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Sample records for carbon nanotube transistors

  1. Carbon nanotube electrodes in organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Irina; Amato, Michele; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Cantele, Giovanni; Maffucci, Antonio; Santato, Clara; Martel, Richard; Cicoira, Fabio

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the recent progress on carbon nanotube electrodes applied to organic thin film transistors. After an introduction on the general aspects of the charge injection processes at various electrode-semiconductor interfaces, we discuss the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin film transistors and the recent achievements in the field. PMID:23639944

  2. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  3. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors.

  4. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-16

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors. PMID:21828739

  5. Carbon nanotube transistors, sensors, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian

    Carbon nanotubes are tiny hollow cylinders, made from a single graphene sheet, that possess many amazing properties. Another reason why nanotubes have generated intense research activities from scientists of various disciplines is they represent a new class of materials for the study of one-dimensional physics. In this thesis we investigate the electrical transport of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes and their potential applications as biological sensors. Electrons have been predicted, by theoretical physicists, to go through nanotubes without much resistance. But this has not been properly quantified experimentally, and the origin of the routinely observed large resistance in nanotubes is not clear. In this thesis we show that in moderate long high quality nanotubes the electrical transport is limited by electron-phonon scattering. Systematic studies are carried out using many devices of different diameters at various temperatures. The resistance and inverse of peak mobility are observed to decrease linearly with temperature, indicating the influence of phonons. The conductance and peak mobility scales with nanotube diameters also, in a linear fashion and quadratic fashion respectively. Based on electron-phonon scattering, a theory model is developed that can not only predict how the resistance changes with gate voltage but also explain the observed temperature and diameter dependence. This work clarifies the nature of electrical transport in nanotubes and sets a performance limit of nanotube devices in diffusive regime. The electrical transport in nanotubes is extremely sensitive to local electrostatic environment due to their small size, large surface to volume ratio and high mobility, making nanotubes ideal key elements in biological sensors. In the second part of this thesis, we integrate nanotubes with supported lipid bilayers, mimic structures of cell membranes, and use this platform as a way to introduce biomolecules into the vicinity of

  6. Hysteresis free carbon nanotube thin film transistors comprising hydrophobic dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J.; Ding, J.; Li, Z.; Cheng, F.; Du, N.; Malenfant, P. R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present two examples of carbon nanotube network thin film transistors with strongly hydrophobic dielectrics comprising either Teflon-AF or a poly(vinylphenol)/poly(methyl silsesquioxane) (PVP/pMSSQ) blend. In the absence of encapsulation, bottom gated transistors in air ambient show no hysteresis between forward and reverse gate sweep direction. Device threshold gate voltage and On-current present excellent time dependent stability even under dielectric stress. Furthermore, threshold gate voltage for hole conduction is negative upon device encapsulation with PVP/pMSSQ enabling much improved current On/Off ratio at 0 V. This work addresses two major challenges impeding solution based fabrication of relevant thin film transistors with printable single-walled carbon nanotube channels.

  7. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  8. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  9. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-07-11

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a 'soma' circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions. PMID:22710137

  10. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, Hirofumi; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are grown using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The field effect transistor operation was confirmed using the PECVD grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The preferential growth of the semiconducting nanotubes was confirmed in the grid-inserted PECVD by measuring current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the devices. Based on the measurement of the electrical breakdown of the metallic CNTs, the probability of growing the semiconducting nanotubes has been estimated to be more than 90%.

  11. Imaging dissipation and hot spots in carbon nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2011-02-01

    We use infrared thermometry of carbon nanotube network (CNN) transistors and find the formation of distinct hot spots during operation. However, the average CNN temperature at breakdown is significantly lower than expected from the breakdown of individual nanotubes, suggesting extremely high regions of power dissipation at the CNN junctions. Statistical analysis and comparison with a thermal model allow the estimate of an upper limit for the average tube-tube junction thermal resistance, ˜4.4×1011 K/W (thermal conductance of ˜2.27 pW/K). These results indicate that nanotube junctions have a much greater impact on CNN transport, dissipation, and reliability than extrinsic factors such as low substrate thermal conductivity.

  12. Enhanced shot noise in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, A.; Fiori, G.; Iannaccone, G.

    2009-12-21

    We predict shot noise enhancement in defect-free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through a numerical investigation based on the self-consistent solution of the Poisson and Schroedinger equations within the nonequilibrium Green's functions formalism, and on a Monte Carlo approach to reproduce injection statistics. Noise enhancement is due to the correlation between trapping of holes from the drain into quasibound states in the channel and thermionic injection of electrons from the source, and can lead to an appreciable Fano factor of 1.22 at room temperature.

  13. Thin film transistors using PECVD-grown carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuki; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-05-21

    Thin film transistors with a carbon nanotube (CNT) network as a channel have been fabricated using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) which has the advantage of preferential growth of the CNTs with semiconducting behavior in the I-V characteristics of CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs). Taking advantage of the preferential growth and suppression of bundle formation, a large ON current of 170 microA mm(-1), which is among the largest in these kinds of devices with a large ON/OFF current ratio of about 10(5), has been realized in the relatively short channel length of 10 microm. The field effect mobility of the device was 5.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). PMID:20418603

  14. Thin film transistors using PECVD-grown carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuki; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Thin film transistors with a carbon nanotube (CNT) network as a channel have been fabricated using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) which has the advantage of preferential growth of the CNTs with semiconducting behavior in the I-V characteristics of CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs). Taking advantage of the preferential growth and suppression of bundle formation, a large ON current of 170 µA mm - 1, which is among the largest in these kinds of devices with a large ON/OFF current ratio of about 105, has been realized in the relatively short channel length of 10 µm. The field effect mobility of the device was 5.8 cm2 V - 1 s - 1.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme. PMID:26512729

