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Sample records for carbon nanotube magnet

  1. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  2. Nickel clusters embedded in carbon nanotubes as high performance magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Briones-Leon, Antonio; Domanov, Oleg; Zechner, Georg; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Saito, Takeshi; Eisterer, Michael; Weschke, Eugen; Lang, Wolfgang; Peterlik, Herwig; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Ensembles of fcc nickel nanowires have been synthesized with defined mean sizes in the interior of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The method allows the intrinsic nature of single-domain magnets to emerge with large coercivity as their size becomes as small as the exchange length of nickel. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we probe electronic interactions at nickel-carbon interfaces where nickel exhibit no hysteresis and size-dependent spin magnetic moment. A manifestation of the interacting two subsystems on a bulk scale is traced in the nanotube’s magnetoresistance as explained within the framework of weak localization.

  3. Nickel clusters embedded in carbon nanotubes as high performance magnets

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Briones-Leon, Antonio; Domanov, Oleg; Zechner, Georg; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Saito, Takeshi; Eisterer, Michael; Weschke, Eugen; Lang, Wolfgang; Peterlik, Herwig; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ensembles of fcc nickel nanowires have been synthesized with defined mean sizes in the interior of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The method allows the intrinsic nature of single-domain magnets to emerge with large coercivity as their size becomes as small as the exchange length of nickel. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we probe electronic interactions at nickel-carbon interfaces where nickel exhibit no hysteresis and size-dependent spin magnetic moment. A manifestation of the interacting two subsystems on a bulk scale is traced in the nanotube’s magnetoresistance as explained within the framework of weak localization. PMID:26459370

  4. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes: powerful tensoactive nanostructures for

    E-print Network

    Bordenave, Charles

    Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Title: Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes: powerful. During this PhD, we will study the synthesis and characterization of amphiphilic CNTs description: Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes: powerful tensoactive nanostructures for application

  5. Nickel clusters embedded in carbon nanotubes as high performance magnets.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Briones-Leon, Antonio; Domanov, Oleg; Zechner, Georg; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Saito, Takeshi; Eisterer, Michael; Weschke, Eugen; Lang, Wolfgang; Peterlik, Herwig; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ensembles of fcc nickel nanowires have been synthesized with defined mean sizes in the interior of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The method allows the intrinsic nature of single-domain magnets to emerge with large coercivity as their size becomes as small as the exchange length of nickel. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we probe electronic interactions at nickel-carbon interfaces where nickel exhibit no hysteresis and size-dependent spin magnetic moment. A manifestation of the interacting two subsystems on a bulk scale is traced in the nanotube's magnetoresistance as explained within the framework of weak localization. PMID:26459370

  6. Carbon nanotubes and magnetic nanomaterials as substratum for neuroscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aatre, Kiran R.

    Nanomaterials have, for the last 10-15 years, been seriously researched for applications ranging from conducting polymers, composites, chemical, biological sensors, etc. Carbon nanotubes have been researched for incorporation with biological sensors and delivery systems. Researchers have shown that their compatible size, bio-friendly inert nature, non-fouling, multiple functional chemistries, and excellent conducting properties give rise to a possibility of utilizing them as scaffold material for the growth and proliferation of biological cells, like neurons. Neurons damaged as part of gradual degradation or through impact injuries leave patients with severely debilitating conditions. The use of Carbon Nanotubes as a substratum to support neural growth has been studied, while the development of magnetic nanotubes opens the possibility of developing a non-invasive method using magnetic fields and for therapeutic/restorative devices for alleviating nervous system disorders. A combination of nanomaterials coupled with magnetic fields can be utilized for the development of such devices. The research described in this dissertation details the experiments conducted to compare carbon nanotubes, hematite nanotubes and magnetite nanowires as a substratum for neuronal growth. The effect of low magnetic fields (23.7 Ga) in combination with the various nanomaterials on the growth of neurites was also studied. The growth characteristics were compared against a standard control sample without the influence of nanomaterial substrates and magnetic fields. The levels of cell death caused by each kind of nanomaterial were also examined to ascertain a suitable material for the future development of a therapeutic/restorative neural probe/sensor.

  7. Microwave absorption of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2009-11-15

    A simple model to describe the microwave absorption of magnetized hydrogen plasma embedded inside the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation (HiPco), is proposed and analyzed. By using Maxwell equations in conjunction with a general expression of the complex permittivity of magnetized hydrogen plasma in HiPco CNTs, known as the Appleton-Hartree formula, the absorption coefficients of the system for right-hand circularly wave propagation along and across the static magnetic field are obtained. The effects of the continuously changing the electron density, the collision frequency, and the cyclotron frequency on the absorption of the microwave are discussed.

  8. Partially unzipped carbon nanotubes as magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costamagna, S.; Schulz, A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F.

    2012-06-01

    The conductance through graphene nanoribbons (GNR) connected to a partially unzipped carbon nanotube (CNT) is studied in the presence of an external magnetic field applied parallel to the long axis of the tube by means of non-equilibrium Green's function technique. We consider CNTs that are partially unzipped to form armchair-GNR/zigzag-CNT/armchair-GNR or zigzag-GNR/armchair-CNT/zigzag-GNR junctions. We find that the inclusion of a longitudinal magnetic field affects the electronic states only in the CNT region, leading to the suppression of the conductance at low energies. We demonstrate that both types of junctions can be used as magnetic field sensors.

  9. Magnetic fullerenes inside single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Simon, F; Kuzmany, H; Náfrádi, B; Fehér, T; Forró, L; Fülöp, F; Jánossy, A; Korecz, L; Rockenbauer, A; Hauke, F; Hirsch, A

    2006-09-29

    C(59)N magnetic fullerenes were formed inside single-wall carbon nanotubes by vacuum annealing functionalized C(59)N molecules encapsulated inside the tubes. A hindered, anisotropic rotation of C(59)N was deduced from the temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance spectra near room temperature. Shortening of the spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) of C(59)N indicates a reversible charge transfer toward the host nanotubes above approximately 350 K. Bound C(59)N-C(60) heterodimers are formed at lower temperatures when C(60) is coencapsulated with the functionalized C(59)N. In the 10-300 K range, T(1) of the heterodimer shows a relaxation dominated by the conduction electrons on the nanotubes. PMID:17026062

  10. Magnetorheological properties of a magnetic nanofluid with dispersed carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Felicia, Leona J; Philip, John

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the magnetorheological properties of an oil based magnetic nanofluid (ferrofluid). The shear resistant plateau observed in a pure ferrofluid disappears when 0.5 wt% of MWCNT is incorporated. The yield stress values of the composite system are slightly smaller than that of the pure system. This shows that the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) weakens the magnetic field induced microstructure of the ferrofluid due to their interaction that affects the hydrodynamic and magnetic interactions between the dispersed nanoparticles. Interestingly, the Mason number plots for both the pure and composite system show scaling of the viscosity curves onto a single master curve for magnetic fields of 80 mT and above while deviations are observed for lower magnetic fields. The weakening of the ferrofluid microstructure in the presence of CNTs is further evident in the amplitude sweep measurements where the linear viscoelastic region develops only at a higher magnetic field strength compared to lower magnetic fields in pure ferrofluids. These results are useful for tailoring ferrofluids with a faster response for various applications. PMID:25353475

  11. Sensitive magnetic force detection with a carbon nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Willick, Kyle; Haapamaki, Chris; Baugh, Jonathan

    2014-03-21

    We propose a technique for sensitive magnetic point force detection using a suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance frequency show that single Bohr magneton changes in the magnetic state of an individual magnetic molecule grafted to the CNT can translate to detectable frequency shifts, on the order of a few kHz. The dependences of the resonator response to device parameters such as length, tension, CNT diameter, and gate voltage are explored and optimal operating conditions are identified. A signal-to-noise analysis shows that, in principle, magnetic switching at the level of a single Bohr magneton can be read out in a single shot on timescales as short as 10??s. This force sensor should enable new studies of spin dynamics in isolated single molecule magnets, free from the crystalline or ensemble settings typically studied.

  12. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  13. Anisotropic conductivity of magnetic carbon nanotubes embedded in epoxy matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Tae; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2010-01-01

    Maghemite (?-Fe2O3)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid-materials were synthesized and their anisotropic electrical conductivities as a result of their alignment in a polymer matrix under an external magnetic field were investigated. The tethering of ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the surface of MWCNT was achieved by a modified sol-gel reaction, where sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) was used in order to inhibit the formation of a 3D iron oxide gel. These hybrid-materials, specifically, magnetized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs) were readily aligned parallel to the direction of a magnetic field even when using a relatively weak magnetic field. The conductivity of the epoxy composites formed in this manner increased with increasing m-MWCNT mass fraction in the polymer matrix. Furthermore, the conductivities parallel to the direction of magnetic field were higher than those in the perpendicular direction, indicating that the alignment of the m-MWCNT contributed to the enhancement of the anisotropic electrical properties of the composites in the direction of alignment. PMID:23019381

  14. Imaging Carbon Nanotubes in High Performance Polymer Composites via Magnetic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Application of carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in structural composites is dependent on the efficient dispersion of the nanotubes in a high performance polymer matrix. The characterization of such dispersion is limited by the lack of available tools to visualize the quality of the matrix/carbon nanotube interaction. The work reported herein demonstrates the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a promising technique for characterizing the dispersion of nanotubes in a high performance polymer matrix.

  15. Anomalous magnetization of a carbon nanotube as an excitonic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    We show theoretically that an undoped carbon nanotube might be an excitonic insulator—the long-sought phase of matter proposed by Keldysh, Kohn, and others fifty years ago. We predict that the condensation of triplet excitons, driven by intervalley exchange interaction, spontaneously occurs at equilibrium if the tube radius is sufficiently small. The signatures of exciton condensation are its sizable contributions to both the energy gap and the magnetic moment per electron. The increase of the gap might have already been measured, albeit with a different explanation [V. V. Deshpande, B. Chandra, R. Caldwell, D. S. Novikov, J. Hone, and M. Bockrath, Science 323, 106 (2009), 10.1126/science.1165799]. The enhancement of the quasiparticle magnetic moment is a pair-breaking effect that counteracts the weak paramagnetism of the ground-state condensate of excitons. This property could rationalize the anomalous magnitude of magnetic moments recently observed in different devices close to charge neutrality.

  16. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikian, Alireza; Bagheri, Mehran

    2013-10-15

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  17. Magnetic Property Measurements on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements were performed on polyimide nanocomposite samples, synthesized with various weight percentages of single wall carbon nanotubes. It was found that the magnetization of the composite, normalized to the mass of nanotube material in the sample, decreased with increasing weight percentage of nanotubes. It is possible that the interfacial coupling between the carbon nanotube (CNT) fillers and the polyimide matrix promotes the diamagnetic response from CNTs and reduces the total magnetization of the composite. The coercivity of the samples, believed to originate from the residual magnetic catalyst particles, was enhanced and had a stronger temperature dependence as a result of the composite synthesis. These changes in magnetic properties can form the basis of a new approach to investigate the interfacial properties in the CNT nanocomposites through magnetic property measurements.

  18. Magnetic properties of metal phosphide nanoparticles periodically inserted in carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    nanoparticles. The periodically inserted nanoparticles are nickel, cobalt or iron phosphides. We will presentMagnetic properties of metal phosphide nanoparticles periodically inserted in carbon nanotubes nanoparticles and their characterisation by local techniques (MFM and electron holography). #12;

  19. Enhancement of thermal and electrical properties of carbon nanotube polymer composites by magnetic field processing

    E-print Network

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Walters et al.8 demonstrated alignment of SWNTs by filter- ing the SWNT suspension in the high magneticEnhancement of thermal and electrical properties of carbon nanotube polymer composites by magnetic by magnetic alignment during processing. The electrical transport properties of the composites are mainly

  20. Magnetic configuration dependence of magnetoresistance in a Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube spintronic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2014-01-20

    By using nonequilibrium Green's functions in combination with the density functional theory, we investigate the spin-dependent transport properties in a Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube spintronic device. The results show that magnetoresistance ratio is strongly dependent on the magnetic configuration of the Fe-porphyrin-like carbon nanotube. Under the application of the external magnetic field, the magnetoresistance ratio of the device can be increased from about 19% to about 1020% by tuning the magnetic configuration in the device. Our results confirm that the magnetic configuration is a key factor for obtaining a high-performance spintronic device.

  1. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  2. In vivo detection of magnetic labeled oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibin; Wu, Ren'an; Zhao, Liang; Qin, Hongqiang; Wu, Jianlin; Zhang, Jingwen; Bao, Ruyi; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) have been widely used in bio-medicine as drug carriers, bio-sensors, imaging agents and tissue engineering additives, which demands better understanding of their in vivo behavior because of the increasing exposure potential to humans. However, there are limited studies to investigate the in vivo biodistribution and elimination of f-CNTs. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) were used to label oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (o-MWCNTs) for in vivo distribution study of o-MWCNTs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPIO labeled o-MWCNTs ((SPIO)o-MWCNTs) were prepared by a hydrothermal reaction process, and characterized by TEM, XRD and magnetometer. (SPIO)o-MWCNTs exhibited superparamagnetic property, excellent biocompatibility and stability. The intravenously injected (SPIO)o-MWCNTs were observed in liver, kidney and spleen, while the subcutaneously injected (SPIO)o-MWCNTs could be only detected in sub mucosa. Most of the intravenously injected (SPIO)o-MWCNTs could be eliminated from liver, spleen, kidney and sub mucosa on 4 d post injection (P.I.). However, the residual o-MWCNTs could induce 30-40% MRI signal-to-noise ratio changes in these tissues even on 30 d P.I. This in vivo biodistribution and elimination information of o-MWCNTs will greatly facilitate the application of f-CNT based nanoproducts in biomedicine. In addition, the magnetic labeling method provides an approach to investigate the in vivo biodistribution and clearance of other nanomaterials.

  3. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  4. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields. PMID:24351838

  5. Optical spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaric, Sasa

    Magnetic flux threading a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is predicted to influence its electronic structure through the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect, causing bandgap oscillations and absorption peaks splitting. In order to verify these predictions, near infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (PL) and visible-NIR absorption in the Voigt geometry were measured at room temperature in external magnetic field (B) up to 74 T. The used aqueous surfactant solubilized SWNT samples show excitonic interband absorption peaks coming from a range of nanotube chiralities present in the sample. At fields B > 30 T, PL peaks showed red shifts and changes in peak widths. Magneto-PL spectra were successfully simulated, demonstrating that the observed spectral changes can be understood in terms of magnetic alignment of SWNTs (due to their predicted anisotropy magnetic properties) and B dependent changes of the bandgap due to the AB effect. By using the measured B-induced nanotube alignment and the measured average length of nanotubes in the sample, we estimated SWNT magnetic anisotropy to be 1.4 x 10-5 emu/mol, consistent with theoretical predictions. At B > 55 T, clear absorption peak splittings were observed, with splitting rates of 1 meV/T in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Recent theory predicts a dark singlet exciton state (below the only bright singlet state) which brightens as B is applied. Our observation of two bright excitons at high B demonstrates that magnetic field is indeed capable of brightening dark excitons.

  6. Hyperspectral imaging of exciton photoluminescence in individual carbon nanotubes controlled by high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Faugeras, Clement; Kossacki, Piotr; Potemski, Marek; Wang, Xu; Kim, Hee Dae; Stranks, Samuel D; Taylor, Robert A; Nicholas, Robin J

    2014-09-10

    Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide an exceptional platform for studying one-dimensional excitons (bound electron-hole pairs), but the role of defects and quenching centers in controlling emission remains controversial. Here we show that, by wrapping the CNT in a polymer sheath and cooling to 4.2 K, ultranarrow photoluminescence (PL) emission line widths below 80 ?eV can be seen from individual solution processed CNTs. Hyperspectral imaging of the tubes identifies local emission sites and shows that some previously dark quenching segments can be brightened by the application of high magnetic fields, and their effect on exciton transport and dynamics can be studied. Using focused high intensity laser irradiation, we introduce a single defect into an individual nanotube which reduces its quantum efficiency by the creation of a shallow bound exciton state with enhanced electron-hole exchange interaction. The emission intensity of the nanotube is then reactivated by the application of the high magnetic field. PMID:25158099

  7. Cobalt nanorods fully encapsulated in carbon nanotube and magnetization measurements by off-axis electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-06-01

    Fully encapsulated face-centered-cubic (fcc) Co nanorods in multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Quantitative magnetization measurements of the Co nanorods were carried out by off-axis electron holography using a theoretical cylindrical model. The component of magnetic induction was then measured to be 1.2±0.1T, which is lower than the expected saturation magnetization of fcc Co of 1.7T. The reason for the reduced magnetic component was discussed.

  8. Fast Characterization of Magnetic Impurities in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Xue, Y. Y.; Hadijiev, Viktor G.; Chu, C. W.; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the magnetic susceptibility measurement is a non-destructive, fast and accurate method to determine the residual metal catalysts in a few microgram single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sample. We have studied magnetic impurities in raw and purified SWCNT by magnetic susceptibility measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. The data suggest that the saturation magnetic moment and the effective field, which is caused by the interparticle interactions, decreases and increases respectively with the decrease of the particle size. Methods are suggested to overcome the uncertainty associated.

  9. Microwave response of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes: multiple reflection effects

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-04-01

    We derived simple sets of equations to describe the microwave response of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab embedded inside carbon nanotubes, which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation. These equations, which are useful when interference effects due to multiple reflections between plasma film interfaces are small, were used to analyze the reflection, absorption, and transmission coefficients of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab. A discussion on the effects of the continuously changing external magnetic field and hydrogen plasma parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power in the system is presented.

  10. Microwave response of magnetized hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes: multiple reflection effects.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-04-01

    We derived simple sets of equations to describe the microwave response of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab embedded inside carbon nanotubes, which were grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation. These equations, which are useful when interference effects due to multiple reflections between plasma film interfaces are small, were used to analyze the reflection, absorption, and transmission coefficients of the magnetized hydrogen plasma slab. A discussion on the effects of the continuously changing external magnetic field and hydrogen plasma parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power in the system is presented. PMID:20357852

  11. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-03-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process. PMID:22301844

  12. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Abdikian, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  13. Nontrivial magnetoresistive behavior of a single-wall carbon nanotube with an attached molecular magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P?omi?ska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-11-01

    The spin-resolved transport properties of a single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dot, with an attached single molecular magnet, are studied theoretically. With the aid of the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation expansion with respect to the tunnel coupling, the current, differential conductance, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) are determined in both the linear and nonlinear response regimes. It is shown that transport properties depend greatly on both the shell filling sequence of the carbon nanotube and the type of exchange interaction between the molecular magnet and nanotube. This results in highly nontrivial behavior of the TMR, which is especially visible in the low bias voltage regime. Depending on the gate voltage and parameters of the system, we find transport regimes where either a greatly enhanced or negative TMR develops. The mechanism leading to such behavior is associated with nonequilibrium spin accumulation, which builds up in the antiparallel magnetic configuration of the device. We show that it is crucial whether the spin accumulation occurs in the highest-weight spin states or in states with lower spin values. While in the former case it leads to enhanced TMR, in the latter case it may result in negative tunnel magnetoresistance. In addition, we analyze how the above effects depend on the magnitude of the molecular magnet's spin, and show that this dependence is generally nonmonotonic.

  14. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  15. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage. PMID:21711614

  16. Selective extraction of gallic acid in pomegranate rind using surface imprinting polymers over magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi; Gao, Ruixia; Liu, Dechun; Tang, Yuhai; Guo, Zengjun

    2015-10-01

    A novel surface imprinting polymer based on magnetic carbon nanotubes was prepared using dendritic polyethyleneimine as functional monomer to amplify the number of imprinted cavities. The characteristics of resulting polymers were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Results suggest that magnetic nanoparticles are deposited onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the imprinted shell is coated on the surface of magnetic carbon nanotubes with a thickness of approximately 8 nm. Magnetic imprinted polymers are sensitive to magnetic fields and can be easily separated within 3 s using an external magnet. The adsorption results indicate that the obtained imprinted polymers have fast kinetics, an ultrahigh adsorption capacity of 479.9 mg g(-1), and satisfactory selectivity towards the template molecule. The prepared materials have excellent stability with no obvious deterioration after six adsorption-regeneration cycles. In addition, a method for determination of gallic acid (GA) in pomegranate rind was developed, using a combination of the prepared polymers used as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for rapid isolation and determination of GA. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 0.001 ?g mL(-1), and the intra and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) are lower than 3.8% and 5.3%, respectively. The recoveries of GA from pomegranate rind extract are in the range 98.2-103.6% with RSDs lower than 4.3%. PMID:26297456

  17. Low temperature magnetic phase transition and interlayer coupling in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamantopoulou, A.; Glenis, S.; Likodimos, V.; Guskos, N.

    2014-08-28

    The magnetic properties of double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. An asymmetric resonance line of low intensity was identified and analyzed by the superimposition of a narrow and a broad metallic lineshape, attributed to the distinct contributions of defect spins located on the inner and outer DWCNTs shells. The spin susceptibilities of both ESR components revealed a ferromagnetic phase transition at low temperatures (T?carbon nanotubes. Interlayer coupling between the DWCNT layers is suggested to effectively reduce the difference between the transition temperatures for the inner and outer shells and enhance spin-spin interactions between defect spins via the RKKY-type interaction of localized spins with conduction electrons.

  18. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polydopamine nanolayer on multiwalled carbon nanotubes surface for protein capture.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuli; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    A novel, facile and low cost process for imprinting protein on the surface of magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MMWNTs) was developed using human serum albumin (HSA) as the template and dopamine as the functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in detail. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic imprinted polymers toward HSA was 66.23mgg(-1) and it took 20min to achieve the adsorption equilibrium. The magnetic imprinted polymers exhibited the specific selective adsorption toward HSA. Coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, the magnetic imprinted polymers were used to solid-phase extract and detect HSA in urine samples successfully with the recoveries of 91.95-97.8%. PMID:26452876

  19. Carbon nanotubes/magnetite hybrids prepared by a facile synthesis process and their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Ni, Qing-Qing; Natsuki, Toshiaki; Fu, Yaqin

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a facile synthesis process is proposed to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotubes/magnetite (MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4) hybrids. The process involves two steps: (1) water-soluble CNTs are synthesized by one-pot modification using potassium persulfate (KPS) as oxidant. (2) Fe 3O 4 is assembled along the treated CNTs by employing a facile hydrothermal process with the presence of hydrazine hydrate as the mineralizer. The treated CNTs can be easily dispersed in aqueous solvent. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis reveals that several functional groups such as potassium carboxylate (-COOK), carbonyl (-C dbnd O) and hydroxyl (-C-OH) groups are formed on the nanotube surfaces. The MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids are characterized with respect to crystal structure, morphology, element composition and magnetic property by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), XPS and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. XRD and TEM results show that the Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 20-60 nm were firmly assembled on the nanotube surface. The magnetic property investigation indicated that the CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior and possess a saturation magnetization of 32.2 emu/g. Further investigation indicates that the size of assembled Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles can be turned by varying experiment factors. Moreover, a probable growth mechanism for the preparation of CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids was discussed.

  20. High-purity carbon nanotubes synthesis method by an arc discharging in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anazawa, Kazunori; Shimotani, Kei; Manabe, Chikara; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Masaaki

    2002-07-01

    We developed a synthesis method of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), in which an arc discharging was controlled by a magnetic field. Using this method, we can obtain high-purity MWNTs (purity >95%) without purification which disorders walls of MWNTs. The current-voltage measurements show that the carriers would transport ballistically through our defect-free MWNTs with the maximum current density of approx1011 A/m2. Therefore, our method provides defect-free/high-purity MWNTs as nanosized electric wires for device fabrication.

  1. The novel synthesis of magnetically chitosan/carbon nanotube composites and their catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Zarnegar, Zohre; Safari, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Chitosan-modified magnetic carbon nanotubes (CS-MCNTs) were synthesized and were investigated by FT-IR, EDX, FE-SEM, elemental analysis, XRD, VSM and TGA. In order to synthesize the CS-MCNTs composites, Fe3O4 decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs-Fe3O4) were modified with a silica layer by the ammonia-catalysed hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (CNTs-Fe3O4@SiO2). Then, CS-MCNTs were successfully grafted on the surface of CNTs-Fe3O4@SiO2via a suspension cross-linking method. The CS-MCNT was found to be an excellent heterogeneous catalyst for the synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs). The attractive advantages of the present process include short reaction times, milder and cleaner conditions, higher purity and yields, easy isolation of products, easier work-up procedure and lower generation of waste or pollutions. This catalyst was easily separated by an external magnet and the recovered catalyst was reused several times without any significant loss of activity. A combination of the advantages of CNTs, chitosan and magnetic nanoparticles provides an important methodology for carrying out catalytic transformations. Therefore, this method provides a green and much improved protocol over the existing methods. PMID:25597431

  2. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-02-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process.We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Schematic diagram of SWNT sampling points, peak areas of S22 and M11 and relative ratios of S/M. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11783e

  3. Water confined in carbon nanotubes: Magnetic response and proton chemical shieldings

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2008-11-14

    We study the proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) of a model system consisting of liquid water in infinite carbon nanotubes (CNT). Chemical shieldings are evaluated from linear response theory, where the electronic structure is derived from density functional theory (DFT) with plane-wave basis sets and periodic boundary conditions. The shieldings are sampled from trajectories generated via first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at ambient conditions, for water confined in (14,0) and (19,0) CNTs with diameters d = 11 {angstrom} and 14.9 {angstrom}, respectively. We find that confinement within the CNT leads to a large ({approx} -23 ppm) upfield shift relative to bulk liquid water. This shift is a consequence of strongly anisotropic magnetic fields induced in the CNT by an applied magnetic field.

  4. Silicon nanowires, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic nanocrystals: Synthesis, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doh Chang

    Central to the practical use of nanoscale materials is the controlled growth in technologically meaningful quantities. Many of the proposed applications of the nanomaterials potentially require inexpensive production of the building blocks. Solution-based synthetic approach offers controllability, high throughput, and scalability, which make the process attractive for the potential scale-up. Growth kinetics could be readily influenced by chemical interactions between the precursor and the solvent. In order to fully utilize its benefits, it is therefore pivotal to understand the decomposition chemistry of the precursors used in the reactions. Supercritical fluids were used as solvent in which high temperature reactions could take place. Silicon nanowires with diameters of 20˜30 nm was synthesized in supercritical fluids with metal nanocrystals as seeds for the nanowire growth. To unravel the effect of silicon precursors, several silicon precursors were reacted and the resulting products were investigated. The scalability of the system is discussed based on the experimental data. The nanowires were characterized with various characterization tools, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The crystallographic signatures were analyzed through the transmission electron microscopic study, and fundamental electrical and optical properties were probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were prepared by reacting carbon-containing chemicals in supercritical fluids with organometallic compounds that form metal seed particles in-situ. A batch reaction, in which the temperature control was relatively poor, yielded a mixture of multiwall nanotubes and amorphous carbon nanofilaments with a low selectivity of nanotubes in the product. When reaction parameters were translated into a continuous flow-through reaction, nanotube selectivity as well as the throughput of the total product significantly improved. Magnetic properties of various metal nanocrystals were also studied. Colloidal synthesis enables the growth of FePt and MnPt3 nanocrystals with size uniformity. The as-synthesized nanocrystals, however, had compositionally disordered soft-magnetic phases. To obtain hard magnetic layered phase, the nanocrystals must be annealed at high temperatures, which led to sintering of the inorganic cores. To prevent sintering, the nanocrystals were encapsulated with silica layer prior to annealing. Interparticle magnetic interactions were also explored using particles with varying silica thickness.

  5. Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes containing N-doped and undoped sections: powerful tensioactive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purceno, Aluir D.; Machado, Bruno F.; Teixeira, Ana Paula C.; Medeiros, Tayline V.; Benyounes, Anas; Beausoleil, Julien; Menezes, Helvecio C.; Cardeal, Zenilda L.; Lago, Rochel M.; Serp, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen.In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04005h

  6. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  7. Magnetic field effects and renormalization of the long-range Coulomb interaction in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, S. . E-mail: Stefano.Bellucci@lnf.infn.it; Onorato, P.

    2006-04-15

    We develop two theoretical approaches for dealing with the low-energy effects of the repulsive interaction in one-dimensional electron systems. Renormalization Group methods allow us to study the low-energy behavior of the unscreened interaction between currents of well-defined chirality in a strictly one-dimensional electron system. A dimensional regularization approach is useful, when dealing with the low-energy effects of the long-range Coulomb interaction. This method allows us to avoid the infrared singularities arising from the long-range Coulomb interaction at D = 1. We can also compare these approaches with the Luttinger model, to analyze the effects of the short-range term in the interaction. Thanks to these methods, we are able to discuss the effects of a strong magnetic field B in quasi one-dimensional electron systems, by focusing our attention on Carbon Nanotubes. Our results imply a variation with B in the value of the critical exponent {alpha} for the tunneling density of states, which is in fair agreement with that observed in a recent transport experiment involving carbon nanotubes. The dimensional regularization allows us to predict the disappearance of the Luttinger liquid, when the magnetic field increases, with the formation of a chiral liquid with {alpha} = 0.

  8. Electrowetting in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. Y.; Kutana, A.; Collier, C. P.; Giapis, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate reversible wetting and filling of open single-wall carbon nanotubes with mercury by means of electrocapillary pressure originating from the application of a potential across an individual nanotube in contact with a mercury drop. Wetting improves the conductance in both metallic and semiconducting nanotube probes by decreasing contact resistance and forming a mercury nanowire inside the nanotube. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the electrocapillarity-driven filling process and provide estimates for the imbibition speed and electrocapillary pressure.

  9. Manifestation of coherent magnetic anisotropy in a carbon nanotube matrix with low ferromagnetic nanoparticle content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyuk, A. L.; Komissarov, I. V.; Labunov, V. A.; Le Normand, F.; Derory, A.; Hernandez, J. M.; Tejada, J.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the magnetic medium can lead to peculiar interaction between ferromagnetic nanoparticles (NPs). Most research in this area involves analysis of the interplay between magnetic anisotropy and exchange coupling. Increasing the average interparticle distance leads to the dominant role of the random magnetic anisotropy. Here we study the interparticle interaction in a carbon nanotube (CNT) matrix with low ferromagnetic NP content. Samples were synthesized by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition. We found that below some critical NP concentration, when NPs are intercalated only inside CNTs, and at low temperatures, the extended magnetic order, of up to 150 nm, presents in our samples. It is shown by analyzing the correlation functions of the magnetic anisotropy axes that the extended order is not simply due to random anisotropy but is associated with the coherent magnetic anisotropy, which is strengthened by the CNT alignment. With increasing temperature the extended magnetic order is lost. Above the critical NP concentration, when NPs start to be intercalated not only into inner CNT channels, but also outside CNTs, the coherent anisotropy weakens and the exchange coupling dominates in the whole temperature range. We can make a connection with the various correlation functions using the generalized expression for the law of the approach to saturation and show that these different correlation functions reflect the peculiarities in the interparticle interaction inside CNTs. Moreover, we can extract such important micromagnetic parameters like the exchange field, local fields of random and coherent anisotropies, as well as their temperature and NP concentration dependencies.

