitrogen isotope composition can reflect relative openness of ecosystem nitrogen cycling. PMID:23272186

  9. Isotopic composition and speciation of sedimentary nitrogen and carbon in the Okinawa Trough over the past 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Hsiao, Silver Sung-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Dong; Li, Dawei; Chang, Yuan-Pin; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Total organic carbon to total nitrogen ratios (C/N) and their isotopic compositions (δ13CTOC and δ15NTN) are oft-applied proxies to discern terrigenous from marine-sourced organics and to unravel ancient environmental information. In high depositional Asian marginal seas, the inclusion of N-bearing minerals in the bulk sediment dilutes or masks signals sought after in δ15N and δ13C analyses, thus leading to incorrect and even contradictory interpretations. We used KOH-KOBr to separate operationally defined total organic matter into oxidizable (labile) and residual fractions for content and isotope measurements. In a sediment core in the Okinawa Trough, significant amounts of carbon and nitrogen existed in the residual phase, in which the C/N ratio was ~9, resembling most documented sedimentary bulk C/N ratios in the China marginal seas. The residual carbon, which was included in operationally defined total organic carbon (TOC), displayed a δ13C range (-22.7 to -18.9‰, mean -20.7‰) similar to the oft-used marine end-member. After removing the interference from the residual fraction, we found that the temporal pattern of δ13CLOC (LOC denotes labile organic carbon) was more variable. The residual nitrogen content was associated with illite, suggesting a terrestrial origin. Additionally, δ15N in the residual fraction likely reflected the climatic controls (e.g., precipitation) on lithogenic source materials. Further studies are required to explore the controlling factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopic speciation and to retrieve the information locked in the residual fraction.

  10. Carbon Isotope Ratiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Anthony O'Keefe

    2001-05-07

    This Report details the design of a optical analyzer capable of measuring and recording the carbon 13/12 isotope ratio in atmospheric carbon dioxide. The system can operate in remote modes for long duration and will transmit real-time data via wireless contact.

  11. Reconciling the elemental and Sr isotope composition of Himalayan weathering fluxes: insights from the carbonate geochemistry of stream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Blum, Joel D.; Walter, Lynn M.

    2002-10-01

    to remove up to ˜70% of the Ca 2+ originally derived from carbonate weathering. Accounting for the nonconservative behavior of Ca 2+ during riverine transport brings the Ca/Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr composition of the carbonate weathering flux into agreement with the composition of carbonate bedrock, thereby permitting consistency between elemental and Sr isotope approaches to partitioning stream water solute sources. These results resolve the dissolved Sr 2+ budget and suggest that the conventional application of two-component Ca/Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr mixing equations has overestimated silicate-derived Sr 2+ and HCO 3- fluxes from the Himalaya. In addition, these findings demonstrate that integrating stream water carbonate mineral equilibria, divalent cation compositional trends, and Sr isotope inventories provides a powerful approach for examining weathering fluxes.

  12. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  13. Impact of contamination and pre-treatment on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of charred plant remains

    PubMed Central

    Vaiglova, Petra; Snoeck, Christophe; Nitsch, Erika; Bogaard, Amy; Lee-Thorp, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Stable isotope analysis of archaeological charred plants has become a useful tool for interpreting past agricultural practices and refining ancient dietary reconstruction. Charred material that lay buried in soil for millennia, however, is susceptible to various kinds of contamination, whose impact on the grain/seed isotopic composition is poorly understood. Pre-treatment protocols have been adapted in distinct forms from radiocarbon dating, but insufficient research has been carried out on evaluating their effectiveness and necessity for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis. Methods The effects of previously used pre-treatment protocols on the isotopic composition of archaeological and modern sets of samples were investigated. An archaeological sample was also artificially contaminated with carbonates, nitrates and humic acid and subjected to treatment aimed at removing the introduced contamination. The presence and removal of the contamination were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and δ13C and δ15N values. Results The results show a ca 1‰ decrease in the δ15N values of archaeological charred plant material caused by harsh acid treatments and ultra-sonication. This change is interpreted as being caused by mechanical distortion of the grains/seeds rather than by the removal of contamination. Furthermore, specific infrared peaks have been identified that can be used to detect the three types of contaminants studied. We argue that it is not necessary to try to remove humic acid contamination for stable isotope analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of crushing the grains/seeds before pre-treatment are discussed. Conclusions We recommend the use of an acid-only procedure (0.5 M HCl for 30 min at 80°C followed by three rinses in distilled water) for cleaning charred plant remains. This study fills an important gap in plant stable isotope research that will enable future researchers to evaluate potential

  14. Carbon stable isotope composition of DNA isolated from an incipient paleosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A. Hope; Kelm, Kellie; Wendland, Beverly; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole

    2006-05-01

    We determined the carbon isotope (δ13C) value of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) isolated from the organic horizons of a Delaware soil that is actively being covered by an encroaching sand dune. The soil belongs to a Nymphaea odorata Ait. (water lily) wetland, and we regard its active acquisition of a thick (˜24 cm) surface mantle to embody the process of paleopedogenesis; therefore, we have termed it an “incipient paleosol.” In this study, we compared the δ13C value of paleosol dsDNA to the bulk δ13C value of N. odorata, as well as to the δ13C value of plants that had colonized the surface mantle. The isotopic offset between paleosol δ13CdsDNA and N. odorata δ13Ctissue was identical to the relationship between δ13CdsDNA and δ13Ctissue for tracheophytes, which we had previously determined. In contrast, the isotopic offset between paleosol δ13CdsDNA and the δ13Ctissue of plants colonizing the surface mantle differed from this relationship by as much as 4‰. Similarly, the δ13C value of bulk paleosol organic matter was extremely heterogeneous and varied across 6‰. All paleosol DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products produced clear, sharp, 350 base-pair (bp) fragments of rbcL, a gene shared by all photosynthetic organisms. These results open the exciting possibility that stable isotope analysis of dsDNA isolated from paleosol organic matter can be used to infer the δ13C value of the plant that dominated the nucleic acid contribution.

  15. Effect of forest and savanna vegetation on the carbon-isotope composition of sediments from the Sanaga River, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, M.I.; Chivas, A.R.; Giresse, P.

    1994-12-01

    The carbon-isotope composition {delta}{sup 13}C values of around -22{per_thousand}. After the river passes through extensively forested regions, the {delta}{sup 13}C values of the sediments closest to the mouth of the river decrease to -25{per_thousand}. Samples collected from rivers with entirely forested catchment had low {delta}{sup 13}C values (from -27 to -29{per_thousand}) consistent with a pure C{sub 3} vegetation source. The downriver carbon-isotope trends are consistent with the hypothesis that observed variations are due to changes in the relative proportions of C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} carbon in the sediments, which are derived from terrestrial vegetation in the river catchment. Some sediments from the Mbam River, the principal tributary of the Sanaga River, have extremely high {delta}{sup 13}C values (up to -16.7{per_thousand}). These high values may be the result of severe erosion in the densely populated and intensively farmed Bamileke region in the headwaters of the Mbam. An underrepresentation of C{sub 4{minus}}derived carbon in the upper reaches of the Sanaga is possibly due to the damming of the Djerem River at Mbakaou. Since the dam was constructed <25 yr ago, this suggests that the {delta}{sup 13}C value of river sediments responds rapidly to changes in the basin. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontes, B. M.; Pel, R.; Ibelings, B. W.; Boschker, H. T. S.; Middelburg, J. J.; Van Donk, E.

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of experimental biomanipulation on community structure, ecosystem metabolism, carbon biogeochemistry and stable isotope composition of a shallow eutrophic lake in the Netherlands. Three different biomanipulation treatments were applied. In two parts of the lake, isolated from the rest, fish was removed and one part was used as a reference treatment in which no biomanipulation was applied. Stable isotopes have proved useful to trace trophic interactions at higher food web levels but until now methodological limitations have restricted species specific isotope analysis in the plankton community. We applied a new approach based on the combination of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to trace carbon flow through the planktonic food web. With this method we aimed at obtaining group specific δ13C signatures of phytoplankton and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal.

    Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Fish removal also resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2 and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is attributed to chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation. Despite high temporal variation we detected differences between the isotopic signatures of the primary producers and between the different treatments. The fractionation values of green algae (~21) and diatoms (~23) were similar and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, consumers seemed generalists to the available food sources.

  17. Methane flux and stable hydrogen and carbon isotope composition of sedimentary methane from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.A.; Barber, T.R.; Sackett, W.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Methane flux and the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane were measured at four locations in the Florida Everglades system. Individual estimates of methane flux ranged over more than 3 orders of magnitude, from about 0.001 to 2.6 g CH{sub 4}/sq m/day. Significant interstation differences in total methane flux were also observed and are judged most likely attributable to differences in the size and spacing of emergent aquatic vegetation, and possibly differences in the type of organic matter incorporated into the sediments. On the basis of measurements presented here and by other investigators, the Everglades system appears to be a relatively weak source of atmospheric methane, probably contributing less than 0.5 Tg CH{sub 4}/yr. Emergent aquatic plants appear to be capable of indirectly affecting the stable isotopic composition of sedimentary methane by stimulating methane oxidation via root aeration. A significant positive correlation between delta D-CH4 and delta C{sup 13}-CH{sub 4} was observed for samples collected from sediments covered by tall, dense stands of emergent plants. In contrast, a significant negative correlation between the delta D and delta C{sup 13} of sedimentary methane was observed for samples collected at an open water site where ebullition dominated methane transfer to the atmosphere. 63 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Precipitation source inferred from stable isotopic composition of Pleistocene groundwater and carbonate deposits in the western desert of Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, M.; Sturchio, N.; Hassan, F. A.; Abdel, M.; Hamdan, R.; Mahmood, A. M.; Alfy, Z. E.; Stein, T.; Environmental Research; Univ. Coll. London; Cairo Univ.; Ain Shams Univ.; Egyptian Geological survey and Mining Authority; Washington Univ.

    1997-01-01

    An Atlantic source of precipitation can be inferred from stable isotopic data (H and O) for fossil groundwaters and uranium-series-dated carbonate spring deposits from oases in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the context of available stable isotopic data for fossil groundwaters throughout North Africa, the observed isotopic depletions ({delta}D -72 to -81{per_thousand}; {delta}{sup 18}O -10.6 to -11.5{per_thousand}) of fossil ({ge}32,000 yr B.P.) groundwaters from the Nubian aquifer are best explained by progressive condensation of water vapor from paleowesterly wet oceanic air masses that traveled across North Africa and operated at least as far back as 450,000 yr before the present. The values of {delta}{sup 18}O (17.1 to 25.9{per_thousand}) for 45,000- to >450,000-yr-old tufas and vein-filling calcite deposits from the Kharga and Farafra Oases are consistent with deposition from groundwaters having oxygen isotopic compositions similar to those of fossil groundwaters sampled recently at these locations.

  19. Evolution of the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Bereiter, B.; Schneider, R.; Fischer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new δ13C measurements of atmospheric CO2 covering the last glacial/interglacial cycle, complementing previous records covering Terminations I and II. Most prominent in the new record is a significant depletion in δ13C(atm) of 0.5‰ occurring during marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, followed by an enrichment of the same magnitude at the beginning of MIS 3. Such a significant excursion in the record is otherwise only observed at glacial terminations, suggesting that similar processes were at play, such as changing sea surface temperatures, changes in marine biological export in the Southern Ocean (SO) due to variations in aeolian iron fluxes, changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, upwelling of deep water in the SO, and long-term trends in terrestrial carbon storage. Based on previous modeling studies, we propose constraints on some of these processes during specific time intervals. The decrease in δ13C(atm) at the end of MIS 4 starting approximately 64 kyr B.P. was accompanied by increasing [CO2]. This period is also marked by a decrease in aeolian iron flux to the SO, followed by an increase in SO upwelling during Heinrich event 6, indicating that it is likely that a large amount of δ13C-depleted carbon was transferred to the deep oceans previously, i.e., at the onset of MIS 4. Apart from the upwelling event at the end of MIS 4 (and potentially smaller events during Heinrich events in MIS 3), upwelling of deep water in the SO remained reduced until the last glacial termination, whereupon a second pulse of isotopically light carbon was released into the atmosphere.

  20. Climate controls on the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter and its regional variability in grasslands and savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, J. M.; Still, C. J.; Cerling, T. E.; Sheldon, N. D.

    2013-12-01

    Future environmental changes driven by anthropogenic CO2 emissions are of increasing importance to human society. Among those changes, the balance between economically and ecologically important C3 and C4 vegetation is of particular significance. There is considerable disagreement in recent predictions of changing distribution of grasses due to anthropogenic climate change because increasing temperature and atmospheric pCO2 have opposing effects on the relative productivity of C3 vegetation. In order to forecast future changes to vegetation composition in grasslands, we must first better constrain the modern relationship between climate and the distribution of C3 and C4 grasses. Due to the isotopic differences between the two photosynthetic pathways, the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter (δ13Corg) is a proxy for the relative abundance and productivity of overlying C3 and C4 vegetation. Here, we have compiled an extensive dataset through literature review of δ13Corg to determine the relationships between the distribution of C3 and C4 vegetation in grasslands with climate. We find that the best predictor of δ13Corg variation is growing season average air temperature, and that there are unique relationships between growing season average temperature and δ13Corg for different regions of the world, including North America, South America and Australia. These results imply that the response of C4 grasses to anthropogenic climate warming may not be uniform across different species and grassland communities. We also use this dataset to create an 'isoscape', or a predictive spatial model for the isotopic composition of soil organic carbon for temperate grasslands and savannas worldwide.

  1. Carbon-isotope composition of Lower Cretaceous fossil wood: Ocean-atmosphere chemistry and relation to sea-level change

    SciTech Connect

    Groecke, D.R.; Hesselbo, S.P.; Jenkyns, H.C.