  16. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Banks, Tony; Rogers, John A; Pesetski, Aaron A; Baumgardner, James E; Krishnaswamy, S V; Zhang, Hong

    2008-02-01

    The potential to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in advanced electronics represents a continuing, major source of interest in these materials. However, scalable integration of SWNTs into circuits is challenging because of difficulties in controlling the geometries, spatial positions, and electronic properties of individual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio frequency (RF) SWNT analog electronic devices, such as narrow band amplifiers operating in the VHF frequency band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demonstration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios, in which SWNT devices provide all of the key functions, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers, and audio amplifiers. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high-speed analog circuits. Comparison studies indicate certain performance advantages over silicon and capabilities that complement those in existing compound semiconductor technologies. PMID:18227509

  17. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-sik; Banks, Tony; Rogers, John A.; Pesetski, Aaron A.; Baumgardner, James E.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Zhang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The potential to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in advanced electronics represents a continuing, major source of interest in these materials. However, scalable integration of SWNTs into circuits is challenging because of difficulties in controlling the geometries, spatial positions, and electronic properties of individual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio frequency (RF) SWNT analog electronic devices, such as narrow band amplifiers operating in the VHF frequency band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demonstration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios, in which SWNT devices provide all of the key functions, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers, and audio amplifiers. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high-speed analog circuits. Comparison studies indicate certain performance advantages over silicon and capabilities that complement those in existing compound semiconductor technologies. PMID:18227509

  18. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  19. High-performance radio frequency transistors based on diameter-separated semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Che, Yuchi; Seo, Jung-Woo T.; Gui, Hui; Hersam, Mark C.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report the high-performance radio-frequency transistors based on the single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes with a refined average diameter of ˜1.6 nm. These diameter-separated carbon nanotube transistors show excellent transconductance of 55 μS/μm and desirable drain current saturation with an output resistance of ˜100 KΩ μm. An exceptional radio-frequency performance is also achieved with current gain and power gain cut-off frequencies of 23 GHz and 20 GHz (extrinsic) and 65 GHz and 35 GHz (intrinsic), respectively. These radio-frequency metrics are among the highest reported for the carbon nanotube thin-film transistors. This study provides demonstration of radio frequency transistors based on carbon nanotubes with tailored diameter distributions, which will guide the future application of carbon nanotubes in radio-frequency electronics.

  20. Phonon populations and electrical power dissipation in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Mathias; Freitag, Marcus; Perebeinos, Vasili; Tsang, James C; Small, Joshua P; Kinoshita, Megumi; Yuan, Dongning; Liu, Jie; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are candidate materials for nanoscale electronic devices. Both materials show weak acoustic phonon scattering and long mean free paths for low-energy charge carriers. However, high-energy carriers couple strongly to optical phonons, which leads to current saturation and the generation of hot phonons. A non-equilibrium phonon distribution has been invoked to explain the negative differential conductance observed in suspended metallic nanotubes, while Raman studies have shown the electrical generation of hot G-phonons in metallic nanotubes. Here, we present a complete picture of the phonon distribution in a functioning nanotube transistor including the G and the radial breathing modes, the Raman-inactive zone boundary K mode and the intermediate-frequency mode populated by anharmonic decay. The effective temperatures of the high- and intermediate-frequency phonons are considerably higher than those of acoustic phonons, indicating a phonon-decay bottleneck. Most importantly, inclusion of scattering by substrate polar phonons is needed to fully account for the observed electronic transport behaviour. PMID:19421219

  1. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits. PMID:26807948

  2. Exploration of vertical scaling limit in carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yingjun; Xiao, Mengmeng; Ding, Li; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-05-01

    Top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) were fabricated by using ultra-thin (4.5 nm or thinner) atomic-layer-deposition grown HfO2 as gate insulator, and shown to exhibit high gate efficiency, i.e., all examined (totally 76) devices present very low room temperature subthreshold swing with an averaged value of 64 mV/Dec, without observable carrier mobility degradation. The gate leakage of the CNT FET under fixed gate voltage is dependent not only on the thickness of HfO2 insulator, but also on the diameter of the CNT. The vertical scaling limit of CNT FETs is determined by gate leakage standard in ultra large scale integrated circuits. HfO2 film with effective oxide thickness of 1.2 nm can provide both excellent gate electrostatic controllability and small gate leakage for sub-5 nm FETs based on CNT with small diameter.

  3. Wafer-level hysteresis-free resonant carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ji; Bartsch, Sebastian T; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-03-24

    We report wafer-level fabrication of resonant-body carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) in a dual-gate configuration. An integration density of >10(6) CNTFETs/cm(2), an assembly yield of >80%, and nanoprecision have been simultaneously obtained. Through combined chemical and thermal treatments, hysteresis-free (in vacuum) suspended-body CNTFETs have been demonstrated. Electrostatic actuation by lateral gate and FET-based readout of mechanical resonance have been achieved at room temperature. Both upward and downward in situ frequency tuning has been experimentally demonstrated in the dual-gate architecture. The minuscule mass, high resonance frequency, and in situ tunability of the resonant CNTFETs offer promising features for applications in radio frequency signal processing and ultrasensitive sensing. PMID:25752991

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  5. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhammad R.; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2015-05-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ < RT < 1 MΩ, periodic, well-defined Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of ~14 meV, corresponding to the transport through a single quantum dot (QD) was observed. For devices with high RT (>1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices.Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET

  6. High performance transistors via aligned polyfluorene-sorted carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Gerald J.; Joo, Yongho; Singha Roy, Susmit; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2014-02-24