  10. Simultaneous Synthesis of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in a Magnetically-enhanced Arc Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices1-4. Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT 5, narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes 6, and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes 7, as well as lead to graphene synthesis 8. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the arc conditions. PMID:22330847

  11. Nanomanipulation and Lithography: The Building (and Modeling) of Carbon Nanotube Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Richard Nam

    2002-12-01

    Aircraft fuselages suffer alternating stress during takeoffs and landings, and fatigue cracks begin to grow, usually at rivet holes. The detection of these fatigue cracks under installed fasteners in aging aircraft is a major goal of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) community. The use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors in electromagnetic (EM) NDE has been increasing rapidly. For example, here at Langley Research Center, a Rotating Probe System (RPS) containing a GMR element has been incorporated into a product to detect deeply buried flaws in aerospace structures. In order to advance this eddy current probe application and many similar ones, research to create smaller, more sensitive and energy-efficient EM sensors has been aggressively pursued. Recent theoretical and experimental work on spin coherent transport supports the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) based magnetic tunnel junctions. In this study, a spatial filtering scheme is presented that improves the signal to noise ratio of the RPS and does not significantly impact the number of false alarms. Signals due to buried flaws occur at higher frequencies than do signals due to rivet tilt or probe misalignment, and the strategy purposefully targets this fact. Furthermore, the spatial filtering scheme exploits decreases in the probe output that are observed immediately preceding and following the peak in output due to a fatigue crack. Using the new filters, an enhanced probability of flaw detection is expected. In the future, even tinier, more sensitive, low-power sensors are envisioned for the rotating probe and other nondestructive inspection systems. These may be comprised of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that connect two ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Theoretical work has been done at Langley to model the electrical and magnetoconductance behavior of such junctions, for systems containing short "armchair" nanotubes. The present work facilitates the modeling of more realistic system sizes, through the re-writing of a critical code segment that gives a hundredfold improvement in speed. Furthermore, the tight-binding model calculations are now generalized to include all types of nanotubes, not merely armchair tubes. On the experimental side, innovative junction fabrication procedures are investigated, including diamond-tip scanning probe lithography and e-beam lithography. Programs are written for the Nanometer Pattern Generation System to effect the creation of many junctions at once, to increase the chances of a CNT connecting two FM electrodes. As it is not prudent to rely solely on luck, the capability for tube nanomanipulation with an unprecedented level of control is also shown, and a procedure for controlled deposition upon chemically functionalized lithographic patterns is discussed. All of the techniques demonstrated can be used to create a magnetic tunnel junction to be refrigerated for extensive magnetoconductance studies.

  12. Origami-inspired nanofabrication utilizing physical and magnetic properties of in situ grown carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    In, Hyun Jin

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in particular the vertically-aligned variety grown through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)-based process, are highly versatile nanostructures that can be used in a variety of ...

  13. Magnetic impurity effects in metallic carbon nanotubes: local non-Fermi liquid theory

    E-print Network

    Kikuo Harigaya

    1999-12-01

    Magnetic impurity effects on metallic carbon nanotubes are studied theoretically. The resolvent method for the multi channel Kondo effect is applied to the band structure of the kp perturbation hamiltonian in the limit of the infinite onsite repulsion at the impurity site. We discuss the local non-Fermi liquid behavior at temperatures lower than the Kondo temperature T_K. The density of states of localized electron has a singularity |omega|^1/2 which gives rise to a pseudo gap at the Kondo resonance in low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the electronic resistivity is predicted as T^1/2, and the imaginary part of dynamical susceptibilities has the |omega|^1/2 dependence. Possible experimental observations are discussed.

  14. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors. PMID:26452937

  15. Water-dispersible magnetic carbon nanotubes as T2-weighted MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Hughes, Timothy C; Muir, Benjamin W; Waddington, Lynne J; Gengenbach, Thomas R; Easton, Christopher D; Hinton, Tracey M; Moffat, Bradford A; Hao, Xiaojuan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-01-01

    An efficient MRI T2-weighted contrast agent incorporating a potential liver targeting functionality was synthesized via the combination of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was coated on the surface of acid treated MWCNTs via electrostatic interactions and SPIO nanoparticles modified with a potential targeting agent, lactose-glycine adduct (Lac-Gly), were subsequently immobilized on the surface of the PDDA-MWCNTs. A narrow magnetic hysteresis loop indicated that the product displayed superparamagnetism at room temperature which was further confirmed by ZFC (zero field cooling)/FC (field cooling) curves measured by SQUID. The multifunctional MWCNT-based magnetic nanocomposites showed low cytotoxicity in vitro to HEK293 and Huh7 cell lines. Enhanced T2 relaxivities were observed for the hybrid material (186 mM(-1) s(-1)) in comparison with the pure magnetic nanoparticles (92 mM(-1) s(-1)) due to the capacity of the MWCNTs to "carry" more nanoparticles as clusters. More importantly, after administration of the composite material to an in vivo liver cancer model in mice, a significant increase in tumor to liver contrast ratio (277%) was observed in T2 weighted magnetic resonance images. PMID:24120046

  16. Reinforcement of epoxy-based composites by magnetically aligned multi walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianjuan; Lin, Song; Li, Moyu; Li, Wusheng; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2015-07-01

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes decorated with ferriferrous oxide nanoparticle (MWCNTs-Fe3O4) complex was used as an effective reinforcement in the polymer composites. The MWCNTs-Fe3O4 with various grafting contents of Fe3O4 nanoparticles were successfully prepared by combining in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and coprecipitation process, which was characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The MWCNTs-Fe3O4 complex showed the strong magnetic response behavior, which could be easily aligned in an external magnetic field. The alignment state of MWCNTs-Fe3O4 complex could be modulated by adjusting the intensity of external magnetic field, grafting content of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and viscosity of the solvent. Moreover, with the addition of MWCNTs-Fe3O4, tensile strength and modulus of epoxy composites were enhanced by 12.3 and 10.9%, respectively, which was due to the reinforcing effect of the aligned MWCNTs-Fe3O4 within magnetic field.

  17. D{sup 0} magnetism in Ca doped narrow carbon nanotubes: First principle chirality effect study

    SciTech Connect

    Hajiheidari, F.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Hashemifar, S. J.

    2014-06-21

    Curvature has always had crucial effects on the physical properties of narrow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and here spin-polarized density functional calculations were employed to study electronic and magnetic properties of calcium-decorated narrow (5,5) and (9,0)CNTs with close diameters (?7?Å) and different chiralities. Our results showed that chirality had great impact on the electronic structure and magnetization of the doped CNTs. In addition, internally or externally doping of the calcium atoms was studied comparatively and although for the (9,0)CNT the internal doping was the most stable configuration, which involves a novel kind of spin-polarization originated from Ca-4s electrons, but for the (5,5)tube the external doping was the most stable one without any spin-polarization. On the other hand, calcium doping in the center of the (5,5)CNT was an endothermic process and led to the spin-polarization of unoccupied Ca-3d orbitals via direct exchange interaction between adjacent Ca atoms. In the considered systems, the existence of magnetization in the absence of any transition-metal elements was an example of valuable d{sup 0} magnetism title.

  18. Sequential coating of magnetic carbonyliron particles with polystyrene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes and its effect on their magnetorheology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei Fei; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Seo, Yongsok

    2010-01-01

    A two-step process for the sequential coating of magnetic carbonyliron (CI) particles with polystyrene (PS) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was used to improve the sedimentation stability of micrometer-sized magnetic CI particles for magnetorheological (MR) applications under an applied magnetic field. The CI particles were initially coated with nanosized PS beads using an in situ dispersion polymerization method and then wrapped with a dense MWCNT nest through a solvent-casting method in a water/oil emulsion system. The morphology, MR performance, and sedimentation stability of the synthesized magnetic composite particles were examined. The composite particles showed enhanced MR characteristics and dispersion stability. PMID:20356220

  19. Magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube iron nanocomposites as adsorbents and antibacterial agents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook; Garg, Vijayendra K

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century is to provide clean and affordable water through protecting source and purifying polluted waters. This review presents advances made in the synthesis of carbon- and iron-based nanomaterials, graphene-carbon nanotubes-iron oxides, which can remove pollutants and inactivate virus and bacteria efficiently in water. The three-dimensional graphene and graphene oxide based nanostructures exhibit large surface area and sorption sites that provide higher adsorption capacity to remove pollutants than two-dimensional graphene-based adsorbents and other conventional adsorbents. Examples are presented to demonstrate removal of metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, Cr(VI), and As) and organics (e.g., dyes and oil) by grapheme-based nanostructures. Inactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species (e.g., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) is also shown. A mechanism involving the interaction of adsorbents and pollutants is briefly discussed. Magnetic graphene-based nanomaterials can easily be separated from the treated water using an external magnet; however, there are challenges in implementing the graphene-based nanotechnology in treating real water. PMID:26498500

  20. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and temperature was investigated. Analysis of data showed that adsorption equilibrium could be better described by Freundlich isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities obtained at the pH of 6.0 was 1.97 mg/g. The estimated thermodynamic values of free energy (?G°), entropy (?S°) and enthalpy (?H°) indicated a spontaneous and an endothermic process. Furthermore, the TA-MWCNTs was magnetized for separation of boron-contaminated adsorbent from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field. The results showed that magnetic TA-MWCNTs particles were separated effectively after adsorption from contaminated water. PMID:24393401

  1. Molecular quantum spintronics: supramolecular spin valves based on single-molecule magnets and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Urdampilleta, Matias; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We built new hybrid devices consisting of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors, decorated with TbPc(2) (Pc = phthalocyanine) rare-earth based single-molecule magnets (SMMs). The drafting was achieved by tailoring supramolecular ?-? interactions between CNTs and SMMs. The magnetoresistance hysteresis loop measurements revealed steep steps, which we can relate to the magnetization reversal of individual SMMs. Indeed, we established that the electronic transport properties of these devices depend strongly on the relative magnetization orientations of the grafted SMMs. The SMMs are playing the role of localized spin polarizer and analyzer on the CNT electronic conducting channel. As a result, we measured magneto-resistance ratios up to several hundred percent. We used this spin valve effect to confirm the strong uniaxial anisotropy and the superparamagnetic blocking temperature (T(B) ~ 1 K) of isolated TbPc(2) SMMs. For the first time, the strength of exchange interaction between the different SMMs of the molecular spin valve geometry could be determined. Our results introduce a new design for operable molecular spintronic devices using the quantum effects of individual SMMs. PMID:22072910

  2. Magnetic force microscopy measurements in external magnetic fields—comparison between coated probes and an iron filled carbon nanotube probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, F.; Mühl, T.; Weissker, U.; Leonhardt, A.; Wolff, U.; Givord, D.; Büchner, B.

    2010-07-01

    We performed magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements in external magnetic fields parallel to the sample plane to qualitatively study their effect on the magnetization of different kinds of MFM probes. As a test structure we used an array of rectangular ferromagnetic thin film elements aligned with the external magnetic field direction. MFM images were taken while the field was increased stepwise to monitor the onset of a tilt in the MFM probe magnetization. Three different probes were investigated: a conventional pyramidal probe coated with 40 nm of CoCrTa, a coated high aspect ratio MFM probe, and a MFM probe based on an iron filled carbon nanotube (FeCNT). The results show that the magnetization of the pyramidal probe is only stable in in-plane fields of up to ˜60 mT, in larger fields a considerable in-plane component of the tip magnetization is observed. This makes it difficult to distinguish the effect of the external field on the sample from those on the MFM probe. The coated high aspect ratio probe is at first stable up to ˜200 mT and then shows a history dependent behavior, in the second sweep the onset of the magnetization tilt is already visible at ˜100 mT. With the FeCNT probe, no tilt of the probe magnetization could be observed in in-plane fields up to the experimental limit of 230 mT. Due to the large shape anisotropy of the enclosed iron nanowire its direction of magnetization stays mainly oriented along the long axis even in moderate fields that deviate from this easy axis. Consequently, this probe is best suited for MFM measurements in external fields.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  4. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  5. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    These project will explore the functionalization of carbon nanotubes via the formation of molecular complexes with perylene diimide based systems. It is anticipated that these complexes would be soluble in organic solvent and enable the homogenous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer films. Molecular complexes will be prepared and characterized using standard spectroscopic and thermal analytical techniques. Polymer films will be prepared with these complexes and their properties (electrical and thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, stability) evaluated.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  7. Dynamics of multiple viscoelastic carbon nanotube based nanocomposites with axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Karli?i?, Danilo; Caji?, Milan; Murmu, Tony; Kozi?, Predrag; Adhikari, Sondipon

    2014-06-21

    Nanocomposites and magnetic field effects on nanostructures have received great attention in recent years. A large amount of research work was focused on developing the proper theoretical framework for describing many physical effects appearing in structures on nanoscale level. Great step in this direction was successful application of nonlocal continuum field theory of Eringen. In the present paper, the free transverse vibration analysis is carried out for the system composed of multiple single walled carbon nanotubes (MSWCNT) embedded in a polymer matrix and under the influence of an axial magnetic field. Equivalent nonlocal model of MSWCNT is adopted as viscoelastically coupled multi-nanobeam system (MNBS) under the influence of longitudinal magnetic field. Governing equations of motion are derived using the Newton second low and nonlocal Rayleigh beam theory, which take into account small-scale effects, the effect of nanobeam angular acceleration, internal damping and Maxwell relation. Explicit expressions for complex natural frequency are derived based on the method of separation of variables and trigonometric method for the “Clamped-Chain” system. In addition, an analytical method is proposed in order to obtain asymptotic damped natural frequency and the critical damping ratio, which are independent of boundary conditions and a number of nanobeams in MNBS. The validity of obtained results is confirmed by comparing the results obtained for complex frequencies via trigonometric method with the results obtained by using numerical methods. The influence of the longitudinal magnetic field on the free vibration response of viscoelastically coupled MNBS is discussed in detail. In addition, numerical results are presented to point out the effects of the nonlocal parameter, internal damping, and parameters of viscoelastic medium on complex natural frequencies of the system. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the suggested methodology to find the closed form solutions for the free vibration response of multiple nanostructure systems under the influence of magnetic field.

  8. Dynamics of multiple viscoelastic carbon nanotube based nanocomposites with axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karli?i?, Danilo; Murmu, Tony; Caji?, Milan; Kozi?, Predrag; Adhikari, Sondipon

    2014-06-01

    Nanocomposites and magnetic field effects on nanostructures have received great attention in recent years. A large amount of research work was focused on developing the proper theoretical framework for describing many physical effects appearing in structures on nanoscale level. Great step in this direction was successful application of nonlocal continuum field theory of Eringen. In the present paper, the free transverse vibration analysis is carried out for the system composed of multiple single walled carbon nanotubes (MSWCNT) embedded in a polymer matrix and under the influence of an axial magnetic field. Equivalent nonlocal model of MSWCNT is adopted as viscoelastically coupled multi-nanobeam system (MNBS) under the influence of longitudinal magnetic field. Governing equations of motion are derived using the Newton second low and nonlocal Rayleigh beam theory, which take into account small-scale effects, the effect of nanobeam angular acceleration, internal damping and Maxwell relation. Explicit expressions for complex natural frequency are derived based on the method of separation of variables and trigonometric method for the "Clamped-Chain" system. In addition, an analytical method is proposed in order to obtain asymptotic damped natural frequency and the critical damping ratio, which are independent of boundary conditions and a number of nanobeams in MNBS. The validity of obtained results is confirmed by comparing the results obtained for complex frequencies via trigonometric method with the results obtained by using numerical methods. The influence of the longitudinal magnetic field on the free vibration response of viscoelastically coupled MNBS is discussed in detail. In addition, numerical results are presented to point out the effects of the nonlocal parameter, internal damping, and parameters of viscoelastic medium on complex natural frequencies of the system. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the suggested methodology to find the closed form solutions for the free vibration response of multiple nanostructure systems under the influence of magnetic field.

  9. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  10. Nitrogen in graphite and carbon nanotubes: Magnetism and mobility Yuchen Ma,* A. S. Foster, A. V. Krasheninnikov, and R. M. Nieminen

    E-print Network

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Nitrogen in graphite and carbon nanotubes: Magnetism and mobility Yuchen Ma,* A. S. Foster, A. V November 2005 We use ab initio methods to study the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structure of nitrogen Incorporation of nitrogen into sp2 -hybridized carbon ma- terials has been shown to be a promising way to change

  11. High-temperature annealing effects on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: electronic structure, field emission and magnetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sekhar Chandra; Pao, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Yu-Shin; Wu, Shang-Lun; Ling, Dah-Chin; Lin, I-Nan; Pong, Way-Faung; Gupta, Sanju; Giorcelli, Mauro; Bianco, Stefano; Musso, Simone; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    This work elucidates the effects of high-temperature annealing on the microscopic and electronic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VBPES), respectively. The field emission and magnetization behaviors are also presented. The results of annealing are as follows: (1) MWCNTs tend to align in the form of small fringes along their length, promote graphitization and be stable in air, (2) XANES indicates an enhancement in oxygen content on the sample, implying that it can be adopted for sensing and storing oxygen gas, (3) the electron field emission current density (J) is enhanced and the turn-on electric field (E(TOE)) reduced, suggesting potential use in field emission displays and as electron sources in microwave tube amplifiers and (4) as-grown MWCNTs with embedded iron nanoparticles exhibits significantly higher coercivity approximately 750 Oe than its bulk counterpart (Fe(bulk) approximately 0.9 Oe), suggesting its potential use as low-dimensional high-density magnetic recording media. PMID:19908682

  12. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  13. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-print Network

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14

    Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies...

  14. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  15. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  16. Properties of K,Rb-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Wâgberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed experimental study on how magnetic and electronic properties of Rb,K-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods can be derived from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigations. Ring currents do play a basic role in those systems; in particular, the inner cavities of nanotubes offer an ideal environment to investigate the magnetism at the nanoscale. We report the largest diamagnetic shifts down to -68.3 ppm ever observed in carbon allotropes, which is connected to the enhancement of the aromaticity of the nanotube envelope upon intercalation. The metallization of intercalated peapods is evidenced from the chemical shift anisotropy and spin-lattice relaxation (T1) measurements. The observed relaxation curves signal a three-component model with two slow and one fast relaxing components. We assigned the fast component to the unpaired electrons charged C60 that show a phase transition near 100 K. The two slow components can be rationalized by the two types of charged C60 at two different positions with a linear regime following Korringa behavior, which is typical for metallic system and allow us to estimate the density of sate at Fermi level n(EF).

  17. Structural and magnetic characterization of batch-fabricated nickel encapsulated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeshan, M. A.; Shou, K.; Pané, S.; Pellicer, E.; Sort, J.; Sivaraman, K. M.; Baró, M. D.; Nelson, B. J.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the growth and fabrication of Ni-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) with an average diameter of 115 nm and variable length of 400 nm-1 µm. The Ni-MWNTs were grown using template-assisted electrodeposition and low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) techniques. Anodized alumina oxide (AAO) templates were fabricated on Si using a current controlled process. This was followed by the electrodeposition of Ni nanowires (NWs) using galvanostatic pulsed current (PC) electrodeposition. Ni NWs served as the catalyst to grow Ni-MWNTs in an atmosphere of H2/C2H2 at a temperature of 700 °C. Time dependent depositions were carried out to understand the diffusion and growth mechanism of Ni-MWNTs. Characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). TEM analysis revealed that the Ni nanowires possess a fcc structure. To understand the effects of the electrodeposition parameters, and also the effects of the high temperatures encountered during MWNT growth on the magnetic properties of the Ni-MWNTs, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements were performed. The template-based fabrication method is repeatable, efficient, enables batch fabrication and provides good control on the dimensions of the Ni-MWNTs.

  18. Structural and magnetic characterization of batch-fabricated nickel encapsulated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zeeshan, M A; Shou, K; Pané, S; Pellicer, E; Sort, J; Sivaraman, K M; Baró, M D; Nelson, B J

    2011-07-01

    We report on the growth and fabrication of Ni-filled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) with an average diameter of 115 nm and variable length of 400 nm-1 µm. The Ni-MWNTs were grown using template-assisted electrodeposition and low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) techniques. Anodized alumina oxide (AAO) templates were fabricated on Si using a current controlled process. This was followed by the electrodeposition of Ni nanowires (NWs) using galvanostatic pulsed current (PC) electrodeposition. Ni NWs served as the catalyst to grow Ni-MWNTs in an atmosphere of H2/C2H2 at a temperature of 700?°C. Time dependent depositions were carried out to understand the diffusion and growth mechanism of Ni-MWNTs. Characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). TEM analysis revealed that the Ni nanowires possess a fcc structure. To understand the effects of the electrodeposition parameters, and also the effects of the high temperatures encountered during MWNT growth on the magnetic properties of the Ni-MWNTs, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements were performed. The template-based fabrication method is repeatable, efficient, enables batch fabrication and provides good control on the dimensions of the Ni-MWNTs. PMID:21606563

  19. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  20. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: EDX spectra, MALDI-TOF MS and data summary. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05367a

  1. Optimization and evaluation of chelerythrine nanoparticles composed of magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yulin; Zhou, Zhide; Liang, Jintao; Chen, Zhencheng; Li, Guiyin

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a new chelerythrine nanomaterial targeted drug delivery system (Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE) was designed with chelerythrine (CHE) as model of antitumor drug and magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWNTs) nanocomposites as drug carrier. The process and formulation variables of Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-level, three-factor Box-Behnken design (BBD). Mathematical equations and response surface plots were used to relate the dependent and independent variables. The experimental results were fitted into second-order response surface model. When Fe3O4/MWNTs:CHE ratio was 20.6:1, CHE concentration was 172.0 ?g/mL, temperature was 34.5 °C, the drug loading content and entrapment efficiency were 3.04 ± 0.17% and 63.68 ± 2.36%, respectively. The optimized Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Zeta potential, in vitro drug release and MTT assays. The in vitro CHE drug release behavior from Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE displayed a biphasic drug release pattern and followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model with Fickian diffusion mechanism for drug release. The results from MTT assays suggested that the Fe3O4/MWNTs-CHE could effectively inhibit the proliferation of human hepatoma cells (HepG2), which displayed time or concentration-dependent manner. All these preliminary studies were expected to provide a theoretical basis and offer new methods for preparation efficient magnetic targeted drug delivery systems.

  2. Electronic and photonic properties of doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jijun; Xie, Rui-Hua

    2003-12-01

    The idea of doping carbon nanotubes is attractive since it provides various possibilities for controlling the physical properties of carbon nanotubes. In this review, we have summarized recent progress on the experimental and theoretical studies of carbon nanotubes doped with nonmetals, alkali metals, transition metals, and clusters. The doping effects on the electronic, magnetic, transport, and optical properties of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The related applications of carbon nanotubes in nanoelectronics, battery, field emission, spintronics, nonlinear optics, and chemical sensors are discussed. PMID:15002124

  3. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  4. Polarized light transmission in ferrofluids loaded with carbon nanotubes in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Martínez-Torres, P.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-optic phenomena in ferrofluids have been shown to be related to the formation of chain structures, due to the arrangement of the ferromagnetic particles, induced by an applied magnetic field. In this work, the effects on transmission of polarized light due to anisotropic effects induced by an external magnetic field in ferrofluids with carbon nanotubes are studied. The time response of the system presents two well defined stages, in the first one, which is very short, the fluid behaves as a polarizer. In contrast in the second stage, the effects of light transmission dominate. In this stage the transmitted light intensity grows with time and after a long time reaches a constant stable value. It is shown that these phenomena depend on the carbon nanotubes concentration as well as on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Using a simple model that considers a chain-like structure formation, it is possible to determine the rate of agglomeration of the formed structures and the attenuation coefficient of the transmitted light. The formation of nanostructures leads to variation in the transmitted light, depending on the polarization of the incident light. These magnetic nanostructures can find numerous applications in nanotechnology, optical devices and medicine.

  5. Spin-unrestricted linear-scaling electronic structure theory and its application to magnetic carbon-doped boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H. J.; Liang, W. Z.; Yang, Jinlong; Hou, J. G.; Zhu, Qingshi

    2005-09-01

    We present an extension of the density-matrix-based linear-scaling electronic structure theory to incorporate spin degrees of freedom. When the spin multiplicity of the system can be predetermined, the generalization of the existing linear-scaling methods to spin-unrestricted cases is straightforward. However, without calculations it is hard to determine the spin multiplicity of some complex systems, such as many magnetic nanostuctures and some inorganic or bioinorganic molecules. Here we give a general prescription to obtain the spin-unrestricted ground state of open-shell systems. Our methods are implemented into the linear-scaling trace-correcting density-matrix purification algorithm. The numerical atomic-orbital basis, rather than the commonly adopted Gaussian basis functions, is used. The test systems include O2 molecule and magnetic carbon-doped boron nitride (BN)(5,5) and BN(7,6) nanotubes. Using the newly developed method, we find that the magnetic moments in carbon-doped BN nanotubes couple antiferromagnetically with each other. Our results suggest that the linear-scaling spin-unrestricted trace-correcting purification method is very powerful to treat large magnetic systems.

  6. Fast microextraction of phthalate acid esters from beverage, environmental water and perfume samples by magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan-Bo; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-02-15

    In this work, magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by mixing the magnetic particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed solutions. Due to their excellent adsorption capability towards hydrophobic compounds, the magnetic CNTs were used as adsorbent of magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) to extract phthalate acid esters (PAEs), which are widely used in many consumable products with potential carcinogenic properties. By coupling MSPE with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for the analysis of PAEs was established. Our results showed that the limits of detection (LODs) of 16 PAEs ranged from 4.9 to 38 ng L(-1), which are much lower compared to the previously reported methods. And good linearities of the detection method were obtained with correlation coefficients (R(2)) between 0.9821 and 0.9993. In addition, a satisfying reproducibility was achieved by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 11.7% and 14.6%, respectively. Finally, the established MSPE-GC/MS method was successfully applied to the determination of PAEs from bottled beverages, tap water and perfume samples. The recoveries of the 16 PAEs from the real samples ranged from 64.6% to 125.6% with the RSDs less than 16.5%. Taken together, the MSPE-GC/MS method developed in current study provides a new option for the detection of PAEs from real samples with complex matrices. PMID:22340126

  7. Spin splitting at the Fermi level in carbon nanotubes in the absence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Márcio M.; Brandão, Júlio; Lima, Jonas R. F.; Moraes, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, motivated by the possibility of experimental realization, we study the low-energy electronic states of a rotating carbon nanotube within a continuum model. An effective Dirac equation in the rotating reference frame is derived and exact analytical solutions for the eigenfunctions and energy spectrum are obtained. A Zeeman-like splitting results from the coupling of rotation to total angular momentum and the previously known static results are obtained in the no rotation limit.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties. PMID:17193459

  9. Spin Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenenberger, Christian

    2005-03-01

    We report on spin transport in carbon nanotubes. First, spin injection in arc-discharge grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is achieved by using a ferromagnetic PdNi alloy as contact material. The two contacts, i.e. source and drain, have different shape rendering different magnetic switching fields. Typical two-terminal resistances are in the range of 5-100 kOhm. We find a tunneling magneto resistance (TMR) signal amounting to 2.5-3%. Secondly, we explore the TMR signal as a function of temperature T, source-drain voltage Vsd, and gate voltage Vg. As expected the TMR signal decays with T and Vsd. Remarkably, however, we find a sign change in the spin signal (the TMR signal) as a function of both Vsd and Vg. This work has been done in collaboration with: S. Sahoo and T. Kontos (Univ. of Basel), C. Sürgers (Univ. of Karlsruhe), and L. Forro (EPFL Lausanne).

  10. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  11. Preparation of novel curcumin-imprinted polymers based on magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the rapid extraction of curcumin from ginger powder and kiwi fruit root.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xing; Rao, Wei; Long, Fang; Yan, Liang; Yin, Yuli

    2015-01-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer based on magnetic phenyl-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes was synthesized using curcumin as the template molecule, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. The phenyl groups contained in the magnetic imprinted polymers acted as the assisting functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Adsorption studies demonstrated that the magnetic imprinted polymers possessed excellent selectivity toward curcumin with a maximum capacity of 16.80 mg/g. Combining magnetic extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography technology, the magnetic imprinted polymer based on magnetic phenyl-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes was applied for the rapid separation and enrichment of curcumin from ginger powder and kiwi fruit root successfully. PMID:25358961

  12. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  13. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  14. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  15. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  16. Carbon nanotube network varactor.

    PubMed

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Erdmanis, M; Lioubtchenko, D V; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G; Räisänen, A V

    2015-01-30

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. PMID:25556375

  17. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes synthesize using ferrite catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Lin, Jiapeng; Peng, Zuxiong; Zeng, Guoxun; Pang, Jinshan; Chen, Yiming

    2009-09-01

    The ferrite powder with honeycombed structure obtained by chemical combustion was used as catalyst to synthesize multi-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. The magnetic components and characters of the the carbon nanotubes synthesized were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectra and vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM). The ferric components of the carbon nanotubes samples can be identified by Mossbauer spectra. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes sample after purification contains two ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to ?-Fe species and Fe3C (cementite) species. While the Mossbauer spectra of the carbon nanotubes sample before purification contains three ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to ?-Fe species, Fe3C species and ?-Fe2O3. The saturation magnetization intensity Ms of carbon nanotubes sample after purification is decreased from 46.61 to 2.94 emu/g, but the coercive force increasd and reached 328Oe.

  18. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many purified tubes aligned in parallel. While the operating principle is somewhat different from that of single-tube diodes because of the presence of metallic tubes in the material, the film diodes nonetheless show a rectifying behavior and much greater light intensity than single-tube devices. With their superior light output and robustness, they bring us one step closer to a real-world application of carbon nanotubes optoelectronics.

  19. Modifying Nanotubes Chemistry and Electronics of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    Modifying Nanotubes Chemistry and Electronics of Carbon Nanotubes Go Together Ernesto Joselevich* Keywords: chemical reactivity · electronic structure · molecular electronics · nanotechnology · nanotubes) in nanoelectronics is the control of their electronic properties, which can be either metallic or semi- conducting

  20. Magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes modified with dual hydroxy functional ionic liquid for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian; Zhou, Yigang

    2015-05-21

    A novel adsorbent based on silica-coated magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface modified by dual hydroxy functional ionic liquid (FIL) ([OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2) has been designed and used for the purification of lysozyme (Lys) by magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2. After extraction, the concentration of Lys was determined by a UV-Vis spectrophotometer at 278 nm. A series of single-factor experiments were carried out to identify the optimal conditions of the extraction and the extraction amount could reach up to 94.6 mg g(-1). The RSD of the precision, the repeatability and the stability experiments were 0.37% (n = 3), 0.47% (n = 3) and 0.52% (n = 3), respectively. Comparison of [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2 with silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 (Fe3O4@SiO2), silica-coated magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs@SiO2) and alkyl quaternary ammonium ionic liquid-modified on m-MWCNTs@SiO2 was carried out by extracting Lys. The extraction of bovine serum albumin (BSA), trypsin (Try) and ovalbumin (OVA) was also done by the proposed method. Desorption of Lys was carried out by 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4-1 mol L(-1) NaCl as the eluent solution and the desorption ratio reached 91.6%. Nearly 97.8% of the [OH]-FIL-m-MWCNTs@SiO2 could be recovered from each run, and the extraction amount decreased less after five runs. The circular dichroism spectral experiment analysis indicated that the secondary structure of Lys was unchanged after extraction. PMID:25826781

  1. CARBON NANOTUBES AS MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exploratory Research Program Project - Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are formed from graphite (or graphene) sheets rolled into tubes, typically with diameters of 1 - 10 nm and lengths of 200 - 500 nm. Carbon nanotubes have unique electrical properties that have led to interest in thei...