    1999-02-01

    The carbon-isotope composition of fossil wood fragments, collected through a biostratigraphically well-constructed Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) shallow-marine siliciclastic succession on the Isle of Wight, southern Britain, shows distinct variations with time. The results indicate that the stratigraphic signature of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the Aptian was influenced primarily by fluctuations in the isotopic composition of CO{sub 2} in the global ocean-atmosphere system, as registered in marine carbonates elsewhere, and was not governed by local paleoenvironmental and/or paleoecological factors. Negative and positive excursions in {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the lower Aptian occur in phase with inferred transgressions and regressions, respectively -- a pattern that contrasts with that observed in many previous studies for different time intervals. The relationship between {delta}{sup 13}C variations and relative sea-level change is tentatively interpreted as a response to various climatic and eustatic factors, relating to rapid sea-floor spreading, thermal uplift of ocean floor, emplacement of plateaus, volcanic CO{sub 2} emissions, weathering, and sedimentary rate.

  2. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  3. Variability in the Mass and Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Fossil-Fuel-Derived Carbon Dioxide Emissions for the Countries of the North American Carbon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Gregg, J. S.; Losey, L.; Marland, G.

    2007-12-01

    As we focus more intently on the carbon cycle in North America, the spatial and temporal scales of our observations become more important. The carbon dioxide released from fossil fuel consumption can show large variability in both spatial and temporal scales. This presentation will focus on this variability. We have compiled a data set that contains the monthly emissions of carbon dioxide released from fossil-fuel consumption for the countries of the North American Carbon Program. These data are consistent with the annual emissions as reported by CDIAC. As an example of spatial variability, in August 2000, emissions from Idaho (356 Gg C) and Texas (19,051 Gg C) differed by a factor of 53. As an example of temporal variability, in 1999, emissions from Texas differed by 31% between the months of February (13,807 Gg C) and August (18,107 Gg C). When looking at the stable carbon isotopic composition (del 13 C), variability also exists at these spatial and temporal scales. As an example of spatial variability, in April 1984, emissions from Louisiana (-36.32 per mil) and North Dakota (-25.23 per mil) differed by 11.09 per mil. As an example of temporal variability, in 2002, emissions from Montana differed by 5.22 per mil between the months of July (-28.38 per mil) and December (- 33.60 per mil). Finally, this presentation will also include analysis of the uncertainty associated with these time series. Variations in data collection are such that the uncertainty varies among the three countries of North America and uncertainty increases as the spatial and temporal scales decrease.

  4. Emission rate, isotopic composition and origin(s) of magmatic carbon dioxide at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.

    2012-12-01

    (iii) other Javanese volcanoes whose lavas do not contain calc-silicate xenoliths emit CO2 with identical δ13C values of -4‰. Based on the above observations and on typical arc-type isotopic ratios for water, sulphur and nitrogen in Merapi magmatic gases [2], I rather propose that 80% of CO2 emitted by the volcano ultimately derives from a subducted sediment contribution, in agreement with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data for bulk lavas [9]. The CO2/HCl ratio of Merapi magmatic gases, normalized to the bulk mass fraction of outgassed Cl inferred from analysis of melt inclusions in clinopyroxene and the matrix glasses, points to a maximum CO2 content of ~1 wt% in the undegassed magma [3], 0.8 wt% of which derived from subducted carbon. [1] Allard, 1980, C.R. Acad Sciences Paris; [2] Allard, 1986, Ph.D thesis, Paris 7 Univ.; [3] Allard et al., 1995, and submitted (JVGR, 2012); [4] Toutain et al., Bull. Volcanol. 2009; [5] Clocchiatti et al., 1982, C.R. Acad. Sciences Paris; [6] Chadwick et al., 2007, J. Petrol.; [7] Deegan et al., 2010, J. Petrol.; [8] Troll et al., 2012, Geophys. Res. Lett.; [9] Gertisser and Keller, 2003, J. Petrol..

  5. An episode of widespread ocean anoxia during the latest Ediacaran Period revealed by light U isotope compositions in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of ocean redox chemistry during the Ediacaran Period is important for understanding the causal relationship between environmental oxygen levels and early metazoan evolution. Geochemical data (e.g., high Mo and U concentrations and/or heavy Mo and U isotope compositions from sedimentary rocks) provide evidence of extensive ocean oxygenation shortly after the Marinoan glaciation at ca. 632 Ma [1], during the late Ediacaran Period at ca. 560-551 Ma [2], and multiple times during the early Cambrian Period [3, 4]. These episodes of oxygenation may have been separated by intervals of less oxygenated conditions [1, 2]. However, the global redox state of the ocean during the terminal Ediacaran period (ca. 551-541 Ma) is poorly constrained. We address this knowledge gap by measuring carbonate U isotope compositions (δ238U) - a novel global ocean redox proxy - of the Gaojiashan Member of the late Ediacaran Dengying Formation (ca. 551-541 Ma) in South China. An abrupt negative shift in δ238U from values scattering around -0.45‰ to values averaging -0.95‰ (±0.20‰, 2sd) was observed in the middle Gaojiashan Member, suggesting a globally widespread expansion of ocean anoxia during the terminal Ediacaran Period. The negative δ238U shift coincides with the onset of a pronounced positive carbon isotope excursion (from 0‰ to +6‰), suggesting that ocean anoxia is the major driving force behind enhanced organic carbon burial that led to the carbon isotope excursion. The widespread anoxia recorded by the Gaojiashan Member is bracketed by known intervals of extensive ocean oxygenation, thus indicating that the Precambrian-Phanerozoic transition was characterized by oscillating ocean redox conditions. The Ediacara biota (ca. 541 Ma) [5] disappeared shortly after the widespread ocean anoxia, suggesting that an expansion of ocean anoxia may have triggerred the onset of a mass extinction in the latest Ediacaran time. References: [1] Sahoo, et al. (2012), Nature

  6. Carbon isotope composition of ambient CO2 and recycling: a matrix simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between isotopic composition and concentration of ambient CO2 in a canopy and its associated convective boundary layer was modeled. The model divides the canopy and convective boundary layer into several layers. Photosynthesis, respiration, and exchange between each layer can be simulated by matrix equations. This simulation can be used to calculate recycling; defined here as the amount of respired CO2 re-fixed by photosynthesis relative to the total amount of respired CO2. At steady state the matrix equations can be solved for the canopy and convective boundary layer CO2 concentration and isotopic profile, which can be used to calculate a theoretical recycling index according to a previously developed equation. There is complete agreement between simulated and theoretical recycling indices for different exchange scenarios. Recycling indices from a simulation of gas exchange between a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the troposphere also agreed with a more generalized form of the theoretical recycling equation developed here.

  7. Stable carbon isotopic composition of methane from some natural and anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.M.; Engelkemeir, A.

    1988-01-20

    The results of delta/sup 13/C measurements of several types of major sources of methane are as follows: rice paddies, -67%; the peat bogs of the Lake Agassiz region of northern Minnesota, -67 +- 5%; swamps of the Florida Everglades, -55 +- 3% and biomass burning, -24 to -32%. In addition, results are presented of a study of the delta/sup 13/C of CH/sub 4/ released from a slough, compared to the CH/sub 4/ in the bottom sediment. These isotopic values are used, together with previously published data, to make up a tentative budget of the fluxes of the major sources for atmospheric methane with an averge isotopic composition matching the measured value for atmospheric CH/sub 4/, taking into account the fractionation effect of the sink processes. This budget requires the existence of a significant flux from an anthropogenic source of heavy CH/sub 4/, calculated to be 45 +- 15 Tg yr/sup -1/ if attributed to CH/sub 4/ from biomass burning, with deltaC = -25%. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  8. Sources of Variation in the Carbon Isotopic Composition of Root Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Pendall, E.

    2008-12-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is comprised of CO2 from root respiration, rhizosphere microbes and heterotrophic respiration from soil organic matter. Isotopic approaches at partitioning autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration require determining source signatures. The signature of root tissue has been commonly used as the root end-member. However, this signature corresponds to all cellular constituents, which are not expected to be part of root respiration. Also, there is some evidence of fractionation during dark respiration so that the use of dried bulk roots may not accurately represent respired CO2. Incubation of excised roots and subsequent isotope analysis offers a simple alternative that can be of use for experimental purposes. To assess the applicability of this approach we measured respiration rates and 13C signatures of the respiration of excised roots from an ongoing field experiment studying the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations and their interactions on soil organic matter dynamics. The experiment uses Free-Air CO2 enrichment and generates continuous labeling with 13C depleted CO2 in the elevated CO2 treatments. Roots were collected from two different depths in the spring and summer seasons and isotopic analyses of respiration and whole tissue were performed. Analyses to date have found no differences in the respiration rates of roots from any treatment at any date. d13C (delta Carbon 13) values of respiration were lower under elevated CO2 and there was no effect of warming or root depth. There was a greater difference between the respiration signatures of roots from elevated CO2 and ambient CO2 in the samples collected in the summer than in the samples collected in the spring because values in the ambient CO2 treatment were higher in the summer. d13C values became significantly more positive with time since collection in all treatments. We hypothesize that root metabolism immediately after excision utilizes labile C (sugars and starch) that

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of particulate organic matter in four large river systems across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.; Kelly, V.J.

    2001-01-01

    Riverine particulate organic matter (POM) samples were collected bi-weekly to monthly from 40 sites in the Mississippi, Colorado, Rio Grande, and Columbia River Basins (USA) in 1996-97 and analysed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic compositions. These isotopic compositions and C : N ratios were used to identify four endmember sources of POM: Plankton, fresh terrestrial plant material, aquatic plants, and soil organic material. This large-scale study also incorporated ancillary chemical and hydrologic data to refine and extend the interpretations of POM sources beyond the source characterizations that could be done solely with isotopic and elemental ratios. The ancillary data were especially useful for differentiating between seasonal changes in POM source materials and the effects of local nutrient sources and in-stream biogeochemical processes. Average values of ??13 C and C : N for all four river systems suggested that plankton is the dominant source of POM in these rivers, with higher percentages of plankton downstream of reservoirs. Although the temporal patterns in some rivers are complex, the low ??13C and C : N values in spring and summer probably indicate plankton blooms, whereas relatively elevated values in fall and winter are consistent with greater proportions of decaying aquatic vegetation and/or terrestrial material. Seasonal shifts in the ??13C of POM when the C : N remains relatively constant probably indicate changes in the relative rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Periodic inputs of plant detritus are suggested by C : N ratios >15, principally on the Columbia and Ohio Rivers. The ??15N and ??13C also reflect the importance of internal and external sources of dissolved carbon and nitrogen, and the degree of in-stream processing. Elevated ??15N values at some sites probably reflect inputs from sewage and/or animal waste. This information on the spatial and temporal variation in sources of POM in four major river systems should prove

  10. Cretaceous shales from the western interior of North America: sulfur/carbon ratios and sulfur-isotope composition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Sulphur/carbon ratios in cores of selected Cretaceous marine shales average 0.67, a value greater than that observed in recent marine sediments and much higher than global values calculated for the Cretaceous. This may be ascribed to generally low levels of bioturbation and enhanced efficiency of sulphate reduction due to low oxygen levels in Cretaceous seaways. Isotopic compositions of pyrite sulphur vary systematically with level of oxygenation of the depositional environment and therefore with organic carbon abundance and type of organic matter. Samples with >4% organic carbon are extremely depleted in 34S (mean delta 34S -31per mille) and contain hydrogen-rich organic matter. Samples containing <1.5% organic carbon display relatively 'heavy' but wide-ranging delta 34S values (-34.6 to +16.8per mille) and contain hydrogen-poor organic matter. Samples with intermediate amounts of organic carbon have average delta 34S of -25.9per mille and contain both types of organic matter. Relations between the nature of these shales, and their sedimentation rate and depositional environment are discussed.-L.C.H.

  11. Carbon isotope compositions of terrestrial C3 plants as indicators of (paleo)ecology and (paleo)climate

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    A broad compilation of modern carbon isotope compositions in all C3 plant types shows a monotonic increase in δ13C with decreasing mean annual precipitation (MAP) that differs from previous models. Corrections for temperature, altitude, or latitude are smaller than previously estimated. As corrected for altitude, latitude, and the δ13C of atmospheric CO2, these data permit refined interpretation of MAP, paleodiet, and paleoecology of ecosystems dominated by C3 plants, either prior to 7–8 million years ago (Ma), or more recently at mid- to high latitudes. Twenty-nine published paleontological studies suggest preservational or scientific bias toward dry ecosystems, although wet ecosystems are also represented. Unambiguous isotopic evidence for C4 plants is lacking prior to 7–8 Ma, and hominid ecosystems at 4.4 Ma show no isotopic evidence for dense forests. Consideration of global plant biomass indicates that average δ13C of C3 plants is commonly overestimated by approximately 2‰. PMID:21041671

  12. Carbon isotope compositions of terrestrial C3 plants as indicators of (paleo)ecology and (paleo)climate.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Matthew J

    2010-11-16

    A broad compilation of modern carbon isotope compositions in all C3 plant types shows a monotonic increase in δ(13)C with decreasing mean annual precipitation (MAP) that differs from previous models. Corrections for temperature, altitude, or latitude are smaller than previously estimated. As corrected for altitude, latitude, and the δ(13)C of atmospheric CO(2), these data permit refined interpretation of MAP, paleodiet, and paleoecology of ecosystems dominated by C3 plants, either prior to 7-8 million years ago (Ma), or more recently at mid- to high latitudes. Twenty-nine published paleontological studies suggest preservational or scientific bias toward dry ecosystems, although wet ecosystems are also represented. Unambiguous isotopic evidence for C4 plants is lacking prior to 7-8 Ma, and hominid ecosystems at 4.4 Ma show no isotopic evidence for dense forests. Consideration of global plant biomass indicates that average δ(13)C of C3 plants is commonly overestimated by approximately 2‰. PMID:21041671

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope microanalysis of carbonate.