    We evaluate the performance of exceptionally electronic-type sorted, semiconducting, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) in field effect transistors (FETs). High on-conductance and high on/off conductance modulation are simultaneously achieved at channel lengths which are both shorter and longer than individual s-SWCNTs. The s-SWCNTs are isolated from heterogeneous mixtures using a polyfluorene-derivative as a selective agent and aligned on substrates via dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly at densities of ∼50 s-SWCNTs μm{sup −1}. At a channel length of 9 μm the s-SWCNTs percolate to span the FET channel, and the on/off ratio and charge transport mobility are 2.2 × 10{sup 7} and 46 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. At a channel length of 400 nm, a large fraction of the s-SWCNTs directly span the channel, and the on-conductance per width is 61 μS μm{sup −1} and the on/off ratio is 4 × 10{sup 5}. These results are considerably better than previous solution-processed FETs, which have suffered from poor on/off ratio due to spurious metallic nanotubes that bridge the channel. 4071 individual and small bundles of s-SWCNTs are tested in 400 nm channel length FETs, and all show semiconducting behavior, demonstrating the high fidelity of polyfluorenes as selective agents and the promise of assembling s-SWCNTs from solution to create high performance semiconductor electronic devices.

  7. Self aligned hysteresis free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Shtempluk, O.; Razin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-04-01

    Hysteresis phenomenon in the transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT FET) is being considered as the main obstacle for successful realization of electronic devices based on CNTs. In this study, we prepare four kinds of CNTFETs and explore their hysteretic behavior. Two kinds of devices comprise on-surface CNTs (type I) and suspended CNTs (type II) with thin insulating layer underneath and a single global gate which modulates the CNT conductance. The third and fourth types (types III and IV) consist of suspended CNT over a metallic local gate underneath, where for type IV the local gate was patterned self aligned with the source and drain electrodes. The first two types of devices, i.e., type I and II, exhibit substantial hysteresis which increases with scanning range and sweeping time. Under high vacuum conditions and moderate electric fields ( |E |>4 ×106 V /cm ), the hysteresis for on-surface devices cannot be eliminated, as opposed to suspended devices. Interestingly, type IV devices exhibit no hysteresis at all at ambient conditions, and from the different roles which the global and local gates play for the four types of devices, we could learn about the hysteresis mechanism of this system. We believe that these self aligned hysteresis free FETs will enable the realization of different electronic devices and sensors based on CNTs.

  8. High field breakdown characteristics of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Man Prakash; Behnam, Ashkan; Lian, Feifei; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric; Kumar, Satish

    2013-10-11

    The high field properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin film transistors (CN-TFTs) are important for their practical operation, and for understanding their reliability. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques we show how the channel geometry (length L(C) and width W(C)) and network morphology (average CNT length L(t) and alignment angle distribution θ) affect heat dissipation and high field breakdown in such devices. The results suggest that when WC ≥ L(t), the breakdown voltage remains independent of W(C) but varies linearly with L(C). The breakdown power varies almost linearly with both W(C) and L(C) when WC > L(t). We also find that the breakdown power is more susceptible to the variability in the network morphology compared to the breakdown voltage. The analysis offers new insight into the tunable heat dissipation and thermal reliability of CN-TFTs, which can be significantly improved through optimization of the network morphology and device geometry. PMID:24029606

  9. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2015-06-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ < RT < 1 MΩ, periodic, well-defined Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of ∼14 meV, corresponding to the transport through a single quantum dot (QD) was observed. For devices with high RT (>1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices. PMID:25962565

  10. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks.

  11. Imperceptible and Ultraflexible p-Type Transistors and Macroelectronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-26

    Flexible thin-film transistors based on semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are promising for flexible digital circuits, artificial skins, radio frequency devices, active-matrix-based displays, and sensors due to the outstanding electrical properties and intrinsic mechanical strength of carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, previous research effort only led to nanotube thin-film transistors with the smallest bending radius down to 1 mm. In this paper, we have realized the full potential of carbon nanotubes by making ultraflexible and imperceptible p-type transistors and circuits with a bending radius down to 40 μm. In addition, the resulted transistors show mobility up to 12.04 cm(2) V(-1) S(-1), high on-off ratio (∼10(6)), ultralight weight (<3 g/m(2)), and good mechanical robustness (accommodating severe crumpling and 67% compressive strain). Furthermore, the nanotube circuits can operate properly with 33% compressive strain. On the basis of the aforementioned features, our ultraflexible p-type nanotube transistors and circuits have great potential to work as indispensable components for ultraflexible complementary electronics. PMID:26624921

  12. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  13. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  14. Hysteresis in Carbon Nanotube Transistors: Measurement and Analysis of Trap Density, Energy Level, and Spatial Distribution.

    PubMed

    Park, Rebecca Sejung; Shulaker, Max Marcel; Hills, Gage; Suriyasena Liyanage, Luckshitha; Lee, Seunghyun; Tang, Alvin; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip

    2016-04-26

    We present a measurement technique, which we call the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement, for characterizing hysteresis in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, and demonstrate its applicability for a broad range of 1D and 2D nanomaterials beyond carbon nanotubes. The Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement enables the quantification (density, energy level, and spatial distribution) of charged traps responsible for hysteresis. A physics-based model of the charge trapping process for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor is presented and experimentally validated using the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement. Leveraging this model, we discover a source of traps (surface traps) unique to devices with low-dimensional channels such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires (beyond interface traps which exist in today's silicon field-effect transistors). The different charge trapping mechanisms for interface traps and surface traps are studied based on their temperature dependencies. Through these advances, we are able to quantify the interface trap density for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (∼3 × 10(13) cm(-2) eV(-1) near midgap), and compare this against a range of previously studied dielectric/semiconductor interfaces. PMID:27002483

  15. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors. PMID:25551046

  16. End-bonded contacts for carbon nanotube transistors with low, size-independent resistance.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-Jen; Tersoff, Jerry; Franklin, Aaron D; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Zhen; Tulevski, George S; Tang, Jianshi; Haensch, Wilfried