  2. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  3. Impact of carbondiimide crosslinker used for magnetic carbon nanotube mediated GFP plasmid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yuzhi; Xu, Peng; He, Chuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Min; Xing, James; Chen, Jie

    2011-07-01

    1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbondiimide hydrochloride (EDC) is commonly used as a crosslinker to help bind biomolecules, such as DNA plasmids, with nanostructures. However, EDC often remains, after a crosslink reaction, in the micro-aperture of the nanostructure, e.g., carbon nanotube. The remaining EDC shows positive green fluorescent signals and makes a nanostructure with a strong cytotoxicity which induces cell death. The toxicity of EDC was confirmed on a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and two leukemic cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1). The MCF-7 cells mainly underwent necrosis after treatment with EDC, which was verified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) annexin V staining, video microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). If the EDC was not removed completely, the nanostructures with remaining EDC produced a green fluorescent background that could interfere with flow cytometry (FACS) measurement and result in false information about GFP plasmid delivery. Effective methods to remove residual EDC on macromolecules were also developed.

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  5. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  7. Fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotube thin films via electrophoretic deposition process: effect of water magnetization on deposition efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazubandi, Behnaz; Moaseri, Ehsan; Baniadam, Majid; Maghrebi, Morteza; Gholizadeh, Mostafa

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effect of water magnetization was investigated on the performance of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Magnetization of water was carried out via two different methods including static and dynamic magnetization processes. It has been found that magnetization of water, as the EPD medium, could enhance several characteristics of MWCNT thin films (MWCNT-TFs). Application of magnetized water as solvent in EPD process resulted in higher electrical conductivity of EPD suspension; consequently, required deposition time was reduced and the electrolysis of water, which is known as one of the main disadvantages of water-based EPDs, was controlled to some extent. Surface morphology of MWCNT-TFs was studied via scanning electron microscopy, and notable enhancement was detected in uniformity and density of MWCNT-TF network. Significant improvement was achieved in electrical conductivity (up to 54 % increase in current) of MWCNT-TF by measuring the current versus voltage characteristics of MWCNT-TFs.

  8. Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals

    E-print Network

    Patrick, David L.

    Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals Michael D. Lynch and David L. Patrick* Department with organization controlled using well-established methods of LC alignment, including grooved surfaces, magnetic blocks, offering a general route for controlled assembly of organized nanomaterials and devices. Over

  9. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  10. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  11. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  12. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    V. Peano; M. Thorwart; A. Kasper; R. Egger

    2005-11-23

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  13. Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Different Local Environments: Effects of Strain and Disorder on Magnetic Brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, T. A.; Hilton, D. J.; Shaver, J.; Rice, W. D.; Jho, Y.-D.; McGill, S. A.; Fagan, J. A.; Hobbie, E. K.; Kono, J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown that in the presence of a high magnetic field the two lowest-energy spin-singlet exciton states become bright [1]. Furthermore, this ``magnetic brightening'', or increase in photoluminescence (PL) intensity as a function of magnetic flux through each SWNT, increases as the temperature decreases. Here, we report results of temperature-dependent magneto-PL from 2 to 200 K and up to 45 T on SWNTs of the same stock solution suspended in four different local environments. We compared both the brightening and temperature dependence of tubes stretch aligned and unaligned in poly-acrylic acid matrices. As expected, the tubes aligned at high magnetic field exhibited more brightening than those unaligned. We also investigated the behavior of SWNTs in two other matrices, iota-Carrageenan and gelatin. Along with the expected peak shifting and broadening from the effects of strain, we found that the temperature dependence changes with local environment. [1] S. Zaric et al., PRL 96, 016406 (2006); J. Shaver et al., Nano Lett. 7, 1851 (2007); I. B. Mortimer and R. J. Nicholas, PRL 98, 027404 (2007).

  14. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  15. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  16. Selective Adsorption of Gd(3+) on a Magnetically Retrievable Imprinted Chitosan/Carbon Nanotube Composite with High Capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Gao, Qiang; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Shen, Xiang; Lei, Hanwu; Han, Bo; Xia, Kaisheng; Zhou, Chenggang

    2015-09-30

    A novel magnetic imprinting nanotechnology for selective capture of Gd(3+) from a mixed solution of rare earth ions was developed by simply adding Gd(3+)-imprinted chitosan/carbon nanotube nanocomposite (IIP-CS/CNT) and silica-coated magnetite nanoparticle (SiO2@Fe3O4). The IIP-CS/CNT was prepared for the first time via a facile "surface deposition-crosslinking" method, exhibiting a well-defined coating structure. Interestingly, the neighboring IIP-CS/CNT monomers were held together as bundles, like a network, containing abundant interstitial spaces. When IIP-CS/CNT and SiO2@Fe3O4 were dispersed in a mixed solution of rare earth ions, the magnetic SiO2@Fe3O4 submicrospheres would be trapped in or adhere to the IIP-CS/CNT network, leading to the magnetization of IIP-CS/CNT; meanwhile, Gd(3+) ions could be selectively captured by the magnetized IIP-CS/CNT. Saturation adsorption capacity for Gd(3+) was up to 88 mg g(-1) at 303.15 K, which is significantly higher than the Gd(3+) adsorption capacities for the reported rare earth ion-imprinted adsorbents over recent years. The selectivity coefficients relative to La(3+) and Ce(3+) were 3.50 and 2.23, respectively, which are very similar to those found for other reported CS-based imprinted materials. Moreover, the imprinted adsorbents could be easily and rapidly retrieved by an external magnetic field without the need of additional centrifugation or filtration, greatly facilitating the separation process. Test of reusability demonstrated that the magnetized IIP-CS/CNT could be repeatedly used without any significant loss in binding capacity. Overall, this work not only provides new insights into the fabrication of magnetic imprinted CS-based composite, but also highlights its application for selective adsorption toward rare earth ions. PMID:26355685

  17. Dragging Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with the Aid of Supramolecular Assemblies of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Molecular Magnets, and Peptides in a Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Ana Cláudia C.; Sáfar, Gustavo A. M.; Góes, Alfredo M.; Bemquerer, Marcelo P.; Ribeiro, Marcos A.; Stumpf, Humberto O.

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for therapeutic applicability in diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of damaged or malfunctioning tissues and organs. There is a growing number of cell therapies using stem cells due to their characteristics of modulation of immune system and reduction of acute rejection. So a challenge in stem cells therapy is the delivery of cells to the organ of interest, a specific site. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of a supramolecular assembly composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), molecular magnets (lawsone-Co-phenanthroline), and a synthetic peptide (FWYANHYWFHNAFWYANHYWFHNA) in the hASCs cultures. The hASCs were isolated, characterized, expanded, and cultured with the SWCNT supramolecular assembly (SWCNT-MA). The assembly developed did not impair the cell characteristics, viability, or proliferation. During growth, the cells were strongly attached to the assembly and they could be dragged by an applied magnetic field of less than 0.3?T. These assemblies were narrower than their related allotropic forms, that is, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and they could therefore be used to guide cells through thin blood capillaries within the human body. This strategy seems to be useful as noninvasive and nontoxic stem cells delivery/guidance and tracking during cell therapy. PMID:25688350

  18. Emerging Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Schnorr, Jan Markus

    On the basis of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great attention in recent years. A diverse array of methods has been developed to modify CNTs and to assemble them ...

  19. Increasing carbon nanotube forest density

    E-print Network

    McCarthy, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding mechanical, electrical, thermal, and morphological properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) open up exciting potential applications in a wide range of fields. One such application is replacing the ...

  20. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel–phosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickel–phosphorous (Ni–P) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with Ni–P layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with Ni–P layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with Ni–P layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  1. PECVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAninch, Ian; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using inductively coupled plasma, has been used to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCF) on substrates sputtered with aluminum and iron catalyst. The capacitive plasma's power has been shown to cause a transition from nanotubes to nanofibers, depending on the strength of the plasma. The temperature, placement, and other factors have been shown to affect the height and density of the tube and fiber growth.

  2. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  3. Carbon nanotube terahertz detector.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Fujimura, Naoki; Lloyd, J Meagan; Erickson, Kristopher J; Talin, A Alec; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Jiang, Qijia; Kawano, Yukio; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) technologies are promising for diverse areas such as medicine, bioengineering, astronomy, environmental monitoring, and communications. However, despite decades of worldwide efforts, the THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum still continues to be elusive for solid state technology. Here, we report on the development of a powerless, compact, broadband, flexible, large-area, and polarization-sensitive carbon nanotube THz detector that works at room temperature. The detector is sensitive throughout the entire range of the THz technology gap, with responsivities as high as ?2.5 V/W and polarization ratios as high as ?5:1. Complete thermoelectric and opto-thermal characterization together unambiguously reveal the photothermoelectric origin of the THz photosignal, triggered by plasmonic absorption and collective antenna effects, and suggest that judicious design of thermal management and quantum engineering of Seebeck coefficients will lead to further enhancement of device performance. PMID:24875576

  4. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  5. Cantilevered carbon nanotube hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyanagi, Toshinori; Terada, Yuki; Takei, Kuniharu; Akita, Seiji; Arie, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effects of humidity on the vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using two types of CNT cantilevers: open-ended and close-ended CNT cantilevers. As the humidity increases, the resonant frequency of the open-ended CNT cantilever decreases due to the adsorption of water molecules onto the CNT tip, whereas that of the close-ended CNT cantilever increases probably due to the change in the viscosity of the air surrounding the CNT cantilever, which is negatively correlated with the humidity of air. Our findings suggest that a close-ended CNT cantilever is more suitable for a quick-response and ultrasensitive hygrometer because it continuously reads the viscosity change of moist air in the vicinity of the CNT.

  6. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  7. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3??m tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10??m in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  9. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  10. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  11. Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris*

    E-print Network

    Harris, Peter J F

    Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris* Carbon nanotubes are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon with outstanding properties. They are among the stiffest and strongest fibres known, with Young. There is currently great interest in exploiting these properties by incorporating carbon nanotubes into some form

  12. Effect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    40 and 20% lower than the conductivity predicted for the same film with zero thermal resistanceEffect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials;Effect of bending buckling of carbon nanotubes on thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube materials

  13. Mechanical energy storage in carbon nanotube springs

    E-print Network

    Hill, Frances Ann

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage in mechanical springs made of carbon nanotubes is a promising new technology. Springs made of dense, ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes have the potential to surpass both the energy density of electrochemical ...

  14. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review. PMID:24587993

  16. Metal and Alloy Nanowires: Iron and Invar Inside Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    -dienyliron, Aldrich 98%) powders under reduced pressures (e.g. 100 torr) with an Ar flow rate of ca. 20 seem at 1050°C. With the introduction ofInvar in carbon nanotubes it is now possible to study the physico chemical properties, HRTEM, EELS, XRD and SQUID. The magnetic properties of metal- and alloy-filled nanotubes may be applied

  17. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  18. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  19. Carbon nanotube linear bearing nanoswitches.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, V V; Chiu, H-Y; Postma, H W Ch; Mikó, C; Forró, L; Bockrath, M

    2006-06-01

    We exploit the remarkable low-friction bearing capabilities of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to realize nanoelectromechanical switches. Our switches consist of two open-ended MWNT segments separated by a nanometer-scale gap. Switching occurs through electrostatically actuated sliding of the inner nanotube shells to close the gap, producing a conducting ON state. For double-walled nanotubes in particular, a gate voltage can restore the insulating OFF state. Acting as a nonvolatile memory element capable of several switching cycles, our devices are straightforward to implement, self-aligned, and do not require complex fabrication or geometries, allowing for convenient scalability. PMID:16771559

  20. Microscopy of single-layer carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Su; Zhou, Dan

    1994-07-01

    Single-layer carbon nanotubes produced with yttrium carbide as catalyst have been studied with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology, condition of iamging and the method of measurement to determine the actual diameter of a single-layer carbon nanotube have been detailed and the growth mechanism of single-layer carbon nanotubes has been discussed in this research.

  1. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  2. Synthesis and properties of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes for magnetic extraction of bisphenol A from water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xing; Rao, Wei; Chen, Hongjun; Cai, Rong

    2014-08-15

    Novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs@MMIPs) with specific selectivity toward bisphenol A were synthesized using bisphenol A as the template molecule, methacrylic acid, and ?-cyclodextrin as binary functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. The MWNTs@MMIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, vibrating sample magnetometer, and transmission electron microscopy. Batch mode adsorption experiment was carried out to investigate the specific adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of the MWNTs@MMIPs. The MWNTs@MMIPs exhibited good affinity with a maximum adsorption capacity of 49.26 ?mol g(-1) and excellent selectivity toward bisphenol A. Combined with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, the MWNTs@MMIPs were employed to extract bisphenol A in tap water, rain water, and lake water successfully with the recoveries of 89.8-95.4, 89.9-93.4, and 87.3-94.1%, respectively. PMID:25043281

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of sin

  4. Thermoelectric power in ultrathin films, quantum wires and carbon nanotubes under classically large magnetic field: Simplified theory and relative comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Choudhury, S.; Saha, S.; Pahari, S.; De, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghatak, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric power under classically large magnetic field (TPM) in ultrathin films (UFs), quantum wires (QWs) of non-linear optical materials on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law considering the anisotropies of the effective electron masses, the spin-orbit splitting constants and the presence of the crystal field splitting within the framework of k· p formalism. The results of quantum confined III-V compounds form the special cases of our generalized analysis. The TPM has also been studied for quantum confined II-VI, stressed materials, bismuth and carbon nanotubes (CNs) on the basis of respective dispersion relations. It is found taking quantum confined CdGeAs 2, InAs, InSb, CdS, stressed n-InSb and Bi that the TPM increases with increasing film thickness and decreasing electron statistics exhibiting quantized nature for all types of quantum confinement. The TPM in CNs exhibits oscillatory dependence with increasing carrier concentration and the signature of the entirely different types of quantum systems are evident from the plots. Besides, under certain special conditions, all the results for all the materials gets simplified to the well-known expression of the TPM for non-degenerate materials having parabolic energy bands, leading to the compatibility test.

  5. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas (Denver, CO); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Landi, Brian J. (Rochester, NY); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  6. Carbon nanotube: the inside story.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were serendipitously discovered as a byproduct of fullerenes by direct current (DC) arc discharge; and today this is the most-wanted material in the nanotechnology research. In this brief review, I begin with the history of the discovery of CNTs and focus on CNTs produced by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere, which is little explored outside my laboratory. DC arc discharge evaporation of pure graphite rod in pure hydrogen gas results in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of high crystallinity in the cathode deposit. As-grown MWCNTs have very narrow inner diameter. Raman spectra of these MWCNTs show high-intensity G-band, unusual high-frequency radial breathing mode at 570 cm(-1), and a new characteristic peak near 1850 cm(-1). Exciting carbon nanowires (CNWs), consisting of a linear carbon chain in the center of MWCNTs are also produced. Arc evaporation of graphite rod containing metal catalysts results in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the whole chamber like macroscopic webs. Two kinds of arc method have been developed to produce SWCNTs: Arc plasma jet (APJ) and Ferrum-Hydrogen (FH) arc methods. Some new purification methods for as-produced SWCNTs are reviewed. Finally, double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are also described. PMID:20355364

  7. Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Kitsyuk, E.; Ryazanov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Adamov, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) was investigated. Sensors were done on quartz and silicon susbtrate. Samples of photodetectors sensors were produced by planar technology. This technology included deposition of first metal layer (Al), lithography for pads formation, etching, and formation of local catalyst area by inverse lithography. Vertically-aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes were directly synthesized on substrate by PECVD method. I-V analysis and spectrum sensitivity of photodetector were investigated for 0.4 ?m - 1.2 ?m wavelength. Resistivity of CNT layers over temperature was detected in the range of -20°C to 100°C.

  8. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  9. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by use of coolant gases. For a given application, the gears would work well at temperatures below the critical range, provided that the rotational energy was less than the energy required to tilt the teeth through an angle of 20 . The predominant mechanism of gear failure would be slippage caused by tilting of teeth. Gears would resume functioning if the slipping gears were decelerated sufficiently.

  10. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  11. Magnetically aligned iron oxide/gold nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotube hybrid structure as a humidity sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Mulmi, Suresh; Thangadurai, Venkataraman; Park, Simon S

    2015-07-22

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs), particularly CNTs decorated with nanoparticles (NPs), are of great interest because of their synergic effects, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, plasmonic resonance energy transfer, magnetoplasmonic, magnetoelectric, and magnetooptical effects. In general, research has focused on a single type of NP, such as a metal or metal oxide, that has been modified on a CNT surface. In this study, however, a new strategy is introduced for the decoration of two different NP types on CNTs. In order to improve the functionality of modified CNTs, we successfully prepared binary NP-decorated CNTs, namely, iron oxide/gold (Au) NP-decorated CNTs (IA-CNTs), which were created through two simple reactions in deionized water, without high temperature, high pressure, or harsh reducing agents. The physicochemical properties of IA-CNTs were characterized by ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a superconducting quantum interference device, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. In this study, IA-CNTs were utilized to detect humidity. Magnetic IA-CNTs were aligned on interdigitated platinum electrodes under external magnetic fields to create a humidity-sensing channel, and its electrical conductivity was monitored. As the humidity increased, the electrical resistance of the sensor also increased. In comparison with various gases, for example, H2, O2, CO, CO2, SO2, and dry air, the IA-CNT-based humidity sensor exhibited high-selectivity performances. IA-CNTs also responded to heavy water (D2O), and it was established that the humidity detection mechanism had D2O-sensing capabilities. Further, the humidity from human out-breathing was also successfully detected by this system. In conclusion, these unique IA-CNTs exhibited potential application as gas detection materials. PMID:26112318

  12. One pot synthesis of magnetic graphene/carbon nanotube composites as magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction adsorbent for rapid determination of oxytetracycline in sewage water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yunyun; Tian, Jing; Wang, Lu; Yan, Hongyuan; Qiao, Fengxia; Qiao, Xiaoqiang

    2015-11-27

    A simple and time-saving one pot synthesis of magnetic graphene/carbon nanotube composites (M-G/CNTs) was developed that could avoid the tedious drying process of graphite oxide, and G/CNTs were modified by Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the reduction procedure. It contributed to a shorten duration of the synthesis process of M-G/CNTs. The obtained M-G/CNTs were characterized and the results indicated that CNTs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were served as spacer distributing to the layers of graphene, which was beneficial for enlarging surface area and improving extraction efficiency. Moreover, M-G/CNTs showed good magnetic property and outstanding thermal stability. Then M-G/CNTs were applied as adsorbent of magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction for rapid extraction and determination of oxytetracycline in sewage water. Under the optimum conditions, good linearity was obtained in the range of 20-800ngmL(-1) and the recoveries were ranged from 95.5% to 112.5% with relative standard deviations less than 5.8%. PMID:26518491

  13. In situ immobilization of a general resolving agent on the magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube for the direct enantioenrichment of dl-mandelic acid.

    PubMed

    Tarigh, Ghazale Daneshvar; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2015-11-01

    l-Threonine (l-thr) as a general chiral selector anchored on the surface of magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) was prepared using an in situ electrostatic adsorption and studied as a new magnetically chiral selector for the separation of chiral dl-mandelic acid (dl-MA) as a model sample. By varying the pH, dl-MA was adsorbed on the surface of magnetic chiral selector through hydrogen bonds. It is recognized that MMWCNT with chiral ligands on its surface simultaneously possesses both magnetic property and direct chiral recognition ability. The successful immobilization of l-thr onto the surface of MMWCNT was confirmed by infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FT-IR and mass spectra of supernatant and elution solutions also confirmed the immobilization of l-thr onto the surface of MMWCNT. The analysis results of specific rotation, HPLC and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy reveal that the l-thr-MMWCNT show stronger complexation of (+)-enantiomer than (-)-enantiomer. The functional magnetic nanotubes were easily separated from the racemic solution using an external magnetic field which demonstrated its feasibility of recycling the adsorbent. All processes including in situ immobilization, enantioseparation (enantioenrichment) and magnetic separation were done by single process in a short time (only 10min). PMID:26452906

  14. Junction array carbon nanotube bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail E.

    2013-04-01

    Vertically aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT forests) irradiated with low-intensity near-infrared laser exhibited bolometric response that became significant with decreasing temperature down from room to about 84 K. High responsivity of 42 V/W with signal bandwidth of about 2600 Hz was observed in the region with a surprisingly small temperature coefficient of resistance. This fact along with peculiar current dependences of material differential photoresistance can be explained by lifting Coulomb blockade in carbon nanotube junctions irradiated with light. A combination of significant bolometric response and nonlinear electrical transport are believed to be characteristic features of the nanostructured junction array system. Investigated material also revealed quite substantial noise with equivalent power of 3 * 10-6 WHz-1/2 that can be reduced by optimization of nanotube junction network in the forest structure.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  16. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  17. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  18. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-13

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  19. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  20. A carbon nanotube bearing and Stodola rotor

    E-print Network

    Cook, Eugene Hightower

    2008-01-01

    A nano-scale rotor supported on a cantilevered multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) shaft (Stodola configuration) is proposed. The nanotube is also expected to function as the bearing, since individual walls of a MWNT are not ...

  1. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  2. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes.

  3. Aharonov-Bohm conductance modulation in ballistic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lassagne, B; Cleuziou, J-P; Nanot, S; Escoffier, W; Avriller, R; Roche, S; Forró, L; Raquet, B; Broto, J-M

    2007-04-27

    We report on magnetoconductance experiments in ballistic multiwalled carbon nanotubes threaded by magnetic fields as large as 55 T. In the high temperature regime (100 K), giant modulations of the conductance, mediated by the Fermi level location, are unveiled. The experimental data are consistently analyzed in terms of the field-dependent density of states of the external shell that modulates the injection properties at the electrode-nanotube interface, and the resulting linear conductance. This is the first unambiguous experimental evidence of Aharonov-Bohm effect in clean multiwalled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17501520

  4. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  5. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  6. Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes Comprising Magnetically Sensitive Metal Oxides in Nanofluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G. P. 'Bud' (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a nanoparticle mixture or suspension or nanofluid comprising nonmagnetically sensitive nanoparticles, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles, and surfactant(s). The present invention also relates to methods of preparing and using the same.

  7. Magneto-optical spectroscopy of highly aligned carbon nanotubes: Identifying the role of threading magnetic flux

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    , programmable pulse magnet powered by a 1.4 GVA motor-generator. We used resonant E22 excita- tion of 6,5 tubes magnetic flux J. Shaver,1 S. A. Crooker,2 J. A. Fagan,3 E. K. Hobbie,3 N. Ubrig,4 O. Portugall,4 V. Perebeinos,5 Ph. Avouris,5 and J. Kono1,* 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  9. Growth and characterization of carbon nanotubes from novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Shawn Patrick

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes has spurred a great deal of research interest due to their exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. Although many applications have been proposed to make use of carbon nanotubes, several major roadblocks prevent their widespread use. The main issue is the lack of a method for the production of large amounts of high-purity carbon nanotubes. Most of the current methods of production either do not produce many nanotubes or produce by-products that must be removed. In order to design a large-scale production method, the growth process must be understood. The first portion of this work focused on growing carbon nanotubes from different carbon precursors. A high-temperature arc furnace was used to heat carbon black in the plasma. Nanotubes formed from this process did not contain a high percentage of other carbon species traditionally found in arc discharge setups. Since the transformation occurred on the surface of the carbon black, not in the plasma, it was determined that the growth process was a solid-state transformation. Once the growth mechanism was understood, an attempt was made to scale-up the process. The high-temperature arc furnace was modified to make the nanotube growth process more continuous. An applied magnetic field was able to spread the plasma over larger anodes, as large as four times the original production area. A set of arc parameters that can yield carbon nanotubes for each anode size studied were determined. A two-pronged anode setup has been used to scale-up carbon nanotubes production twofold. A field emission device was created using carbon nanotubes as field emitters and CdSe quantum dots as phosphor replacements. The carbon nanotube layer is a stable source of field emission without any purification. In addition, cathodoluminescence of CdSe quantum dots is possible with the carbon nanotube layer as the electron source. The cathodoluminescence is only slightly red-shifted compared to its photoluminescence. Different sized quantum dots were able to produce different colors in the device.

  10. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  11. Wave propagation in viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes with surface effect under magnetic field based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Hu, Yujin; Ling, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The governing equation of wave motion of viscoelastic SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes) with surface effect under magnetic field is formulated on the basis of the nonlocal strain gradient theory. Based on the formulated equation of wave motion, the closed-form dispersion relation between the wave frequency (or phase velocity) and the wave number is derived. It is found that the size-dependent effects on the phase velocity may be ignored at low wave numbers, however, is significant at high wave numbers. Phase velocity can increase by decreasing damping or increasing the intensity of magnetic field. The damping ratio considering surface effect is larger than that without considering surface effect. Damping ratio can increase by increasing damping, increasing wave number, or decreasing the intensity of magnetic field.

  12. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of metallic carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Farhat, Hootan

    2010-01-01

    Metallic carbon nanotubes are one dimensional conductors that are both technologically promising for electronic applications, and scientifically interesting for studying the physics of low dimensional materials. In this ...

  14. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  15. Rapid determination of trans-resveratrol in vegetable oils using magnetic hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Li; Zhang, Liangxiao

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, a rapid and simple procedure was developed and validated for the analysis of trans-resveratrol in vegetable oils based on magnetic hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (h-MWCNT-MNPs) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). h-MWCNT-MNPs were simply obtained by wrapping amine-functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles into previously oxidized hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The major parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated, including the type and volume of desorption solvents, extraction and desorption time, washing solution, and sorbent amount. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were calculated as 0.6 and 2.0 ?g/kg, respectively. The recoveries of trans-resveratrol in oil samples were in the range of 90.0-110.0% with RSDs of less than 17.5%. The results showed that only peanut oil contained trans-resveratrol, ranging from 8 ± 1 to 103 ± 12 ?g/kg. The proposed method is reliable and robust, having an excellent potential for the analysis of trans-resveratrol in edible oils. PMID:25704710

  16. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  17. Angular magnetoresistance of stretched carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimpoiasu, E.; Sandu, V.; Levin, G. A.; Simpson, A.; Lashmore, D.

    2012-06-01

    We studied the anisotropic properties of mechanically stretched bulk carbon nanotube sheets using magnetoresistance (MR) measurements in magnetic fields applied under different orientations with respect to the stretching direction. The stretching direction was either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the electric current. The magnetic field was rotated either in-the-plane or out-of-the-plane of the sheets. We found that the angular dependence of the MR is a superposition of two terms, one with twofold symmetry and the other one with fourfold symmetry. We also found that the field-dependence of the MR is composed of two terms, one positive and one negative, whose magnitudes are largest when the field is parallel with the stretching direction. If the sheets are treated with nitric acid, the positive term is removed and the MR is smallest when the field is aligned with the magnetic field. We attribute these anisotropic features to magnetoelastic effects induced by the coupling between the magnetic catalyst nanoparticles, the magnetic field, and the network of nanotubes.

  18. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Covalent Sidewall Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, I.W.; Saini, R. K.; Mickelson, E. T.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Progress of fluorination of single-wall carbon nanotubes is being reported. Covalent attachment of alkyl groups including methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been achieved. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR were used to characterize these alkylated SWNTs. Application of these nanotubes are being investigated-fibers, composites, batteries, lubricants, etc.

  20. Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity conductivity of interconnected networks of bundles in carbon nanotube (CNT) films reveals a strong effect of the finite thermal conductivity kT of individual nanotubes on the conductivity k of the CNT materials

  1. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of the new materials, highly porous carbide-derived carbons (CDC), is the subject of an add-on to this grant awarded to myself and Taner Yildirim (NIST). Results from the add-on led eventually to a new 3-year award DE-FG02-08ER46522 “From Fundamental Understanding to Predicting New Nanomaterials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage”, $1000K, (05/31/2008 - 05/01/2011) with Taner Yildirim and myself as co-PI’s.

  2. Longitudinal solitons in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Astakhova, T. Yu.; Gurin, O. D.; Menon, M.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2001-07-15

    We present results on soliton excitations in carbon nanotubes (CNT's) using Brenner's many-body potential. Our numerical simulations demonstrate high soliton stability in (10,10) CNT's. The interactions of solitons and solitary excitation with CNT defect are found to be inelastic if the excitations and defects length scales are comparable, resulting in a substantial part of soliton energy being distributed inhomogeneously over the defect bonds. In these solitary-excitation--cap collisions the local energy of a few bonds in the cap can exceed the average energy by an order of magnitude and more. This phenomenon, denoted the ''Tsunami effect,'' can contribute dynamically to the recently proposed ''kinky chemistry.'' We also present results of changes in the local density of states and variations in the atomic partial charges estimated at different time instants of the solitary-excitation Tsunami at the nanotube cap.

  3. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-print Network

    Das, Suman

    Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

  4. Photoluminescence of carbon nanotubes grown over trench

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Photoluminescence of carbon nanotubes grown over trench Shinya Iwasaki 1 , Yutaka Ohno 2 , Yoichi_iwasa@echo.nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp The optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) grown over trench are sensitive to environ- mental atmosphere [1, 2]. We have compared E11 and E22 of the SWNTs over trench

  5. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-print Network

    Lin, Liwei

    PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

  6. Single Carbon Nanotube Transistor at GHz Frequency

    E-print Network

    Plaçais, Bernard

    Single Carbon Nanotube Transistor at GHz Frequency J. Chaste,, L. Lechner,£ P. Morfin,, G. Fe operation of top-gated single carbon nanotube transistors. From transmission measurements in the 0.1-1.6 GHz effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are very attractive as ultimate, quantum limited devices. In particular

  7. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  8. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Knörzer, J; Fey, C; Sadeghpour, H R; Schmelcher, P

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems. PMID:26627961

  9. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    E-print Network

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  10. Light Emission in Silicon from Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Noury, Adrien; Roux, Xavier Le; Rasigade, Gilles; Beck, Alexandre; Vivien, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of optics in microelectronic circuits to overcome the limitation of metallic interconnects is more and more considered as a viable solution. Among future silicon compatible materials, carbon nanotubes are promising candidates thanks to their ability to emit, modulate and detect light in the wavelength range of silicon transparency. We report the first integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon waveguides, successfully coupling their emission and absorption properties. A complete study of this coupling between carbon nanotubes and silicon waveguides was carried out, which led to the demonstration of the temperature-independent emission from carbon nanotubes in silicon at a wavelength of 1.3 {\\mu}m. This represents the first milestone in the development of photonics based on carbon nanotubes on silicon.