    PubMed

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A; Ignatiev, Alexander V; Gorbarenko, Sergey A

    2009-08-30

    Technical modification of the conventional method for the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of 10-30 microg carbonate samples is described. The CO(2) extraction is carried out in vacuum using 105% phosphoric acid at 95 degrees C, and the isotopic composition of CO(2) is measured in a helium flow by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The feed-motion of samples to the reaction vessel provides sequential dropping of only the samples (without the sample holder) into the acid, preventing the contamination of acid and allowing us to use the same acid to carry out very large numbers of analyses. The high accuracy and high reproducibility of the delta(13)C and delta(18)O analyses were demonstrated by measurements of international standards and comparison of results obtained by our method and by the conventional method. Our method allows us to analyze 10 microg of the carbonate with a standard deviation of +/-0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C and delta(18)O. The method has been used successfully for the analyses of the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the planktonic and benthic foraminifera in detailed palaeotemperature reconstructions of the Okhotsk Sea. PMID:19603476

  14. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  15. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1994-02-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems. PMID:11536629

  16. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems. PMID:11536629

  17. A balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon and nitrogen. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen were measured at energies near 300 MeV amu, using a balloon-borne instrument at an atmospheric depth of approximately 5 g/sq cm. The calibrations of the detectors comprising the instrument are described. The saturation properties of the cesium iodide scintillators used for measurement of particle energy are studied in the context of analyzing the data for mass. The achieved rms mass resolution varies from approximately 0.3 amu at boron to approximately 0.5 amu at nitrogen, consistent with a theoretical analysis of the contributing factors. Corrected for detector interactions and the effects of the residual atmosphere the results are B-10/B=0.33 (+0.17, -0.11), C-13/C=0.06 (+0.13, -0.11), and N-15/N=0.42 (+0.19, -0.17). A model of galactic propagation and solar modulation is described. Assuming a cosmic ray source composition of solar-like isotopic abundances, the model predicts abundances near Earth consistent with the measurements.

  18. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  19. Organismal versus Environmental Control of the Carbon Isotope Composition of Dicot Angiosperm Pollen: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. P.; Schubert, B.; Foelber, K.; Jahren, H.

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence and diagenetic resilience of palynomorphs in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sediments has led researchers to investigate its potential as an environmental proxy based on its stable isotope composition. Towards this, Loader and Hemming (2001), noted that the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of modern Pinus sylvestris pollen exine correlates with the developmental period temperature (°C) of the pollen (R2=0.68), implying that the δ13C of gymnosperm pollen could be quantitatively utilized as a paleotemperature proxy. However, the majority of pollen-producing organisms during the last ~120 million years have been angiosperms, which are subject to complex internal signaling for reproduction, in addition to environmental triggers. Because these internal signals control the relative proportion of lipids, long-chain fatty acids, and polysaccharides within pollen grains, we hypothesized that the δ13C variability in pollen (δ13Cpollen) from several plants subject to the same external environmental parameters is of the same magnitude as the amount attributed to the environment for gymnosperms. Within growth chambers, the test organism (Brassica rapa) was cultivated under constant light, water, pCO2, and nutrient supply, but exhibited average δ13Cpollen variability = 4.35% within any chamber (n = 6 to 8 plants per chamber). Field experiments were also conducted in which the pollen from the test organism (Hibiscus spp.) was sampled from several botanical gardens within the state of Hawaii. Pollen collected from any one botanical garden exhibited an average δ13Cpollen variability = 4.5% (up to 5 plants per garden). Upon comparing chambers operating at different temperatures (17°C to 32°C), we discovered no correlation (R2=0.01) between the developmental period temperature (°C) and the δ13C of B. rapa pollen; similarly, no correlation was found between the δ13C of Hibiscus pollen and its developmental period temperature (°C) (R2=0.12). This work

  20. Tracking Transport and Transformation of Aerosols using C and O-triple Isotopic Composition of Carbonates: CSI La Jolla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.; Chong, K.; Hill, A.; Wong, J.; Zhang, Z.; Dominguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols affect climate in numerous ways, including change in the earth's energy balance by absorbing and scattering solar radiations, alteration of the hydrological cycle by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, change in biogeochemical cycles by providing nutrients. Another significant process is the effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere by providing surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions. Fine particles of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) also impinge upon human health by admission to the respiratory system causing a range of cardiopulmonary diseases. Both climate and public health aspects depend on their physical and chemical properties, therefore, understanding physico-chemical and photochemical transformations on aerosol surfaces is important for predicting their effects on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and human health. Here we present initial findings on the processes occurring on aerosol surfaces using isotopes to delineate day and night time chemistry, thus resolving photochemistry effects, and to identify their sources by way of the carbon isotopes. Aerosols were collected on filter papers for 12h during the day and at night time from June-Dec. 2011in La Jolla, CA., using high volume, multi stage cascade impactors. CO2 released after treating these filter papers with 100% phosphoric acid at 27oC was collected, purified chromatographically and analyzed for both C and O isotopes. Our data indicate that both C and O isotopes can be used to distinguish between heterogeneous and photochemical transformations. Aerosol carbonates collected during the day time were depleted in δ13Cday = -23 to -28‰ and δ18Oday = +3 to +10‰ and were isotopically distinct from the carbonates collected at night time δ13Cnight = 0 to -12‰, δ18Onightnight = +23 to +32‰. Higher chloride concentration in the samples collected at night time indicated the transport of marine air masses whereas higher nitrate and sulfate concentration

  1. The Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Methane Released from Natural Wetlands and Ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansdown, John Malcolm

    The delta^{13} {rm C} of CH_4 emitted from the tropical Amazon river floodplain, temperate peat bogs in Washington and Minnesota, and the arctic Alaskan tundra was -59, -73, -66, and -65perthous, respectively. The deltaD of CH_4 from these sites was -294, -308, -339, and -391perthous, respectively, and a linear relationship was observed between the deltaD of CH_4 and soil water. A ^{13} C balance between CH_4, CO _2 and soil organic matter indicated a higher percentage of CH_4 production via methyl conversion at the Amazon floodplain than at the other wetland sites and that the anoxic CO _2 flux was 1.5 to 2.0 times the CH _4 flux. The ^{13} C balance provided greater constraint on the anoxic CO_2 flux than calculations based on soil water gradients. An in situ value of 0.774 for the hydrogen kinetic isotope effect during microbial CH _4 oxidation was estimated from the increase in the delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 in flux samples from the Amazon site. The average delta^{13 }{rm C} of CH_4 released from an acidic peat bog in Washington state (pH = 3.5) was -73perthous, lower than previously measured at freshwater wetland sites. Soil incubations with ^{14 }C-labeled CO_2 and acetate substrates showed that CO_2 reduction accounted for essentially all methane production in the bog. An in situ value of 0.933 for the carbon kinetic isotope effect for CO_2 reduction was calculated from the delta^{13 }{rm C} of the CH_4 flux and soil water CO_2.. The delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 emitted from ruminants was measured and averaged -63 and -404perthous, respectively. CO _2 reduction accounted for ~70% of rumen CH_4 production based on the change in the delta ^{13}{rm C} and deltaD of rumen CH_4 vs. time during normal conditions and after the addition of deuterated water to the rumen. These results contrast the dogma in the literature that CO_2 reduction accounts for essentially all CH _4 production in the rumen. A global budget for the deltaD of CH_4 was

  2. Assessment of grain-scale homogeneity and equilibration of carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of minerals in carbonate-bearing metamorphic rocks by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, John M.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen samples of metamorphosed carbonate-bearing rocks were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios by ion microprobe with a ˜5-15 μm spot, three from a regional terrain and 16 from five different contact aureoles. Contact metamorphic rocks further represent four groups: calc-silicate marble and hornfels (6), brucite marble (2), samples that contain a reaction front (4), and samples with a pervasive distribution of reactants and products of a decarbonation reaction (4). The average spot-to-spot reproducibility of standard calcite analyses is ±0.37‰ (2 standard deviations, SD) for δ 18O and ±0.71‰ for δ 13C. Ten or more measurements of a mineral in a sample that has uniform isotope composition within error of measurement can routinely return a weighted mean with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09-0.16‰ for δ 18O and 0.10-0.29‰ for δ 13C. Using a difference of >6SD as the criterion, only four of 19 analyzed samples exhibit significant intracrystalline and/or intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 13C at the 100-500 μm scale, with differences within individual grains up to 3.7‰. Measurements are consistent with carbon isotope exchange equilibrium between calcite and dolomite in five of six analyzed samples at the same scale. Because of relatively slow carbon isotope diffusion in calcite and dolomite, differences in δ 13C can survive intracrystalline homogenization by diffusion during cooling after peak metamorphism and likely represent the effects of prograde decarbonation and infiltration. All but 2 of 11 analyzed samples exhibit intracrystalline differences in δ 18O (up to 9.4‰), intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 18O (up to 12.5‰), and/or disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among calcite-dolomite, calcite-quartz, and calcite-forsterite pairs at the 100-500 μm scale. Inhomogeneities in δ 18O and δ 13C are poorly correlated with only a single mineral (dolomite) in a single sample exhibiting both. Because of relatively

  3. Methane oxidation by termite mounds estimated by the carbon isotopic composition of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Atsuko; Inoue, Tetsushi; Kirtibutr, Nit; Abe, Takuya

    1998-12-01

    Emission rates and carbon isotope ratios of CH4, emitted by workers of termites, and of CH4, emitted from their mounds, were observed in a dry evergreen forest in Thailand to estimate the proportion of CH4 oxidized during emission through the mound. The δ13C of CH4 emitted from a termite mound (-70.9 to -82.4‰) was higher than that of CH4 emitted by workers in the mound (-85.4 to -97. l‰). Using a fractionation factor (a = 0.987) for oxidation of CH4 which was obtained in the incubation experiment, an emission factor defined as (CH4 emitted from a termite mound/CH4 produced by termites) was calculated. The emission factor obtained in each termite mound was nearly zero for Macrotermes (fungus-growing termites), of which the nest has a thick soil wall and subterrannean termites, and 0.17 to 0.47 for Termitinae (small-mound-making termites). Global CH4 emission by termites was estimated on the basis of the CH4 emission rates by workers and termite biomass with the emission factors. The calculated result was 1.5 to 7.4 Tg/y (0.3 to 1.3% of total source), which is considerably smaller than the estimate by the IPCC [1994].

  4. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Seiya; Kodama, Hiroki; Aramaki, Takafumi; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    This study reports carbon isotopic ratios (Δ(14)C and δ(13)C) of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system, northern Japan. These acids have a refractory feature and they represent the largest fraction of dissolved organic matter in aquatic environments. The acids were isolated using the XAD extraction method from river water samples collected at three sites (on the upper and lower Tokachi River, and from one of its tributaries) in June 2004 and 2005. δ(13)C values were -27.8 to -26.9 ‰ for humic and fulvic acids. On the other hand, the Δ(14)C values ranged from -247 to +26 ‰ and the average values were -170 ± 79 ‰ for humic acid and -44 ± 73 ‰ for fulvic acid. The difference was attributed to the residence time of fulvic acid in the watershed being shorter than that of humic acid. The large variation suggested that humic substances have a different pathway in each watershed environment. PMID:21515623

  5. Stable carbon isotope ratio and composition of microbial fatty acids in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Burke, Roger A; Molina, Marirosa; Cox, Julia E; Osher, Laurie J; Piccolo, Marisa C

    2003-01-01

    The soil microbial community plays a critical part in tropical ecosystem functioning through its role in the soil organic matter (SOM) cycle. This study evaluates the relative effects of soil type and land use on (i) soil microbial community structure and (ii) the contribution of SOM derived from the original forest vegetation to the functioning of pasture and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) ecosystems. We used principal components analysis (PCA) of soil phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles to evaluate microbial community structure and PLFA stable carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) as indicators of the delta13C of microbial substrates. Soil type mainly determined the relative proportions of gram positive versus gram negative bacteria whereas land use primarily determined the relative proportion of fungi, protozoa, and actinomycetes versus other types of microorganisms. Comparison of a simple model to our PLFA delta13C data from land use chronosequences indicates that forest-derived SOM is actively cycled for appreciably longer times in sugarcane ecosystems developed on Andisols (mean turnover time = 50 yr) than in sugarcane ecosystems developed on an Oxisol (mean turnover time = 13 yr). Our analyses indicate that soil chronosequence PLFA delta13C measurements can be useful indicators of the contribution that SOM derived from the original vegetation makes to continued ecosystem function under the new land use. PMID:12549559

  6. Similar glacial and Holocene deep water circulation inferred from southeast Pacific benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    1999-04-01

    We present Holocene and last glacial maximum (LGM) oxygen and carbon isotope measurements on Planulina wuellerstorfi in six southeast Pacific cores. Sedimentation rates are low in this part of the ocean, and measurements were made on individual foraminiferal shells in order to identify the Holocene and glacial individuals on the basis of their extreme δ18O. The new δ13C data were combined with previous P. wuellerstorfi data for interpretation of global thermohaline circulation. Data from the Southern Ocean were examined closely for regional coherency and a few anomalous δ13C values suspected of having productivity overprint were removed. The resulting global δ13C distributions and gradients indicate that the deep water circulation was similar during the Holocene and LGM. This interpretation brings δ13C data to a better agreement with Cd/Ca data and marks a sharp contrast with a widely held view based on δ13C measurements that the glacial Southern Ocean was the terminus of the thermohaline circulation. The proposed presence of glacial North Atlantic Deep Water does not necessarily contradict the postulated presence of Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water.