    2015-10-01

    Moving beyond the limits of silicon transistors requires both a high-performance channel and high-quality electrical contacts. Carbon nanotubes provide high-performance channels below 10 nanometers, but as with silicon, the increase in contact resistance with decreasing size becomes a major performance roadblock. We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistor technology with an end-bonded contact scheme that leads to size-independent contact resistance to overcome the scaling limits of conventional side-bonded or planar contact schemes. A high-performance SWNT transistor was fabricated with a sub-10-nanometer contact length, showing a device resistance below 36 kilohms and on-current above 15 microampere per tube. The p-type end-bonded contact, formed through the reaction of molybdenum with the SWNT to form carbide, also exhibited no Schottky barrier. This strategy promises high-performance SWNT transistors, enabling future ultimately scaled device technologies. PMID:26430114

  17. End-bonded contacts for carbon nanotube transistors with low, size-independent resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-Jen; Tersoff, Jerry; Franklin, Aaron D.; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Zhen; Tulevski, George S.; Tang, Jianshi; Haensch, Wilfried

    2015-10-01

    Moving beyond the limits of silicon transistors requires both a high-performance channel and high-quality electrical contacts. Carbon nanotubes provide high-performance channels below 10 nanometers, but as with silicon, the increase in contact resistance with decreasing size becomes a major performance roadblock. We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistor technology with an end-bonded contact scheme that leads to size-independent contact resistance to overcome the scaling limits of conventional side-bonded or planar contact schemes. A high-performance SWNT transistor was fabricated with a sub-10-nanometer contact length, showing a device resistance below 36 kilohms and on-current above 15 microampere per tube. The p-type end-bonded contact, formed through the reaction of molybdenum with the SWNT to form carbide, also exhibited no Schottky barrier. This strategy promises high-performance SWNT transistors, enabling future ultimately scaled device technologies.

  18. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W.; Na, J.; Kim, G. T.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H.; Lee, I.; Kim, K. S.

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  19. A review of carbon nanotube- and graphene-based flexible thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Ming; Liu, Chang; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-04-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have attracted great attention for numerous applications for future flexible electronics, owing to their supreme properties including exceptionally high electronic conductivity and mechanical strength. Here, the progress of CNT- and graphene-based flexible thin-film transistors from material preparation, device fabrication techniques to transistor performance control is reviewed. State-of-the-art fabrication techniques of thin-film transistors are divided into three categories: solid-phase, liquid-phase, and gas-phase techniques, and possible scale-up approaches to achieve realistic production of flexible nanocarbon-based transistors are discussed. In particular, the recent progress in flexible all-carbon nanomaterial transistor research is highlighted, and this all-carbon strategy opens up a perspective to realize extremely flexible, stretchable, and transparent electronics with a relatively low-cost and fast fabrication technique, compared to traditional rigid silicon, metal and metal oxide electronics. PMID:23519953

  20. Electric Characteristics of the Carbon Nanotube Network Transistor with Directly Grown ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Bae, Gi Yoon; Suh, Dong Ik; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We report on the electrical characteristics of field effect transistors fabricated with random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes with surfaces modified by ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticles are directly grown on single-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water. Electrical observations show that ZnO nanoparticles act as charge transfer sources that provide electrons to the nanotube channel. The valley position in ambipolar transport of nanotube transistors is negatively shifted for 3V due to the electronic n-typed property of ZnO nanoparticles. However, the Raman resonance remains invariant despite the charge transfer effect produced by ZnO nanoparticles. PMID:27455727

  1. Electrostatic Simulation of Charge Trapping in Carbon Nanotube Vertical Organic Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew; Hershfield, Selman

    The carbon nanotube vertical organic field effect transistor is a vertical sequence consisting of a gate electrode, gate dielectric, thin nanotube network source electrode, organic semiconducting channel and finally the drain electrode. The drain current is modulated by the gate voltage which varies a Schottky barrier between source and channel layers. Hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristic has been observed when a electret charge trapping layer is placed between the nanotube source and the gate dielectric. We provide a model for charge injection into a trapping layer placed in contact with the carbon nanotube film and solve self-consistently for the electrostatics and the occupancy of the traps. For a range of applied gate voltages the simulations demonstrate hysteresis of the carbon nanotubes' charge as a result of the electric field produced by the trapped charge. This affects the current by modulating the Schottky barrier. This work was supported by the NSF Grant DMR-1461019.

  2. Short Channel Field-Effect-Transistors with Inkjet-Printed Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-11-01

    Short channel field-effect-transistors with inkjet-printed semiconducting carbon nanotubes are fabricated using a novel strategy to minimize material consumption, confining the inkjet droplet into the active channel area. This fabrication approach is compatible with roll-to-roll processing and enables the formation of high-performance short channel device arrays based on inkjet printing. PMID:26312458

  3. Mechanically Durable and Highly Stretchable Transistors Employing Carbon Nanotube Semiconductor and Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Koleilat, Ghada I; Pfattner, Raphael; Kong, Desheng; Lin, Pei; Nur, Roda; Lei, Ting; Wang, Huiliang; Liu, Nan; Lai, Ying-Chih; Kim, Myung-Gil; Chung, Jong Won; Lee, Sangyoon; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-06-01

    Mechanically durable stretchable trans-istors are fabricated using carbon nanotube electrical components and tough thermoplastic elastomers. After an initial conditioning step, the electrical characteristics remain constant with strain. The strain-dependent characteristics are similar in orthogonal stretching directions. Devices can be impacted with a hammer and punctured with a needle while remaining functional and stretchable. PMID:26179120

  4. Room-temperature single charge sensitivity in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. B.; Hughes, M. E.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Electrical current fluctuation studies are reported for coaxial p-type and n-type single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (FETs). Abrupt discrete switching of the source-drain current is observed at room temperature. The authors attribute these random telegraph signals to charge fluctuating electron traps near the FET conduction channels. Evolution of the current-switching behavior associated with the occupancy of individual electron traps is demonstrated and analyzed statistically. The result strongly indicates room temperature single charge sensitivity in carbon nanotube FETs, which may offer potential applications for single molecule sensors based on suitably prepared FET devices.