  11. Covalently Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilly, Delphine; Cabana, Janie; Meunier, François; Lapointe, François; Larouche, Francis L.; Paillet, Matthieu; Martel, Richard; Desjardins-Carrière, Maxime; Gagnon, Philippe; Adam, Elyse

    2012-02-01

    Covalent chemistry on carbon nanotubes generates useful and stable functionalities, but it also generally damages their electronic properties, which is a critical drawback for device applications. Here we present two approaches to achieve covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes without compromising on their electronic properties. For each case, we demonstrate the fabrication of functional carbon nanotube devices. First, double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) are functionalized using a monovalent reaction with aryldiazonium salts. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy along with electrical measurements show that the functionalization occurs strictly on the outer wall and preserves the optical and transport properties of the inner wall. Functionalized-DWNT devices are operated with similar characteristics as pristine single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) devices [1]. Second, SWNTs are functionalized with different addends using a divalent carbene reaction. For both metallic and semiconducting species, electrical measurements of numerous functionalized and unfunctionalized SWNT devices show identical characteristics. Ref: [1] Bouilly D. et al. ACS Nano, 5 (6), 4927 (2011)

  12. Making Macroscopic Assemblies of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smith, Ken A.; Walters, Deron A.; Casavant, Michael J.; Qin, Xiaochuan; Yakobson, Boris; Hauge, Robert H.; Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Chiung, Wan-Ting; Huffman, Charles B.

    2005-01-01

    A method of aligning and assembling single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate macroscopic structures has been invented. The method entails suspending SWNTs in a fluid, orienting the SWNTs by use of a magnetic and/or electric field, and then removing the aligned SWNTs from suspension in such a way as to assemble them while maintaining the alignment. SWNTs are essentially tubular extensions of fullerene molecules. It is desirable to assemble aligned SWNTs into macroscopic structures because the common alignment of the SWNTs in such a structure makes it possible to exploit, on a macroscopic scale, the unique mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties that individual oriented SWNTs exhibit at the molecular level. Because of their small size and high electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes, and especially SWNTs, are useful for making electrical connectors in integrated circuits. Carbon nanotubes can be used as antennas at optical frequencies, and as probes in scanning tunneling microscopes, atomic-force microscopes, and the like. Carbon nanotubes can be used with or instead of carbon black in tires. Carbon nanotubes are useful as supports for catalysts. Ropes of SWNTs are metallic and, as such, are potentially useful in some applications in which electrical conductors are needed - for example, they could be used as additives in formulating electrically conductive paints. Finally, macroscopic assemblies of aligned SWNTs can serve as templates for the growth of more and larger structures of the same type. The great variety of tubular fullerene molecules and of the structures that could be formed by assembling them in various ways precludes a complete description of the present method within the limits of this article. It must suffice to present a typical example of the use of one of many possible variants of the method to form a membrane comprising SWNTs aligned substantially parallel to each other in the membrane plane. The apparatus used in this variant of the method (see figure) includes a reservoir containing SWNTs dispersed in a suspending agent (for example, dimethylformamide) and a reservoir containing a suitable solvent (for example, water mixed with a surfactant). By use of either pressurized gas supplied from upstream or suction from downstream, the suspension of SWNTs and the solvent are forced to mix and flow into a tank. A filter inside the tank contains pores small enough to prevent the passage of most SWNTs, but large enough to allow the passage of molecules of the solvent and suspending agent. The filter is oriented perpendicular to the flow path. A magnetic field parallel to the plane of the filter is applied. The success of the method is based on the tendency of SWNTs to become aligned with their longitudinal axes parallel to an applied magnetic field. The alignment energy of an SWNT increases with the length of the SWNT and the magnetic-field strength. In order to obtain an acceptably small degree of statistical deviation of SWNTs of a given length from alignment with a magnetic field, one must make the field strong enough so that the thermal energy associated with rotation of an SWNT away from alignment is less than the alignment energy.

  13. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  15. Exciton Polarization in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeeva, N. N.; Belonenko, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    The nonlinear process of propagation of optical pulses in the spectral region inside the polarization gap in carbon nanotubes has been investigated. A simultaneous solution of the Maxwell equation and the equation of motion for exciton polarization has been carried out. The dynamics of an electromagnetic pulse has been examined as a function of the parameters of the problem. It is shown that taking exciton polarization into account does not have a substantial effect on the propagation process, but alters the shape of the optical pulse.

  16. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  17. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  18. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  19. A novel magnetic ionic liquid modified carbon nanotube for the simultaneous determination of aryloxyphenoxy-propionate herbicides and their metabolites in water.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mai; Liu, Donghui; Zhao, Lu; Han, Jiajun; Liang, Yiran; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-10

    A reliable, sensitive, rapid and environmentally friendly analysis procedure for the simultaneous determination of the analytes with a wide range of polarity in the environmental water was developed by coupling dispersive magnetic solid-phase extraction (d-MSPE) with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detector (DAD) and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS), in this work. Magnetic ionic liquid modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-IL-MWCNTs) were prepared by spontaneous assembly of magnetic nanoparticles and imidazolium-modified carbon nanotubes, and used as the sorbent of d-MSPE to simultaneously extract aryloxyphenoxy-propionate herbicides (AOPPs) and their polar acid metabolites due to the excellent ?-? electron donor-acceptor interactions and anion exchange ability. The factors, including the amount of sorbent, pH of the sample solution, extraction time and the volume of elution solvent were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed d-MSPE coupling to HPLC-DAD system had a satisfactory performance, the limits of detection (LODs, defined as the signal to noise ratio of 3) and the limits of quantification (LOQs, defined as the signal to noise ratio of 10) for analytes in Milli-Q water were in the range of 2.8-14.3 and 9.8-43.2 ?g L(-1) respectively. Calibration curves were linear (r(2)>0.998) over the concentration range from 0.02 to 1 mg L(-1). The recoveries of the eight analytes ranged from 66.1 to 89.6% with the RSDs less than 8.6%. In order to extend the method in extremely low concentration analysis, d-MSPE-UHPLC-MS/MS was investigated, which showed better performance in terms of limit of detection and analysis time. PMID:25441884

  20. Peptides with selective affinity for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siqun; Humphreys, Elen S.; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Delduco, Daniel F.; Lustig, Steven R.; Wang, Hong; Parker, Kimberley N.; Rizzo, Nancy W.; Subramoney, Shekhar; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Jagota, Anand

    2003-03-01

    Because of their extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have great potential as materials for applications ranging from molecular electronics to ultrasensitive biosensors. Biological molecules interacting with carbon nanotubes provide them with specific chemical handles that would make several of these applications possible. Here we use phage display to identify peptides with selective affinity for carbon nanotubes. Binding specificity has been confirmed by demonstrating direct attachment of nanotubes to phage and free peptides immobilized on microspheres. Consensus binding sequences show a motif rich in histidine and tryptophan, at specific locations. Our analysis of peptide conformations shows that the binding sequence is flexible and folds into a structure matching the geometry of carbon nanotubes. The hydrophobic structure of the peptide chains suggests that they act as symmetric detergents.

  1. Carbon nanotubes grafted on silicon oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guowen; Cao, Anyuan; Cheng, Ju-Yin; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2004-09-01

    In this article, we report the grafting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on silica nanowires by directly growing nanotubes on the surfaces of the nanowires via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using ferrocene and xylene as Fe catalyst precursor and carbon source, respectively. The grafted carbon nanotubes are a few micrometers long with diameters of 10 to approximately 30 nm, and grow uniformly along the lengths of the nanowires. The distribution density of the grafted carbon nanotubes on the silica nanowires can be tuned by simply adjusting the CVD growth temperature. Our method provides a simple approach for synthesizing nanometer scale grafted heterostructures between nanotubes and nanowires, which could be used to design and construct high-performance filters, chemical sensors and reinforced composites. PMID:15570949

  2. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  3. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  4. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  5. Directional Dark Matter Searches with Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

    2015-12-05

    A new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection might come from the use of large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes. We calculate the expected rate of carbon ions channeled in single-wall nanotubes once extracted by the scattering with a massive dark matter particle. Depending on its initial kinematic conditions, the ejected Carbon ion may be channeled in the nanotube array or stop in the bulk. The orientation of the array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability. This provides the required anisotropic response for a directional detector.

  6. Directional Dark Matter Searches with Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

    2015-08-26

    A new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection might come from the use of large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes. We calculate the expected rate of carbon ions channeled in single-wall nanotubes once extracted by the scattering with a massive dark matter particle. Depending on its initial kinematic conditions, the ejected Carbon ion may be channeled in the nanotube array or stop in the bulk. The orientation of the array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability. This provides the required anisotropic response for a directional detector.

  7. Directional dark matter searches with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, L. M.; Cavoto, G.; Mazzilli, D.; Polosa, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    A new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection might come from the use of large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes. We calculate the expected rate of carbon ions channeled in single-wall nanotubes once extracted by the scattering with a massive dark matter particle. Depending on its initial kinematic conditions, the ejected carbon ion may be channeled in the nanotube array or stop in the bulk. The orientation of the array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability. This provides the required anisotropic response for a directional detector.

  8. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes-Based Electrochemical Sensing for Cell Culture Monitoring

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Carbon Nanotubes-Based Electrochemical Sensing for Cell Culture Monitoring Cristina Boero, Sandro different presented strategies to develop biosensors, carbon nanotubes exhibit great properties, particularly suitable for biosensing. In this work nanostructured electrodes by using multi-walled carbon

  10. Testing and characterization of carbon nanotubes as strain sensors

    E-print Network

    Diaz, Juan D

    2011-01-01

    The potential of using carbon nanotube coated flexible cloth as strain gauges was studied. Samples were prepared by sonicating strips of cloth inside a 1mg/ml carbon nanotube in propylene carbonate solution. A dynamic ...

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Conceptual design of carbon nanotube processes

    E-print Network

    Pike, Ralph W.

    of carbon fibers. Keywords Carbon nanotubes Á Conceptual design Á Carbon monoxide disproportionation graphite fiber (Ajayan 2000). Discovered in 1991, carbon nanotubes have caught the attention of scientistsORIGINAL PAPER Conceptual design of carbon nanotube processes Adedeji E. Agboola Æ Ralph W. Pike Æ

  12. Nanolithographic control of carbon nanotube synthesis 

    E-print Network

    Huitink, David Ryan

    2009-05-15

    A method offering precise control over the synthesis conditions to obtain carbon nanotube (CNT) samples of a single chirality (metallic or semi-conducting) is presented. Using this nanolithographic method of catalyst deposition, the location of CNT...

  13. Towards a carbon nanotube antibody sensor

    E-print Network

    Bojö, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer-protein A complexes for optically reporting antibody concentration via a change in near infrared fluorescent emission after antibody binding. SWNT have ...

  14. Carbon nanotube synthesis for integrated circuit interconnects

    E-print Network

    Nessim, Gilbert Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Based on their properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified as ideal replacements for copper interconnects in integrated circuits given their higher current density, inertness, and higher resistance to ...

  15. Carbon nanotube bearings in theory and practice

    E-print Network

    Cook, Eugene Hightower

    2011-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are attractive elements for bearings in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), because their structure comprises nested shells with no bonding and sub-nanometer spacing between them, enabling ...

  16. Functionalization and applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Schnorr, Jan M. (Jan Markus)

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess a unique set of electrical and mechanical properties and have been used in a variety of applications. In this thesis, we explore strategies to functionalize CNTs as well as applications which ...

  17. Carbon nanotube interconnects for IC chips

    E-print Network

    Anwar Ali, Hashina Parveen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been investigated as candidate materials to replace or augment the existing copper-based technologies as interconnects for Integrated Circuit (IC) chips. Being ballistic conductors, CNTs are ...

  18. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao (Oakland, CA); Johnson, Stephen (Richmond, CA); Kerr, John B. (Oakland, CA); Minor, Andrew M. (El Cerrito, CA); Mao, Samuel S. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  19. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph (Arvada, CO); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  20. Transplanting assembly of individual carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Kim, Soohyung

    2009-01-01

    Handling and assembling individual nanostructures to bigger scale systems such as MEMS have been the biggest challenge. A deterministic assembly of individual carbon nanotubes by transplanting them to MEMS structures is ...

  1. Carbon nanotube-based field ionization vacuum

    E-print Network

    Jang, Daniel, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a novel micropump architecture that uses arrays of isolated vertical carbon nanotubes (CNT) to field ionize gas particles. The ionized gas molecules are accelerated to and implanted into a ...

  2. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and ... his or her work experience. NIOSH issues Current Intelligence Bulletins (CIBs) to disseminate new scientific information about ...

  3. Reversible high-pressure carbon nanotube vessel

    E-print Network

    Wang, Lifeng

    Applying a full pressure loop, i.e., loading and unloading, on a nanocrystal with in situ observation remains a challenge to experimentalists up until now. Using a multiwalled carbon nanotube, we realize the pressure loop ...

  4. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  5. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanmei; Zhang, Qiu; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Bing

    2008-08-01

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.

  6. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  7. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  8. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances. PMID:23803293

  9. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Ero?lu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  10. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Ero?lu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  12. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  13. Immersing carbon nanotubes in cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, C. T.; Mironova, P. V.; Fortágh, J.; Schleich, W. P.; Walser, R.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the sympathetic relaxation of a free-standing, vibrating carbon nanotube that is mounted on an atom chip and is immersed in a cloud of ultracold atoms. Gas atoms colliding with the nanotube excite phonons via a Casimir-Polder potential. We use Fermi's golden rule to estimate the relaxation rates for relevant experimental parameters and develop a fully dynamic theory of relaxation for the multimode phononic field embedded in a thermal atomic reservoir. Based on currently available experimental data, we identify the relaxation rates as a function of atom density and temperature that are required for sympathetic ground-state cooling of carbon nanotubes.

  14. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Insepov, Zeke (Darien, IL); Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  15. Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-print Network

    Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

  16. Fabrication of nylon-6/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, D.; Han, Q.; Meek, T.

    2006-05-01

    A new technique to fabricate nylon-6/carbon nanotube (PA6/CNT) composites is presented. The method involves a pretreatment of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and an improved in-situ process for mixing nanotubes with the nylon 6 matrix. A good bond between carbon nanotubes and the nylon-6 matrix is obtained. Mechanical property measurements indicate that the tensile strength of PA6/CNT composites is improved significantly while the toughness and elongation are somewhat compromised. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured tensile specimens reveals cracking initiated at the wrapping of the CNTs PA6 layer/PA6 matrix interface rather than at the PA6/CNT interface.

  17. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  18. Carbon nanotube based biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Klingeler, Ruediger; Buechner, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Due to their extraordinary physical and chemical properties carbon nanotubes reveal a promising potential as biomedical agents for heating, temperature sensoring and drug delivery on the cellular level. Filling carbon nanotubes with tailored materials realises nanoscaled containers in which the active content is encapsulated by a protecting carbon shell. We describe different synthesis routes and show the structural and magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the filling with magnetic materials offers the potential for hyperthermia applications while the insertion of NMR active substances allows the usage as markers and sensors. The potential of carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications is highlighted by hyperthermia studies which prove their applicability for local in-situ heating. In addition we have shown that a non-invasive temperature control by virtue of a carbon-wrapped nanoscaled thermometer and filling with anti-cancer drugs is possible.

  19. Carbon nanotube biocompatibility with cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Bavastrello, Valter; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Nicolini, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Purified carbon nanotubes are new carbon allotropes, sharing similarities with graphite, that have recently been proposed for their potential use with biological systems as probes for in vitro research and for diagnostic and clinical purposes. However the biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes with cells represents an important problem that, so far, remains largely uninvestigated. The objective of this in vitro study is to explore the cytocompatibility properties of purified carbon nanofibres with cardiomyocytes. Cardiac muscle cells from a rat heart cell line H9c2 (2-1) have been used. Highly purified single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) were suspended at the concentration of 0.2 mg ml-1 by ultrasound in complete Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, and administered to cells to evaluate cell proliferation and shape changes by light microscopy, cell viability by trypan blue exclusion, and apoptosis, determined flow cytometrically by annexin/PI staining. Microscopic observation evidenced that carbon nanotubes bind to the cell membrane, causing a slight modification in cell shape and in cell count only after three days of treatment. Cell viability was not affected by carbon nanotubes in the first three days of culture, while after this time, cell death was slightly higher in nanotube-treated cells (p = ns). Accordingly, nanotube treatment induced little and non-significant change in the apoptotic cell number at day 1 and 3. The effect of nanotubes bound to cells was tested by reseeding treated cardiomyocytes. Cells from a trypsinized nanotube-treated sample showed a limited ability to proliferate, and a definite difference in shape, with a high degree of cell death: compared to reseeded untreated ones, in SWNT-treated samples the annexin-positive/PI-negative cells increased from 2.9% to 9.3% in SWNT (p<0.05, where p<0.05 defines a statistically significant difference with a probability above 95%), and the annexin-positive/PI-positive cells increased from 5.2% to 18.7% (p<0.05). However, overtime cells from a trypsinized nanotube-treated sample continued to grow, and partially recovered the original shape. In conclusion our results demonstrate that highly purified carbon nanotubes possess no evident short-term toxicity and can be considered biocompatible with cardiomyocytes in culture, while the long-term negative effects, that are evidenced after reseeding, are probably due to physical rather than chemical interactions.

  20. One-Step Fabrication of a Multifunctional Magnetic Nickel Ferrite/Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanohybrid-Modified Electrode for the Determination of Benomyl in Food.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Yang, Jichun; Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Lei

    2015-05-20

    Benomyl, as one kind of agricultural pesticide, has adverse impact on human health and the environment. It is urgent to develop effective and rapid methods for quantitative determination of benomyl. A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method for determination of benomyl using a magnetic nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanohybrid-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented. The electrocatalytic properties and electroanalysis of benomyl on the modified electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) of pH 6.0, this constructed biosensor exhibited two linear relationships with the benomyl concentration range from 1.00 × 10(-7) to 5.00 × 10(-7) mol/L and from 5.00 × 10(-7) to 1.00 × 10(-5) mol/L, respectively. The detection limit was 2.51 × 10(-8) mol/L (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine benomyl in real samples with satisfactory results. The NiFe2O4/MWCNTs/GCE showed good reproducibility and stability, excellent catalytic activity, and anti-interference. PMID:25947038

  1. An ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on signal amplification strategy of gold nanoparticles functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with lead ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Faying; Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Wang, Yulan; Li, Yueyun; Dong, Yunhui; Wei, Qin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, a novel and ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was prepared for the quantitative detection of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), a well-known hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were prepared and utilized for the adsorption of lead ions (Pb(2+)) and the secondary antibodies (Ab2). The resultant nanocomposites (Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4) were used as the label for signal amplification, showing better electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than MWCNTs, MWCNTs-Fe3O4 or Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4 due to the synergetic effect presented in Pb(2+)@Au@MWCNTs-Fe3O4. Moreover, Au NPs were electrodeposited on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the effective immobilization of primary antibodies (Ab1). Under the optimal conditions, a linear range from 10 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL and a detection limit of 3.33 fg/mL were obtained. The proposed electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensor shows high sensitivity, good selectivity and stability for the quantitative detection of AFP, holding a great potential in clinical and diagnostic applications. PMID:25656779

  2. Solid phase extraction of amoxicillin using dibenzo-18-crown-6 modified magnetic-multiwalled carbon nanotubes prior to its spectrophotometric determination.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mazaher; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on a method for selective extraction and sensitive determination of amoxicillin drug (AMX). The method is based on solid phase extraction of AMX by a novel modified magnetic nanoadsorbent prior to spectrophotometric determination of AMX using a procedure based on formation a colored azo-derivative of the investigated drug. The nanoadsorbent has been synthesized by modification of magnetic-multiwalled carbon nanotube with dibenzo-18-crown-6 moieties. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using TEM, XRD and FT-IR measurements. At the next step, various factors that could potentially affect adsorption and desorption efficiencies of AMX, have been optimized. The results showed that under the optimized conditions, sensitive and selective determination of the investigated drug in concentration range of 5.0-1000.0ngmL(-1) with the limit of detection of 3.0ngmL(-1) was achievable. Furthermore, the real sample analysis (i.e. amoxicillin capsules and human urine samples) results indicated that a reliable promising candidate method has been developed for the determination of AMX in the investigated real samples. PMID:26653432

  3. Synthesis and application of novel ion-imprinted polymer coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for selective solid phase extraction of lead(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Fayazi, Maryam; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Ghanei-Motlagh, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    In this study, novel magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (MIIP) nanoparticles were utilized for the sensitive and selective detection of Pb(II) ions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The Pb(II)-imprinted polymer was synthesized by using 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker, 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridyl) pyrazine (TPPZ) as the chelating agent and magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as the carrier. The synthesized MIIP materials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various analytical parameters such as extraction and desorption time, eluent type and concentration, pH and sample volume were systematically examined. The selectivity of MIIP sorbent for Pb(II) ions in the presence of some cations was also evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD, 3Sb) and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n=8, c=25ngL(-1)) were found to be 2.4ngL(-1) and 5.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the MIIP for Pb(II) was found to be 48.1mgg(-1). Finally, the proposed analytical procedure was successfully applied to monitoring lead in human hair and water samples with satisfactory results for the spiked samples. PMID:26706542

  4. Magnetic N-doped carbon nanotubes: A versatile and efficient material for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Helvécio Costa; de Barcelos, Stella Maris Resende; Macedo, Damiana Freire Dias; Purceno, Aluir Dias; Machado, Bruno Fernades; Teixeira, Ana Paula Carvalho; Lago, Rochel Monteiro; Serp, Philippe; Cardeal, Zenilda Lourdes

    2015-05-11

    This paper describes a new, efficient and versatile method for the sampling and preconcentration of PAH in environmental water matrices using special hybrid magnetic carbon nanotubes. These N-doped amphiphilic CNT can be easily dispersed in any aqueous matrix due to the N containing hydrophilic part and at the same time show high efficiency for the adsorption of different PAH contaminants due to the very hydrophobic surface. After adsorption, the CNT can be easily removed from the medium by a simple magnetic separation. GC/MS analyses showed that the CNT method is more efficient than the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with much lower solvent consumption, technical simplicity and time, showing good linearity (range 0.18-80.00 ?g L(-1)) and determination coefficient (R(2) > 0.9810). The limit of detection ranged from 0.05 to 0.42 ?g L(-1) with limit of quantification from 0.18 to 1.40 ?g L(-1). Recovery (n=9) ranged from 80.50 ± 10 to 105.40 ± 12%. Intraday precision (RSD, n=9) ranged from 1.91 to 9.01%, whereas inter day precision (RSD, n=9) ranged from 7.02 to 17.94%. The method was applied to the analyses of PAH in four lake water samples collected in Belo Horizonte City, Brazil. PMID:25911429

  5. Application of Laplace Transform for the Exact Effect of a Magnetic Field on Heat Transfer of Carbon Nanotubes-Suspended Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Al Sharif, Mohammed A.

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), there is an increasing interest in their applications in industry and medical fields. Attempts of using such CNTs as drug carriers and in cancer therapy in the presence of a magnetic field are now undertaken because of their direct impacts on increasing the thermal conductivity of base fluids. Two types of CNTs are well known for the researchers, the single-walled CNT (SWCNTs) and the multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs); however, the subject of which one is more effective in treatment of cancer deserves more investigations. The present article discusses the effect of such types of CNTs on the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Exact analytical solution for the heat equation has been obtained by using the Laplace transform, where the solution is expressed in terms of a new special function, the generalised incomplete gamma function. The effects of various parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, and heat transfer rates have been introduced. Details of possible applications of the current results in the treatment of cancer have been also discussed.

  6. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  7. Analyzing manufacturing methods of carbon nanotubes for commercialization

    E-print Network

    Dee, H. Devin (Herbert Devin)

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the history and structure of carbon nanotubes and the current technologies and methods available for synthesizing, purifying, and assembling carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, the current state of ...

  8. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  9. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials 

    E-print Network

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel 1985-

    2012-09-28

    Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various fields demands a thorough investigation of their stability under irradiation. Open structure, ability to reorganize and heal defects, and large surface-to-volume ratio of carbon nanotubes affect...

  10. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  11. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of the plasma had recombined into molecules.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  13. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes by water plasma.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S; Amade, R; Jover, E; Bertran, E

    2012-09-28

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were functionalized by H(2)O plasma treatment. Through a controlled functionalization process of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) we were able to modify and tune their chemical reactivity, expanding the range of potential applications in the field of energy and environment. In particular, different oxygen groups were attached to the surfaces of the nanotubes (e.g. carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl), which changed their physicochemical properties. In order to optimize the main operational parameters of the H(2)O plasma treatment, pressure and power, a Box-Wilson experimental design was adopted. Analysis of the morphology, electrochemical properties and functional groups attached to the surfaces of the CNTs allowed us to determine which treatment conditions were suitable for different applications. After water plasma treatment the specific capacitance of the nanotubes increased from 23 up to 68 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 10 mV s(-1). PMID:22947598

  14. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Judson, Marc A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis. PMID:25525507

  15. Reassessing Fast Water Transport Through Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    rates of pressure-driven water through membranes of 1.6 and 7 nm diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs that the flow rate enhancement is caused by liquid slip at the water/carbon boundary. Using the slip-modified Hagen-Poiseuille relation with a bulk water viscosity, Holt et al. predict that slip lengths up to 1

  16. Raman spectroscopy of single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Son, HyungBin, 1981-

    2008-01-01

    A single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) is a new form of carbon, whose atomic arrangement is equivalent to a graphene sheet rolled into a cylinder in a seamless way. The typical diameter of a SWNT ranges from 0.6 nm to several ...

  17. Mechanical detection of carbon nanotube resonator vibrations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, D; San Paulo, A; Esplandiu, M J; Perez-Murano, F; Forró, L; Aguasca, A; Bachtold, A

    2007-08-24

    Bending-mode vibrations of carbon nanotube resonators were mechanically detected in air at atmospheric pressure by means of a novel scanning force microscopy method. The fundamental and higher order bending eigenmodes were imaged at up to 3.1 GHz with subnanometer resolution in vibration amplitude. The resonance frequency and the eigenmode shape of multiwall nanotubes are consistent with the elastic beam theory for a doubly clamped beam. For single-wall nanotubes, however, resonance frequencies are significantly shifted, which is attributed to fabrication generating, for example, slack. The effect of slack is studied by pulling down the tube with the tip, which drastically reduces the resonance frequency. PMID:17930953

  18. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  19. Formation of Carbon Nanotubes in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Even though nanotube science has become one of the worlds most rapidly advancing areas of research, very little is known about the processes involved in nanotube synthesis. To study the formation of carbon nanotubes in an environment unhindered by the buoyancy induced flows generated by the high temperatures necessary to vaporize carbon and grow nanotubes, we have designed a miniature carbon arc apparatus that can produce carbon nanotubes under microgravity conditions. During the first phase of this project, we designed, built, and successfully tested the mini carbon arc in both 1g and 2.2 sec drop tower microgravity conditions. We have demonstrated that microgravity can eliminate the strong convective flows from the carbon arc and we have successfully produced single-walled carbon nanotubes in microgravity. We believe that microgravity processing will allow us to better understand the nanotube formation process and eventually allow us to grow nanotubes that are superior to ground-based production.

  20. Mechanical response of carbon nanotubes turfs under lateral strains

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Mechanical response of carbon nanotubes turfs under lateral strains Melinda C. Lopez, David F. Bahr of carbon nanotubes, or "turfs", and their response under different strains. In this experiment the mechanical response of carbon nanotube (CNT) turfs are examined by nanoindentation under different strains

  1. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device M. Barkelid and V. Zwiller

    E-print Network

    Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device M. Barkelid and V. Zwiller Citation: Journal of Applied: Thu, 07 Nov 2013 22:16:01 #12;Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device M. Barkelida) and V. Zwiller photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced

  2. A multiscale projection method for the analysis of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Qian, Dong

    properties. One such example is the carbon nanotube (CNT) that was discovered by Iijima [12] more thanA multiscale projection method for the analysis of carbon nanotubes Dong Qian a,*, Gregory J of carbon nanotube systems. The multiscale coupled governing equations are first derived based

  3. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  4. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  5. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact. PMID:26377211

  6. Measurement Challenges for Carbon Nanotube Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    The advances in large scale applications of carbon nanotubes demand a reliable supply of raw and processed materials. It is imperative to have a consistent quality control of these nanomaterials to distinguish material inconsistency from the modifications induced by processing of nanotubes for any application. NASA Johnson Space Center realized this need five years back and started a program to standardize the characterization methods. The JSC team conducted two workshops (2003 and 2005) in collaboration with NIST focusing on purity and dispersion measurement issues of carbon nanotubes [1]. In 2004, the NASA-JSC protocol was developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA [2]. This protocol is routinely used by several researchers across the world as a first step in characterizing raw and purified carbon nanotubes. A suggested practice guide consisting of detailed chapters on TGA, Raman, electron microscopy and NIR absorption is in the final stages and is undergoing revisions with input from the nanotube community [3]. The possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be presented. Recent activities at ANSI and ISO towards implementing these protocols as nanotube characterization standards will be discussed.

  7. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  8. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C.; Mostofi, Arash A.

    2014-10-28

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup ?4}?e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  9. Composition, Electronic and Magnetic Investigation of the Encapsulated ZnFe2O4 Nanoparticles in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Containing Ni Residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Khabouri, Saja; Al Harthi, Salim; Maekawa, Toru; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Elzain, Mohamed E.; Al Hinai, Ashraf; Al-Rawas, AD; Gismelseed, AM; Yousif, Ali A.

    2015-06-01

    We report investigation on properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (mCNTs) containing Ni residuals before and after encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles. The pristine tubes exhibit metallic character with a 0.3 eV reduction in the work function along with ferromagnetic behavior which is attributed to the Ni residuals incorporated during the preparation of tubes. Upon encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles, 0.5 eV shift in Fermi level position and a reduction in both the ? band density of state along with a change in the hybridized sp2/sp3 ratio of the tubes from 2.04 to 1.39 are observed. As a result of the encapsulation, enhancement in the ? bands density of state and coating of the zinc ferrite nanoparticles by the internal layers of the CNTs in the direction along the tube axis is observed. Furthermore, Ni impurities inside the tubes are attracted to the encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles, suggesting the possibility of using these particles as purifying agents for CNTs upon being synthesized using magnetic catalyst particles. Charge transfer from Ni/mCNTs to the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles is evident via reduction of the density of states near the Fermi level and a 0.3 eV shift in the binding energy of C 1 s core level ionization. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles in mCNTs resulted in two interacting sub-systems featured by distinct blocking temperatures and enhanced magnetic properties; i.e., large coercivity of 501 Oe and saturation magnetization of 2.5 emu/g at 4 K.

  10. Composition, Electronic and Magnetic Investigation of the Encapsulated ZnFe2O 4 Nanoparticles in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Containing Ni Residuals.