  7. Leaf wax composition and carbon isotopes vary among major conifer groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Leslie, Andrew B.; Wing, Scott L.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf waxes (e.g. n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) and their carbon isotopes (δ13C) are commonly used to track past changes in the carbon cycle, water availability, and plant ecophysiology. Previous studies indicated that conifers have lower n-alkane concentrations than angiosperms and that 13C fractionation during n-alkane synthesis (εn-alkane) is smaller than in angiosperms. These prior studies, however, sampled a limited phylogenetic and geographic subset of conifers, leaving out many important subtropical and Southern Hemisphere groups that were once widespread and common components of fossil assemblages. To expand on previous work, we collected 43 conifer species (and Ginkgo biloba) from the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley, sampling all extant conifer families and almost two-thirds of extant genera. We find that Pinaceae, including many North American species used in previous studies, have very low or no n-alkanes. However, other conifer groups have significant concentrations of n-alkanes, especially Southern Hemisphere Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae (monkey puzzles, Norfolk Island pines, and yellowwoods), and many species of Cupressaceae (junipers and relatives). Within the Cupressaceae, we find total n-alkane concentrations are high in subfamilies Cupressoideae and Callitroideae, but significantly lower in the early diverging taxodioid lineages (including bald cypress and redwood). Individual n-alkane chain lengths have a weak phylogenetic signal, except for n-C29 alkane, but when combined using average chain length (ACL), a strong phylogenetic signal emerges. The strong phylogenetic signal in ACL, observed in the context of a common growth environment for all plants we sampled, suggests that ACL is strongly influenced by factors other than climate. An analysis of εn-alkane indicates a strong phylogenetic signal in which the smallest biosynthetic fractionation occurs in Pinaceae and the largest in Taxaceae (yews and relatives). The

  8. Effect of Salinity on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Microbial Mats and Associated Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Modern microbial mats are commonly used as analogs for understanding early ecosystem evolution. A primary feature of benthic ecosystems is the fixation of CO2 in the photic zone and transfer and/or mineralization of organic carbon through a diverse tropic structure. Generally, the resulting δ13C values for organic matter relative to DIC is small which indicates that these mats are CO2-limited. Microcoleus mat flux measurements indicate that small amounts of CO2 fixed during the day are lost to the overlying water at night as C13-enriched DIC (Des Marais and Canfield 1994). This loss results in depletion in mat organic matter and is thought to occur as a result of remineralized DIC fixation by chemo- and/or photoautotrophs. We have examined the fate of fixed carbon in hypersaline mats by analysis of the stable C-isotopes of bulk organic carbon and lipid compounds in a laminated-Microcoleus mat (90 ‰, pH 8.6) and in a gypsum-endoevaporitic, Halothece mat (163‰, pH 7.4). In the surface photic zone of Microcoleus mat, the δ13C TOC was -10.0 ‰ with membrane fatty acids (i-15, n-16, n-18, cy-19) ranging from -17.2 to -18.0‰. Cyanobacterial alkanes were similarly depleted (n-17 = -19.5‰). Eurkaryotic sterols and bacterial hopanoids were somewhat enriched with δ13C values ~-15‰. For Microcoleus mat, little variation occurred over 70 mm of core depth. The TOC and FA values for surface, endoevaporitic Halothece mat were generally similar to those of Microcoleus. However, below the surface gypsum crust, discrimination increased. Mass balance calculations for surface FA = -18.5‰ while the FA from layers below the crust = -25.2‰. The δ13C values for cyanobacterial alkanes (~-20‰) were similar from all layers while hopanoids from below crust were slightly depleted relative to those from surface. An apparent increased discrimination during fixation of remineralized DIC presumably by anoxygenic phototrophs present below the surface gypsum crust (Jahnke et al

  9. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30 degrees C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate --> total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 +/- 0.9% to -57.2 +/- 2.3%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 +/- 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. PMID:11542159

  10. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30 degrees C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate --> total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 +/- 0.9% to -57.2 +/- 2.3%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 +/- 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring.

  11. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  12. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  13. Different carbon reservoirs of auriferous fluids in African Archean and Proterozoic gold deposits? Constraints from stable carbon isotopic compositions of quartz-hosted CO2-rich fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüders, Volker; Klemd, Reiner; Oberthür, Thomas; Plessen, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon (and when present, nitrogen) isotope ratios of fluid inclusions in quartz from selected gold deposits in Ghana and Zimbabwe have been analyzed using a crushing device interfaced to an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) in order to constrain possible sources of the auriferous fluids. The study revealed a striking difference in stable carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from Archean and Paleoproterozoic orogenic gold deposits and points to diverse sources of CO2 in the studied deposits. Whether this finding can be generalized for other Archean and Proterozoic orogenic gold deposits worldwide remains open. However, a significant CO2 contribution by mantle degassing can be ruled out for every deposit studied. Devolatilization of greenstone belt rocks is the most likely source for CO2 in some Archean Au deposits in Zimbabwe, whereas CO2 in Proterozoic vein-type Au deposits in the West African Craton is most likely derived from Corg-bearing metasedimentary rocks. The δ13CCO2 values of high-density CO2-rich, water-poor inclusions hosted in quartz pebbles from the world-class Au-bearing conglomerate deposits at Tarkwa (Ghana) differ considerably from the δ13CCO2 values of similar high-density CO2-rich inclusions in vein quartz from the giant Ashanti deposit (Ghana) and disprove the idea of derivation of the Tarkwaian quartz (and gold?) from an older equivalent to the Ashanti vein-type gold deposit.

  14. [Carbon isotopic compositions of n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in the smoke from combustion of rice straw].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Sun, Li-Na; Li, Jiu-Hai; Xu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to investigate the carbon isotopic fractionation in n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in smoke from rice straw combustion, six types of rice straw were burned in laboratory under flaming and smoldering conditions, and the compound specific isotopic compositions for the two classes of biomarkers in the smoke were determined. The results showed that the delta13C values of individual n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids released from flaming burns of all the rice species ranged from -28.6 per thousand to -38.8 per thousand and from -29.6 per thousand to -41.9per thousand, respectively, and that the mean delta13C values for the two compound classes in the flaming smoke for the six types of rice straw were in the range of -32.6 per thousand to -36. 4per thousand and -34.0 per thousand to -36.2 per thousand, respectively. Moreover, the n-alkanes in the smoke from the most straws were more depleted in 13C in general than the identical substances with equal carbon number in corresponding unburned biomass. The magnitude of the isotopic discrimination (delta) was up to 4.1per thousand. Conversely, the n-alkanoic acids in the smoke tended to be more enriched in 13C than the corresponding biomarkers in the unburned straw for all of the species, and the delta was up to 6.3 per thousand. The delta13C values of the individual n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in the smoke from smoldering burns of the six species varied between -31.7 per thousand and -39.0 per thousand and between -31.3 per thousand and -38.8 per thousand, respectively. The average values for the two compound classes in the smoke for a species were in the range of -35.1 per thousand to -36.4 per thousand and -34.4 per thousand to -35.6 per thousand, respectively. The compound specific delta13C values of the n-alkanes in the smoke for most species were smaller than those of the same substances in the corresponding rice straw, and the greatest delta was 6.1 per thousand. However, the delta13C values of n-alkanoic acids

  15. Tracing the Carbon Cycle in a Small Boreal Catchment of a Groundwater Dominated River Using the Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinikoski, P. I. A.; Karhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the carbon cycle in river systems is particularly important in fragile catchments with agriculture, urbanization, water purification facilities and other possible contamination sources. The isotopic composition and concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) has been used to determine carbon sinks and sources in river systems. The Vantaanjoki River, in southern Finland, is located in one of the most densely populated areas in Finland. Previous studies have shown the river having a considerable amount of groundwater - surface water interaction which leads to local groundwater being vulnerable to any contaminants released into the river. The catchment of the river has six water purification facilities, and during times of high discharge some of the waste water is released into the river without treatment. Other possible sources of contamination are urban areas, agriculture and a saw mill. In this study the isotopic composition of DIC was studied, along with the concentration of DIC in the river water, to determine the major influences in carbon balance in the river water, to see if human induced changes in the environment are affecting the carbon cycle. The highest δ13CDIC values were found in the summer, and the lowest ones in the spring. Locations of the water purification facilities or fields along the flow path did not show on the δ13CDIC values, nor in the DIC contents of the water. Similar trends in δ13CDIC values related to the variations between warm and cold seasons have been reported in other studies as well and are likely due to organic material forming and decaying in and around the river channel.

  16. Crystallization temperatures and stable isotope compositions of Mississippi valley-type carbonates and sulfides of the Trenton Limestone, Wyandot County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.; Mancuso, J.J.; Frizado, J.P.; Shelton, K.L.; Gregg, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study provides the first quantitative data on crystallization temperatures and isotopic compositions of Mississippi Valley-type mineralization in northwest Ohio. Samples of Trenton Limestone sulfides and associated carbonates were obtained from drill cores penetrating the Wyandot fracture zone, Wyandot County, Ohio. -Authors

  17. Stable isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group, northwestern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buick, R.; Des Marais, D. J.; Knoll, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Marine carbonate rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group of northwestern Australia show little deviation (+/-1.3%) in whole-rock delta 13C(carb)-values about a mean of -0.5%. This narrow range persists despite close sampling (every 10-20 m) through long sections (up to 2500 m) that are geographically widespread (up to 250 km apart), over many depositional environments (supralittoral to outer shelf), sediment sources (stromatolitic bioherms to detrital calcilutites) and rock types (pure limestones to dolomitic shales). The only major excursions from the norm seem related to unusual environmental or post-depositional processes, as they are correlated with large enrichments (to -3%) or depletions (to -16%) in 18O. Relatively heavy delta 13C-values, up to +2.5%, occur in a single bed of brecciated ferruginous dolostone at a single locality; these abnormal values may result from local evaporitic conditions. Limey and shaley nodular dolostones have delta 13C-values as low as -4.3%, probably caused by remineralization of organic matter during late and patchy dolomitization. Most notably, sharp negative excursions in delta 13C, up to -8.4%, occur in bleached kerogen-free rocks with mineral assemblages of dolomite + quartz + calcite +/- tremolite + talc, reflecting isotopic re-equilibration in thick metamorphic aureoles around dolerite intrusions. General environmental variations are minor, with delta 13C-values of peritidal facies tending to be slightly positive whereas those of subtidal facies are slightly negative. There are no strong secular trends, but subtle fluctuations within the range -2 to +l% can be correlated along the northwestern margin of the basin. This resembles the pattern seen in other Mesoproterozoic successions, but is markedly unlike the heavy background (> +5%) and extreme variations (up to l0%) in delta 13C evident in Neoproterozoic successions of similar thickness and environmental setting. Hence, in contrast to the Neoproterozoic, the global

  18. Stable isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group, northwestern Australia.

    PubMed

    Buick, R; Des Marais, D J; Knoll, A H

    1995-06-20

    Marine carbonate rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group of northwestern Australia show little deviation (+/-1.3%) in whole-rock delta 13C(carb)-values about a mean of -0.5%. This narrow range persists despite close sampling (every 10-20 m) through long sections (up to 2500 m) that are geographically widespread (up to 250 km apart), over many depositional environments (supralittoral to outer shelf), sediment sources (stromatolitic bioherms to detrital calcilutites) and rock types (pure limestones to dolomitic shales). The only major excursions from the norm seem related to unusual environmental or post-depositional processes, as they are correlated with large enrichments (to -3%) or depletions (to -16%) in 18O. Relatively heavy delta 13C-values, up to +2.5%, occur in a single bed of brecciated ferruginous dolostone at a single locality; these abnormal values may result from local evaporitic conditions. Limey and shaley nodular dolostones have delta 13C-values as low as -4.3%, probably caused by remineralization of organic matter during late and patchy dolomitization. Most notably, sharp negative excursions in delta 13C, up to -8.4%, occur in bleached kerogen-free rocks with mineral assemblages of dolomite + quartz + calcite +/- tremolite + talc, reflecting isotopic re-equilibration in thick metamorphic aureoles around dolerite intrusions. General environmental variations are minor, with delta 13C-values of peritidal facies tending to be slightly positive whereas those of subtidal facies are slightly negative. There are no strong secular trends, but subtle fluctuations within the range -2 to +l% can be correlated along the northwestern margin of the basin. This resembles the pattern seen in other Mesoproterozoic successions, but is markedly unlike the heavy background (> +5%) and extreme variations (up to l0%) in delta 13C evident in Neoproterozoic successions of similar thickness and environmental setting. Hence, in contrast to the Neoproterozoic, the global

  19. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Scott F; Levey, Douglas J; Greenberg, Cathryn H; Martínez Del Rio, Carlos

    2003-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine delta15N and delta13C turnover rates for blood, delta15N and delta13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for delta13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for delta15N . Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for delta13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7-3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by -1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds on diets with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures require use of mixing models that incorporate elemental concentration. PMID:16228250

  20. Oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of limestones and dolomites, bikini and eniwetok atolls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Gross M.; Tracey, J.I., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Aragonitic, unconxolidated sediments from the borings on the Eniwetok and Bikini atolls are isotopically identical with unaltered skeletal fragments, whereas the recrystallized limestones exhibit isotopic variations resulting from alteration in meteoric waters during periods of emergence. Dolomites and associated calcites are enriched in O18, perhaps because of interaction with hypersaline brines.

  1. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Edger, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; DesMarais, David J.; Cady, Sherry; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarkers and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber. "Thermocrinis sp. HI", Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyls. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by a very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as CIS() monoethers with the expection of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known 'pink-streamers community' (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the upper outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic Aquificales n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21, and in addition, a series of iso-branched fatty acids from i-C-15:0 to i-C-21:0, With i-C-17:0 dominant in the PSC and i-C-19:0 in the biofilm, suggesting the presence of two major bacterial groups. Bacteriohopanepolyols were absent and the minute quantities of archaeol detected showed that Archaea were only minor constituents. Carbon isotopic compositions of the PSC yielded information about community structure and likely physiology. Biomass was C-13-depleted (10.9%) relative to available

  2. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide from a boreal forest fire: Inferring carbon loss from measurements and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Mack, M.C.; Harden, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Fire is an important pathway for carbon (C) loss from boreal forest ecosystems and has a strong effect on ecosystem C balance. Fires can range widely in severity, defined as the amount of vegetation and forest floor consumed by fire, depending on local fuel and climatic conditions. Here we explore a novel method for estimating fire severity and loss of C from fire using the atmosphere to integrate ecosystem heterogeneity at the watershed scale. We measured the ??13C and ??14C isotopic values of CO2 emitted from an experimental forest fire at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW), near Fairbanks, Alaska. We used inverse modeling combined with dual isotope near measurements of C contained in aboveground black spruce biomass and soil organic horizons to estimate the amount of C released by this fire. The experimental burn was a medium to severe intensity fire that released, on average, about 2.5 kg Cm-2, more than half of the C contained in vegetation and soil organic horizon pools. For vegetation, the model predicted that approximately 70-75% of pools such as needles, fine branches, and bark were consumed by fire, whereas only 20-30% of pools such as coarse branches and cones were consumed. The fire was predicted to have almost completely consumed surface soil organic horizons and burned about half of the deepest humic horizon. The ability to estimate the amount of biomass combusted and C emission from fires at the watershed scale provides an extensive approach that can complement more limited intensive ground-based measurements.