  5. Controlled n-Type Doping of Carbon Nanotube Transistors by an Organorhodium Dimer.

    PubMed

    Geier, Michael L; Moudgil, Karttikay; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-07-13

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors are among the most developed nanoelectronic devices for high-performance computing applications. While p-type SWCNT transistors are easily achieved through adventitious adsorption of atmospheric oxygen, n-type SWCNT transistors require extrinsic doping schemes. Existing n-type doping strategies for SWCNT transistors suffer from one or more issues including environmental instability, limited carrier concentration modulation, undesirable threshold voltage control, and/or poor morphology. In particular, commonly employed benzyl viologen n-type doping layers possess large thicknesses, which preclude top-gate transistor designs that underlie high-density integrated circuit layouts. To overcome these limitations, we report here the controlled n-type doping of SWCNT thin-film transistors with a solution-processed pentamethylrhodocene dimer. The charge transport properties of organorhodium-treated SWCNT thin films show consistent n-type behavior when characterized in both Hall effect and thin-film transistor geometries. Due to the molecular-scale thickness of the organorhodium adlayer, large-area arrays of top-gated, n-type SWCNT transistors are fabricated with high yield. This work will thus facilitate ongoing efforts to realize high-density SWCNT integrated circuits. PMID:27253896

  6. In vitro detection of biological molecules using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briman, Mikhail Borisovich

    The operation and the stability of different types of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors in the liquid buffer are investigated. The effects of environmental parameters of aqueous solutions such as pH and the ionic-strength on the device parameters are also reported. Another set of experiments carried out in the electrolyte showed that number fluctuations are the most likely source of low frequency electrical noise found in the devices. Finally, charge transfer was found to be the dominant effect in the mechanism of nanotube-protein interactions.

  7. High-performance air-stable n-type carbon nanotube transistors with erbium contacts.

    PubMed

    Shahrjerdi, Davood; Franklin, Aaron D; Oida, Satoshi; Ott, John A; Tulevski, George S; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-09-24

    So far, realization of reproducible n-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors suitable for integrated digital applications has been a difficult task. In this work, hundreds of n-type CNT transistors from three different low work function metals-erbium, lanthanum, and yttrium-are studied and benchmarked against p-type devices with palladium contacts. The crucial role of metal type and deposition conditions is elucidated with respect to overall yield and performance of the n-type devices. It is found that high oxidation rates and sensitivity to deposition conditions are the major causes for the lower yield and large variation in performance of n-type CNT devices with low work function metal contacts. Considerable improvement in device yield is attained using erbium contacts evaporated at high deposition rates. Furthermore, the air-stability of our n-type transistors is studied in light of the extreme sensitivity of these metals to oxidation. PMID:24006886

  8. Analytical ballistic theory of carbon nanotube transistors: Experimental validation, device physics, parameter extraction, and performance projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinwande, Deji; Liang, Jiale; Chong, Soogine; Nishi, Yoshio; Wong, H.-S. Philip

    2008-12-01

    We developed a fully analytical ballistic theory of carbon nanotube field effect transistors enabled by the development of an analytical surface potential capturing the temperature dependence and gate and quantum capacitance electrostatics. The analytical ballistic theory is compared to the experimental results of a ballistic transistor with good agreement. The validated analytical theory enables intuitive circuit design, provides techniques for parameter extraction of the bandgap and surface potential, and elucidates on the device physics of drain optical phonon scattering and its role in reducing the linear conductance and intrinsic gain of the transistor. Furthermore, a threshold voltage definition is proposed reflecting the bandgap-diameter dependence. Projections for key analog and digital performances are discussed.

  9. Enhancement of minority carrier injection in ambipolar carbon nanotube transistors using double-gate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Liang, Kelly; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2016-07-01

    We show that double-gate ambipolar thin-film transistors can be operated to enhance minority carrier injection. The two gate potentials need to be significantly different for enhanced injection to be observed. This enhancement is highly beneficial in devices such as light-emitting transistors where balanced electron and hole injections lead to optimal performance. With ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors, we demonstrate that higher ambipolar currents are attained at lower source-drain voltages, which is desired for portable electronic applications, by employing double-gate structures. In addition, when the two gates are held at the same potential, the expected advantages of the double-gate transistors such as enhanced on-current are also observed.

  10. Light-emitting polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid transistors: below and above the percolation limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming; Jakubka, Florian; Gannott, Florentina; Zaumseil, Jana

    2013-09-01

    Hybrids of semiconducting polymers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are interesting for organic electronic devices such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistors (FETs). They are easily produced by selective dispersion of SWNTs in polymer solutions by ultrasonication followed by centrifugation. We demonstrate that nanotubes at concentration levels well below the percolation limit significantly improve charge injection of both holes and electrons into semiconducting polymers in top-gate FETs. This leads to lower contact resistances and reduced threshold voltages, thus the maximum ambipolar currents and visible light emission due to electron-hole recombination are considerably enhanced. The improved injection of holes and electrons allows for a much wider range of accessible polymers for ambipolar and light-emitting transistors. The same conjugated polymers can also be used to enrich specific semiconducting SWNT and to produce high-performance ambipolar nanotube network FETs. These show efficient nearinfrared electroluminescence. Mapping the emission from these networks during a gate voltage sweep allows us to visualize preferential current paths and investigate percolation models for purely semiconducting nanotube networks.