    PubMed

    Al Khabouri, Saja; Al Harthi, Salim; Maekawa, Toru; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Elzain, Mohamed E; Al Hinai, Ashraf; Al-Rawas, A D; Gismelseed, A M; Yousif, Ali A

    2015-12-01

    We report investigation on properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (mCNTs) containing Ni residuals before and after encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles. The pristine tubes exhibit metallic character with a 0.3 eV reduction in the work function along with ferromagnetic behavior which is attributed to the Ni residuals incorporated during the preparation of tubes. Upon encapsulation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles, 0.5 eV shift in Fermi level position and a reduction in both the ? band density of state along with a change in the hybridized sp(2)/sp(3) ratio of the tubes from 2.04 to 1.39 are observed. As a result of the encapsulation, enhancement in the ? bands density of state and coating of the zinc ferrite nanoparticles by the internal layers of the CNTs in the direction along the tube axis is observed. Furthermore, Ni impurities inside the tubes are attracted to the encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles, suggesting the possibility of using these particles as purifying agents for CNTs upon being synthesized using magnetic catalyst particles. Charge transfer from Ni/mCNTs to the ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles is evident via reduction of the density of states near the Fermi level and a 0.3 eV shift in the binding energy of C 1 s core level ionization. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that encapsulated zinc ferrite nanoparticles in mCNTs resulted in two interacting sub-systems featured by distinct blocking temperatures and enhanced magnetic properties; i.e., large coercivity of 501 Oe and saturation magnetization of 2.5 emu/g at 4 K. PMID:26068078

  11. Carbon nanotubes in neuroregeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, we have experienced an increasing interest and an improved understanding of the application of nanotechnology to the nervous system. The aim of such studies is that of developing future strategies for tissue repair to promote functional recovery after brain damage. In this framework, carbon nanotube based technologies are emerging as particularly innovative tools due to the outstanding physical properties of these nanomaterials together with their recently documented ability to interface neuronal circuits, synapses and membranes. This review will discuss the state of the art in carbon nanotube technology applied to the development of devices able to drive nerve tissue repair; we will highlight the most exciting findings addressing the impact of carbon nanotubes in nerve tissue engineering, focusing in particular on neuronal differentiation, growth and network reconstruction. PMID:23856411

  12. Modelling Carbon Nanotubes-Based Mediatorless Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Petrauskas, Karolis; Razumiene, Julija

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate. PMID:23012537

  13. Modelling carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor.

    PubMed

    Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas; Petrauskas, Karolis; Razumiene, Julija

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate. PMID:23012537

  14. Ionic liquids for soft functional materials with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2007-01-01

    A serendipitous finding that ionic liquids gel with carbon nanotubes has opened a new possibility of ionic liquids as modifiers for carbon nanotubes. Upon being ground into ionic liquids, carbon nanotube bundles are untangled, and the resultant fine bundles form a network structure. This is due to the possible specific interaction between the imidazolium ion component and the pi-electronic nanotube surface. The resultant gelatinous materials, consisting of highly electroconductive nanowires and fluid electrolytes, can be utilized for a wide variety of electrochemical applications, such as sensors, capacitors, and actuators. Ionic liquids allow for noncovalent and covalent modifications of carbon nanotubes and fabrication of polymer composites with enhanced physical properties. The processing of carbon nanotubes with ionic liquids is not accompanied by the disruption of the pi-conjugated nanotube structure and does not require solvents; therefore it can readily be scaled up. This article focuses on new aspects of ionic liquids for designer soft materials based on carbon nanotubes. PMID:17516613

  15. Mechanical behaviors of carbon nanotubes with randomly located vacancy defects.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenyi; Xiao, Shaoping

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, (10, 0) zigzag nanotubes and (6, 6) armchair nanotubes are considered to investigate the effects of randomly distributed vacancy defects on mechanical behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotubes. A spatial Poisson point process is employed to randomly locate vacancy defects on nanotubes. Atomistic simulations indicate that the presence of vacancy defects result in reducing nanotube strength but improving nanotube bending stiffness. In addition, the studies of nanotube torsion indicate that vacancy defects prevent nanotubes from being utilized as torsion springs. PMID:18283831

  16. Orientational Growth of Carbon Nanotube for Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Most applications require uniform aligned CNT. In this presentation, a directional growth of CNT will be reported. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. It is found that the nanotube diameter distribution mainly depends on the growth-temperature. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of MWCNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes in each sample are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  18. Enrichment of Armchair Carbon Nanotubes via Density Gradient

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Enrichment of Armchair Carbon Nanotubes via Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation: Raman both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes are produced. Here, we use a metallic nanotube enrichment first introduced by Arnold and co-workers7,8 to create metallic-enriched nanotube samples. Using

  19. Novel Functions in Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Morinobu

    2008-03-01

    Nano-sized carbon nanotubes with hollow core were observed when hydrocarbons were catalytically decomposed in the existence of nano-sized catalyst such as iron at higher temperature. Up to now, this catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method has been utilized as the most powerful technique for the selective and large-scale production of carbon nanotubes. Since large amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (up to 250 ton/year) are available, much efforts has intensified on the development of their industrial usages. A recent hot topic has focused on the synthesis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) because these tubes are more thermally and chemically stable when compared to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs); they also exhibiting the 1D character of a quantum wire. In addition, DWNTs could also be used in the fabrication of electron field emitter and nano-composites. Very recently, we have successfully prepared highly pure and crystalline DWNTs by the combination of the CCVD and the subsequent oxidative purification process. In this talk, I will describe the preferential growth of DWNTs over SWNT or MWNTs, their structural characterizations using various analytic techniques and their possible applications. We found that these coaxial tubes consist of two relatively round, small and homogeneous-sized (below 2 nm in the outer shell) concentric tubules and are packed in a hexagonal array. Then, I will discuss a novel and stable structure consisting of flattened tubules containing two SWNTs via the coalescence of two adjacent tubes, chemical doping effect as a tunable way of electronic structure of DWNTs, and formation of atomic scale metal wires in the hollow core of DWNTs. Finally, I will report their transport properties as well as their performance in field effect transistors as compared with those of SWNTs. Therefore, in the near future, it may be possible that DWNTs replace SWNTs in specific carbon nanotube devices used today.

  20. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  1. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  2. Compressed carbon nanotubes: a family of new multifunctional carbon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Zhao, Zhisheng; Tian, Fei; Oganov, Artem R; Wang, Qianqian; Xiong, Mei; Fan, Changzeng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Yu, Dongli; Wang, Hui-Tian; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of novel functional carbon polymorphs is an enduring topic of scientific investigations. In this paper, we present simulations demonstrating metastable carbon phases as the result of pressure induced carbon nanotube polymerization. The configuration, bonding, electronic, and mechanical characteristics of carbon polymers strongly depend on the imposed hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure, as well as on the geometry of the raw carbon nanotubes including diameter, chirality, stacking manner, and wall number. Especially, transition processes under hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure are investigated, revealing unexpectedly low transition barriers and demonstrating sp(2)?sp(3) bonding changes as well as peculiar oscillations of electronic property (e.g., semiconducting?metallic?semiconducting transitions). These polymerized nanotubes show versatile and superior physical properties, such as superhardness, high tensile strength and ductility, and tunable electronic properties (semiconducting or metallic). PMID:23435585

  3. Compressed carbon nanotubes: A family of new multifunctional carbon allotropes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Meng; Zhao, Zhisheng; Tian, Fei; Oganov, Artem R.; Wang, Qianqian; Xiong, Mei; Fan, Changzeng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Yu, Dongli; Wang, Hui-Tian; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of novel functional carbon polymorphs is an enduring topic of scientific investigations. In this paper, we present simulations demonstrating metastable carbon phases as the result of pressure induced carbon nanotube polymerization. The configuration, bonding, electronic, and mechanical characteristics of carbon polymers strongly depend on the imposed hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure, as well as on the geometry of the raw carbon nanotubes including diameter, chirality, stacking manner, and wall number. Especially, transition processes under hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure are investigated, revealing unexpectedly low transition barriers and demonstrating sp2?sp3 bonding changes as well as peculiar oscillations of electronic property (e.g., semiconducting?metallic?semiconducting transitions). These polymerized nanotubes show versatile and superior physical properties, such as superhardness, high tensile strength and ductility, and tunable electronic properties (semiconducting or metallic). PMID:23435585

  4. Micromechanics of carbon nanotube turfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Hamid

    Complex structures consisting of intertwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are called turfs. Unique electrical, thermal, optical, and permeability properties of these turfs have attracted growing attention during the past decade, and have rendered them as appropriate candidates for applications such as contact thermal switches. These properties are controlled by the details of the turf microstructures. Due to the application of the turfs in different fields, they are subjected to different loading conditions. Deformation changes the microstructure of a CNT turf, which results in change of effective properties. Many researchers have recently studied the collective mechanical behavior of CNT turfs to compression loading, as this behavior determines their performance. However, their complex and intertwined structure must be investigated in more details to find the relation between their deformation and their underlying morphology. Under uniform compression experiments, CNT turfs exhibit irreversible collective buckling of a layer preceded by reorientation of CNT segments. Experimentally observed independence of the buckling stress and the buckling wavelength on the turf width suggests the existence of an intrinsic material length. To investigate the relationship the macroscopic material properties and the statistical parameters describing the nano-scale geometry of the turf (tortuosity, density and connectivity) we develop a nano-scale computational model, based on the representation of CNT segments as elastica finite elements with van der Waals interactions. The virtual turfs are generated by means of a constrained random walk algorithm and subsequent relaxation. The resulting computational model is robust and is capable of modeling the collective behavior of CNTs. We first establish the dependence of statistical parameters on the computational parameters used for turf generation, then establish relationships between post-buckling stress, initial elastic modulus and buckling wavelength on statistical turf parameters. Finally, we analyze the reorientation of buckling planes of individual CNTs during the collective buckling process.

  5. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L; Cola, Baratunde A

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna-a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current-was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1?PHz (switching speed on the order of 1?fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ?2?aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (?10?nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77?°C, indicating a potential for robust operation. PMID:26414198

  6. Carbon Nanotube Based Deuterium Ion Source for Improved Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R. L.; Jiang, N.; Thuesen, L.; Leung, K. N.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Field ionization uses high electric fields to cause the ionization and emission of ions from the surface of a sharp electrode. We are developing a novel field ionization neutron generator using carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce the deuterium ion current. The generator consists of three major components: a deuterium ion source made of carbon nanotubes, a smooth negatively-biased target electrode, and a secondary electron suppression system. When a negative high voltage is applied on the target electrode, a high gradient electric field is formed at the tips of the carbon nanotubes. This field is sufficiently strong to create deuterium (D) ions at or near the nanotubes which are accelerated to the target causing D-D reactions to occur and the production of neutrons. A cross magnetic field is used to suppress secondary emission electrons generated on the target surface. We have demonstrated field ionization currents of 70 nA (1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) at hydrogen gas pressure of 10 mTorr. We have found that the current scales proportionally with CNT area and also with the gas pressure in the range of 1 mTorr to 10 mTorr. We have demonstrated pulse cut-off times as short as 2 {mu}sec. Finally, we have shown the feasibility of generating neutrons using deuterium gas.

  7. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  8. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jeonyoon

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. ...

  9. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  11. Facile synthesis of multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles/polyaniline composite nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lirong; Lu Xiaofeng; Zhang Wanjin

    2008-03-15

    With an average diameter of 100-150 nm, composite nanotubes of polyaniline (PANI)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) containing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by a two-step method. First, we synthesized monodispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs (d=17.6 nm, {sigma}=1.92 nm) on the surface of MWNTs and then decorated the nanocomposites with a PANI layer via a self-assembly method. SEM and TEM images indicated that the obtained samples had the morphologies of nanotubes. The molecular structure and composition of MWNTs/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs/PANI nanotubes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra. UV-vis spectra confirmed the existence of PANI and its response to acid and alkali. As a multifunctional material, the conductivity and magnetic properties of MWNTs/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs/PANI composites nanotubes were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: The work on preparing nanocomposites has been too much, but few reports were about synthesizing one-dimensional nanocomposite of three different nanoscale materials. In our work, we prepared one-dimensional multiwalled carbon nanotubes/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles/polyaniline composite nanotubes and studied their conductive and magnetic properties.

  12. Defective fullerenes and nanotubes as molecular magnets: An ab initio study Yong-Hyun Kim,* Jin Choi, and K. J. Chang

    E-print Network

    Tománek, David

    Defective fullerenes and nanotubes as molecular magnets: An ab initio study Yong-Hyun Kim,* Jin the electronic and magnetic structures of a C60 fullerene during a structural transition to a nanotube segment all- carbon nanostructures, related to fullerenes and nanotubes with a particular arrangement

  13. CARBON NANOTUBES IN MICROWAVE ENVIRONMENT-IGNITION AND RECONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unusual property of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall (MWNT) nanotubes and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) is observed upon exposure to microwave-assisted ignition. Carbon nanotubes known for a range of mechanical and electronic properties because of their unique...

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations for Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Thomas Luu; Timo A. Lähde

    2015-11-16

    We show how lattice Quantum Monte Carlo can be applied to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of strong electron-electron correlations. We employ the path-integral formalism and use methods developed within the lattice QCD community for our numerical work. Our lattice Hamiltonian is closely related to the hexagonal Hubbard model augmented by a long-range electron-electron interaction. We apply our method to the single-quasiparticle spectrum of the (3,3) armchair nanotube configuration, and consider the effects of strong electron-electron correlations. Our approach is equally applicable to other nanotubes, as well as to other carbon nanostructures. We benchmark our Monte Carlo calculations against the two- and four-site Hubbard models, where a direct numerical solution is feasible.

  15. Heat Transport in Liquid Polyester Resin with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Quiñones-Weiss, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent one of the most important materials in nanoscience and nanotechnology, due to their outstanding structural, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. It has been shown that when incorporated in a polymeric matrix, carbon nanotubes can improve its physical properties. In this work, thermal-diffusivity measurements of composite materials, prepared by mixing carbon nanotubes in liquid polyester resin, were performed by means of the thermal-wave resonant cavity. The results show an increase of the thermal diffusivity when the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes grows. It is also shown that this increase depends strongly on the diameter of the nanotubes.

  16. Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Joselevich, Ernesto

    , rather than to bending or stretching. The corresponding torsional spring constants (see SupplementaryTorsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes TZAHI COHEN-KARNI1 *, LIOR by mechanical torsion4 can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal

  17. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  18. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Zepp, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that may damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate environmental transformations of CNTs. Photosensitization by derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus with different intrinsic characteristics (e.g., diameter and electronic properties), has been investigated under environmentally relevant aquatic conditions. We used the CNT-sensitized photoisomerization of sorbic acid ((2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoic acid) and singlet oxygen formation to quantify the triplet states ((3)CNT*) formed upon irradiation of selected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The CNTs used in our studies were derivatized by carboxyl groups to facilitate their dispersion in water. Results indicate that high-defect-density (thus well-stabilized), small-diameter, and semiconducting-rich CNTs have higher-measured excited triplet state formation and therefore singlet oxygen ((1)O2) yield. Derivatized SWCNTs were significantly more photoreactive than derivatized MWCNTs. Moreover, addition of sodium chloride resulted in increased aggregation and small increases in (1)O2 production of CNTs. The most photoreactive CNTs exhibited comparable photoreactivity (in terms of (3)CNT* formation and (1)O2 yield) to reference natural organic matter (NOM) under sunlight irradiation with the same mass-based concentration. Selected reference NOM could therefore be useful in evaluating environmental photoreactivity or intended antibacterial applications of CNTs. PMID:26186124

  19. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  20. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  1. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes and metallic nanomaterials

    E-print Network

    Height, Murray John, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a remarkable material with many appealing properties. Despite the appeal of this material, there are few synthesis techniques capable of producing nanotubes in large quantities at low-cost. The broad ...

  2. Characterizing carbon-nanotube devices for an integrated sensor system

    E-print Network

    Lee, Kyeong-Jae

    2007-01-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer promise for future nano-electronic applications, reliably controlling CNT growth has been a big challenge. As-grown devices can have a number of different nanotubes, which can be either ...

  3. Magnetic single-walled carbon nanotubes as efficient drug delivery nanocarriers in breast cancer murine model: noninvasive monitoring using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as sensitive imaging biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Shaik, Asma Sultana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Targeting doxorubicin (DOX) by means of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocarriers may help improve the clinical utility of this highly active therapeutic agent. Active targeting of SWCNTs using tumor-specific antibody and magnetic attraction by tagging the nanotubes with iron oxide nanoparticles can potentially reduce the unnecessary side effects and provide enhanced theranostics. In the current study, the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of DOX-loaded SWCNTs as theranostic nanoprobes was evaluated in a murine breast cancer model. Methods Iron-tagged SWCNTs conjugated with Endoglin/CD105 antibody with or without DOX were synthetized and extensively characterized. Their biocompatibility was assessed in vitro in luciferase (Luc2)-expressing 4T1 (4T1-Luc2) murine breast cancer cells using TiterTACS™ Colorimetric Apoptosis Detection Kit (apoptosis induction), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (marker for DNA damage), and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (oxidative stress generation) assays, and the efficacy of DOX-loaded SWCNTs was evaluated by measuring the radiance efficiency using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Tumor progression and growth were monitored after 4T1-Luc2 cells inoculation using noninvasive BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after subsequent injection of SWCNT complexes actively and magnetically targeted to tumor sites. Results Significant increases in apoptosis, DNA damage, and oxidative stress were induced by DOX-loaded SWCNTs. In addition, a tremendous decrease in bioluminescence was observed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Noninvasive BLI and MRI revealed successful tumor growth and subsequent attenuation along with metastasis inhibition following DOX-loaded SWCNTs injection. Magnetic tagging of SWCNTs was found to produce significant discrepancies in apparent diffusion coefficient values providing a higher contrast to detect treatment-induced variations as noninvasive imaging biomarker. In addition, it allowed their sensitive noninvasive diagnosis using susceptibility-weighted MRI and their magnetic targeting using an externally applied magnet. Conclusion Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of DOX delivered through antibody-conjugated magnetic SWCNTs was achieved. Further, the superiority of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements using diffusion-weighted MRI was found to be a sensitive imaging biomarker for assessment of treatment-induced changes. PMID:25565811

  4. Biomolecules Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Daxiang

    In recent years, functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with biomolecules such as nucleotide acids, proteins, and artificial polymers have emerged as a new exciting field. Theoretical and experimental studies of structure and function of bio-inspired CNT composites have made great advances. The importance of nucleic acids, proteins, and synthesized polymers to the fundamental developments in CNT-based bio-nano-composites or devices has been recognized. In particular, biomechanics, biochemistry, thermodynamics, electronic, optical and magnetic properties, and biocompatibility and toxicology of the bio-inspired CNT composites have become a new interdisciplinary frontier in life science and nanomaterial science. Bio-inspired CNT composites have been actively exploited potentials in applications such as gene/drug delivery system, tissue engineering scaffolds, hydrogen storage, molecular imaging, biocatalyst systems, biosensors, and antifouling films. Here we review the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore their application prospects, and discuss the issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of improving and developing CNT-based bio-nanotechnology.

  5. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  6. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations. PMID:24022336

  7. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  8. Transmission Through Carbon Nanotubes with Polyhedral Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study electron transport between capped carbon nanotubes and a substrate, and relate this transport to the local density of states in the cap. Our results show that that the transmission probability mimics the behavior of the density of states at all energies except those that correspond to localized states. For a capped carbon nanotube that is not connected to a substrate, the localized states do not couple to the coexisting continuum states. However, close proximity of a substrate causes hybridization between these states. As a result, new transmission paths open from substrate states to nanotube continuum states via the localized states in the cap. We show that the interference between various paths gives rise to transmission antiresonances with the minimum equal to zero at the energy of the localized state. The presence of defects in the tube places close to the cap transforms antiresonances into resonances. Depending on the spatial position of defects, these resonant states are capable of carrying a large current. The results of this paper are of relevance to carbon nanotube based studies on molecular electronics and probe tip applications.

  9. Second-order harmonic and combination modes in graphite, single wall carbon nanotube bundles, and isolated single wall carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    , carbon fibers, and other forms important to our industrial society [1]. The recently discovered carbonSecond-order harmonic and combination modes in graphite, single wall carbon nanotube bundles, and isolated single wall carbon nanotubes V. W. Brara , Ge. G. Samsonidzeb , M. S. Dresselhausa,b , G

  10. Relaxation phenomena in nematic liquid crystals with multiwall carbon nanotubes adding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cîrtoaje, Cristina; Stoian, Victor; Petrescu, Emil; Mo?oc, Cornelia

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies about the influence of an external magnetic field on a nematic liquid crystal with carbon nanotubes adding are presented. Planar oriented cells filled with a mixture of MCL-6601 (Merck) nematic and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were subjected to a magnetic field higher than the critical one for the magnetic Freedericksz transition. A laser beam was used to observe the molecular director distortion. Dynamical measurements of the transmitted light intensity were performed when the magnetic field was switched on and off. The results were used to evaluate the relaxation times of the mixture and to show the influence of the carbon nanotubes on these parameters. We also present a theoretical model to explain the experimental results.

  11. Electrochemical Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Fuel Cell MEA's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagaris, Jael; Loyselle, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes from different sources have been evaluated before and after sonication to identify structural differences and evaluate electrochemical performance. Raman spectral analysis and cyclic voltammetry in situ with QCM were the principle means of evaluating the tubes. The raman data indicates that sonication in toluene modifies the structural properties of the nanotubes. Sonication also affects the electrochemical performance of single-walled nanotubes and the multi-walled tubes differently. The characterization of different types of carbon nanotubes leads up to identifying a potential candidate for incorporating carbon nanotubes for fuel cell MEA structures.

  12. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L?V), and liquid-commensurate (L?CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L?V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  13. Diffusion through Carbon Nanotube Semipermeable membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O

    2006-02-13

    The goal of this project is to measure transport through CNTs and study effects of confinement at molecular scale. This work is motivated by several simulation papers in high profile journals that predict significantly higher transport rates of gases and liquids through carbon nanotubes as compared with similarly-sized nanomaterials (e.g. zeolites). The predictions are based on the effects of confinement, atomically smooth pore walls and high pore density. Our work will provide the first measurements that would compare to and hopefully validate the simulations. Gas flux is predicted to be >1000X greater for SWNTs versus zeolitesi. A high flux of 6-30 H2O/NT/ns {approx} 8-40 L/min for a 1cm{sup 2} membrane is also predicted. Neutron diffraction measurements indicate existence of a 1D water chain within a cylindrical ice sheet inside carbon nanotubes, which is consistent with the predictions of the simulation. The enabling experimental platform that we are developing is a semipermeable membrane made out of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with gaps between nanotubes filled so that the transport occurs through the nanotubes. The major challenges of this project included: (1) Growth of CNTs in the suitable vertically aligned configuration, especially the single wall carbon nanotubes; (2) Development of a process for void-free filling gaps between CNTs; and (3) Design of the experiments that will probe the small amounts of analyte that go through. Knowledge of the behavior of water upon nanometer-scale confinement is key to understanding many biological processes. For example, the protein folding process is believed to involve water confined in a hydrophobic environment. In transmembrane proteins such as aquaporins, water transport occurs under similar conditions. And in fields as far removed as oil recovery and catalysis, an understanding of the nanoscale molecular transport occurring within the nanomaterials used (e.g. zeolites) is the key to process optimization. Furthermore, advancement of many emerging nanotechnologies in chemistry and biology will undoubtedly be aided by an understanding confined water transport, particularly the details of hydrogen bonding and solvation that become crucial on this length scale. We can envision several practical applications for our devices, including desalination, gas separations, dialysis, and semipermeable fabrics for protection against CW agents etc. The single wall carbon nanotube membranes will be the key platform for applications because they will allow high transport rates of small molecules such as water and eliminate solvated ions or CW agents.

  14. Fabrication and application of polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, Kausala; Zhang, Liangchi C

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being used in place of carbon fibers in making composites due to their high strength, high aspect-ratio and excellent thermal and electrical conductivity. Although carbon nanotubes were discovered more than a decade ago, works on preparation of satisfactory composites reinforced by carbon nanotubes have encountered difficulties. This review will discuss some registered patents and relevant papers on the fabrication of carbon nanotube-polymer composites on improving material properties such as electrical conductivity, mechanical strength, and radiation detection which have a broad range of applications in nano-electronic devices, and space and medical elements. PMID:19076021

  15. 75 FR 80819 - Draft Current Intelligence Bulletin “Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...Bulletin ``Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers'' AGENCY...plans to evaluate the scientific data on carbon nanotubes and to issue its findings on...entitled ``Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers'' has...

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition Based Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Using a Template Method

    E-print Network

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Based Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Using a Template developed a new approach for preparing graphitic carbon nanofiber and nanotube ensembles. This approach nanotubes into carbon nanofibers. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction data show

  17. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  18. Spin-based Optomechanics with Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-01-01

    A simple scheme for determination of spin-orbit coupling strength in spinbased optomechanics with carbon nanotubes is introduced, under the control of a strong pump field and a weak signal field. The physical mechanism comes from the phonon induced transparency (PIT), by relying on the coherent coupling of electron spin to vibrational motion of the nanotube, which is analogous to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in atom systems. Based on this spin-nanotube optomechanical system, we also conceptually design a single photon router and a quantum microwave transistor, with ultralow pump power (~ pW) and tunable switching time, which should provide a unique platform for the study of spin-based microwave quantum optics and quantum information processing. PMID:23198093

  19. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  20. A Structural Transition of Carbon Nanotubes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The superior properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are good for many applications. A possible temperature-related structural transition is found in the CNT, which may suggest new applications of CNT. CNT materials have been synthesized on Si substrates by pulsed laser vaporization in various temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to determine the CNT structure and morphology. It is found that the formation of nanotubes depends strongly on the growth temperatures and high quality multi-wall and single-wall nanotubes were produced at 700 and 990 C, respectively. The radial breath modes of Raman spectra measured in the range of 50 cm(exp -1) to 300 cm(exp -1), indicate that one of samples grown at 700 C is to be dependent on the excitation intensity. The spectra of the sample suggest that the structure is similar to that of multi-wall nanotubes at low excitation intensity (2.5 kW per square centimeter) and it converts to the structure of single-wall nanotubes at higher intensity (25 kW per square centimeter). Measurements taken while cycling the light intensity suggests a reversible transition.

  1. Coupling of Carbon Nanotubes to Metallic Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Xiang; Govindan, T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The modeling of carbon nanotube-metal contacts is important from both basic and applied view points. For many applications, it is important to design contacts such that the transmission is dictated by intrinsic properties of the nanotube rather than by details of the contact. In this paper, we calculate the electron transmission probability from a nanotube to a free electron metal, which is side-contacted. If the metal-nanotube interface is sufficiently ordered, we find that k-vector conservation plays an important role in determining the coupling, with the physics depending on the area of contact, tube diameter, and chirality. The main results of this paper are: (1) conductance scales with contact length, a phenomena that has been observed in experiments and (2) in the case of uniform coupling between metal and nanotube, the threshold value of the metal Fermi wave vector (below which coupling is insignificant) depends on chirality. Disorder and small phase coherence length relax the need for k-vector conservation, thereby making the coupling stronger.

  2. Arrays of carbon nanoscrolls as deep subwavelength magnetic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios; Tzavala, Marilena; Tsetseris, Leonidas

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that an array of carbon nanoscrolls acts as a hyperbolic magnetic metamaterial in the terahertz regime with genuine subwavelength operation corresponding to a wavelength-to-structure ratio of about 200. Due to the low sheet resistance of graphene, the electromagnetic losses in an array of carbon nanoscrolls are almost negligible, offering a very sharp magnetic resonance of extreme positive and negative values of the effective magnetic permeability. The latter property leads to superior imaging properties for arrays of carbon nanoscrolls which can operate as magnetic endoscopes in the terahertz range where magnetic materials are scarce. Our optical modeling is supplemented with ab initio density functional calculations of the self-winding of a single layer of graphene onto a carbon nanotube so as to form a carbon nanoscroll. The latter process is viewed as a means to realize ordered arrays of carbon nanoscrolls in the laboratory based on arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes which are now routinely fabricated.

  3. Fiddling the string of carbon nanotubes with amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Ke, Pu Chun

    2007-01-28

    The field of carbon nanotube-amphiphile self assembly has been reviewed to address the ongoing debate regarding their binding. Based on our spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy studies, this report shows the binding of lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes is dependent on the charge and geometry of the lipids and the pH of the solvent, and independent of solvent temperature. From molecular dynamics simulations, the binding of lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes does not fully obey any of the models proposed in the literature. We also studied carbon nanotube diffusion using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, and carbon nanotube-lipid binding and dissociation using the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The use of carbon nanotube-lipid assembly for enabling nanotoxicological studies is demonstrated by the uptake of the assembly in the living organism Daphnia magna. PMID:17216058

  4. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted. PMID:25855947

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of divacancies in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berber, Savas; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2008-04-01

    We present atomic and electronic structure of divacancies in carbon nanotubes, which is calculated using the density functional theory. Divacancies in carbon nanotubes self-heal by spontaneous reconstructions, which consist of concerted bond formations. Divacancy formation energies EDV , which strongly depend on the divacancy orientation with respect to the tube axis, are in the range of 2.8 4.3 eV for favorable orientations in the nanotubes of 4 9Å diameter, making divacancies more probable than monovacancies in carbon nanotubes. Defect related states lead to a higher density of states around the Fermi level. Semiconducting nanotubes develop midgap levels that may adversely affect the functionality of carbon nanotube based devices. Our spin polarized density functional calculations show that the exchange splitting of defect-related bands in nonsemiconducting defective nanotubes leads to net spin polarizations of ??-???0.5?B per divacancy for some divacancy orientations.

  6. Method of making carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei; Liu, Jun

    2006-03-14

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  7. Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention incorporates new processes for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes. Such processes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions thermally induced reactions (via in-situ generation of diazonium compounds or pre-formed diazonium compounds), and photochemically induced reactions. The derivatization causes significant changes in the spectroscopic properties of the nanotubes. The estimated degree of functionality is ca. 1 out of every 20 to 30 carbons in a nanotube bearing a functionality moiety. Such electrochemical reduction processes can be adapted to apply site-selective chemical functionalization of nanotubes. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes ##STR00001##.

  8. First-principles study of transition-metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yu-Liang; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yang

    2005-12-01

    We study the effect of doping transition metals (TMs) into single-wall carbon nanotubes by using first-principles calculations. For metallic isolated (3,3) single-wall carbon nanotubes, doping of Mn, Fe and Co makes them semi-metallic, while Ni doping leads to semiconductors. For (3,3) nanotube bundles, a Co atom in the unit cell makes it exhibit semiconductor character. With two or three Co and Ni atoms doped into the bundle, the impurity atoms change the nanotube to semi-metal. In particular, the Mn2C12 and Mn3C12 bundle have comparable large magnetic moments, suggesting that such TM-doped nanotubes could be useful as nanomagnets.

  9. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that by hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.

  10. Varied morphology carbon nanotubes and method for their manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Li, Wenzhi; Wen, Jian Guo; Ren, Zhi Feng

    2007-01-02

    The present invention describes the preparation of carbon nanotubes of varied morphology, catalyst materials for their synthesis. The present invention also describes reactor apparatus and methods of optimizing and controlling process parameters for the manufacture carbon nanotubes with pre-determined morphologies in relatively high purity and in high yields. In particular, the present invention provides methods for the preparation of non-aligned carbon nanotubes with controllable morphologies, catalyst materials and methods for their manufacture.