  3. Carbon isotopic composition and oxygen isotopic enrichment in phloem and total leaf organic matter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) along a climate gradient.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Claudia; Matzarakis, Andreas; Rennenberg, Heinz; Gessler, Arthur

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of climate on the carbon isotopic composition (sigma13C) and oxygen isotopic enrichment (delta18O) above the source water of different organic matter pools in European beech. In July and September 2002, sigma13C and delta18O were determined in phloem carbohydrates and in bulk foliage of adult beech trees along a transect from central Germany to southern France, where beech reaches its southernmost distributional limit. The data were related to meteorological and physiological parameters. The climate along the transect stretches from temperate [subcontinental (SC)] to submediterranean (SM). Both sigma13Cleaf and delta18Oleaf were representative of site-specific long-term environmental conditions. sigma13C of leaves collected in September was indicative of stomatal conductance, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and radiation availability of the current growing season. delta18O was mainly correlated to mean growing season relative humidity (RH) and VPD. In contrast to the leaves, sigma13Cphloem varied considerably between July and September and was well correlated with canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) in a 2 d integral prior to phloem sampling. The relationship between sigma13C and delta18O in both leaves and phloem sap points, however, to a combined influence of stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity on the variation of sigma13C along the transect. delta18Ophloem could be described by applying a model that included 18O fractionation associated with water exchange between the leaf and the atmosphere and with the production of organic matter. Hence, isotope signatures can be used as effective tools to assess the water balance of beech, and thus, help predict the effects of climatic change on one of the ecologically and economically most important tree species in Central Europe. PMID:16898013

  4. Stable carbon isotopic composition of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids and ketoacids in remote marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haobo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2006-04-01

    We determined stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of C2 to C9 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) and some ketoacids in the marine aerosols from the western Pacific and Southern Ocean (35°N to 65°S). On average, oxalic (mean, -16.8‰), adipic (-17.2‰), and glyoxylic (-17.6‰) acids showed heavier δ13C, whereas maleic (-24.2‰), methylmalonic (-23.6‰), and phthalic (-23.1‰) acids were more depleted in 13C. Oxalic acid presented very diverse δ13C values (-27 to -7‰), which increased from midlatitudes toward the equator. A similar latitudinal trend of δ13C was also found for malonic, succinic, and adipic acids. However, such a trend was not observed for phthalic, maleic, and glyoxylic acids. We suggest that the δ13C increase toward the equator is associated with photochemically aged air masses, in which kinetic isotope effects for photochemical degradation of DCAs may be important. Differences in δ13C of some saturated DCAs were also found to increase from midlatitudes to the equator.

  5. Fe, C, and O isotope compositions of banded iron formation carbonates demonstrate a major role for dissimilatory iron reduction in ~2.5 Ga marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Adriana; Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Valley, John W.; Roden, Eric E.; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Beukes, Nicolas J.

    2010-05-01

    Combined Fe, C, and O isotope measurements of ~ 2.5 Ga banded iron formation (BIF) carbonates from the Kuruman Iron Formation and underlying BIF and platform Ca-Mg carbonates of the Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, constrain the biologic and abiologic formation pathways in these extensive BIF deposits. Vertical intervals of up to 100 m were sampled in three cores that cover a lateral extent of ~ 250 km. BIF Fe carbonates have significant Fe isotope variability ( δ56Fe = + 1 to - 1‰) and relatively low δ13C (down to - 12‰) and δ18O values ( δ18O ~ + 21‰). In contrast, Gamohaan and stratigraphically-equivalent Campbellrand Ca-Mg carbonates have near-zero δ13C values and higher δ18O values. These findings argue against siderite precipitation from seawater as the origin of BIF Fe-rich carbonates. Instead, the C, O, and Fe isotope compositions of BIF Fe carbonates reflect authigenic pathways of formation in the sedimentary pile prior to lithification, where microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) was the major process that controlled the C, O, and Fe isotope compositions of siderite. Isotope mass-balance reactions indicate that the low- δ13C and low- δ18O values of BIF siderite, relative to those expected for precipitation from seawater, reflect inheritance of C and O isotope compositions of precursor organic carbon and ferric hydroxide that were generated in the photic zone and deposited on the seafloor. Carbon-Fe isotope relations suggest that BIF Fe carbonates formed through two end-member pathways: low- δ13C, low- δ56Fe Fe carbonates formed from remobilized, low- δ56Fe aqueous Fe 2+ produced by partial DIR of iron oxide, whereas low- δ13C, high- δ56Fe Fe carbonates formed by near-complete DIR of high- δ56Fe iron oxides that were residual from prior partial DIR. An important observation is the common occurrence of iron oxide inclusions in the high- δ56Fe siderite, supporting a model where such compositions reflect DIR "in place" in the soft

  6. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of particulate organic matter in four large river systems across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Carol; Silva, Steven R.; Kelly, Valerie J.

    2001-05-01

    Riverine particulate organic matter (POM) samples were collected bi-weekly to monthly from 40 sites in the Mississippi, Colorado, Rio Grande, and Columbia River Basins (USA) in 1996-97 and analysed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic compositions. These isotopic compositions and C : N ratios were used to identify four endmember sources of POM: plankton, fresh terrestrial plant material, aquatic plants, and soil organic material. This large-scale study also incorporated ancillary chemical and hydrologic data to refine and extend the interpretations of POM sources beyond the source characterizations that could be done solely with isotopic and elemental ratios. The ancillary data were especially useful for differentiating between seasonal changes in POM source materials and the effects of local nutrient sources and in-stream biogeochemical processes.Average values of 13C and C : N for all four river systems suggested that plankton is the dominant source of POM in these rivers, with higher percentages of plankton downstream of reservoirs. Although the temporal patterns in some rivers are complex, the low 13C and C : N values in spring and summer probably indicate plankton blooms, whereas relatively elevated values in fall and winter are consistent with greater proportions of decaying aquatic vegetation and/or terrestrial material. Seasonal shifts in the 13C of POM when the C : N remains relatively constant probably indicate changes in the relative rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Periodic inputs of plant detritus are suggested by C : N ratios >15, principally on the Columbia and Ohio Rivers. The 15N and 13C also reflect the importance of internal and external sources of dissolved carbon and nitrogen, and the degree of in-stream processing. Elevated 15N values at some sites probably reflect inputs from sewage and/or animal waste. This information on the spatial and temporal variation in sources of POM in four major river systems should prove useful in future

  7. Problem of soot aggregates separation and purification for Carbon isotopic composition analyses - burning experiment and real black layers from speleothems examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercman, Helena; Zawidzki, Pawel; Majewska, Agata

    2015-04-01

    Burning products are often used as an indicator of fire or prehistoric men activities. When it consists of macroscopically visible black layer it may be studied by different methods. When it is dispersed within sediment it is necessary to apply method for burning product separation. Soot aggregates as a result of incomplete combustion of organic materials are most reliable indication of burning. Size of soot particles is too small to observe by optical microscopy. There are two main advantages of application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for investigations of samples formed as a result of organic materials (like wood) combustion. First, it makes possible to investigate not only morphology but also its interior structure. The carbon layers arrangement is characteristic for particles obtained from combustion processes, and it directly confirm that these particles were formed that way. And second, analysis of chemical composition using of EDS spectroscopy in transmission microscope are precise and it spatial resolution is about a few nanometers. Burning chamber for wood burning experiments was constructed. It allows wood burning with controlling of burning temperature, carbon isotopic composition in carbon dioxide of burning atmosphere and carbon dioxide originated during burning. Burning products are collected on the plates with controlling of plates material, temperature and distance from flame. Two types of samples were studied. The first type of samples consisted the products of recent wood burning. The second type of samples consisted of black layers collected from speleothems. Soot aggregates were chemically separated from other burning products collected on plates. Process of chemical separation and purity of soot material were tested by TEM observations. Isotopic carbon composition at each step of soot separation as well as original wood fragments was analysed at the Isotopic Laboratory for Dating and Palaeoenvironment Studies, Polish Academy of

  8. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of bone collagen from marine and terrestrial animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeninger, Margaret J.; DeNiro, Michael J.

    1984-04-01

    The stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios of bone collagen prepared from more than 100 animals representing 66 species of birds, fish, and mammals are presented. The δ15N values of bone collagen from animals that fed exclusively in the marine environment are, on average, 9%. more positive than those from animals that fed exclusively in the terrestrial environment; ranges for the two groups overlap by less than 1%. Bone collagen δ15N values also serve to separate marine fish from the small number of freshwater fish we analyzed. The bone collagen δ15N values of birds and fish that spent part of their life cycles feeding in the marine environment and part in the freshwater environment are intermediate between those of animals that fed exclusively in one or the other system. Further, animals that fed at successive trophic levels in the marine and terrestrial environment are separated, on average, by a 3%. difference in the δ15N values of their bone collagen. Specifically, carnivorous and herbivorous terrestrial animals have mean δ15N values for bone collagen of + 8.0 and + 5.3%., respectively. Among marine animals, those that fed on fish have a mean δ15N value for bone collagen of + 16.5%., whereas those that fed on invertebrates have a mean δ15N value of + 13.3%. These results support previous suggestions of a 3%. enrichment in δ15N values at each successively higher trophic level. In contrast to the results for δ15N values, the ranges of bone collagen δ13C values from marine and terrestrial feeders overlap to a great extent. Additionally, bone collagen δ13C values do not reflect the trophic levels at which the animals fed. These results indicate that bone collagen δ15N values will be useful in determining relative dependence on marine and terrestrial food sources and in investigating trophic level relationships among different animal species within an ecosystem. This approach should be applicable to animals represented by prehistoric or fossilized

  9. The pool of organic carbon and its isotopic composition in cryomorphic quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybenov, Yu. B.; Chimitdorzhieva, G. D.; Egorova, R. A.; Gongal'skii, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region are characterized by the clearly pronounced anisotropy of their properties related to carbon sequestration processes. The main carbon pool is concentrated in the humus horizon; the organic carbon content sharply decreases down the soil profile. The pool of organic carbon in the cryogenic fissures is two to three times higher than its pool in the enclosing soil horizons. The analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the plants and soils attests to the predominance of C3 plants. The composition of stable carbon isotopes is clearly differentiated in the soil profile with an increase in the portion of heavy isotopes in the deep horizons. In the humus pockets and cryogenic fissures, the increase in the portion of heavy carbon isotopes with the depth is weaker, which attests to a lower degree of the organic matter transformation. It is probable that the organic matter in the fissures is younger than the organic matter in the enclosing soil mass and derives from the upper humus horizon. The organic matter in the cryogenic fissures preserves the evolutionary properties of humus from the upper horizons.

  10. Organic and inorganic components of aerosols over the central Himalayas: winter and summer variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prashant; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Joshi, H; Naja, M

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site, Nainital, in India (1958 m asl) during September 2006 to June 2007 and were analyzed for water-soluble inorganic species, total carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N, respectively). The chemical and isotopic composition of aerosols revealed significant anthropogenic influence over this remote free-troposphere site. The amount of total carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic composition suggest a considerable contribution of biomass burning to the aerosols during winter. On the other hand, fossil fuel combustion sources are found to be dominant during summer. The carbon aerosol in winter is characterized by greater isotope ratios (av. -24.0 ‰), mostly originated from biomass burning of C4 plants. On the contrary, the aerosols in summer showed smaller δ(13)C values (-26.0 ‰), indicating that they are originated from vascular plants (mostly of C3 plants). The secondary ions (i.e., SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), and NO3 (-)) were abundant due to the atmospheric reactions during long-range transport in both seasons. The water-soluble organic and inorganic compositions revealed that they are aged in winter but comparatively fresh in summer. This study validates that the pollutants generated from far distant sources could reach high altitudes over the Himalayan region under favorable meteorological conditions. PMID:26490923

  11. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ(13)C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19-C36), fatty acids (C8-C32) and n-alcohols (C16-C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ(13)C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from -34.1 to -24.7% and -26.9 to -24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  12. Stable isotopic compositions of elemental carbon in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhaobing; Jiang, Wenjuan; Chen, Shanli; Sun, Deling; Shi, Lei; Zeng, Gang; Rui, Maoling

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotopic compositions (δ13C) of elemental carbon (EC) in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing region were determined in order to quantitatively evaluate the carbon sources of atmospheric fine particles during different seasons. Besides, δ13C values from potential sources such as coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, biomass burning, and dust were synchronously measured. The results showed that the average δ13C values of EC in PM1.1 in winter and summer were - 23.89 ± 1.6‰ and - 24.76 ± 0.9‰, respectively. Comparing with δ13C values from potential sources, we concluded that the main sources of EC in PM1.1 were from the emission of coal combustion and vehicle exhaust. The higher δ13C values in winter than those in summer were chiefly attributed to the more coal consumption. Combining with the concentrations of SO42 - and K+ in PM1.1, the high δ13C values of EC on 24 December and 27 December 2013 were ascribed to extra input of corn straw burning in addition to coal combustion and vehicle exhaust.