  11. Large-scale complementary macroelectronics using hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes and IGZO thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haitian; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Jialu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and metal oxide semiconductors have emerged as important materials for p-type and n-type thin-film transistors, respectively; however, realizing sophisticated macroelectronics operating in complementary mode has been challenging due to the difficulty in making n-type carbon nanotube transistors and p-type metal oxide transistors. Here we report a hybrid integration of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors to achieve large-scale (>1,000 transistors for 501-stage ring oscillators) complementary macroelectronic circuits on both rigid and flexible substrates. This approach of hybrid integration allows us to combine the strength of p-type carbon nanotube and n-type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors, and offers high device yield and low device variation. Based on this approach, we report the successful demonstration of various logic gates (inverter, NAND and NOR gates), ring oscillators (from 51 stages to 501 stages) and dynamic logic circuits (dynamic inverter, NAND and NOR gates). PMID:24923382

  12. Fabrication process of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using atomic layer deposition passivation for biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    Fabrication process of the carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors (FETs) for biosensors was studied. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 was applied to the deposition of the passivation/gate insulator film. The CNT-FETs did not show the drain current degradation after ALD passivation even though the passivation by Si3N4 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) resulted in a significant drain current decrease. This indicates the advantage of the present ALD technique in terms of the damage suppression. The biosensing operation was confirmed using thus fabricated CNT-FETs. PMID:20355371

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  14. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  15. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements. PMID:26540144

  16. Highly stretchable carbon nanotube transistors enabled by buckled ion gel gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Feng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-08-03

    Deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) are expected to facilitate new technologies like stretchable displays, conformal devices, and electronic skins. We previously demonstrated stretchable FETs based on buckled thin films of polyfluorene-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as the channel, buckled metal films as electrodes, and unbuckled flexible ion gel films as the dielectric. The FETs were stretchable up to 50% without appreciable degradation in performance before failure of the ion gel film. Here, we show that by buckling the ion gel, the integrity and performance of the nanotube FETs are extended to nearly 90% elongation, limited by the stretchability of the elastomer substrate. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >10{sup 4} and a field-effect mobility of 5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} under elongation and demonstrate invariant performance over 1000 stretching cycles.

  17. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-21

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology. PMID:27121370

  18. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors; Toward all carbon electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Seo, Miri; Na, Junhong; Kim, Yong Hyeon; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Kim, Jin-Ju; Yun, Hoyeol; Kim, Hakseong; Yoon, Ho-Ang; Kim, Keun Soo; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2014-03-01

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode array on top of the pre-deposited SWNTs which were aligned along one direction. Aligned arrays of SWNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on quartz substrate. The micro scale contact electrodes and following circuit structures were defined by photo lithography on the large area graphene produced by CVD. Both of the single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials. In this presentation, the device fabrication procedure, the contact properties, and the transistor performances of the device structures were discussed. This work was supported by NRF.

  19. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10-19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3-78.8 cm2 (V-s)-1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4-287 cm2 (V-s)-1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  20. Polymer-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotube networks for high-performance ambipolar field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Schiessl, Stefan P; Fröhlich, Nils; Held, Martin; Gannott, Florentina; Schweiger, Manuel; Forster, Michael; Scherf, Ullrich; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-01-14

    Efficient selection of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from as-grown nanotube samples is crucial for their application as printable and flexible semiconductors in field-effect transistors (FETs). In this study, we use atactic poly(9-dodecyl-9-methyl-fluorene) (a-PF-1-12), a polyfluorene derivative with asymmetric side-chains, for the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWNTs with large diameters (>1 nm) from plasma torch-grown SWNTs. Lowering the molecular weight of the dispersing polymer leads to a significant improvement of selectivity. Combining dense semiconducting SWNT networks deposited from an enriched SWNT dispersion with a polymer/metal-oxide hybrid dielectric enables transistors with balanced ambipolar, contact resistance-corrected mobilities of up to 50 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1), low ohmic contact resistance, steep subthreshold swings (0.12-0.14 V/dec) and high on/off ratios (10(6)) even for short channel lengths (<10 μm). These FETs operate at low voltages (<3 V) and show almost no current hysteresis. The resulting ambipolar complementary-like inverters exhibit gains up to 61. PMID:25493421

  1. Polymer-Sorted Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Networks for High-Performance Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficient selection of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from as-grown nanotube samples is crucial for their application as printable and flexible semiconductors in field-effect transistors (FETs). In this study, we use atactic poly(9-dodecyl-9-methyl-fluorene) (a-PF-1-12), a polyfluorene derivative with asymmetric side-chains, for the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWNTs with large diameters (>1 nm) from plasma torch-grown SWNTs. Lowering the molecular weight of the dispersing polymer leads to a significant improvement of selectivity. Combining dense semiconducting SWNT networks deposited from an enriched SWNT dispersion with a polymer/metal-oxide hybrid dielectric enables transistors with balanced ambipolar, contact resistance-corrected mobilities of up to 50 cm2·V–1·s–1, low ohmic contact resistance, steep subthreshold swings (0.12–0.14 V/dec) and high on/off ratios (106) even for short channel lengths (<10 μm). These FETs operate at low voltages (<3 V) and show almost no current hysteresis. The resulting ambipolar complementary-like inverters exhibit gains up to 61. PMID:25493421

  2. Defect Screening Effects of Fluoropolymer Capping in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael; Hersam, Mark; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-03-01

    One of the most promising uses of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is as active channel semiconductor materials in field-effect transistors (FETs). Recent advances in the availability of highly sorted semiconducting SWCNT source material and in printing such nanotubes to realize high-performance thin-film transistors make them very promising candidates for printed electronics. In this presentation, we report on the substantial improvements in the characteristics of SWCNT FET devices and circuits comprised of these devices by the use of coatings of the fluoropolymer containing copolymer, PVDF-TrFE. The origins of these improvements may be attributed to the polar nature of C-F bonds and the local organization of the fluoropolymer at the interfaces with the SWCNTs so as to partially neutralize charged defects. This hypothesis was tested by the experiments using a number of vapor phase polar molecules which produce similar effects on the FET characteristics. The polar vapor experiments show that dipoles can partially neutralize residual charges arising from defects/impurities. The dipole present in polar molecules adopts an orientation that tends to cancel the effects of the charged defect/impurity from the perspective of mobile charges in the SWCNTs.