  11. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  12. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  13. Carbon nanotubes as photoacoustic molecular imaging agents in living mice

    E-print Network

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    Carbon nanotubes as photoacoustic molecular imaging agents in living mice ADAM DE LA ZERDA1 not shown to target a diseased site in living subjects. Here we show that single-walled carbon nanotubes were verified ex vivo using Raman microscopy. Photoacoustic imaging of targeted single-walled carbon

  14. Carbon Nanotube Correlation: Promising Opportunity for CNFET Circuit Yield Enhancement

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Carbon Nanotube Correlation: Promising Opportunity for CNFET Circuit Yield Enhancement Jie Zhang1 Mitra1 1 Stanford University, Stanford, CA, U.S.A 2 LSI-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Abstract Carbon are very difficult to control. As a result, "small-width" Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors (CNFETs

  15. Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Nanoelectrodes for

    E-print Network

    Dekker, Cees

    Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Nanoelectrodes for Electrochemistry Iddo Heller, Jing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as nanoelectrodes for electrochemistry. SWNTs were contacted. These studies demonstrate the potential of using a SWNT as a model carbon nanoelectrode for electrochemistry

  16. Fano Antiresonance and Kondo Resonance for Electronic Transport Through a Laterally Coupled Carbon-Nanotube Quantum-Dot System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Dong-Ming

    2015-10-01

    We present nonequilibrium Green function calculations for electronic transport through a laterally coupled carbon-nanotube quantum-dot system. In this system, a one-dimensional double carbon nanotube quantum dot attached to polarised electrodes forms a main channel for electronic tunnelling. Each carbon nanotube quantum dot in the main channel couples to a dangling carbon nanotube quantum dot. Then, the conductance spectrum is calculated. The insulating band and resonance peak in this spectrum, due to Fano antiresonance and Kondo resonance, are discussed. The intradot electron's Coulomb interaction effect on the insulating band is also investigated. By controlling the coupling coefficient between the quantum dots, we can realise mutual transformation between Kondo resonance and Fano antiresonance at the Fermi level. The spin-orbit coupling and magnetic field's influence on the Kondo resonance peak are discussed in detail. Finally, spin magnetic moment and orbital magnetic moment of electrons in the quantum dot by applying parallel magnetic field are also predicted.

  17. Block copolymer-templated iron oxide nanoparticles for bimodal growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Yazzie, Kyle E

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have sparked great interest due to their exceptional mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. These properties make carbon nanotubes desirable for numerous applications ...

  18. CHAPTER 4: VISCOELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE-REINFORCED POLYMERS

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Frank

    123 CHAPTER 4: VISCOELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF CARBON NANOTUBE-REINFORCED POLYMERS Recent experimental results demonstrate that substantial improvements in the elastic properties of a polymer can be attained of the nanotubes on the viscoelastic response of the polymer. Because the nanotubes are on the same length scale

  19. Towards structural health monitoring in carbon nanotube reinforced composites

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wennie

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to understand the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) capabilities of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of several network architectures towards structural health monitoring (SHM). As ...

  20. Monolithic Integration of Carbon Nanotube Devices with Silicon MOS

    E-print Network

    Javey, Ali

    Monolithic Integration of Carbon Nanotube Devices with Silicon MOS Technology Yu-Chih Tseng, Peiqi individually using the NMOS circuit, were rapidly characterized. The successful monolithic integration

  1. Shock formation and rate effects in impacted carbon nanotube foams

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    for transpar- ent highly elastomeric electrodes [6] and underwater thermoacoustic projectors [2]. Thin film, forming a hierarchical structure: entangled individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs

  2. Characterization of composites with aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement

    E-print Network

    García, Enrique J

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes' (CNTs) superlative combination of electrical, thermal, and especially mechanical properties make them ideal candidates for composite reinforcement. Nanocomposites and hybrid composite architectures employing ...

  3. Photoacoustic characterization of carbon nanotube array thermal interfaces

    E-print Network

    Xu, Xianfan

    Photoacoustic characterization of carbon nanotube array thermal interfaces Baratunde A. Cola, Jun a photoacoustic technique PA . Well-anchored, dense, and vertically oriented multiwalled CNT arrays have been

  4. Carbon nanotube applications for CMOS back-end processing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Tan Mau, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material with excellent mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. In particular, they are potential ballistic transporters and are theorized to have thermal conductivities ...

  5. Finite Element Modelling and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Carbon nanotubes/ Polymer Composites 

    E-print Network

    Gaddamanugu, Dhatri

    2010-07-14

    Modeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled nanotubes and nanotube reinforced polymer composites using both the Finite Element method and the Molecular Dynamic simulation technique is presented. Nanotubes subjected to mechanical loading...

  6. Transparent and Electrically Conductive Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposite Materials for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervishi, E.; Biris, A. S.; Biris, A. R.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Miller, D. W.; Schmitt, T.; Buzatu, D. A.; Wilkes, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied because of their superior electrical, magnetic, and optical properties and large number of possible applications that range from nano-electronics, specialty coatings, electromagnetic shielding, and drug delivery. The aim of the present work is to study the electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer nanocomposite materials for electrostatic charge dissipation. Single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes were grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on metal/metal oxide catalytic systems using acetylene or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. After the purification process, in which amorphous carbon and non-carbon impurities were removed, the nanotubes were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups in order to achieve a good dispersion in water and various other solvents. The carbon nanostructures were analyzed, both before and after functionalization by several analytical techniques, including microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Solvent dispersed nanotubes were mixed (1 to 7 wt %) into acrylic polymers by sonication and allowed to dry into 25 micron thick films. The electrical and optical properties of the films were analyzed as a function of the nanotubes' concentration. A reduction in electrical resistivity, up to six orders of magnitude, was measured as the nanotubes' concentration in the polymeric films increased, while optical transparency remained 85 % or higher relative to acrylic films without nanotubes.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  8. Biomedical Applications of Functionalised Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Alberto; Sainz, Raquel; Li, Shouping; Dumortier, Hélène; Lacerda, Lara; Kostarelos, Kostas; Giordani, Silvia; Prato, Maurizio

    This chapter describes the developing potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedicine. Methodologies to render nanotubes biocompatible, the related studies on cell uptake, applications in vaccine delivery, interaction with nucleic acids and impact on health will be described. The use of CNTs for biomedical applications is acquiring more and more substantiating evidence for efficient development. It is clear that some important issues related to the health impact including the biodistribution, accumulation and elimination have to be addressed more thoroughly before CNTs can be proposed for clinical trials. However, CNTs show remarkable carrier properties, with a very strong tendency to cross cell membranes. Although, the toxicological studies on pristine CNTs are contradictory, showing a certain degree of risk, it is becoming evident that functionalised CNTs have reduced toxic effects. Therefore, the combination of cell uptake capacity with high loading of cargo molecules achievable with CNTs makes this new carbon nanomaterial a promising candidate for innovative therapies.

  9. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail. PMID:26264684

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Suspended Carbon Nanotube Devices in Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Stadermann, M; Stroeve, P; Bakajin, O; Noy, A

    2006-10-30

    Suspended carbon nanotube devices are a promising platform for future bio-electronic applications. Suspended carbon nanotube transistors have been previously fabricated in air; however all previous attempts to bring them into liquid failed. We analyze forces acting on the suspended nanotube devices during immersion into liquids and during device operation and show that surface tension forces acting on the suspended nanotubes during transfer into the liquid phase are responsible for the nanotube damage. We have developed a new strategy that circumvents these limitations by coating suspended nanotubes with a rigid inorganic shell in the gas phase. The coating reinforces the nanotubes and allows them to survive transfer through the interface. Subsequent removal of the coating in the solution phase restores pristine suspended nanotubes. We demonstrate that devices fabricated using this technique preserve their original electrical characteristics.

  12. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-11

    through the sample. These responses will be determined as a function of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) type, alignment, mass and sample thickness as well as the incident power intensity of the radiation. This provides the basis for exploitation... (SEM) to determine their appearance and dimensions, including length and diameter. The SEM was coupled with chemical analysis in some cases, to qualititatively identify the elements present on the surface of the tubes. A transmission electron...

  13. An ultrafast carbon nanotube terahertz polarisation modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docherty, Callum J.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Joyce, Hannah J.; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast modulation of terahertz radiation by unaligned optically pumped single-walled carbon nanotubes. Photoexcitation by an ultrafast optical pump pulse induces transient terahertz absorption in nanowires aligned parallel to the optical pump. By controlling the polarisation of the optical pump, we show that terahertz polarisation and modulation can be tuned, allowing sub-picosecond modulation of terahertz radiation. Such speeds suggest potential for semiconductor nanowire devices in terahertz communication technologies.

  14. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibits extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and offers significant potential for structural, sensor, and nanoelectronics applications. An overview of CNT, growth methods, properties and applications is provided. Single-wall, and multi-wall CNTs have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. Catalyst development and optimization has been accomplished using combinatorial optimization methods. CNT has also been grown from the tips of silicon cantilevers for use in atomic force microscopy.

  16. Identification of Complex Carbon Nanotube Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A variety of complex carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been observed experimentally. These include sharp bends, branches, tori, and helices. They are believed to be formed by using topological defects such as pentagons and heptagons to connect different CNT. The effects of type, number, and arrangement (separation and orientation) of defects on atomic structures and energetics of complex CNT are investigated using topology, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. Energetically stable models are derived for identification of observed complex CNT structures.

  17. Field-modulated carrier transport in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, J; Knoch, J; Derycke, V; Martel, R; Wind, S; Avouris, Ph

    2002-09-16

    We have investigated the electrical transport properties of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors as a function of channel length, gate dielectric film thickness, and dielectric material. Our experiments show that the bulk properties of the semiconducting carbon nanotubes do not limit the current flow through the metal/nanotube/metal system. Instead, our results can be understood in the framework of gate and source-drain field induced modulation of the nanotube band structure at the source contact. The existence of one-dimensional Schottky barriers at the metal/nanotube interface determines the device performance and results in an unexpected scaling behavior. PMID:12225112

  18. Growth mechanisms of aligned carbon nanotubes and carbon tubular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Dai, Liming; Wang, En Ge

    2000-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopic study on the aligned carbon nanotubes, prepared by a pyrolysis technique, has demonstrated a growth mechanism which involves two sizes of iron nanoparticles. While the small particle is catalytically active for the nucleation of the nanotube, the large particle produces the carbon atomistic species required for the growth of the nanotubes. The aligned nanotubes are believed to be the result of a competition growth process along the normal direction of the substrate, similar to the process for growth of textured polycrystalline diamond films. The growth mechanism is also studied for the tubular carbon structure grown by CVD with the assistance of transition metal catalysts. Carbon tubules grown using Ni catalysts exhibit a preferred orientation relative to the catalytically active surfaces of Ni. The axial directions of the tubular structure are mainly parallel to the <110> and <042> directions of Ni. The faceted shape of the Ni particles determines the intrinsic structure of the tubules. A mechanism involving spiral growth is proposed to explain the nucleation and growth of such

  19. Optical modulation of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of single walled carbon nanotubes have significantly enhanced our ability to understand and control their surface chemistry, both covalently and non-covalently. Our work has focused on modulating the optical properties of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes as near infrared photoluminescent sensors for chemical analysis. Molecular detection using near-infrared light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole-blood media. In one system, the transition of DNA secondary structure modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. We demonstrate the detection of the mercuric ions in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells using this technology. Similar results are obtained for DNA hybridization and the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. We also report the synthesis and successful testing of near-infrared ?-D-glucose sensors2 that utilize a different mechanism: a photoluminescence modulation via charge transfer. The results demonstrate new opportunities for nanoparticle optical sensors that operate in strongly absorbing media of relevance to medicine or biology.

  20. Fast Electromechanical Switches Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Wong, Eric; Epp, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated nanoelectromechanical switches based on carbon nanotubes have been fabricated and tested in a continuing effort to develop high-speed switches for a variety of stationary and portable electronic equipment. As explained below, these devices offer advantages over electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical switches, which, heretofore, have represented the state of the art of rapid, highly miniaturized electromechanical switches. Potential applications for these devices include computer memories, cellular telephones, communication networks, scientific instrumentation, and general radiation-hard electronic equipment. A representative device of the present type includes a single-wall carbon nanotube suspended over a trench about 130 nm wide and 20 nm deep in an electrically insulating material. The ends of the carbon nanotube are connected to metal electrodes, denoted the source and drain electrodes. At bottom of the trench is another metal electrode, denoted the pull electrode (see figure). In the off or open switch state, no voltage is applied, and the nanotube remains out of contact with the pull electrode. When a sufficiently large electric potential (switching potential) is applied between the pull electrode and either or both of the source and drain electrodes, the resulting electrostatic attraction bends and stretches the nanotube into contact with the pull electrode, thereby putting the switch into the "on" or "closed" state, in which substantial current (typically as much as hundreds of nanoamperes) is conducted. Devices of this type for use in initial experiments were fabricated on a thermally oxidized Si wafer, onto which Nb was sputter-deposited for use as the pull-electrode layer. Nb was chosen because its refractory nature would enable it to withstand the chemical and thermal conditions to be subsequently imposed for growing carbon nanotubes. A 200- nm-thick layer of SiO2 was formed on top of the Nb layer by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. In the device regions, the SiO2 layer was patterned to thin it to the 20-nm trench depth. The trenches were then patterned by electron- beam lithography and formed by reactive- ion etching of the pattern through the 20-nm-thick SiO2 to the Nb layer.

  1. Reversible separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Sangeeta; Lastella, Sarah; Maranganti, Ravi; Sharma, Pradeep; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2008-08-25

    We show that electrostatic charging of nanotubes and the consequent repulsion can lead to reversible separation of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes in bundles. Low-energy electron beam irradiation leads to this completely reversible phenomenon. A simple semianalytical model is used to explain the observed separation mechanism. The reversibility of the separation process is attributed to discharging and thermal-fluctuation induced motion of the nanotubes in ambient air. Further, the separation impacts the electrical conductance of small nanotube bundled devices.

  2. Deformations and nanomechanical energy storage in twisted carbon nanotube ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanek, David; Fthenakis, Zacharias G.; Seifert, Gotthard; Teich, David

    2013-03-01

    We determine the deformation energetics and energy density of twisted carbon nanotube ropes that effectively constitute a torsional spring. Due to the unprecedented stiffness and resilience of constituent carbon nanotubes, a twisted nanotube rope becomes an efficient energy carrier. Using ab initio and parameterized density functional calculations, we identify structural changes in these systems and determine their elastic limits. The deformation energy of twisted nanotube ropes contains contributions associated not only with twisting, but also with stretching, bending and compression of individual nanotubes. We quantify these energy contributions and show that their relative role changes with the number of nanotubes in the rope. The calculated reversible nanomechanical energy storage capacity of carbon nanotube ropes surpasses that of advanced Li-ion batteries by up to a factor of ten. Supported by the National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement #EEC-0832785, titled ``NSEC: Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing''.

  3. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Albert D.; Araujo, Paulo T.; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2014-12-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15?nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600?°C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  4. Effect of Alignment on Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Metallic Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip; Harvey, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Ballistic and spin coherent transport in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are predicted to enable high sensitivity single-nanotube devices for strain and magnetic field sensing. Based upon these phenomena, electron beam lithography procedures have been developed to study the transport properties of purified HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes for development into sensory materials for nondestructive evaluation. Purified nanotubes are dispersed in solvent suspension and then deposited on the device substrate before metallic contacts are defined and deposited through electron beam lithography. This procedure produces randomly dispersed ropes, typically 2 - 20 nm in diameter, of single walled carbon nanotubes. Transport and scanning probe microscopy studies have shown a good correlation between the junction resistance and tube density, alignment, and contact quality. In order to improve transport properties of the junctions a technique has been developed to align and concentrate nanotubes at specific locations on the substrate surface. Lithographic techniques are used to define local areas where high frequency electric fields are to be concentrated. Application of the fields while the substrate is exposed to nanotube-containing solution results in nanotube arrays aligned with the electric field lines. A second electron beam lithography layer is then used to deposit metallic contacts across the aligned tubes. Experimental measurements are presented showing the increased tube alignment and improvement in the transport properties of the junctions.

  5. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Chai, G.; Heinrich, H.; Chow, L.; Schenkel, T.

    2007-08-01

    We report on the transport of energetic electrons through single, well aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTs in a protective carbon fiber coating enables the application of focused ion beam based sample preparation techniques for the non-destructive isolation and alignment of individual tubes. Aligned tubes with lengths of 0.7 to 3 mu m allow transport of 300 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope through their hollow cores at zero degree incident angles and for a misalignment of up to 1 degree.

  6. Terahertz Response of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    The terahertz (THz) research field is expected to serve as a new platform for studying low-energy excitation in solids and higher-order structures in large molecules, and for realizing applications in medicine, agriculture, security, and high-capacity communications. The THz frequency region, however, is located between the electronic and photonic bands, hampering the development of basic components like detectors and sources. This article presents an overview of basic background information about THz waves and THz detector applications and describes the THz response of carbon-based low-dimensional systems, such as single carbon nanotubes (CNT), CNT-array films, and graphene.

  7. Studies of DNA-carbon nanotube interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Recently a new biomaterial consisting of a DNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotube, and known as a DNA/SWNT, has been discovered. The possible applications of this hybrid are varied and range from genomic sequencing to nanoscale electronics to molecular delivery. The realization of these potential applications requires more knowledge about the microscopic properties of this material. In this thesis, I present studies of: the orientation of nucleobases on the nanotube sidewall; the sequence and length dependence of the DNA-nanotube interaction; and solution conditions to manipulate the DNA/SWNT hybrid. The measurement of the UV optical absorbance of DNA/SWNT and the nucleotide absorbance from DNA/SWNT provide the first experimental confirmation that DNA binds to nanotubes through pi-stacking. Because the hypochromic absorbance typical of pi-stacked structures are expected to occur primarily for DNA dipole transitions that lie along the axis of the optically anisotropic SWNTs, the absorbance changes following binding of DNA to the nanotubes reveals the preferred orientation assumed by each of the four bound nucleotides with respect to the nanotube's long axis. The first observations of pronounced sequence- and length-dependent variations in the binding between ssDNA and SWNTs in aqueous solution are presented. These observations rely on the discovery that there exists a range of DNA lengths able to hybridize with SWNTs that can nevertheless be dissociated at temperatures below the boiling point of water. Quantitative results comparing the isochronal dissociation temperatures and binding energies of DNA/SWNT composed of differing DNA sequences and lengths are given. These results indicate variability and complexity in the binding mechanism responsible for the stability of the hybrid system that transcends simple models based on the sum of independent base-nanotube interactions. Binding energies between a DNA base and nanotube (0.05 to 0.09 eV per base) are similar to stacking energies in the native dsDNA structure (0.04 to 0.08 eV per base), as well as recent computational results (0.09 to 0.13 eV per base). Solution conditions and experiments manipulating the DNA/SWNT, such as removal of bound DNA and the separation of DNA from DNA/SWNTs, are also discussed. These results increase the utility of DNA/SWNTs for researchers in diverse fields.

  8. Adaptive Materials from Carbon Nanotube - Polyurethane Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Daniel; Koerner, Hilmar

    2005-04-01

    Adaptive materials undergo large-scale shape or property change in response to an external stimulus such as stress, temperature, light, or pH. Technological uses range from durable, shape recovery eye-glass frames, to temperature sensitive switches, to the generation of stress to induced mechanical motion. Here in, we demonstrate that the uniform dispersion of 1-5vol% of carbon nanotubes in a thermoplastic elastomer yields nanocomposites that can store and subsequently release, through remote means, up to 50% more recovery stress than the pristine resin. The anisotropic nanotubes increase the rubbery modulus by a factor of 2 to 5 (for 1-5vol%) and improve shape fixity by enhancing strain-induced crystallization. Non-radiative decay of infrared photons absorbed by the nanotubes raises the internal temperature, melting the polymer crystallites (which act as physical cross-links that secure the deformed shape) and remotely triggering the release of the stored strain energy. Comparable effects occur for electrically-induced actuation associated with Joule heating of the matrix when a current is passed through the conductive percolative network of the nanotubes within the resin.

  9. High-yield solvo-thermal synthesis of carbon nanotubes from sp3 hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G. Z.; Chen, D.; Tang, K.-B.; Qian, Y.-T.; Lee, C.-J.

    2005-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by a high-yield solvo-thermal process by using sp3-hydrocarbons as the carbon sources and solvents. Studies have shown that sp3-hydrocarbons used in the process not only act as the carbon sources and solvents, but also increase the yield of carbon nanotubes dramatically. Besides carbon nanotubes, some interesting carbon materials, such as carbon “olives”, carbon hollow spheres, carbon microtubes and “crossed” carbon nanotubes, were also obtained by the present route.

  10. Optimized fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Samm, J.; Gramich, J.; Baumgartner, A. Weiss, M.; Schönenberger, C.

    2014-05-07

    We report an improved fabrication scheme for carbon based nanospintronic devices and demonstrate the necessity for a careful data analysis to investigate the fundamental physical mechanisms leading to magnetoresistance. The processing with a low-density polymer and an optimised recipe allows us to improve the electrical, magnetic, and structural quality of ferromagnetic Permalloy contacts on lateral carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dot spin valve devices, with comparable results for thermal and sputter deposition of the material. We show that spintronic nanostructures require an extended data analysis, since the magnetization can affect all characteristic parameters of the conductance features and lead to seemingly anomalous spin transport. In addition, we report measurements on CNT quantum dot spin valves that seem not to be compatible with the orthodox theories for spin transport in such structures.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-enhanced Carbon-phenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B.; Waid, M.; Maloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) is a thermal protection system (TPS) material developed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-90 s for Discovery missions. It was used on the Stardust return capsule heat shield which successfully executed the highest speed Earth entry to date on January 15, 2006. PICA is a porous fibrous carbon insulation infiltrated with phenolic resin, and is an excellent ablator that is effective for heating rates up to 1000 W/sq cm. It is one of several candidate TPS materials for the next generation of crewed spacecraft for Lunar and Mars missions. We will describe an ongoing research effort at NASA to improve mechanical properties of the phenolic matrix with carbon nanotubes. The aim is two-fold: to increase overall TPS strength during reentry and to improve Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) protection in space. The former requires at least a good dispersion of nanotubes in phenolic, while the latter also requires covalent bonding between them to couple and transfer impact energy effectively from matrix to nanotubes. We will discuss the required chemical functionalization of nanotubes, processing issues and test results.

  12. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  13. Single carbon-nanotube photonics and optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuichiro K.

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have unique optical properties as a result of their one-dimensional structure. Not only do they exhibit strong polarization for both absorption and emission, large exciton binding energies allow for room-temperature excitonic luminescence. Furthermore, their emission is in the telecom-wavelengths and they can be directly synthesized on silicon substrates, providing new opportunities for nanoscale photonics and optoelectronics. Here we discuss the use of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes for generation, manipulation, and detection of light on a chip. Their emission properties can be controlled by coupling to silicon photonic structures such as photonic crystal microcavities and microdisk resonators. Simultaneous photoluminescence and photocurrent measurements show that excitons can dissociate spontaneously, enabling photodetection at low bias voltages despite the large binding energies. More recently, we have found that alternating gate-voltages can generate optical pulse trains from individual nanotubes. Ultimately, these results may be combined to achieve further control over photons at the nanoscale. Work supported by KAKENHI, The Canon Foundation, The Asahi Glass Foundation, and JSPS Open Partnership Joint Projects, as well as the Nanotechnology Platform and Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes Growth on Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles are coated and act as catalysts for CNT growth. The growth temperature ranges from 550 to 1000 C at an ambient pressure. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane contents of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than 800 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in a rough fiber surface with no CNT grown on the surface. When the growth temperature is relatively low (650 - 800 C), CNT are fabricated on the graphite surface with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends. Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT can be determined, depending on methane concentrations.

  15. Phase diagram of water in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Takaiwa, Daisuke; Hatano, Itaru; Koga, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    A phase diagram of water in single-walled carbon nanotubes at atmospheric pressure is proposed, which summarizes ice structures and their melting points as a function of the tube diameter up to 1.7 nm. The investigation is based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations over numerous thermodynamic states on the temperature-diameter plane. Spontaneous freezing of water in the simulations and the analysis of ice structures at 0 K suggest that there exist at least nine ice phases in the cylindrical space, including those reported by x-ray diffraction studies and those unreported by simulation or experiment. Each ice has a structure that maximizes the number of hydrogen bonds under the cylindrical confinement. The results show that the melting curve has many local maxima, each corresponding to the highest melting point for each ice form. The global maximum in the melting curve is located at approximately 11 A, where water freezes in a square ice nanotube. PMID:18162549

  16. Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Tin Oxide

    E-print Network

    Zettl, Alex

    Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Tin Oxide Wei-Qiang Han and A. Zettl* Department ABSTRACT Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with crystalline tin oxide by a simple chemical@Rice are used in this work. These SWCNTs are produced by a laser ablation method using nickel as a catalyst

  17. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  18. Catalytic systems of cumene oxidation based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobotaeva, N. S.; Skorokhodova, T. S.; Ryabova, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic systems for cumene oxidation were prepared on the basis of silver-activated carbon nanotubes. Silver lies on the surface of the carbon nanotubes in the nanocrystalline state and has a size of 15-20 nm. The use of the obtained catalytic systems in cumene oxidation with molecular oxygen allowed a considerable decrease in the oxidation temperature and an increase in selectivity.

  19. Density Enhancement of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jie

    Density Enhancement of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin Films on Quartz Substrates July 31, 2009 ABSTRACT The density of the aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) grown. It was discovered that the addition of a sulfur-containing compound (thiophene) to the reaction mixture improved

  20. THz bandwidth optical switching with carbon nanotube metamaterial

    E-print Network

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    THz bandwidth optical switching with carbon nanotube metamaterial Andrey E. Nikolaenko,1,* Nikitas Optoelectronics Research Centre & Centre for photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 of exceptional light-with- light optical switching performance of a carbon nanotube metamaterial ­ a hybrid

  1. Carbon Nanotubes in a Photonic Metamaterial Andrey E. Nikolaenko,1

    E-print Network

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Carbon Nanotubes in a Photonic Metamaterial Andrey E. Nikolaenko,1 Francesco De Angelis,2 Stuart A-walled carbon nanotubes with plasmonic metamaterials leads to photonic media with an exceptionally strong to the weakly radiating Fano-type resonant plasmonic modes that can be tailored by metamaterial design. DOI: 10

  2. Bouncing Water Droplet on a Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Array

    E-print Network

    Aria, Adrianus I

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, superhydrophobic materials have attaracted a lot of interests, due to their numerous practical applications. Among various superhydrophobic materials, carbon nanotube arrays have gained enormous attentions simply because of their outstanding properties. The impact dynamic of water droplet on a superhydrophobic carbon nanotube array is shown in this fluid dynamics video.

  3. Apparatus for the laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA)

    2010-02-16

    An RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of carbon nanotubes. Such an apparatus, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently provides a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization.

  4. Thermal conductance of buckled carbon nanotubes Fumio Nishimura1

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Thermal conductance of buckled carbon nanotubes Fumio Nishimura1 , Takuma Shiga1 , Shigeo Maruyama1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601, Japan Abstract Knowledge of thermal conductance of carbon nanotubes conduction. In this study, using molecular dynamic simulations, we have calculated thermal conductance

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Electrical, dielectric and surface wetting properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nylon-6 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun-Ze; Li, Meng-Meng; Sui, Wan-Mei; Kong, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Lei

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/nylon-6 (PA6) nanocomposites with different MWCNT loadings have been prepared by a simple melt-compounding method. The electrical, dielectric, and surface wetting properties of the CNT/PA6 composites have been studied. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the CNT/PA6 composite with 10.0 wt% CNT loading (?RT ~ 10-4 S/cm) are measured, and afterwards a charge-energy-limited tunnelling model (ln ?(T) ~ T-1/2) is found. With increasing CNT weight percentage from 0.0 to 10.0 wt%, the dielectric constant of the CNT/PA6 composites enhances and the dielectric loss tangent increases two orders of magnitude. In addition, water contact angles of the CNT/PA6 composites increase and the composites with CNT loading larger than 2.0 wt% even become hydrophobic. The obtained results indicate that the electrical and surface properties of the composites have been significantly enhanced by the embedded carbon nanotubes.

  6. Electrically excited, localized infrared emission from single carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Marcus; Tsang, James C; Kirtley, John; Carlsen, Autumn; Chen, Jia; Troeman, Aico; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Avouris, Phaedon

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) produce band gap derived infrared emission under both ambipolar and unipolar transport conditions. We demonstrate here that heterogeneities/defects in the local environment of a CNTFET perturb the local potentials and, as a result, the characteristic bias dependent motion of the ambipolar light emission. Such defects can also introduce localized infrared emission due to impact excitation by carriers accelerated by a voltage drop at the defect. The correlation of the change in the motion of the ambipolarlight emission and of the stationary electroluminescence with the electrical characteristics of the CNTFETs shows that stationaryelectroluminescence can identify "environmental defects" in carbon nanotubes and help evaluate their influence on electrical transport and device operation. A number of different defects are studied involving local dielectric environment changes (partially polymer-covered nanotubes), nanotube-nanotube contacts in looped nanotubes, and nanotube segments close to the electronic contacts. Random defects due to local charging are also observed. PMID:16834423

  7. Nanodeposition and plasmonically enhanced Raman spectroscopy on individual carbon nanotubes 

    E-print Network

    Strain, Kirsten Margaret

    2014-06-28

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) exhibit extraordinary properties: mechanical, thermal, optical and, possibly the most interesting, electrical. These all-carbon cylindrical structures can be metallic or semi-conducting ...

  8. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Electrode Arrays For Enhanced Chemical and Biological Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes for ultra-sensitive electrical sensing of chemical and biological species have been a major focus in NASA Ames Center for Nanotechnology. Great progress has been made toward controlled growth and chemical functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and integration into micro-fabricated chip devices. Carbon nanotube electrode arrays devices have been used for sub-attomole detection of DNA molecules. Interdigitated carbon nanotubes arrays devices have been applied to sub ppb (part per billion) level chemical sensing for many molecules at room temperature. Stability and reliability have also been addressed in our device development. These results show order of magnitude improvement in device performance, size and power consumption as compared to micro devices, promising applications of carbon nanotube electrode arrays for clinical molecular diagnostics, personal medical testing and monitoring, and environmental monitoring.