  13. Quantifying precision and accuracy of measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon stable isotopic composition using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Susan; Marian Scott, E; Vihermaa, Leena E; Newton, Jason

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE We describe an analytical procedure that allows sample collection and measurement of carbon isotopic composition (δ13CV-PDB value) and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, [DIC], in aqueous samples without further manipulation post field collection. By comparing outputs from two different mass spectrometers, we quantify with the statistical rigour uncertainty associated with the estimation of an unknown measurement. This is rarely undertaken, but it is needed to understand the significance of field data and to interpret quality assurance exercises. METHODS Immediate acidification of field samples during collection in evacuated, pre-acidified vials removed the need for toxic chemicals to inhibit continued bacterial activity that might compromise isotopic and concentration measurements. Aqueous standards mimicked the sample matrix and avoided headspace fractionation corrections. Samples were analysed using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, but for low DIC concentration the mass spectrometer response could be non-linear. This had to be corrected for. RESULTS Mass spectrometer non-linearity exists. Rather than estimating precision as the repeat analysis of an internal standard, we have adopted inverse linear calibrations to quantify the precision and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the δ13CDIC values. The response for [DIC] estimation was always linear. For 0.05–0.5 mM DIC internal standards, however, changes in mass spectrometer linearity resulted in estimations of the precision in the δ13CVPDB value of an unknown ranging from ± 0.44‰ to ± 1.33‰ (mean values) and a mean 95% CI half-width of ±1.1–3.1‰. CONCLUSIONS Mass spectrometer non-linearity should be considered in estimating uncertainty in measurement. Similarly, statistically robust estimates of precision and accuracy should also be adopted. Such estimations do not inhibit research advances: our consideration of small-scale spatial variability at two points on a

  14. Intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope and oxygen-isotope compositions of a brachiopod Basiliola lucida collected off Okinawa-jima, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideko; Asami, Ryuji; Abe, Osamu; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Keiichi; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2013-08-01

    This study presents intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope (δ13C) and oxygen-isotope (δ18O) compositions of nine specimens of a subtropical brachiopod, Basiliola lucida, collected west of Okinawa-jima, Ryukyu Islands, southwestern Japan. The δ13C values of samples collected along the maximum growth axis (ontogenetic samples) from two modern and seven older (pre-1945 cal AD) shells show no seasonal changes. The modern shells, which were collected from comparable depths, have similar δ13C values that fall within the range of calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater (equilibrium calcite) (δ13CEC values), and their mean δ13C values are ˜1.1-1.6‰ less than those from the older shells. This decrease in δ13C values is similar in magnitude to the decreases in atmospheric CO2 and the oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon at the sea surface in recent years (13C Suess effect), suggesting that the effect can even be detected at water depths of 200-300 m in the subtropical northwestern Pacific Ocean. The δ18O values fluctuate within a narrow range (0.26-0.41‰) with no seasonal changes, and they exhibit small (0.14-0.51‰) offsets from those of equilibrium calcite (δ18OEC values). A statistically significant negative linear relationship is established between seawater temperature and mean δ18O values of the nine shells, but the slope (-0.31‰/°C) is steeper than those of equilibrium calcite (-0.23‰/°C) and other calcareous organisms (-0.15‰ to -0.26‰/°C). The cross-plots of the δ13C and δ18O values suggest that the degree of the vital effect varies among individuals in this species. The δ13C and δ18O values of B. lucida are potentially useful for reconstructing the δ13C and δ18O evolution of ancient oceans, because both values show small intraspecific variations, the former is identical to the δ13CEC values, and the latter shows small within-shell variations and small, nearly constant offsets from the δ18OEC values.

  15. Temporal changes in the isotope composition of Sierra spring water: Implications for recent climatic changes and carbon cycling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.; Rademacher, L. K.; Manning, A. H.; Blumhagen, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    Springs are natural windows into groundwater systems, which are good archives of signals inherited at the time of recharge, as well as those gained during subsequent groundwater flow. These signals are influenced by water rock interactions and temporal variations of external forcing often related to climatic, anthropogenic, and ecological changes. Spring water piston flow ages as determined from environmental tracers (CFCs, tritium, SF6) range between <1 yr to 50 yr and differ depending on which tracer is used. Using a 13-yr data set, Manning et al. (J Hydro., 460/61, 13-28, 2012) found that a bimodal mixing model consisting of a new (<1 yr old) fraction and a fraction that is older, but still modern (<50 yr), best explained the age data. Here, we will present spring apparent ages using the CFC piston flow model. Many parameters, including major cations, stable isotopes of water, 14C, and caddisfly species diversity correlate with CFC apparent ages. Cation concentrations, pH, and caddisfly species diversity increase while stable isotope compositions and 14C contents decrease with increasing apparent CFC ages. From waters recharging in 1960 to waters recharging in 1990, there is a 1.2‰ and 11‰ increase in δ18O and δD, respectively. Historic temperature records from surrounding areas show about a 2°C mean winter temperature increase over the same period. This temperature change alone is not great enough to explain the observed increase in δ18O. We suggest that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns or changes in snow melt processes account for the remaining offset in δ18O. Spring 14C content ranged between 85 and 110 pmc and vary with apparent age, whereby the youngest groundwater has the highest radiocarbon values. The spring 14C is set by the soil pCO2 because the aquifer contains little carbonate, and its trend can be best described assuming the soil CO2 is composed of a 50:50 mix of young (15-25 years) and old (4000 years) soil carbon reservoir

  16. Apportionment of carbon dioxide over central Europe: insights from combined measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnoch, M.; Jelen, D.; Galkowski, M.; Kuc, T.; Necki, J.; Chmura, L.; Gorczyca, Z.; Jasek, A.; Rozanski, K.

    2012-04-01

    The European continent, due to high population density and numerous sources of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, plays an important role in the global carbon budget. Nowadays, precise measurements of CO2 mixing ratios performed by both global and regional monitoring networks, combined with appropriate models of carbon cycle, allow quantification of the European input to the global atmospheric CO2 load. However, measurements of CO2 mixing ratios alone cannot provide the information necessary for the apportionment of fossil-fuel related and biogenic contributions to the total CO2 burden of the regional atmosphere. Additional information is required, for instance obtained through measurements of radiocarbon content in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Radiocarbon is a particularly useful tracer for detecting fossil carbon in the atmosphere on different spatial and temporal scales. Regular observations of atmospheric CO2mixing ratios and their isotope compositions have been performed during the period of 2005-2009 at two sites located in central Europe (southern Poland). The sites, only ca. 100 km apart, represent two extreme environments with respect to the extent of anthropogenic pressure: (i) the city of Krakow, representing typical urban environment with numerous sources of anthropogenic CO2, and (ii) remote mountain site Kasprowy Wierch, relatively free of local influences. Regular, quasi-continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratios have been performed at both sites. In addition, cumulative samples of atmospheric CO2 have been collected (weekly sampling regime for Krakow and monthly for Kasprowy Wierch) to obtain mean carbon isotope signature (14C/12C and 13C/12C ratios) of atmospheric CO2 at both sampling locations. Partitioning of the local atmospheric CO2 load at both locations has been performed using isotope- and mass balance approach. In Krakow, the average fossil-fuel related contribution to the local atmospheric CO2 load was equal to approximately 3.4%. The biogenic

  17. Iron isotope composition of particles produced by UV-femtosecond laser ablation of natural oxides, sulfides, and carbonates.

    PubMed

    d'Abzac, Francois-Xavier; Beard, Brian L; Czaja, Andrew D; Konishi, Hiromi; Schauer, James J; Johnson, Clark M

    2013-12-17

    The need for femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) systems coupled to MC-ICP-MS to accurately perform in situ stable isotope analyses remains an open question, because of the lack of knowledge concerning ablation-related isotopic fractionation in this regime. We report the first iron isotope analysis of size-resolved, laser-induced particles of natural magnetite, siderite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, collected through cascade impaction, followed by analysis by solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS, as well as imaging using electron microscopy. Iron mass distributions are independent of mineralogy, and particle morphology includes both spheres and agglomerates for all ablated phases. X-ray spectroscopy shows elemental fractionation in siderite (C-rich agglomerates) and pyrrhotite/pyrite (S-rich spheres). We find an increase in (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratios of +2‰, +1.2‰, and +0.8‰ with increasing particle size for magnetite, siderite, and pyrrhotite, respectively. Fe isotope differences in size-sorted aerosols from pyrite ablation are not analytically resolvable. Experimental data are discussed using models of particles generation by Hergenröder and elemental/isotopic fractionation by Richter. We interpret the isotopic fractionation to be related to the iron condensation time scale, dependent on its saturation in the gas phase, as a function of mineral composition. Despite the isotopic variations across aerosol size fractions, total aerosol composition, as calculated from mass balance, confirms that fs-LA produces a stoichiometric sampling in terms of isotopic composition. Specifically, both elemental and isotopic fractionation are produced by particle generation processes and not by femtosecond laser-matter interactions. These results provide critical insights into the analytical requirements for laser-ablation-based stable isotope measurements of high-precision and accuracy in geological samples, including the importance of quantitative aerosol transport to the ICP. PMID

  18. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  19. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N; Leu, A; Muñoz, E; Olsen, J; Kwong, E; Des Marais, D

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4% depleted in 13C relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3% enriched in 13C. The acetate 13C enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6% depleted in 13C, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7%, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7%, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. PMID:2867741

  20. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  1. Hydrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopic Compositions and Concentrations of Methane in Cave Air of Cueva de Villa Luz, Tabasco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, K.; Rosales Lagarde, L.; Sauer, P. E.; Schimmelmann, A.; Lennon, J. T.; Boston, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Cueva de Villa Luz (CVL) is a unique biogeochemical environment where microbial consortia are supported by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) leading to sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) which is thought to have generated the porosity and permeability of several petroleum reservoirs. Possible sources of the sulfur (S) include the Chichón Volcano and petroleum basins in the area. A better understanding of the source of the H2S in CVL may help predict where else SAS may have occurred. Analysis of methane (CH4) in CVL may provide a proxy to assess the source of S entering CVL. We obtained 13 air samples in 1-L Tedlar® bags from varying locations in CVL to assess the role of CH4 in sulfide-rich karst systems. CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured by gas-chromatography. The stable isotopic ratios of carbon and hydrogen were measured on a stable isotope-ratio mass-spectrometer. CH4 in the air of CVL ranged from 1.88 ± 0.10 ppmv to 3.7 ± 0.2 ppmv. CO2 concentrations ranged from 400 ± 20 ppmv to 920 ± 50 ppmv. For comparison, the CH4 and CO2 concentrations in the outside atmosphere were 1.96 ± 0.10 ppmv and 430 ± 20 ppmv respectively. CH4 and CO2 were positively correlated in CVL (R2 = 0.91, CH4 = [0.0035 ± 0.0007] CO2 + [0.4 ± 0.4], p >0.01). The highest concentrations were near springs. Keeling-style analysis showed that the CH4 samples from CVL plot along a two-end member mixing model and suggest that CH4 is outgassing from spring water with isotopic compositions δ13CCH4 = -24 ± 3 ‰ and δ2HCH4 = -40 ± 40 ‰. CO2 did not plot along a two end member mixing model. The proposed δ13C of CH4 entering from springs does not closely match the δ13CCH4 values from hydrocarbon basins in the area. This is likely due to oxidative loss of CH4 as it ascends to CVL which may be partly driven by anaerobic methanotrophy coupled to sulfate reduction. Analysis of the spring water chemistry coupled to biogeochemical modeling may help quantify the amount of

  2. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  3. Carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, silicon, and titanium isotopic compositions of single interstellar silicon carbide grains from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Ireland, Trevor; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Seven hundred and twenty SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite, ranging in size from 1 to 10 micrometers, were analyzed by ion microprobe mass spectrometry for their C-isotopic compositions. Subsets of the grains were also analyzed for N (450 grains), Si (183 grains), Mg (179 grains), and Ti (28 grains) isotopes. These results are compared with previous measurements on 41 larger SiC grains (up to 15 x 26 micrometers) from a different sample of Murchison analyzed by Virag et al. (1992) and Ireland, Zinner, & Amari (1991a). All grains of the present study are isotopically anomalous with C-12/C-13 ratios ranging from 0.022 to 28.4 x solar, N-14/N-15 ratios from 0.046 to 30 x solar, Si-29/Si-28 from 0.54 to 1.20 x solar, Si-30/Si-28 from 0.42 to 1.14 x solar, Ti-49/Ti-48 from 0.96 to 1.95 x solar, and Ti-50/Ti-48 from 0.94 to 1.39 x solar. Many grains have large Mg-26 excesses from the decay of Al-26 with inferred Al-26/Al-27 ratios ranging up to 0.61, or 12,200 x the ratio of 5 x 10(exp -5) inferred for the early solar system. Several groups can be distinguished among the SiC grains. Most of the grains have C-13 and N-14 excesses, and their Si isotopic compositions (mostly excesses in Si-29 and Si-30) plot close to a slope 1.34 line on a Delta Si-29/Si-28 versus Delta Si-30/Si-28 three-isotope plot. Grains with small C-12/C-13 ratios (less than 10) tend to have smaller or no N-14 excesses and high Al-26/Al-27 ratios (up to 0.01). Grains with C-12/C-13 greater than 150 fall into two groups: grains X have N-15 excesses and Si-29 and Si-30 deficits and the highest (0.1 to 0.6) Al-26/Al-27 ratios; grains Y have N-14 excesses and plot on a slope 0.35 line on a Si three-isotope plot. In addition, large SiC grains of the Virag et al. (1992) study fall into three-distinct clusters according to their C-, Si-, and Ti-isotopic compositions. The isotopic diversity of the grains and the clustering of their isotopic compositions imply distinct and multiple stellar sources

  4. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of intact polar lipids reveal complex carbon flow patterns among hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities at the Chapopote asphalt volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Seepage of asphalt forms the basis of a cold seep system at 3000 m water depth at the Chapopote Knoll in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Anaerobic microbial communities are stimulated in the oil-impregnated sediments as evidenced by the presence of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) derived from archaea and Bacteria at depths up to 7 m below the seafloor. Detailed investigation of stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of alkyl and acyl moieties derived from a range of IPL precursors with distinct polar head groups resolved the complexity of carbon metabolisms and utilization of diverse carbon sources by uncultured microbial communities. In surface sediments most of the polar lipid-derived fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) head groups could be tentatively assigned to autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, with a relatively small proportion involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Derivatives of phosphatidyl-( N)-methylethanolamine (PME) were abundant and could be predominantly assigned to heterotrophic oil-degrading bacteria. Archaeal IPLs with phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic glyceroldibiphytanylglyceroltetraethers (GDGTs) were assigned to methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-2 and ANME-1 cluster, respectively, whereas δ 13C values of phosphate-based archaeols and mixed phosphate-based and diglycosidic GDGTs point to methanogenic archaea. At a 7 m deep sulfate-methane transition zone that is linked to the upward movement of gas-laden petroleum, a distinct increase in abundance of archaeal IPLs such as phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic archaeol and GDGTs is observed; their δ 13C values are consistent with their origin from both methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. This study reveals previously hidden, highly complex patterns in the carbon-flow of versatile microbial communities involved in the degradation of heavy oil including hydrocarbon gases