  3. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency. PMID:22901374

  4. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency. PMID:22901374

  5. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-01

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10-5 of on/off ratio and ~8 cm2 V-1 s-1 of field effect mobility.

  6. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-22

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10(-5) of on/off ratio and approximately 8 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) of field effect mobility. PMID:19567966

  7. Detection of α-fetoprotein in human serum using carbon nanotube transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Lee, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Beom Soo; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2009-03-01

    We have fabricated antibody-coated carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT-FET) sensor for the detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), single chain glycoprotein of 70 kDa that is normally expressed in the fetal liver, in human serum. The AFP-specific antibodies were immobilized on CNT with linker molecule such as pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. To prevent nonspecific adsorption of antigen, we performed blocking procedure using bovine serum albumin (BSA). Antibody-antigen binding was determined by measuring electrical conductance change of FET and took an average of thereshold voltage change before and after binding. Also we checked concentration-dependent conductance change in human serum using both p-type SWNT-FETs and n-type SWNT-FETs.

  8. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-01

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact

  9. Suspended single-walled carbon-nanotube field-effect transistor for gas sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yukiko; Fujita, Yoshihiro; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the pressure dependence of transfer characteristics of suspended single-walled carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors. We find that the gate bias around the charge neutral point with low drain current is appropriate for gas sensing application, while the high gate bias condition with high drain current that induces Joule heating in the suspended region for the desorption of the adsorbed molecules is preferable for the vacuum gauge application based on the heat exchange surrounding gas molecules, where the temperature at the suspended channel is investigated based on the simple one-dimensional heat transport model. We also revealed that the pressure dependence of the channel conductance at the gate bias around the charge neutral point can be explained by the Langmuir isotherm.

  10. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  11. Intrinsic memory function of carbon nanotube-based ferroelectric field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Gu, Changzhi; Wang, Enge

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the intrinsic memory function of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) based on an integration of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and epitaxial ferroelectric films. In contrast to the previously reported "charge-storage" CNT-FET memories, whose operations are haunted by a lack of control over the "charge traps", the present CNT-FeFETs exhibit a well-defined memory hysteresis loop induced by the reversible remnant polarization of the ferroelectric films. Large memory windows approximately 4 V, data retention time up to 1 week, and ultralow power consumption (energy per bit) of femto-joule, are highlighted in this report. Further simulations and experimental results show that the memory device is valid under operation voltage less than 1 V due to an electric-field enhancement effect induced by the ultrathin SWCNTs. PMID:19206218

  12. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon-nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are studied. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, and this makes the device characteristics quite unique. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and inversion and accumulation threshold voltages (V(sub Ti), and V(sub Ta)) are derived. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger doping dependence than that of the metal-oxide- semiconductor FETs, while V(sub Ta) of both devices depends weakly on doping with the same functional form.

  13. Carbon nanotube based field-effect transistors: merits and fundamental limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lian-Mao

    The development of even more powerful computer systems are made possible by scaling of CMOS transistors, and this simple process has afforded continuous improvement in both the device switch time and integration density. However, CMOS scaling has become very difficult at the 22-nm node and unlikely to be rewarding beyond the 14-nm node. Among other new approaches, carbon nanotube devices are emerging as the most promising technique with unique properties that are ideal for nanoelectronics. In particular, perfect n-type and p-type contacts are now available for controlled injection of electrons into the conduction band and holes into the valence band of the CNT, paving the way for a doping free fabrication of CNT based ballistic CMOS, high performance optoelectronic devices, and integrated circuits. These results will be compared with data projected for Si CMOS toward the end of the roadmap at 2026, as well as with those thermodynamic and quantum limits.

  14. Floating-gated memory based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si floating dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seike, Kohei; Fujii, Yusuke; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET)-based nonvolatile memory device with Si floating dots. The electrical characteristics of this memory device were compared with those of devices with a HfO2 charge storage layer or Au floating dots. For a sweep width of 6 V, the memory window of the devices with the Si floating dots increased twofold as compared with that of the devices with the HfO2 layer. Moreover, the retention characteristics revealed that, for the device with the Au floating dots, the off-state had almost the same current as the on-state at the 400th s. However, the devices with the Si floating dots had longer-retention characteristics. The results indicate that CNTFET-based devices with Si floating dots are promising candidates for low-power consumption nonvolatile memory devices.

  15. Performance analysis of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistors using NEGF formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbastegan, Saber; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation study of a junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor (JL-CNTFET) and a comparison is made with the conventional CNTFET using the atomistic scale simulation, within the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, both analog and digital parameters of the device are studied. Results have shown that JL-CNTFET with respect to C-CNTFET shows slightly higher ION/IOFF ratio about two times larger than that of C-CNTFET, smaller electric field along channel more than three order of magnitude and reduced tunneling current about 100 times. In addition, the investigation of analog properties of both devices has exhibited that junctionless structure has a transconductance about two times and an intrinsic gain of 15 dB larger than C-CNTFET in same bias condition which makes JL-CNTFET a promising candidate for low voltage analog applications.