  10. Superconductivity in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes--a short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Shi, Wu; Lortz, Rolf; Sheng, Ping

    2011-12-01

    We give an up-to-date review of the superconducting phenomena in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes embedded in aligned linear pores of the AlPO4-5 (AFI) zeolite, first discovered in 2001 as a fluctuation Meissner effect. With the introduction of a new approach to sample synthesis around 2007, new data confirming the superconductivity have been obtained. These comprise electrical, specific heat, and magnetic measurements which together yield a consistent yet complex physical picture of the superconducting state, largely owing to the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes. For the electrical transport characteristics, two types of superconducting resistive behaviors were reproducibly observed in different samples. The first type is the quasi 1D fluctuation superconductivity that exhibits a smooth resistance drop with decreasing temperature, initiating at 15 K. At low temperatures the differential resistance also shows a smooth increase with increasing bias current (voltage). Both are unaffected by an applied magnetic field up to 11 Tesla. These manifestations are shown to be consistent with those of a quasi 1D superconductor with thermally activated phase slips as predicted by the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin (LAMH) theory. The second type is the quasi 1D to 3D superconducting crossover transition, which was observed to initiate at 15 K with a slow resistance decrease switching to a sharp order of magnitude drop at ~7.5 K. The latter exhibits anisotropic magnetic field dependence and is attributed to a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT)-like transition that establishes quasi-long-range order in the plane transverse to the c-axis of the aligned nanotubes, thereby mediating a 1D to 3D crossover. The electrical data are complemented by magnetic and thermal specific heat bulk measurements. By using both the SQUID VSM and the magnetic torque technique, the onset of diamagnetism was observed to occur at ~15 K, with a rapid increase of the diamagnetic moment below ~7 K. The zero-field-cooled and field-cooled branches deviated from each other below 7 K, indicating the establishment of a 3D Meissner state with macroscopic phase coherence. The superconductivity is further supported by the specific heat measurements, which show an anomaly with onset at 15 K and a peak at 11-12 K. In the 3D superconducting state, the nanotube arrays constitute a type-II anisotropic superconductor with Hc1 ~ 60 to 150 Oe, coherence length ? ~ 5 to 15 nm, London penetration length ? ~ 1.5 µm, and Ginzburg-Landau ? ~ 100. We give a physical interpretation to the observed phenomena and note the challenges and prospects ahead.

  11. Superconductivity in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes--a short review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Shi, Wu; Lortz, Rolf; Sheng, Ping

    2012-01-01

    We give an up-to-date review of the superconducting phenomena in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes embedded in aligned linear pores of the AlPO(4)-5 (AFI) zeolite, first discovered in 2001 as a fluctuation Meissner effect. With the introduction of a new approach to sample synthesis around 2007, new data confirming the superconductivity have been obtained. These comprise electrical, specific heat, and magnetic measurements which together yield a consistent yet complex physical picture of the superconducting state, largely owing to the one-dimensional (1D) nature of the 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes. For the electrical transport characteristics, two types of superconducting resistive behaviors were reproducibly observed in different samples. The first type is the quasi 1D fluctuation superconductivity that exhibits a smooth resistance drop with decreasing temperature, initiating at 15 K. At low temperatures the differential resistance also shows a smooth increase with increasing bias current (voltage). Both are unaffected by an applied magnetic field up to 11 Tesla. These manifestations are shown to be consistent with those of a quasi 1D superconductor with thermally activated phase slips as predicted by the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin (LAMH) theory. The second type is the quasi 1D to 3D superconducting crossover transition, which was observed to initiate at 15 K with a slow resistance decrease switching to a sharp order of magnitude drop at ?7.5 K. The latter exhibits anisotropic magnetic field dependence and is attributed to a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT)-like transition that establishes quasi-long-range order in the plane transverse to the c-axis of the aligned nanotubes, thereby mediating a 1D to 3D crossover. The electrical data are complemented by magnetic and thermal specific heat bulk measurements. By using both the SQUID VSM and the magnetic torque technique, the onset of diamagnetism was observed to occur at ?15 K, with a rapid increase of the diamagnetic moment below ?7 K. The zero-field-cooled and field-cooled branches deviated from each other below 7 K, indicating the establishment of a 3D Meissner state with macroscopic phase coherence. The superconductivity is further supported by the specific heat measurements, which show an anomaly with onset at 15 K and a peak at 11-12 K. In the 3D superconducting state, the nanotube arrays constitute a type-II anisotropic superconductor with H(c1)? 60 to 150 Oe, coherence length ?? 5 to 15 nm, London penetration length ?? 1.5 µm, and Ginzburg-Landau ?? 100. We give a physical interpretation to the observed phenomena and note the challenges and prospects ahead. PMID:22105840

  12. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration. PMID:17450889

  13. Synthesis and characterization of novel fullerenes and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskoti, Charles Richard

    Since the discovery of Buckminsterfullerene, the soccerball shaped carbon-caged molecule consisting of 60 carbon atoms, there has been much speculation about the stability of other "fullerenes" with less than 60 carbon atoms. Although several fullerenes with greater than 60 carbon atoms have since been isolated in bulk, the only evidence of lower fullerenes has come from minute-quantity gas phase experiments. This thesis presents work on the first ever bulk synthesis, extraction and characterization of a lower fullerene: C36. By exploring the parameter space of the Kratschmer-Huffman graphite arc-discharge method, C36 was produced in milligram quantities. This new material which was extracted with pyridine was found by electron diffraction to form a covalently bonded solid with a d-spacing of 6.68 A. This material is electrically insulating in its pure form but it becomes conducting upon intercalation with alkali metals. The resistance vs temperature behavior of the alkali intercalated samples is consistent with variable range hopping. From microwave-loss measurements and current vs. voltage data, there are preliminary results that may indicate the presence of a very small superconducting fraction in these alkali doped samples. This result would be consistent with predictions by Grossman, Cote, Cohen and Louie that a certain isomer of C 36 with D6h symmetry has an exceptionally strong electron-phonon coupling constant. Other developments described in this thesis include a method of synthesizing multi-walled carbon nanotubes in high yield at an accelerated rate using a low pressure mixture of nitrogen and helium as the buffer gas. Also, a simple technique has been developed for synthesizing magnetic nickel-iron clusters that are coated with both electrical insulators and electrical conductors. These clusters may have a variety of applications in the fields of magnetic recording and biochemistry where magnetic manipulation of cells is important. Finally, a preliminary study of doping effects in multi-walled carbon nanotubes was conducted. This study showed that the transport properties of these nanotubes changed dramatically upon intercalation with both oxygen and potassium.

  14. Field Emission from Hybrid Diamond-like Carbon and Carbon Nanotube Composite Structures

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    , porous DLC, low threshold voltage, aligned nanotubes, DLC 1. INTRODUCTION Carbon-based materialsField Emission from Hybrid Diamond-like Carbon and Carbon Nanotube Composite Structures H. Zanin Information ABSTRACT: A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest

  15. Carbon species confined inside carbon nanotubes: A density functional study Yi Liu and R. O. Jones*

    E-print Network

    Carbon species confined inside carbon nanotubes: A density functional study Yi Liu and R. O. Jones of the energies, structures, and vibration frequencies of carbon chains, rings, graphitic sheets, bowls, cages, and tubes inside single-walled carbon nanotubes CNT's with different diameters. The calculated energies show

  16. Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Interconnections in ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Ye, Qi; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-01-01

    A process for growing multiwalled carbon nanotubes anchored at specified locations and aligned along specified directions has been invented. Typically, one would grow a number of the nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to a silicon integrated-circuit (IC) substrate, starting from (and anchored on) patterned catalytic spots on the substrate. Such arrays of perpendicular carbon nanotubes could be used as electrical interconnections between levels of multilevel ICs. The process (see Figure 1) begins with the formation of a layer, a few hundred nanometers thick, of a compatible electrically insulating material (e.g., SiO(x) or Si(y)N(z) on the silicon substrate. A patterned film of a suitable electrical conductor (Al, Mo, Cr, Ti, Ta, Pt, Ir, or doped Si), having a thickness between 1 nm and 2 m, is deposited on the insulating layer to form the IC conductor pattern. Next, a catalytic material (usually, Ni, Fe, or Co) is deposited to a thickness between 1 and 30 nm on the spots from which it is desired to grow carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Unlike the matted and tangled carbon nanotubes grown by thermal CVD, the carbon nanotubes grown by PECVD are perpendicular and freestanding because an electric field perpendicular to the substrate is used in PECVD. Next, the free space between the carbon nanotubes is filled with SiO2 by means of CVD from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), thereby forming an array of carbon nanotubes embedded in SiO2. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is then performed to remove excess SiO2 and form a flat-top surface in which the outer ends of the carbon nanotubes are exposed. Optionally, depending on the application, metal lines to connect selected ends of carbon nanotubes may be deposited on the top surface. The top part of Figure 2 is a scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of carbon nanotubes grown, as described above, on catalytic spots of about 100 nm diameter patterned by electron-beam lithography. These and other nanotubes were found to have lengths ranging from 2 to 10 m and diameters ranging from 30 to 200 nm, the exact values of length depending on growth times and conditions and the exact values of diameter depending on the diameters and thicknesses of the catalyst spots. The bottom part of Figure 2 is an SEM of an embedded array of carbon nanotubes after CMP.

  17. From Carbon Nanotube Dispersion to Composite Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yachin; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim

    2005-03-01

    Composite polymer nanofibers containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are fabricated by electrospinning. We describe the path from dispersing individual SWCNTs or thin bundles in water using amphiphilic polymers, through a structural characterization of the polymer conformation in the SWCNT/polymer hybrid to the characteristics of the electrospun composite nanofibers. An alternating copolymer of styrene and sodium maleate (PSSty) and gum arabic (GA)-a highly branched natural polysaccharide were successfully used to produce stable aqueous dispersions. Measurements of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) show that both polymers form a thick corona of adsorbed coils on the nanotubes. The large coils introduce a significant steric barrier stabilizing the dispersions, in addition to electrostatic repulsion by charged groups. The composite nanofibers showed good distribution and alignment of the SWCNTs in the poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanfubers, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction demonstrated a high degree of orientation of the PEO crystals in the electrospun nanofibers. Enhanced tensile properties were achieved due to the high degree of alignment of both nanotubes and polymer crystals, and a strong interface, especially with PSSty. The morphology and possible applications of these composite nanofibers will be discussed.

  18. Miniaturized gas ionization sensors using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Ashish; Koratkar, Nikhil; Lass, Eric; Wei, Bingqing; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2003-07-01

    Gas sensors operate by a variety of fundamentally different mechanisms. Ionization sensors work by fingerprinting the ionization characteristics of distinct gases, but they are limited by their huge, bulky architecture, high power consumption and risky high-voltage operation. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of ionization microsensors featuring the electrical breakdown of a range of gases and gas mixtures at carbon nanotube tips. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate very high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering breakdown voltages several-fold in comparison to traditional electrodes, and thereby enabling compact, battery-powered and safe operation of such sensors. The sensors show good sensitivity and selectivity, and are unaffected by extraneous factors such as temperature, humidity, and gas flow. As such, the devices offer several practical advantages over previously reported nanotube sensor systems. The simple, low-cost, sensors described here could be deployed for a variety of applications, such as environmental monitoring, sensing in chemical processing plants, and gas detection for counter-terrorism.

  19. Computational Nanotechnology of Materials, Devices, and Machines: Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Kwak, Dolhan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics and chemistry of carbon nanotubes have relevance for their numerous electronic applications. Mechanical deformations such as bending and twisting affect the nanotube's conductive properties, and at the same time they possess high strength and elasticity. Two principal techniques were utilized including the analysis of large scale classical molecular dynamics on a shared memory architecture machine and a quantum molecular dynamics methodology. In carbon based electronics, nanotubes are used as molecular wires with topological defects which are mediated through various means. Nanotubes can be connected to form junctions.

  20. Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    A low-temperature plasma process has been devised for attaching specified molecular groups to carbon nanotubes in order to impart desired chemical and/or physical properties to the nanotubes for specific applications. Unlike carbon-nanotube- functionalization processes reported heretofore, this process does not involve the use of wet chemicals, does not involve exposure of the nanotubes to high temperatures, and generates very little chemical residue. In addition, this process can be carried out in a relatively simple apparatus and can readily be scaled up to mass production.

  1. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Popescu, Adrian (Tampa, FL); Woods, Lilia M. (Tampa, FL); Bondarev, Igor V. (Fuquay Varina, NC)

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  2. Noncatalytic synthesis of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, R. R. Shvets, P. V.; Kharin, A. Yu.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new method is proposed to obtain uniform arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes without catalysts. Nanotubes have been formed by carbon condensation from a hydrogen-methane gas mixture activated by a dc discharge. Structural and morphological investigations of the obtained material were performed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is shown that the obtained nanotubes contain no impurities that could act as catalysts. Based on these experimental data, it is concluded that the nanotube synthesis under study is noncatalytic. Possible mechanisms of this synthesis are considered.

  3. Polyglycerol-derived amphiphiles for single walled carbon nanotube suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.; Popeney, C. S.; Trappmann, B.; Datsyuk, V.; Haag, R.; Reich, S.

    2010-06-01

    Inspired by the commercially available SDS surfactant, a new polyglycerol-derived amphiphile has been synthesized for functionalizing carbon nanotubes. SDS' sulphate group was replaced by a polyglycerol dendron. The steric hindrance offered by the dendrons makes the compound much more efficient than SDS in isolating and stabilizing nanotubes in solution. Further amphiphiles have been synthesized by adding small aromatic moieties between head and tail groups. We show that this addition leads to selective interaction between surfactants and carbon nanotubes. Excitation photoluminescence and optical absorption spectroscopy analysis confirm the change in the distribution of nanotubes' chiralities in suspension, depending on the amphiphile.

  4. Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an array of two or more carbon nanotube (CNT) structures on a coated substrate surface, the structures having substantially the same orientation with respect to a substrate surface. A single electrode, having an associated voltage source with a selected voltage, is connected to a substrate surface after the substrate is coated and before growth of the CNT structures, for a selected voltage application time interval. The CNT structures are then grown on a coated substrate surface with the desired orientation. Optionally, the electrode can be disconnected before the CNT structures are grown.

  5. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  7. Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Future Commercial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Volder, Michael F. L.; Tawfick, Sameh H.; Baughman, Ray H.; Hart, A. John

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide commercial interest in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reflected in a production capacity that presently exceeds several thousand tons per year. Currently, bulk CNT powders are incorporated in diverse commercial products ranging from rechargeable batteries, automotive parts, and sporting goods to boat hulls and water filters. Advances in CNT synthesis, purification, and chemical modification are enabling integration of CNTs in thin-film electronics and large-area coatings. Although not yet providing compelling mechanical strength or electrical or thermal conductivities for many applications, CNT yarns and sheets already have promising performance for applications including supercapacitors, actuators, and lightweight electromagnetic shields.

  8. Superhydrophobic conductive carbon nanotube coatings for steel.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-04-21

    We report the synthesis of superhydrophobic coatings for steel using carbon nanotube (CNT)-mesh structures. The CNT coating maintains its structural integrity and superhydrophobicity even after exposure to extreme thermal stresses and has excellent thermal and electrical properties. The coating can also be reinforced by optimally impregnating the CNT-mesh structure with cross-linked polymers without significantly compromising on superhydrophobicity and electrical conductivity. These superhydrophobic conductive coatings on steel, which is an important structural material, open up possibilities for many new applications in the areas of heat transfer, solar panels, transport of fluids, nonwetting and nonfouling surfaces, temperature resilient coatings, composites, water-walking robots, and naval applications. PMID:19281157

  9. Complex Multifunctional Polymer/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Pritesh; Balasubramaniyam, Gobinath; Chen, Jian

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for developing complex multifunctional materials that consist of or contain polymer/carbon-nanotube composites has been conceived. As used here, "multifunctional" signifies having additional and/or enhanced physical properties that polymers or polymer-matrix composites would not ordinarily be expected to have. Such properties include useful amounts of electrical conductivity, increased thermal conductivity, and/or increased strength. In the present methodology, these properties are imparted to a given composite through the choice and processing of its polymeric and CNT constituents.

  10. Electronic properties of disordered zigzag carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    We study the density of states of zigzag carbon nanotube (CNT) doped with both Boron and nitrogen atoms as donor and acceptor impurities, respectively. The effect of scattering of the electrons on the electronic spectrum of the system can be obtained via adding random on-site energy term to the tight binding model Hamiltonian which describes the clean system. Green's function approach has been implemented to find the behavior of electronic density. Due to Boron (Nitrogen) doping, Fermi surface tends to the valence (conduction) band of semiconductor CNT so that the energy gap width reduces. Furthermore the density of states of disordered metallic zigzag CNTs includes a peak near the Fermi energy.

  11. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  12. Friction of water slipping in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming D.; Shen, Luming; Sheridan, John; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Chen, Chao; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-03-01

    Liquid slip is essential in nanofluidic systems, as shrinking channel size leads to a dramatic increase in flow resistance and thus high-energy consumption for driving nonslip flow. Using large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water flowing in carbon nanotubes (CNT’s), we show that the relationship between the CNT wall-water interfacial friction stress and slip velocity follows a transition-state-theory-based inverse hyperbolic sine function, which remains universally valid regardless of wetting properties, CNT chiralities, and CNT sizes, and holds for all slip velocities from 0 to 1400 m/s. The finding could benefit the research in desalination and other chemical purification techniques.

  13. Carbon nanotube alignment driven rapid actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Hsien; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Chang, Han-Chen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Fang, Wei-Leun; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    Suspended micro-beams made from aligned carbon nanotubes and parylene deflect reversibly in an ac field and the deflection rate is three orders of magnitude greater than those for existing devices. The direction of beam deflection is determined by the area moment of inertia and the actuation mechanism involves rapid accumulation of charges at tube surfaces, the creation of Coulomb repulsive forces between tubes, beam dilation and the formation of compressive stresses at beam ends. Tube alignment plays a crucial role in the first step as is verified by experimental data and calculation.

  14. Cross-linked carbon nanotube heat spreader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2014-09-01

    Isolated individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown exceptional thermal conductivity along their axis, but have poor thermal transfer between adjacent CNTs. Thick bundles of aligned CNTs have been used as heat pipes, but the thermal input and output areas are the same, providing no heat spreading effect. Energetic argon ion beams are used to join, or cross-link overlapping CNTs in a thick film to form an interpenetrating network with an isotropic thermal conductivity of 2150 W/m-K. Such thick films may be used as heat spreaders to enlarge the thermal footprint of various electronic and semiconductor devices, laser diodes and CPU chips, for example, to enhance cooling.

  15. Cell mobility after endocytosis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirbhai, Massooma; Flores, Thomas; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Rotkin, Slava

    2013-03-01

    Directed cell movement plays a crucial role in cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation. There is evidence in preclinical in vivo studies that small fields have successfully been used to enhance regrowth of damages spinal cord axons but with a small success rate. Fortunately, the evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for enhancing the application of electric fields in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system. In this work, we studied how endocytosis and subsequent retention of carbon nanotubes affects the mobility of cells under the influence of an electric field, including the directed cell movement.

  16. Growth of decorated carbon nano-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Ralph; Karimi, Ayatollah; Hoffmann, Volker

    2001-03-01

    Decomposition of methane in a nitrogen atmosphere using bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapour deposition results in the growth of nitrogenated carbon tubes. Different shapes were formed ranging from spherical aggregates to twisted nano-tubes. All these structures were grown direct onto pure Si wafer. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy reveals the presence of tungsten carbide impurities at the interface. Graphitic sheets growing perpendicular to the tube axis typically cover the surface of each coiled tube. The observed morphology resembles a feather boa. From this an enhanced charge transfer in a composite is expected making the material interesting for high strength, lightweight applications.

  17. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochní?ek, Zden?k

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are estimated. For this calculation only simple high school physics is necessary. The results, the same as known from experimental data, show that carbon nanotubes could be, at least hypothetically, a possible material for construction of a space elevator cable.

  18. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  19. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  20. Thermionic Emission of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krainsky, Isay L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Elich, Jeffrey M.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, have investigated the thermionic properties of high-purity, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use as electron-emitting electrodes. Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material made from carbon atoms bonded into nanometer-scale hollow tubes. Such nanotubes have remarkable properties. An extremely high aspect ratio, as well as unique mechanical and electronic properties, make single-wall nanotubes ideal for use in a vast array of applications. Carbon nanotubes typically have diameters on the order of 1 to 2 nm. As a result, the ends have a small radius of curvature. It is these characteristics, therefore, that indicate they might be excellent potential candidates for both thermionic and field emission.

  1. Superconducting characteristics of 4-? carbon nanotube–zeolite composite

    PubMed Central

    Lortz, Rolf; Zhang, Qiucen; Shi, Wu; Ye, Jian Ting; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Zhe; He, Hongtao; Sheng, Ping; Qian, Tiezheng; Tang, Zikang; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xixiang; Wang, Jiannong; Chan, Che Ting

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated nanocomposites consisting of 4-? carbon nanotubes embedded in the 0.7-nm pores of aluminophosphate-five (AFI) zeolite that display a superconducting specific heat transition at 15 K. MicroRaman spectra of the samples show strong and spatially uniform radial breathing mode (RBM) signals at 510 cm?1 and 550 cm?1, characteristic of the (4, 2) and (5, 0) nanotubes, respectively. The specific heat transition is suppressed at >2 T, with a temperature dependence characteristic of finite-size effects. Comparison with theory shows the behavior to be consistent with that of a type II BCS superconductor, characterized by a coherence length of 14 ± 2 nm and a magnetic penetration length of 1.5 ± 0.7 ?m. Four probe and differential resistance measurements have also indicated a superconducting transition initiating at 15 K, but the magnetoresistance data indicate the superconducting network to be inhomogeneous, with a component being susceptible to magnetic fields below 3 T and other parts capable of withstanding a magnetic field of 5 T or beyond. PMID:19369206

  2. Fabrication and characterization of single carbon nanotube emitters as point electron sources

    E-print Network

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    a producing micron-size carbon fibers which contain single carbon nanotubes at their cores by a chemical vapor of the fractured carbon fiber, a multiwalled nanotube sticks out due to its different fracture toughness from the carbon fiber that is largely made of amorphous carbon. The pro- truded carbon nanotubes are usually 4

  3. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals. PMID:17980962

  4. Modeling of HiPco Process for Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, T.; Dateo, C. E.; Meyyappan, M.; Colbert, D. T.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, K.; Smalley, R. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) reactor, developed at Rice University, is used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl and nickel carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10 - 100 atm). Computational modeling is used to better understand the HiPco process. In the present model, decomposition of the precursor, metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth are addressed. Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. Diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by Boudouard reaction (2CO ---> C(s) + CO2) with metal catalysts. The growth kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance.

  5. Double-walled carbon nanotube processing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Katherine E; Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-05-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been the focus of intense research, and the body of literature continues to grow exponentially, despite more than two decades having passed since the first reports. As well as extensive studies of the fundamental properties, this has seen SWCNTs used in a plethora of applications as far ranging as microelectronics, energy storage, solar cells, and sensors, to cancer treatment, drug delivery, and neuronal interfaces. On the other hand, the properties and applications of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) have remained relatively under-explored. This is despite DWCNTs not only sharing many of the same unique characteristics of their single-walled counterparts, but also possessing an additional suite of potentially advantageous properties arising due to the presence of the second wall and the often complex inter-wall interactions that arise. For example, it is envisaged that the outer wall can be selectively functionalized whilst still leaving the inner wall in its pristine state and available for signal transduction. A similar situation arises in DWCNT field effect transistors (FETs), where the outer wall can provide a convenient degree of chemical shielding of the inner wall from the external environment, allowing the excellent transconductance properties of the pristine nanotubes to be more fully exploited. Additionally, DWCNTs should also offer unique opportunities to further the fundamental understanding of the inter-wall interactions within and between carbon nanotubes. However, the realization of these goals has so far been limited by the same challenge experienced by the SWCNT field until recent years, namely, the inherent heterogeneity of raw, as-produced DWCNT material. As such, there is now an emerging field of research regarding DWCNT processing that focuses on the preparation of material of defined length, diameter and electronic type, and which is rapidly building upon the experience gained by the broader SWCNT community. This review describes the background of the field, summarizing some relevant theory and the available synthesis and purification routes; then provides a thorough synopsis of the current state-of-the-art in DWCNT sorting methodologies, outlines contemporary challenges in the field, and discusses the outlook for various potential applications of the resulting material. PMID:25899061

  6. Mott Insulating State in Ultra-clean Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vikram; Chandra, Bhupesh; Caldwell, Robert; Novikov, Dmitry; Hone, James; Bockrath, Marc

    2009-03-01

    The Mott insulating state is a manifestation of strong electron interactions in nominally metallic systems. Using transport spectroscopy, we show that an energy gap exists in nominally metallic carbon nanotubes, and occurs in addition to the band-gap in small-band-gap nanotubes, indicating that carbon nanotubes are never metallic. This gap has a magnitude ˜10-100 meV and nanotube radius dependence ˜1/r, in good agreement with predictions for a nanotube Mott insulating state. We also observe neutral excitations within the gap, as predicted for this state. Our results underscore nanotubes' exceptional capabilities for studying correlated electron phenomena in 1D.Ref: V. V. Deshpande et al, Science (in press)

  7. Thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer based on carbon nanotube sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail; Oh, Jiyoung

    2014-09-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube sheet stretched between conductive rods was placed in magnetic field and excited with alternating electrical current to obtain hybrid thermo-electromagnetic sound transducer (TEMST). Unlike quite common thermoacoustic (TA) device capable of conversion of heat into acoustic signal, sound generation in explored design is provided by diaphragm-like oscillations of thermally excited sheet induced by the electromagnetic Lorentz force. This results in the interference of TA and Lorentz force-driven contributions causing substantial variation of intensity and spatial distribution of first harmonic of emitted signal. Acoustic spectra and sound propagation direction for TEMST device can be controlled by applied bias voltage that is beneficial for diverse sound management applications. Observed dependence of acoustic amplitude on field strength can be used for magnetic sensing.

  8. Carbon nanotube assisted synthesis of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dengsong |. E-mail: dengsongzh@163.com; Fu Hongxia; Shi Liyi |. E-mail: sly0726@163.com; Fang Jianhui; Li Qiang

    2007-02-15

    CeO{sub 2} nanotubes have been synthesized facilely using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as templates by a liquid phase deposition method. The properties of the CeO{sub 2} nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) as well as thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The obtained CeO{sub 2} nanotubes with a polycrystalline face-centered cubic phase have a uniform diameter ranging from 40 to 50 nm. The CeO{sub 2} nanotubes are composed of many tiny interconnected nanocrystallites of about 10 nm in size. The pretreatment of CNTs and calcination temperature were confirmed to be the crucial factors determining the formation of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes. A possible formation mechanism has been suggested to explain the formation of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes. - Graphical abstract: CeO{sub 2} nanotubes have been synthesized facilely using carbon nanotubes as templates by a liquid phase deposition method. The obtained CeO{sub 2} nanotubes are composed of many tiny interconnected nanocrystallites of about 10 nm in size, and have a uniform diameter ranging from 40 to 50 nm.

  9. Nanotube

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces.more »Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices« less

  10. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays over a century ago the techniques applied to the engineering of X-ray sources have remained relatively unchanged. From the inception of thermionic electron sources, which, due to simplicity of fabrication, remain central to almost all X-ray applications, there have been few fundamental technological advances. However, with the emergence of ever more demanding medical and inspection techniques, including computed tomography and tomosynthesis, security inspection, high throughput manufacturing and radiotherapy, has resulted in a considerable level of interest in the development of new fabrication methods. The use of conventional thermionic sources is limited by their slow temporal response and large physical size. In response, field electron emission has emerged as a promising alternative means of deriving a highly controllable electron beam of a well-defined distribution. When coupled to the burgeoning field of nanomaterials, and in particular, carbon nanotubes, such systems present a unique technological opportunity. This review provides a summary of the current state-of-the-art in carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray sources. We detail the various fabrication techniques and functional advantages associated with their use, including the ability to produce ever smaller electron beam assembles, shaped cathodes, enhanced temporal stability and emergent fast-switching pulsed sources. We conclude with an overview of some of the commercial progress made towards the realisation of an innovative and disruptive technology.

  11. A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-30

    Technologies for introducing molecules into living cells are vital for probing the physical properties and biochemical interactions that govern the cell's behavior. Here we report the development of a nanoscale cell injection system-termed the nanoinjector-that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. A single multi-walled carbon nanotube attached to an atomic force microscope tip was functionalized with cargo via a disulfide-based linker. Penetration of cell membranes with this 'nanoneedle', followed by reductive cleavage of the disulfide bonds within the cell's interior, resulted in the release of cargo inside the cells. The capability of the nanoinjector was demonstrated by injection of protein-coated quantum dots into live human cells. Single-particle tracking was employed to characterize the diffusion dynamics of injected quantum dots in the cytosol. This new technique causes no discernible membrane or cell damage, and can deliver a discrete number of molecules to the cell's interior without the requirement of a carrier solvent.

  12. Design and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.

    2003-01-01

    Revolutionary design concepts in future aerospace vehicles will depend on extraordinary material properties to permit significant reduction of mass and size of components, while imparting intelligence. Due to their combination of remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are expected to enable this paradigm shift in design concepts. However, significant challenges still exist in translating these CNT properties into the macrostructures required for future generations of aerospace vehicles. While an accepted route for making the leap from nanostructures to useful macrostructures has not been fully charted, this paper will give an overview of the approach taken by some researchers at NASA Langley Research Center to sort out issues involved in the development of CNT nanocomposites for multifunctional structures. Specifically, the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices, characterization of nanocomposites, the role of quantum computation in providing guidance for processing and the use of computational analysis in data interpretation will be covered. Significant improvements in mechanical and electrical properties of CNT nanocomposites with very low loadings of CNTs are described and lend credence to the potential for using CNTs in achieving technological leaps in composite development.

  13. Waveguide-integrated electroluminescent carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Flavel, Benjamin S; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Krupke, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Carbon based optoelectronic devices promise to revolutionize modern integrated circuits by combining outstanding electrical and optical properties into a unified technology. By coupling nanoelectronic devices to nanophotonic structures functional components such as nanoscale light emitting diodes, narrow-band thermal emitters, cavity controlled detectors and wideband electro optic modulators can be realized for chipscale information processing. These devices not only allow the light-matter interaction of low-dimensional systems to be studied, but also provide fundamental building blocks for high bandwidth on-chip communication. Here we demonstrate how light from an electrically-driven carbon-nanotube can be coupled directly into a photonic waveguide architecture. We realize wafer scale, broadband sources integrated with nanophotonic circuits allowing for propagation of light over centimeter distances. Moreover, we show that the spectral properties of the emitter can be controlled directly on chip with passive...

  14. A torsional parametric oscillator based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Byeong-Woo; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2009-08-01

    Parametric oscillations are observed in torsional electromechanical oscillators based on carbon nanotubes via molecular dynamics simulations. The stretch of nanotube torsion springs due to the vertical translational-electrostatic force acting on the paddle makes possible the parametric oscillations. The electrostatic force can provide control over nanotube stretching that allows it to parametrically modulate the torsional spring constant at twice the resonance frequency. This reveals potential building blocks for a variety of applications of the devices.

  15. Ultrasonic Spraying of Carbon Nanotubes using Organic Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Anthony; Davis, Robert; Vanfleet, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, thin films of carbon nanotubes have several potential applications, especially in the fields of organic electronics and photovoltaics. We present a method for spraying thin films of nanotubes that have been suspended in organic solvents N-methyl Pyrollidone (NMP) and N-Cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP). The sprayed nanotubes are randomly oriented, and films are transparent, conductive, and mechanically stable.

  16. Numerical simulation of polarization beam splitter with triangular lattice of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yun, Maojin; Wang, Mei; Liu, Chao; Li, Kai; Qin, Xiheng; Kong, Weijin; Dong, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    A kind of polarization beam splitter with triangular lattice of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays is designed and simulated. In the employed structure transverse-electric (TE) light is confined in the line defect with photonic band gap effect, while transverse-magnetic (TM) light is guided through it with extremely low diffraction. The performance of the designed polarization beam splitter is evaluated by utilizing optical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, finite element modeling of wave propagation and transmission through periodic arrays. Simulation results indicate that the designed polarization beam splitter has low loss and less cross talk, and thereby may have practical applications in the integrated optical field.