  5. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  6. Characterization of n-alkanes and their carbon isotopic composition in sediments from a small catchment of the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jixiang; Gao, Wenjing; Huang, Changchun; Xie, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The biomarker composition and stable carbon isotope values of organic matter (OM) in sediment cores from Shuanglong catchment of the Dianchi watershed show an unimodal n-alkane distribution ranging from C15-C33 with a strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes, maximizing at n-C27, n-C29 and n-C31. Organic carbon to nitrogen (OC/N) ratio indicates a strong terrestrial influence on the OM. The values of δ(13)C27, δ(13)C29 and δ(13)C31 of n-alkanes range from -36.1‰ to -26.1‰, -34.1‰ to -30.1‰ and -33.8‰ to -28.7‰, respectively, suggesting a mainly C3 land plants origin. The carbon preference index (CPI25-31), odd-even preference (OEP27-31), average chain length (ACL25-33), pristine/phytane (pr/ph), Paq, (C27+C29)/2C31, nC16-23/nC24-33 and 3C17/(C21+C23+C25) values are also consistent with the predominance of C3 land plant-derived OM. Different sources of OM are reflected by the peak of n-C15, ascribed to a contribution by aquatic algae and photosynthetic bacteria. Eutrophication seems to be enhanced by both autochthonous (weak) and allochthonous (strong) contributions of OM. A major factor affecting the OM accumulation in the catchment and OM transportation to the Dianchi Lake may be increased by human activities from 1871 to 2011. PMID:24630457

  7. Determination of Cr isotopic composition in low-level carbonates by MC-ICP-MS: a sensitive proxy for redox changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, Pierre; Parkinson, Ian; James, Rachael; Karjalainen, Anne-Mari; Fehr, Manuela; Fairchild, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Geochemical data suggest that atmospheric oxygen increased during two major steps: the Great oxidation event (~2.4 Ga) and the Neoproterozoic (~1Ga-545Ma). The O2 concentration in the atmosphere is strongly linked to the redox condition of the oceans. Therefore the study of redox sensitive elements in marine sediments can be used to evaluate the evolution of O2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Chromium is a redox sensitive element which significantly fractionates its isotopes during the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) (Ellis et al., 2002). Thus, Cr isotopes can be used to assess redox changes in the past oceans. Chromium isotopic compositions in sedimentary rocks (BIFs) have been used to determine the evolution of the O2 concentration in the atmosphere during the Proterozoic (Frei et al., 2009). We have developed a chemical procedure for the purification of Cr in carbonates by using a single cation column to separate the Cr from the matrix, Fe, Ti and V. Cr isotopic compositions are determined used a 50Cr-54Cr double spike method and analysed on a ThermoFisher Neptune MC-ICP-MS using HR and MR in order to be able to discriminate Ar interferences. Standards and samples are analysed as 50ppb Cr solutions and yield an external reproducibility 50 and 70ppm. This new method allowed us to analyse samples with a Cr concentrations as low as 1ppm. We have analysed a suite of Neoproterozoic carbonates from Australia, but also modern ooids and oolithic limestones through the Phanerozoic. The Cr isotopic data for carbonates record a range of δ53Cr between -0.1 and +1.7. This range indicates that some of these carbonates clearly reflect oxidising conditions in the ocean. By comparison, the Neoproterozoic samples have Cr isotopic compositions close to the continental crust value (-0.1 to 0.1), indicating the Neoproterozoic samples reflect deposition under more reducing conditions These data suggests that the redox condition during the deposition of shallow-water carbonates

  8. Evolution of stable carbon-isotope compositions for methane and carbon dioxide in freshwater wetlands and other anaerobic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornibrook, Edward R. C.; Longstaffe, Frederick J.; Fyfe, William S.

    2000-03-01

    Two types of distribution for α C values are observed in anaerobic environments when δ 13C-ΣCO 2 and δ 13C-CH 4 values are measured across gradients of depth or age of organic debris. The type-I distribution involves a systematic increase in α C values with depth as a result of decreasing δ 13C-CH 4 and increasing δ 13C-ΣCO 2 values. This behavior corresponds to a progressive increase in the prevalence of methanogenesis by the CO 2 reduction pathway relative to acetate fermentation. Utilization of autotrophically formed acetate by methanogens would also cause an increase in α C values. The type-II distribution occurs when both δ 13C-CH 4 and δ 13C-ΣCO 2 values decrease with depth, resulting in approximately constant α C values. This condition corresponds with a strong dependence of methanogens on porewater ΣCO 2 as a carbon source by way of either the CO 2 reduction pathway or utilization of autotrophically formed acetate. Freshwater wetlands possess both types of α C value distribution. Wetlands with type-I distributions exhibit curves with slopes that vary probably as a function of deposition and preservation of labile organic carbon. An abundance of labile substrates in anaerobic soils yields steeper curves because aceticlastic methanogenesis predominates and δ 13C-CH 4 and δ 13C-CO 2 values are high. Diminished transfer of labile carbon to the methanogenic zone results in an increased prevalence of the CO 2 reduction pathway, yielding low δ 13C-CH 4 values and shallowly sloping curves. Aerobic oxidation of organic matter or decay involving sulfate reduction produces CO 2 with low δ 13C values, which also will contribute to shallowly sloping curves. The size of the dissolved CO 2 pool can influence the sensitivity of δ 13C-CO 2 values to change during methanogenesis. Regression curves of δ 13C-CH 4 and δ 13C-ΣCO 2 values from four wetlands with type-I distributions intersect at δ 13C-CH 4 = -40.7 ± 6.1‰ (1σ) and δ 13C-ΣCO 2 = -23

  9. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  10. Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable carbon-isotopic compositions for authenticity and security protection and intellectual property considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, J. P.; Farina, P.; Pearson, A.; Mezes, P. S.; Sabatelli, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Isotopic Engineering (MIE) is the directed stable-isotopic synthesis of chemical products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations. We report here a generally excellent correspondence between the observed and predicted stable carbon-isotopic (δ13C) results for a successful directed synthesis of racemic mixture from its immediate precursors. The observed results are readily explained by the laws of mass balance and isotope mass balance. Oxygen- and hydrogen isotopic results which require an additional assessment of the effects of O and H exchange, presumably due to interaction with water in the reaction solution, are addressed elsewhere. A previous, cooperative study with the US FDA-DPA showed that individual manufacturers of naproxen could readily be differentiated by their stable-isotopic provenance (δ13C, δ18O, and δD ref. 1). We suggest that MIE can be readily employed in the bio/pharmaceutical industry without alteration of present manufacturing processes other than isotopically selecting and/or monitoring reactants and products.

  11. Long-term trends of aerosol carbon and nitrogen, their stable isotopic compositions, and water-soluble organic carbon in the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Umomoto, N.

    2009-12-01

    The western North Pacific is an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants. A rapid industrial development in China and East Asian countries for last two decades may have seriously altered the air quality of the North Pacific. However, long-term changes of atmospheric composition have not been studied in this region. To better understand long-term atmospheric changes in the western North Pacific, we collected marine aerosols on weekly basis in 2001-2009 at a remote island, Chichijima (27°04'E; 142°13'N) using high volume air sampler and pre-combusted quartz filter. The island is located in the boundary of westerly (winter and spring) and trade wind (summer and autumn) regimes. Here, the aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN) and their stable isotopic compositions as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Concentrations of aerosol TC and TN were in a range of 0.21-4.58 (average 1.07) ug/m3 and 0.01-3.43 (av. 0.29) ng/m3. These values are ca. 20 times lower than the concentrations in urban Tokyo. C/N weight ratios ranged from 0.50 to 41 (av. 6.6) with summer maxima. Both TC and TN showed a gradual increase with winter/spring maxima probably due to the enhanced anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer usage in East Asia. On the other hand, stable carbon isotopic ratios (d13C) of TC ranged from -27.3 to -15.1‰; however, no systematic trend was detected. Nitrogen isotopic ratios of TN (d15N) ranged from +1.56 to +25.2‰ with lower values in winter and higher values in summer. Interestingly, d15N values showed a long-term trend of increase by 4‰ from 2001 to 2009. This may be caused by an increased emission of nitrogen species (NH3, NOx) from biomass burning sources in East Asia and other regions. WSOC (0.05-2.46 ug/m3, av. 0.40 ug/m3) also showed a long-term increase probably due to the increased emissions of organic aerosols and their precursors and subsequent oxidations in the atmosphere

  12. Intra-specific association between carbon isotope composition and productivity in woody plants: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fardusi, Most Jannatul; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Comas, Carles; Voltas, Jordi; Resco de Dios, Víctor; Serrano, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The study of intra-specific variations in growth and plant physiological response to drought is crucial to understand the potential for plant adaptation to global change. Carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in plant tissues offers an integrated measure of intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi). The intra-specific association between δ(13)C and productivity has been extensively studied in herbaceous crops, but species-specific information on woody plants is still limited and has so far provided contradictory results. In this work we explored the general patterns of the relationship between δ(13)C and growth traits (height, diameter and biomass) using a meta-analysis. We compiled information from 49 articles, including 176 studies performed on 34 species from 16 genera. We found a positive global intra-specific correlation between δ(13)C and growth (Gr=0.28, P<0.0001), stronger for biomass than for height, and non-significant for diameter. The extent of this intra-specific association increased from Mediterranean to subtropical, temperate and boreal biomes, i.e. from water-limited to energy-limited environments. Conifers and shrubs, but not broadleaves, showed consistent positive intra-specific correlations. The meta-analysis also revealed that the relationship between δ(13)C and growth is better characterized at juvenile stages, under near-optimal and controlled conditions, and by analyzing δ(13)C in leaves rather than in wood. PMID:27593469

  13. Interannual, seasonal, and diel variability in the carbon isotope composition of respiration in a C3/C4 agricultural ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stable carbon isotope ratio 13CO2/12CO2 is a valuable tool for understanding the processes controlling the autotrophic (FRa) and heterotrophic (FRh) contributions to ecosystem respiration (FR) as well as influences of photosynthesis on respiration. There is increasing interest in the temporal va...

  14. Measurement and Interpretation of the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Carbon Dioxide Respired by Leaves in the Dark

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Farquhar, Graham D.; Wong, S. Chin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary

    2004-01-01

    We measured the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of CO2 respired by Ricinus communis leaves in the dark. Experiments were conducted at low CO2 partial pressure and at normal atmospheric CO2 partial pressure. Across both experiments, the δ18O of dark-respired CO2 (δR) ranged from 44‰ to 324‰ (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water scale). This seemingly implausible range of values reflects the large flux of CO2 that diffuses into leaves, equilibrates with leaf water via the catalytic activity of carbonic anhydrase, then diffuses out of the leaf, leaving the net CO2 efflux rate unaltered. The impact of this process on δR is modulated by the δ18O difference between CO2 inside the leaf and in the air, and by variation in the CO2 partial pressure inside the leaf relative to that in the air. We developed theoretical equations to calculate δ18O of CO2 in leaf chloroplasts (δc), the assumed location of carbonic anhydrase activity, during dark respiration. Their application led to sensible estimates of δc, suggesting that the theory adequately accounted for the labeling of CO2 by leaf water in excess of that expected from the net CO2 efflux. The δc values were strongly correlated with δ18O of water at the evaporative sites within leaves. We estimated that approximately 80% of CO2 in chloroplasts had completely exchanged oxygen atoms with chloroplast water during dark respiration, whereas approximately 100% had exchanged during photosynthesis. Incorporation of the δ18O of leaf dark respiration into ecosystem and global scale models of C18OO dynamics could affect model outputs and their interpretation. PMID:15377777

  15. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to −24.7% and −26.9 to −24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  16. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-06-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to ‑24.7% and ‑26.9 to ‑24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China.

  17. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-04-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized by a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N), stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C) composition, as well as molecular-level analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.61±1.20% in the upper reach down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.11‰ to -21.28‰ across the studied area, with a trend of enrichment seaward. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio from 10.9±1.3 in the Lingdingyang Bay surface sediments to 6.5±0.09 in the outer shelf surface sediments. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments, suggesting that the relative abundance of total carbohydrate was fairly constant in TOC. Total neutral sugars as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose) yielded between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that a significant amount of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. The bulk organic matter properties, isotopic composition and C/N ratios, combined with molecular-level carbohydrate compositions were used to assess the sources and accumulation of terrestrial organic matter in the Pearl River Estuary and the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf. Results showed a mixture of terrestrial riverine organic carbon with in situ phytoplankton organic carbon in the areas studied. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 57±13% for Lingdingyang Bay, 19±2% for the inner shelf

  18. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of aquatic and terrestrial plants of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Harris, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of seasonal variability in the C-N stable isotope ratios of plants collected across the habitat mosaic of San Francisco Bay, its marshes, and its tributary river system. Analyses of 868 plant samples were binned into 10 groups (e.g., terrestrial riparian, freshwater phytoplankton, salt marsh) to determine whether C-N isotopes can be used as biomarkers for tracing the origins of organic matter in this river-marsh-estuary complex. Variability of ??13C and ??15N was high (???5-10???) within each plant group, and we identified three modes of variability: (1) between species and their microhabitats, (2) over annual cycles of plant growth and senescence, and (3) between living and decomposing biomass. These modes of within-group variability obscure any source-specific isotopic signatures, confounding the application of C-N isotopes for identifying the origins of organic matter. A second confounding factor was large dissimilarity between the ??13C-??15N of primary producers and the organic-matter pools in the seston and sediments. Both confounding factors impede the application of C-N isotopes to reveal the food supply to primary consumers in ecosystems supporting diverse autotrophs and where the isotopic composition of organic matter has been transformed and become distinct from that of its parent plant sources. Our results support the advice of others: variability of C-N stable isotopes within all organic-matter pools is high and must be considered in applications of these isotopes to trace trophic linkages from primary producers to primary consumers. Isotope-based approaches are perhaps most powerful when used to complement other tools, such as molecular biomarkers, bioassays, direct measures of production, and compilations of organic-matter budgets.

  19. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-10-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N) ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.1‰ to -21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose), were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and/or transformation during transport. Sediment budget based on calculated regional accumulation rates

  20. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  1. Preservation and detection of microstructural and taxonomic correlations in the carbon isotopic compositions of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Schopf, J. William; Lepot, Kevin; Kitajima, Kouki; Valley, John W.

    2013-03-01

    Here we present techniques for, and new data from, in situ carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis of Precambrian permineralized microscopic fossils with a reproducibility of 1-2‰ using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual microfossils, selected for their excellent preservation, were analyzed in petrographic thin sections of stromatolitic cherts from the Proterozoic Gunflint (˜1880 Ma), Bitter Springs (˜830 Ma), Min'yar (˜740 Ma), and Chichkan (˜775 Ma) Formations. The range of δ13C values (-34.6‰ to -22.1‰ VPDB) among the 46 individuals analyzed falls within that expected for photoautotrophic carbon fixation by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO), consistent with morphology-based taxonomic assignments for these specimens. Microfossils classified as cyanobacteria from the Gunflint, Bitter Springs, and Min'yar Formations (for which published carbonate carbon isotope data can be used to estimate the δ13C of the original dissolved inorganic carbon substrate) exhibit a consistent ˜19‰ total fractionation (δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon - δ13C of biomass) similar to that observed in living cyanobacteria, over a wide range of δ13Ccarb values (-2.9‰ to 3.4‰). In stromatolitic chert of the Min'yar Formation, morphologically diverse microfossils preserved in a ˜1 mm2 part of a microbial mat exhibit systematic isotopic differences among and within taxa that correlate with their morphologically inferred biological affinities and suggest that isotopic signatures of their original biosynthetic processes (e.g., lipid and peptidoglycan synthesis) are preserved. Isotopic offsets consistent with the different RuBisCO-based fractionations typical of cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes are documented by the differing δ13C values of a colonial cyanobacterium (-22.6 ± 0.5‰) and a phytoplanktonic protistan acritarch (-28.9 ± 1.0‰) situated <1 cm apart in the stromatolitic Chichkan chert. These findings show for the first time the

  2. The stable isotopic compositions of indigenous carbon-bearing components in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that the most likely source of SNC meteorites is Mars. An oblique impact on Mars, or vaporization of permafrost, by an impactor seem to be the most likely ejection mechanisms capable of accelerating material to the 5 km/s velocity needed to overcome the gravitational field of Mars. These ejection mechanisms involve a large shock event in the SNC class, the shergottites EETA 79001 and ALHA 77055 are the most likely shocked samples, in which whole rock pressures of 35 to 45 GPa have been estimated. Martian weathering products have also been identified in EETA 79001. Here, the author started a series of analyses of EETA 79001 using a high-sensitivity static mass spectrometer capable of measuring sub-nanogram quantities of carbon. Recent measurements of lithology C confirm that the shock-implanted atmospheric CO2 is released during the 1100 to 1200 C step.

  3. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during two cruises in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of various other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of DIC in the interior ocean, and also assist in determining the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37‰, relative to the Vienna Peedee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during both cruises, the precision for the 552 results is 0.07‰, which is similar to other published studies of this kind. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (Northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  4. Lithium and strontium isotope compositions of serpentinite-hosted carbonate veins from the MAR (ODP Leg 209): Records of different stages of seafloor metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, M.; Bach, W.; Paulick, H.; Erzinger, J.

    2004-12-01

    Geochemical investigations of carbonate veins hosted in serpentinized peridotites drilled from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 14° -16° N (ODP Leg 209) were conducted to gain insights into temperature and composition of the alteration fluids from which carbonates were precipitated. We have examined carbonate veins that can be grouped into low-T (<20° C) aragonite veins hosted in serpentinite, low-T calcite veins hosted in troctolitic rocks, and high-T (90-220° C) calcite veins hosted in talc-serpentine schists. The geochemical and radiometric characteristics of these veins is presented in a companion paper (Bach, Paulick, and Rosner) in this session. Here we report on Li and Sr isotope compositions and their relations to age, temperature, and trace element composition. Strontium isotope compositions are similar to, or slightly lower than that of modern seawater. This is consistent with young radiocarbon ages (<55 kyrs) and limited Sr exchange between circulating seawater and basement at low temperatures.δ 7Li values (relative to L-SVEC) of the majority of aragonite samples range between 14 and 20 ‰ . At sites 1271 and 1274 on rift valley walls of inside corner highs north and south of the 15° 20N fracture zone, the δ 7Li values of aragonites increase systematically with depth. At site 1274 .δ 7Li shows a weak positive correlation with 14-C formation ages. Our preliminary interpretation of the Li isotope data is a decrease in the Li isotope fractionation factor as temperatures increase with increasing basement depth. This interpretation would require a fractionation factor at 2° C of about 1.016 - significantly larger than α =1.011 proposed for biogenic aragonite formation at 25° C. The large fractionation observed in the upper part of the drilled cores could be due to lower temperature, different precipitation kinetics, variations in fluid chemistry (e.g., strongly variable Mg/Ca), or combination of these effects. Calcite veins from Sites 1271 and 1275 display

  5. Isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in subsurface sediments of gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes, Lake Baikal: implications for methane and carbonate origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Alexey A.; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Nunokawa, Yutaka; Shoji, Hitoshi; Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Naudts, Lieven; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Kida, Masato; Kalmychkov, Gennady V.; Poort, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    We report on the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in pore-water samples recovered by gravity coring from near-bottom sediments at gas hydrate-bearing mud volcanoes/gas flares (Malenky, Peschanka, Peschanka 2, Goloustnoe, and Irkutsk) in the Southern Basin of Lake Baikal. The δ13C values of DIC become heavier with increasing subbottom depth, and vary between -9.5 and +21.4‰ PDB. Enrichment of DIC in 13C indicates active methane generation in anaerobic environments near the lake bottom. These data confirm our previous assumption that crystallization of carbonates (siderites) in subsurface sediments is a result of methane generation. Types of methanogenesis (microbial methyl-type fermentation versus CO2-reduction) were revealed by determining the offset of δ13C between dissolved CH4 and CO2, and also by using δ13C and δD values of dissolved methane present in the pore waters. Results show that both mechanisms are most likely responsible for methane generation at the investigated locations.

  6. Lipid Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopic Composition from Authigenic Carbonates and Seep Sediments from the US Mid-Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P.; Prouty, N.; Demopoulos, A. W.; Roark, B.; Coykendall, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria, is common in continental margin sediment and can result in authigenic carbonate precipitation. A lipid biomarker study was undertaken in Mid-Atlantic submarine canyons, focusing specifically on Baltimore and Norfolk canyons, to determine biomarker variability of carbonate rock and the associated sediment in cold seep communities dominated by chemosynthetic mussels, Bathymodiolus childressi. Preliminary 16S metagenomic results confirm the presence of free-living sulfur-reducing bacteria and methantrophic endosymbiotic bacteria in the mussels. Depleted d13C values in both the mussel tissue (-63 ‰) and authigenic carbonates (-48 ‰) support methanotrophy as the dominant nutritional pathway and AOM as the main driver of carbonate precipitation. In addition, paired 14C and 230Th dates are highly discordant, reflecting dilution of the 14C pool with fossil hydrocarbon derived carbon. Seep and canyon sediment, as well as authigenic carbonates, were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers, including sterols, alcohols, alkanes and fatty acids, as well as δ13C values of select biomarkers, to elucidate pathways of organic matter cycling. A comparison of terrestrial biomarker signatures (e.g., n-alkane carbon preference index and C23 / (C23 + C29) values, HMW n-alkanes and C29 sterols) suggests that terrestrial inputs dominate the submarine canyon surface sediment, whereas seep sediment is predominantly marine autochthonous (i.e., cholesterol and 5α-cholestanol). Lipid biomarker profiles (e.g., n-alkanes in the C15 to C33 range) from authigenic carbonates mirror those found in the seep sediment, suggesting that the organisms mediating carbonate precipitation on the seafloor are characteristic of the assemblages present in the sediment at these sites. With widespread methane leakage recently discovered along the Atlantic Margin, the presence of AOM-mediated carbonate

  7. Magnesium isotopic composition of achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghatpour, Fatemeh; Teng, Fang-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of 22 well-characterized differentiated meteorites including 7 types of achondrites and pallasite meteorites were measured to estimate the average Mg isotopic composition of their parent bodies and evaluate Mg isotopic heterogeneity of the solar system. The δ26Mg values are -0.236‰ and -0.190‰ for acapulcoite-lodranite and angrite meteorites, respectively and vary from -0.267‰ to -0.222‰ in the winonaite-IAB-iron silicate group, -0.369‰ to -0.292‰ in aubrites, -0.269‰ to -0.158‰ in HEDs, -0.299‰ to -0.209‰ in ureilites, -0.307‰ to -0.237‰ in mesosiderites, and -0.303‰ to -0.238‰ in pallasites. Magnesium isotopic compositions of most achondrites and pallasite meteorites analyzed here are similar and reveal no significant isotopic fractionation. However, Mg isotopic compositions of D‧Orbigny (angrite) and some HEDs are slightly heavier than chondrites and the other achondrites studied here. The slightly heavier Mg isotopic compositions of angrites and some HEDs most likely resulted from either impact-induced evaporation or higher abundance of clinopyroxene with the Mg isotopic composition slightly heavier than olivine and orthopyroxene. The average Mg isotopic composition of achondrites (δ26Mg = -0.246 ± 0.082‰, 2SD, n = 22) estimated here is indistinguishable from those of the Earth (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07‰; 2SD, n = 139), chondrites (δ26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06‰; 2SD, n = 38), and the Moon (δ26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.16‰; 2SD, n = 47) reported from the same laboratory. The chondritic Mg isotopic composition of achondrites, the Moon, and the Earth further reflects homogeneity of Mg isotopes in the solar system and the lack of Mg isotope fractionation during the planetary accretion process and impact events.

  8. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient

    PubMed Central

    Ricalde, M. Fernanda; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J. Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year−1) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ13C less negative than −20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ13C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ13C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO2 assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune. PMID:20652592

  9. Regional primary productivity differences off Morocco (NW-Africa) recorded by modern benthic foraminifera and their stable carbon isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberwein, A.; Mackensen, A.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of different primary productivity regimes on live (Rose Bengal stained) and dead benthic foraminiferal distribution, as well as on the stable carbon isotopic composition of foraminiferal tests, was investigated in sediment surface samples (0-1 cm) from the upwelling region off Morocco between Cape Ghir (31°N) and Cape Yubi (27°N). A combination of factor analysis, detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was applied to the benthic foraminiferal data sets. Five major assemblages for both the live and dead fauna were revealed by factor analysis. In the cape regions organic matter fluxes are enhanced by high chlorophyll- α concentrations in the overlying surface waters. Here, benthic foraminiferal faunas are characterized by identical live and dead assemblages, high standing stocks, and low species δ13C values, indicating constant year-round high productivity. Bulimina marginata dominates the unique fauna at the shallowest station off Cape Ghir indicating highest chlorophyll- a concentrations. Off both capes, the succession of the Bulimina aculeata/ Uvigerina mediterranea assemblage, the Sphaeroidina bulloides/ Gavelinopsis translucens assemblage, and the Hoeglundina elegans assemblage from the shelf to the deep sea reflects the decrease in chlorophyll- a concentrations, hence the export flux. In contrast, the area between the capes is characterized by differently composed live and dead assemblages, low standing stocks, and less depleted δ13C values, thus reflecting low primary productivity. High foraminiferal numbers of Epistominella exigua, Eponides pusillus, and Globocassidulina subglobosa in the dead fauna indicate a seasonally varying primary productivity signal. Significantly lower mean δ13C values were recorded in Bulimina mexicana, Cibicidoides kullenbergi, H. elegans, U. mediterranea and Uvigerina peregrina. Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi is a faithful recorder of bottom water δ13C in the Canary

  10. Modern climate and vegetation variability recorded in organic compounds and carbon isotopic compositions in the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meina; Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Xie, Biao; Niu, Xiaoyin

    2015-09-01

    The aliphatic hydrocarbons distribution and compound-specific characteristics of carbon isotopic compositions in the sediments from the small catchment (197 km(2)) of the Dianchi watershed were investigated for identification of modern climate and vegetation variations in the study area. Results show that a regular bimodal n-alkanes distribution ranged from nC16 to nC33, with strong dominance at nC17 for short-chain n-alkanes and nC31 for long-chain n-alkanes. Mass chromatogram of total fatty acids also indicates corresponding mixed contribution of algae, hydrophilous non-emergent (C4 plants) and terrestrial plants (C3 plants) to sedimentary organic matter (OM). At the depth of -24 to -25 cm (early 1970s), nC31/nC17 and terrestrial to aquatic ratio of hydrocarbons (TAR) values decrease, suggesting a shift of OM origins from C3 terrestrial plants to algae-derived C4 plants. The highest water stage in 1971 was found to be recorded in the particle size (<4 μm). For long-chain alkanes, the values of δ (13)Corg and δ (13)Cn-alkanes varied from -26.9 to -22.4 and -33.4 to -27.9 ‰, respectively. Population growth and economic development led to a demand for abundant habitable and cultivable land. Due to unreasonable land expansion, the primordial forest sporadically distributed. A mixture of C3 and C4 plants probably replaced C3 plants as the sources of OM in the past 10 years. The changes of land-use types and severe drought resulted in the excessive OM inputs to the watershed. PMID:25976326