  17. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed localized transverse compression at low loads (muN to mN) and small displacements (nm to a few mum). Force, strain, stiffness, and electrical resistance were monitored simultaneously during compression experiments. The results showed that CNT/CF possess a high sensing capability between force and resistance. Hysteresis in both force-displacement and resistance-displacement curves was observed with CNT/CF, but was more evident as maximum strain increased and did not depend on strain rate. Force was higher and resistance was lower during compression as compared to decompression. A model is proposed to explain hysteresis where van der Waals forces between deformed and entangled nanotubes hinder decompression of some of the compressed tubes that are in contact with each other. This study provides a new understanding of the mechanical and electrical behavior of CNT/CF that will facilitate usage as stress and strain sensors in both stand-alone and composite materials applications. A novel method for in situ observation of nano-micro scale CNT/CF mechanical behavior by SEM has been developed in this study. The results indicated that deformation of vertical aligned CNT (VACNT) forest followed a column-like bending mechanism under localized radial (axial) compression. No fracture was observed even at very high compression strain on a VACNT forest. In order to fully understand CNT forest properties, the viscous creep behavior of VACNT arrays grown on flat Si substrate has also been characterized using a nanoindentation method. Resulting creep response was observed to consist of a short transient stage and a steady state stage in which the rate of displacement was constant. The strain rate sensitivity depended on the density of the nanotube arrays, but it was independent of the ramping (compression) rate of the indenter.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is coated on U.S. currency. After deposition, the growth is carried out in a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition apparatus. A tungsten hot filament placed in the flow of H2 at a temperature greater than 1,600 C creates atomic hydrogen, which serves to reduce the Fe catalyst into a metallic state. The catalyst can now precipitate SWNTs in the presence of growth gases. The gases used for the experiments reported are C2H2, H2O, and H2, at rates of 2, 2, and 400 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm), respectively. In order to retain the flakes, a cage is constructed by spot welding stainless steel or copper mesh to form an enclosed area, in which the flakes are placed prior to growth. This allows growth gases and atomic hydrogen to reach the flakes, but does not allow the flakes, which rapidly nucleate SWNTs, to escape from the cage.

  19. Comparison of two different carbon nanotube-based surfaces with respect to potassium ferricyanide electrochemistry

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Comparison of two different carbon nanotube-based surfaces with respect to potassium ferricyanide 10 September 2011 Keywords: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes Cyclic voltammetry Potassium ferricyanide nanotube-based elec- trodes using potassium ferricyanide as a benchmark redox system. Carbon nanotubes were

  20. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by aromatic organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian Ping; Zhao, Jijun; Han, Jie

    2003-03-01

    The interaction between carbon nanotubes and aromatic/nonaromatic organic molecules including benzene (C_6H_6), cyclohexane (C_6H_12), and 2,3-dichloro- 5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ: C_8N_2O_2Cl_2) have been studied. Using first principles methods, the equilibrium tube-molecule distance, adsorption energy and charge transfer are obtained. The hybridization between the DDQ molecular levels and nanotube valence bands transforms the semiconducting nanotube into metallic. Coupling of ? electrons between tubes and aromatic molecules are observed. Our results show that noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by aromatic molecules is an efficient way to control the electronic properties of the carbon nanotube.

  1. Coupling carbon nanotube mechanics to a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, B. H.; Etaki, S.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Steele, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    The quantum behaviour of mechanical resonators is a new and emerging field driven by recent experiments reaching the quantum ground state. The high frequency, small mass, and large quality-factor of carbon nanotube resonators make them attractive for quantum nanomechanical applications. A common element in experiments achieving the resonator ground state is a second quantum system, such as coherent photons or a superconducting device, coupled to the resonators motion. For nanotubes, however, this is a challenge due to their small size. Here, we couple a carbon nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) device to a superconducting circuit. Suspended carbon nanotubes act as both superconducting junctions and moving elements in a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). We observe a strong modulation of the flux through the SQUID from displacements of the nanotube. Incorporating this SQUID into superconducting resonators and qubits should enable the detection and manipulation of nanotube mechanical quantum states at the single-phonon level. PMID:22953042

  2. Rotational actuator of motor based on carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA); Fennimore, Adam M. (Berkeley, CA); Yuzvinsky, Thomas D. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  3. Rotational actuator or motor based on carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Zetti, Alexander K.; Fennimore, Adam M.; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.

    2006-05-30

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  4. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes in Biotechnology and Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Bekyarova, Elena; Ni, Yingchun; Malarkey, Erik B.; Montana, Vedrana; McWilliams, Jared L.; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Due to their electrical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for the electronics, computer and aerospace industries. Here, we discuss their properties in the context of future applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. The purification and chemical modification of carbon nanotubes with organic, polymeric and biological molecules are discussed. Additionally we review their uses in biosensors, assembly of structures and devices, scanning probe microscopy and as substrates for neuronal growth. We note that additional toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes are necessary so that exposure guidelines and safety regulations can be established in a timely manner. PMID:19763242

  5. Tensile Yielding of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Srivastava, Deepak; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The tensile yielding of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been studied using Molecular Dynamics simulations and a Transition State Theory based model. We find a strong dependence of the yielding on the strain rate. A critical strain rate has been predicted above/below which yielding strain of a MWCNT is larger/smaller than that of the corresponding single-wall carbon nanotubes. At experimentally feasible strain rate of 1% /hour and T = 300K, the yield strain of a MWCNT is estimated to be about 3-4 % higher than that of an equivalent SWCNT (Single Wall Carbon Nanotube), in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  6. Interaction of microwaves with carbon nanotubes to facilitate modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Stephenson, Jason J. (Inventor); Yakobson, Boris I. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of crosslinking carbon nanotubes to each other using microwave radiation, articles of manufacture produced by such methods, compositions produced by such methods, and applications for such compositions and articles of manufacture. The present invention is also directed toward methods of radiatively modifying composites and/or blends comprising carbon nanotubes with microwaves, and to the compositions produced by such methods. In some embodiments, the modification comprises a crosslinking process, wherein the carbon nanotubes serve as a conduit for thermally and photolytically crosslinking the host matrix with microwave radiation.

  7. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Sun, Jianwei; Reeves, Mark

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90?K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100?F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  8. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Sun, Jianwei; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Reeves, Mark; Keidar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90 K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100 F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  9. Growth of carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Gaohui; Li, Wenzhi

    2007-03-01

    Branched carbon nanotubes have been reported and produced by the pyrolysis of metallocene-thiophence mixture. In our experiments, we prepared the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the pyrolysis of thiophene as the carbon source over cobalt catalysts. The lengths of carbon nanotubes can reach 0.5-1 mm for the growth time of 15 min. The effects of flow rate and temperature on the growth of CNTs have been investigated. The branched carbon nanotubes were also found in the experiments, showing Y-junction or T-junction, even connecting each other to form a web. The growth mechanism of the branched CNTs was studied using transmission electron microscopy. The electron transportation properties along these branched CNTs are under investigation.

  10. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This research has involved the analysis and interpretation of spectroscopic data taken over a two year period from 1998 to 1999 at the Johnson Space Center. The data was taken in an attempt to perform diagnostic studies of the formation of carbon nanotubes in a laser produced plume. Carbon nanotubes hold great promise for the development of new materials with exciting properties. Current production processes are not sufficient to meet research and development needs. A better understanding of the chemical processes involved in carbon nanotube formation will suggest better production processes that would be more able to meet the demands of research and development. Our work has focused on analysis of the emission spectra and laser induced fluorescent spectra of the carbon dimer, C2, and the laser induced fluorescence spectra of the nickel atom, which is a necessary reagent in th formation of carbon nanotubes.

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis. PMID:21711812

  12. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  13. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  14. Roping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lu-Chang; Liu, Zejian

    2003-03-01

    Though single-walled carbon nanotubes often form raft-like bundles in which the individual carbon nanotubes of about the same diameter stack together in parallel in a hexagonal close-packed structure, it has also been observed that single-walled carbon nanotubes sometimes form a ropelike structure in which the constituent nanotubes are intertwisted when they are produced by the laser evaporation technique [1]. An experimental analysis of the helicities of the thus produced single-walled carbon nanotubes using electron nanodiffraction indicates that the helicity has a rather uniform distribution between the zigzag (helicity = 0) and the armchair (helicity = 30 degrees) structures. We will present the experimental characterization as well as numerical simulations of the morphology and energetics of the ropelike bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The role of the helicity of the single-walled carbon nanotubes will also be discussed. [1] L.-C. Qin and S. Iijima, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 593 (2000) 33. lcqin@physics.unc.edu

  15. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self-catalytic growth mechanism, and the vapor-quasiliquid-solid mechanism. The model appears to explain most, if not all, of the experimental findings reported to date on semiconductor nanotubes. It addresses various issues related to the uniqueness of the single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotube growths; it explains why almost all carbon nanotubes are grown at a temperature between 800 and 1000 °C; and why metals, semiconductors, oxides, and clusters serve almost equally well as FECAs to achieve these growths.

  16. Broken SU(4) symmetry in a Kondo-correlated carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Daniel R.; Smirnov, Sergey; Marga?ska, Magdalena; Dirnaichner, Alois; Stiller, Peter L.; Grifoni, Milena; Hüttel, Andreas K.; Strunk, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interplay between many-body phenomena and nonequilibrium in systems with entangled spin and orbital degrees of freedom is a central objective in nanoelectronics. We demonstrate that the combination of Coulomb interaction, spin-orbit coupling, and valley mixing results in a particular selection of the inelastic virtual processes contributing to the Kondo resonance in carbon nanotubes at low temperatures. This effect is dictated by conjugation properties of the underlying carbon nanotube spectrum at zero and finite magnetic field. Our measurements on a clean carbon nanotube are complemented by calculations based on a field-theoretical Keldysh approach to the nonequilibrium Kondo problem which well reproduces the rich experimental observations in Kondo transport.

  17. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingqi; Wang, Qingxiao; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; Li, Liang; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xianbin; Abutaha, Anas I; Alshareef, H N; Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, X X

    2014-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations. PMID:24965261

  18. Light induced aggregation of specific single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopannagari, Madhusudana; Chaturvedi, Harsh

    2015-10-01

    We report optically induced aggregation and consequent separation of specific diameters of nanotubes from stable solutions of pristine single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Dispersed solutions of pristine SWNTs in different solvents show rapid and selective aggregation. The separated SWNTs show enrichment in specific diameters of SWNTs aggregating under UV, visible and NIR illumination.

  19. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  20. Book review Carbon Nanotube Science: Synthesis, Properties and Appli-

    E-print Network

    Harris, Peter J F

    Book review Carbon Nanotube Science: Synthesis, Properties and Appli- cations, Peter J.F. Harris in the nanotube discovery is dis- cussed in the first chapter of this book), a few years after ful- lerenes were of the nanotechnology era ­ you'll find their pictures on book covers, in newspaper articles and magazine centerfolds

  1. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors Coskun Kocabas*, Hoon properties of individ- ual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demon- stration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios

  2. Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau*1

    E-print Network

    Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau*1 , José Bico2 , Kenneth B. K. Teo3 demonstrates the creation of a stable, superhydrophobic surface using the nano-scale roughness inherent (PTFE) coating on the surface of the nanotubes. Superhydrophobicity is achieved down to the microscopic

  3. Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite for gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Hollanda, L M; Lobo, A O; Lancellotti, M; Berni, E; Corat, E J; Zanin, H

    2014-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite (GCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines. The tips of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching, which is also known to attach oxygen content groups on the MWCNT surfaces, changing their hydrophobicity. The nanocomposite was characterised by high resolution scanning electron microscopy; energy-dispersive X-ray, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies, as well as zeta potential and particle size analyses using dynamic light scattering. BET adsorption isotherms showed the GCN to have an effective surface area of 38.5m(2)/g. The GCN and pIRES plasmid conjugated with the GFP gene, forming ?-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring, resulting in a helical wrap. The measured zeta potential confirmed that the plasmid was connected to the nanocomposite. The NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines could phagocytize this wrap. The gene transfection was characterised by fluorescent protein produced in the cells and pictured by fluorescent microscopy. Before application, we studied GCN cell viability in NIH-3T3 and NG97 line cells using both MTT and Neutral Red uptake assays. Our results suggest that GCN has moderate stability behaviour as colloid solution and has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity and good transfection efficiency. PMID:24863227

  4. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred nanotubes are highly conductive, transparent, and flexible as well. Based on transferred nanotube arrays on fabric, we have successfully demonstrated nanotube transistors with on/off ratios ˜ 105, and chemical sensors for low-concentration NO2 and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). In Chapter 5, I present the study of transparent conductive thin films made with two kinds of commercial carbon nanotubes: HiPCO and arc-discharge nanotubes. These films have been further exploited as hole-injection electrodes for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) on both rigid glass and flexible substrates. Our experiments reveal that films based on arc discharge nanotubes are overwhelmingly better than HiPCO-nanotube-based films in all the critical aspects, including the surface roughness, sheet resistance, and transparency. The optimized films show a typical sheet resistance of ˜160O/? at 87% transparency and have been successfully used to make OLEDs with high stability and long lifetime. Lastly, I present the fast and scalable integration of nanowire chemical sensors with micromachined hotplates built on SiN membranes. These hotplates allowed nanowire chemical sensors to operate at elevated temperatures in order to enhance the sensitivity of chemical sensors to target gases. By applying different current through the platinum heating filament, we can easily vary the device temperature from room temperature to 350°C. These nanosensors with integrated hot plates have been exploited for the detection of ethanol, CO and hydrogen down to concentrations of 1 ppm, 10 ppm and 50 ppm, respectively.

  5. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of carbon, seen here in cross section. They form a nested series of concentric cylinders, much like the growth rings on a tree. This sample was obtained by the supported catalyst method, whereby the nanoscale catalysts are dispersed on a substrate providing their support. The substrate with catalyst particles was immersed within an acetylene diffusion flame to which nitrogen had been added to eliminate soot formation. Upon removal from the flame, the nanotubes were dispersed on a holder suitable for electron microscopy. Although not seen in the figure, the tube diameter reflects that of the catalyst particle.

  6. Carbon nanotube mechanics in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strus, Mark Christopher

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties which have led to the development of novel nanomechanical materials and devices. In this thesis, the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are studied with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and, conversely, the use of CNTs to enhance conventional AFM probes is also investigated. First, the performance of AFM probes with multiwalled CNT tips are evaluated during attractive regime AFM imaging of high aspect ratio structures. The presented experimental results show two distinct imaging artifacts, the divot and large ringing artifacts, which are inherent to such CNT AFM probes. Through the adjustment of operating parameters, the connection of these artifacts to CNT bending, adhesion, and stiction is described qualitatively and explained. Next, the adhesion and peeling of CNTs on different substrates is quantitatively investigated with theoretical models and a new AFM mode for nanomechanical peeling. The theoretical model uncovers the rich physics of peeling of CNTs from surfaces, including sudden transitions between different geometric configurations of the nanotube with vastly different interfacial energies. The experimental peeling of CNTs is shown to be capable of resolving differences in CNT peeling energies at attoJoule levels on different materials. AFM peeling force spectroscopy is further studied on a variety of materials, including several polymers, to demonstrate the capability of direct measurement of interfacial energy between an individual nanotube or nanofiber and a given material surface. Theoretical investigations demonstrate that interfacial and flexural energies can be decoupled so that the work of the applied peeling force can be used to estimate the CNT-substrate interfacial fracture energy and nanotube's flexural stiffness. Hundreds of peeling force experiments on graphite, epoxy, and polyimide demonstrate that the peeling force spectroscopy offers a convenient experimental framework to quickly screen different combinations of polymers and functionalized nanotubes for optimal interfacial strength. Finally, multiple CNT AFM probe oscillation states in tapping mode AFM as the cantilever is brought closer to a sample are fully investigated, including two kinds of permanent contact and two types of intermittent contact. Large deformation continuum elastica models of MWCNTs with different end boundary conditions are used to identify whether the CNT remains anchored to the sample in line-contact or in point-contact in the permanent contact regime. Energy dissipation spectroscopy and phase contrast are demonstrated as a way to predict the state of CNT-substrate boundary condition in the intermittent tapping regime on different substrates and to highlight the implications of these different imaging regimes for critical dimension AFM, biological sensing, and nanolithography. Together, this work studies the effect of CNT mechanical interactions in AFM, including artifact-avoidance optimization of and new compositional mapping using CNT AFM probes as well as novel techniques that will potentially enhance the future development of CNT-based nanodevices and materials.

  7. Hierarchical carbon fiber composites with radially aligned carbon nanotubes : preservation of in-plane tensile properties

    E-print Network

    Li, Richard, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based composites have significant potential to expand the performance and functionality of aerospace composite structures. Notably, circumferentially aligned CNT arrays have previously ...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of next-generation multifunctional material architectures : aligned carbon nanotube carbon matrix nanocomposites

    E-print Network

    Stein, Itai Y

    2013-01-01

    Materials comprising carbon nanotube (CNT) aligned nanowire (NW) polymer nanocomposites (A-PNCs) have emerged as promising architectures for next-generation multifunctional applications. Enhanced operating regimes, such ...

  9. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  10. Directed Growth of Carbon Nanotubes Across Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Meyyapan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    An experiment has shown that when single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown by chemical vapor deposition in the presence of an electric field of suitable strength, the nanotubes become aligned along the electric field. In an important class of contemplated applications, one would exploit this finding in fabricating nanotube transistors; one would grow SWNTs across gaps between electrodes that would serve, subsequently, as source and drain contacts during operation of the transistors. In preparation for the experiment, a multilayer catalyst comprising a 20-nmthick underlayer of iridium (platinum group), a 1-nm-thick middle layer of iron, and a 0.2-nm-thick outer layer of molybdenum was ion-beam sputtered onto a quartz substrate. A 25 micrometers-diameter iron wire was used as a shadow mask during the sputtering to create a 25 micrometers gap in the catalyst. Then electrical leads were connected to the catalyst areas separated by the gap so that these catalyst areas would also serve as electrodes. The substrate as thus prepared was placed in a growth chamber that consisted of a quartz tube of 1-in. (2.54-cm) diameter enclosed in a furnace. SWNTs of acceptably high quantity and quality were grown in 10 minutes with methane at atmospheric pressure flowing through the chamber at a rate of 1,000 standard cubic centimeters per minute at a temperature of 900 C. To prevent oxidation of the SWNTs, the chamber was purged with 99.999-percent pure argon before and after growth, and the chamber was cooled to less than 300 C before opening it to the atmosphere after growth. When no voltage was applied across the gap, the SWNTs grew in random directions extending out from the edges of the catalyst at the gap. When a potential of 10 V was applied between the catalyst/electrode areas to create an electric field across the gap, the SWNTs grew across the gap, as shown in the figure.

  11. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Moothi, Kapil; Simate, Geoffrey S; Falcon, Rosemary; Iyuke, Sunny E; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates carbon nanotube (CNT) production from coal pyrolysis wherein the output gases are used in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. The carbon products are similar to those using commercial coal gas as feedstock, but coal is a relatively cheaper feedstock compared to high purity source gases. A Gibbs minimization model has been developed to predict the volume percentages of product gases from coal pyrolysis. Methane and carbon monoxide were the largest carbon components of the product stream and thus formed the primary source for CNT synthesis. Both the model and the observations showed that increasing the furnace temperature led to a decrease in the absolute quantities of "useful" product gases, with the optimal temperature between 400 and 500 °C. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic rate law for CNT from coal pyrolysis was derived as d[CNT]/dt = K([CO][CH4])(1/2), where K is a function of several equilibrium constants representing various reactions in the CNT formation process. PMID:26262467

  13. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  14. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Barclay, J. Elaine; Peng, Wenchao; Li, Yang; Li, Xianyu; Zhang, Guoliang; Evans, David J.; Zhang, Fengbao

    2008-04-01

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  15. Engineered Carbon Nanotube Materials for High-Q Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Mike; Epp, Larry; Hoenk, Michael; Hoppe, Dan; Kowalczyk, Bob; Wong, Eric; Xu, Jimmy; Adam, Douglas; Young, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This document represents a presentation offered by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with assistance from researchers from Brown University and Northrop Grumman. The presentation took place in Seoul, Korea in July 2003 and attempted to demonstrate the fabrication approach regarding the development of high quality factor (high-Q) mechanical oscillators (in the forms of a tunable nanotube resonator and a nanotube array radio frequency [RF] filter) aimed at signal processing and based on carbon nanotubes. The presentation also addressed parallel efforts to develop both in-plane single nanotube resonators as well as vertical array power devices.

  16. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Helen F.; Cooper, Sarah M.; Meyyappan, M.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials.

  17. Engineering carbon nanostructures : development of novel aerogel-nanotube composites and optimization techniques for nanotube growth

    E-print Network

    Steiner, Stephen Alan, III

    2006-01-01

    Carbon aerogels offer several unique advantages which make them ideal for evaluating a metal's ability to catalyze nanotube growth, including in situ carbothermic reduction of oxidized nanoparticles to their catalytic ...

  18. Helical Polycarbodiimide Cloaking of Carbon Nanotubes Enables Inter-Nanotube Exciton Energy Transfer Modulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly. PMID:25343218

  19. Patterned Growth of Carbon Nanotubes or Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the growth of carbon nanotubes or nanofibers in a desired pattern has been invented. The essence of the method is to grow the nanotubes or nanofibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto a patterned catalyst supported by a substrate. The figure schematically depicts salient aspects of the method and apparatus in a typical application. A substrate is placed in a chamber that contains both ion-beam sputtering and CVD equipment. The substrate can be made of any of a variety of materials that include several forms of silicon or carbon, and selected polymers, metals, ceramics, and even some natural minerals and similar materials. Optionally, the substrate is first coated with a noncatalytic metal layer (which could be a single layer or could comprise multiple different sublayers) by ion-beam sputtering. The choice of metal(s) and thickness(es) of the first layer (if any) and its sublayers (if any) depends on the chemical and electrical properties required for subsequent deposition of the catalyst and the subsequent CVD of the carbon nanotubes. A typical first-sublayer metal is Pt, Pd, Cr, Mo, Ti, W, or an alloy of two or more of these elements. A typical metal for the second sublayer or for an undivided first layer is Al at a thickness .1 nm or Ir at a thickness .5 nm. Proper choice of the metal for a second sublayer of a first layer makes it possible to use a catalyst that is chemically incompatible with the substrate. In the next step, a mask having holes in the desired pattern is placed over the coated substrate. The catalyst is then deposited on the coated substrate by ion-beam sputtering through the mask. Optionally, the catalyst could be deposited by a technique other than sputtering and/or patterned by use of photolithography, electron- beam lithography, or another suitable technique. The catalytic metal can be Fe, Co, Ni, or an alloy of two or more of these elements, deposited to a typical thickness in the range from 0.1 to 20 nm.

  20. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  1. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process up. We are also working on necessary purification of nanotubes. Applications of nanotubes are in such various fields as lightweight composites, molecular electronics, energy storage (electrodes in Li ion batteries), flat panel displays, conductive polymers, etc. JSC nanotube team is focused on development of lightweight materials. We work on the injection thermoset epoxies reinforced with nanotubes. Early results show good wetting of nanotube surface with epoxy, which is very important. More research will be possible as more nanotubes become available.

  2. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  3. Tailored Carbon Nanotubes for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Veetil, Jithesh V.; Ye, Kaiming

    2008-01-01

    A decade of aggressive researches on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has paved way for extending these unique nanomaterials into a wide range of applications. In the relatively new arena of nanobiotechnology, a vast majority of applications are based on CNTs, ranging from miniaturized biosensors to organ regeneration. Nevertheless, the complexity of biological systems poses a significant challenge in developing CNT-based tissue engineering applications. This review focuses on the recent developments of CNT-based tissue engineering, where the interaction between living cells/tissues and the nanotubes have been transformed into a variety of novel techniques. This integration has already resulted in a revaluation of tissue engineering and organ regeneration techniques. Some of the new treatments that were not possible previously become reachable now. Because of the advent of surface chemistry, the CNT’s biocompatibility has been significantly improved, making it possible to serve as tissue scaffolding materials to enhance the organ regeneration. The superior mechanic strength and chemical inert also makes it ideal for blood compatible applications, especially for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The applications of CNTs in these cardiovascular surgeries led to a remarkable improvement in mechanical strength of implanted catheters and reduced thrombogenecity after surgery. Moreover, the functionalized CNTs have been extensively explored for in vivo targeted drug or gene delivery, which could potentially improve the efficiency of many cancer treatments. However, just like other nanomaterials, the cytotoxicity of CNTs has not been well established. Hence, more extensive cytotoxic studies are warranted while converting the hydrophobic CNTs into biocompatible nanomaterials. PMID:19496152

  4. Cross-polarized excitons in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Doorn, Stephen K.; Luo, Zhengtang; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Piryatinski, Andrei; Saxena, Avadh; Bishop, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Polarization of low-lying excitonic bands in finite-size semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is studied by using quantum-chemical methodologies. Our calculations elucidate properties of cross-polarized excitons, which lead to the transverse optical absorption of nanotubes and presumably couple to intermediate-frequency modes recently observed in resonance Raman excitation spectroscopy. We identify up to 12 distinct excitonic transitions below the second fundamental band associated with the E22 van Hove singularity. Calculations for several chiral SWNTs distinguish the optically active “bright” excitonic band polarized parallel to the tube axis and several optically “weak” cross-polarized excitons. The rest are optically (near) forbidden “dark” transitions. An analysis of the transition density matrices related to excitonic bands provides detailed information about delocalization of excitonic wavefunction along the tube. Utilization of the natural helical coordinate system accounting for the tube chirality allows one to disentangle longitudinal and circumferential components. The distribution of the transition density matrix along a tube axis is similar for all excitons. However, four parallel-polarized excitons associated with the E11 transition are more localized along the circumference of a tube, compared with others related to the E12 and E21 cross-polarized transitions. Calculated splitting between optically active parallel- and cross-polarized transitions increases with tube diameter, which compares well with experimental spectroscopic data. PMID:18463293

  5. Hetero-doped Nanotubes: Theory, Synthesis and Characterization of Phosphorus-Nitrogen Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Romo Herrera, Jose M; Smith, David J; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Meunier, Vincent; Cullen, David A; Charlier, Jean Christophe; Lopez, Florentino; Gu, Lin; Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes doped with phosphorous and nitrogen are synthesized using a solution of ferrocene and triphenyl-phosphine in benzylamine in conjunction with spray pyrolysis. We demonstrate that iron phosphide (Fe3P) nanoparticles act as catalysts during nanotube growth, leading to the formation of novel PN-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The samples produced were examined by SEM, HRTEM and STEM, as well as high-resolution elemental analyses using EELS and EDX spectroscopy, and their chemical stability was explored by means of thermogravimetric analysis in the presence of oxygen. The results reveal striking differences when compared to other types of doped nanotubes. These types of hetero-doped nanotubes with the underlying theory and synthesis are predicted to offer great opportunities in the fabrication of fast responsive chemical sensors.

  6. CARBON NANOTUBE POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITES FOR ELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM APPLICATIONS 

    E-print Network

    Chakrabarty, Arnab

    2010-10-12

    -grained modeling and constitutive equations to develop structureproperty relationships for an amorphous aromatic piezoelectric polyimide substituted with nitrile dipole, carbon nanotubes and resulting nanocomposites. We have studied in detail structure...

  7. Minimum Exergy Requirements for the Manufacturing of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Gutowski, Timothy G.

    The purpose of this paper is to address both the high values, and the large variation in reported values for the energy requirements for the production of carbon nanotubes. The paper includes an estimate of the standard ...

  8. Growth and deterministic assembly of single stranded carbon nanotube

    E-print Network

    Doddabasanagouda, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    The ability to control the shape, position, alignment, length and assembly of carbon nanotubes over large areas has become an essential but very difficult goal in the field of nanotechnology. Current assembly efforts for ...

  9. Inhibition of microbial growth by carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivi, Massimiliano; Zanni, Elena; de Bellis, Giovanni; Talora, Claudio; Sarto, Maria Sabrina; Palleschi, Claudio; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Monthioux, Marc; Rapino, Stefania; Uccelletti, Daniela; Fiorito, Silvana

    2013-09-01

    In the last years carbon nanotubes have attracted increasing attention for their potential applications in the biomedical field as diagnostic and therapeutic nano tools. Here we investigate the antimicrobial activity of different fully characterized carbon nanotube types (single walled, double walled and multi walled) on representative pathogen species: Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans. Our results show that all the carbon nanotube types possess a highly significant antimicrobial capacity, even though they have a colony forming unit capacity and induction of oxidative stress in all the microbial species to a different extent. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that the microbial cells were wrapped or entrapped by carbon nanotube networks. Our data taken together suggest that the reduced capacity of microbial cells to forming colonies and their oxidative response could be related to the cellular stress induced by the interactions of pathogens with the CNT network.

  10. Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Hudson, Jared L.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material.

  11. Superconductivity in Bundles of Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Shi, Wu

    We present electrical and thermal specific heat measurements that show superconductivity in double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) bundles. Clear evidence, comprising a resistance drop as a function of temperature, magnetoresistance ...

  12. Observation of Electronic Raman Scattering in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Berciaud, S.

    We present experimental measurements of the electronic contribution to the Raman spectra of individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (MSWNTs). Photoexcited carriers are inelastically scattered by a continuum of ...

  13. Carbon Nanotube Growth Using Ni Catalyst in Different Layouts

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, H. Q.

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been grown using Ni as catalyst by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (PECVD) in various pre-patterned substrates. Ni was thermally evaporated on silicon substrates ...

  14. Optical studies of DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Chou, Shin Grace

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of detailed optical studies of phonon-assisted relaxation processes in DNA-wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes. Using resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) and photoluminescence spectroscopy ...

  15. Evaluations of single walled carbon nanotubes using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Brar, Victor W. (Victor Watson), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    This work reports the results of two studies which use resonance Raman scattering to evaluate the vibrational properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In the first study, we report an evaluation of second-order ...

  16. Modeling Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-print Network

    Beetge, Jenni Mignon

    2013-02-27

    ABSTRACT Modeling Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes. (May 2013) Jenni M. Beetge Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Perla B. Balbuena Artie McFerrin Department...

  17. Computational Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Networks in Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites 

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Kevin S

    2013-09-16

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much attention as reinforcements in polymer composite materials because of their unique mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs is especially promising for use...

  18. Computational Study of Catalyzed Growth of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Jin

    2010-01-14

    A recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis process called CoMoCAT yields single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)s of controlled diameter and chirality, making them extremely attractive for technological applications...

  19. Mechanics of deformation of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    E-print Network

    Akiskalos, Theodoros, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to develop finite element techniques to evaluate the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube enabled composites and gain a thorough understanding of the parameters that affect the properties of the composite, ...

  20. Single chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes : isolation and application

    E-print Network

    Jain, Rishabh M

    2015-01-01

    Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes are of great interest as a semiconducting material with diameters around 1nm and length in the 100s of nm to mm range. The large aspect ratio, near-infrared wavelength bandgap and a high ...