  16. Sensing Reversible Protein–Ligand Interactions with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the reversible detection of CaptAvidin, a tyrosine modified avidin, with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) noncovalently functionalized with biotin moieties using 1-pyrenebutyric acid as a linker. Binding affinities at different pH values were quantified, and the sensor’s response at various ionic strengths was analyzed. Furthermore, protein “fingerprints” of NeutrAvidin and streptavidin were obtained by monitoring their adsorption at several pH values. Moreover, gold nanoparticle decorated SWNT FETs were functionalized with biotin using 1-pyrenebutyric acid as a linker for the CNT surface and (±)-α-lipoic acid linkers for the gold surface, and reversible CaptAvidin binding is shown, paving the way for potential dual mode measurements with the addition of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). PMID:25126155

  17. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  18. Modeling and simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor and its circuit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Saini, Dinesh Kumar; Agarwal, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Sajal; Khosla, Mamta; Raj, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    The carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) is modelled for circuit application. The model is based on the transport mechanism and it directly relates the transport mechanism with the chirality. Also, it does not consider self consistent equations and thus is used to develop the HSPICE compatible circuit model. For validation of the model, it is applied to the top gate CNTFET structure and the MATLAB simulation results are compared with the simulations of a similar structure created in NanoTCAD ViDES. For demonstrating the circuit compatibility of the model, two circuits viz. inverter and SRAM are designed and simulated in HSPICE. Finally, SRAM performance metrics are compared with those of device simulations from Nano TCAD ViDES.

  19. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results.

  20. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-31

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results. PMID:24394672

  1. Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-02-10

    We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at low operating voltages (<5 V) in air. We further show that the SWCNT-ZTO hybrid ambipolar FETs can be integrated into functional inverter circuits that display high peak gain (>10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures.

  2. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  3. The Effect of Hydrophobin Protein on Conductive Properties of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: First Study on Sensing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yotprayoonsakl, Peerapong; Szilvay, Géza R; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Ahlskog, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobin is a surface active protein having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional domains which has previously been used for functionalization and solubilization of graphene and carbon nanotubes. In this work, field-effect transistors based on single nanotubes have been employed for electronic detection of hydrophobin protein in phosphate buffer solution. Individual nanotubes, single- and multiwalled, are characterized by atomic force microscopy after being immersed in protein solution, showing a relatively dense coverage with hydrophobin. We have studied aspects such as nanotube length (0.3-1.2 µm) and the hysteresis effect in the gate voltage dependent conduction. When measured in ambient condition after the exposure to hydrophobin, the resistance increase has a strong dependence on the nanotube length, which we ascribe to mobility degradation and localization effects. The change could be exceptionally large when measured in-situ in solution and at suitable gate voltage conditions, which is shown to relate to the different mechanism behind the hysteresis effect. PMID:26413623

  4. Micropatterned single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for use in high-performance transistors and inverters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woonggi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Dong Yun; Chang, Suk Tai; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2014-06-25

    We demonstrated the solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) source-drain electrodes patterned using a plasma-enhanced detachment patterning method for high-performance organic transistors and inverters. The high-resolution SWNT electrode patterning began with the formation of highly uniform SWNT thin films on a hydrophobic silanized substrate. The SWNT source-drain patterns were then formed by modulating the interfacial energies of the prepatterned elastomeric mold and the SWNT thin film using oxygen plasma. The SWNT films were subsequently selectively delaminated using a rubber mold. The patterned SWNTs could be used as the source-drain electrodes for both n-type PTCDI-C8 and p-type pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs). The n- and p-type devices exhibited good and exactly matched electrical performances, with a field-effect mobility of around 0.15 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an ON/OFF current ratio exceeding 10(6). The single electrode material was used for both the n and p channels, permitting the successful fabrication of a high-performance complementary inverter by connecting a p-type pentacene FET to an n-type PTCDI-C8 FET. This patterning technique was simple, inexpensive, and easily scaled for the preparation of large-area electrode micropatterns for flexible microelectronic device fabrication. PMID:24915751

  5. Solution-Processed Carbon Nanotube and Chemically Synthesized Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Patrick Bryce

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess great potential as high performance semiconducting channels due to their one-dimensional nature, extremely high mobility, and their demonstrated ability to transport electrons ballistically in transistors. However, the presence of metallic CNTs in CNT films and arrays represents a major impediment towards large-scale integration. Methods of solution purification have demonstrated partial success in metallic CNT removal, although their effects on device performance are unknown. While this problem may be solvable, new synthesis techniques have recently resulted in the creation of high-density films of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with atomically smooth edges, uniform widths, and uniform band structure. These may ultimately supplant CNTs in device applications due to their theoretically similar, but uniform electronic properties. This work aims to study the effects of purification of semiconducting CNTs in thin film transistors (TFTs) and to develop methods to increase device performance when metallic CNTs are present. Devices consisting of large networks of CNTs as well as short channel, single CNT devices are characterized to determine the effects of solution processing on CNTs themselves. Short channel, bottom-up GNR devices are fabricated to compare their performance to CNT transistors. The first half of this dissertation describes the methods of integrating CNTs from various sources into transistors. Growth and transfer are described, as well as methods of creating aqueous suspensions for solution processing. Development of novel surfactant materials based on biomimetic polymers used to suspend CNTs in solution are reported and characterized. Methods of deposition out of solution and onto insulating substrates are covered. Device fabrication from start to finish is detailed, with the subtleties of processing required to produce sub 10-nm channel length devices explained. The second half reports devices produced via these techniques

  6. Functionalized carbon nanotube field effect transistors for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle Hsiu-Yu

    Specific, sensitive, reproducible, and rapid detection of chemical and biological species is crucial for the environment, disease diagnosis, and even homeland security. Owing to the miniature size, large surface to volume ratio, high electrical conductivity, and compatibility with dense array fabrication, carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for sensing application. In this thesis we present nanosealed chemical and biological sensors based on functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors (SWNT-FETs). For chemical sensors, single stranded DNA/RNA serve as the chemical recognition sites and SWNT-FETs as the electronic readout components. Non-covalent functionalization of SWNT-FETs with DNA/RNA resulted in current changes when exposed to gaseous analytes, whereas the bare nanotube devices show no detectable change. The sensor responses differ in sign and magnitude depending both on the type of gaseous analyte and the sequence of DNA/RNA being used. DNA/RNA functionalized SWNT-FET gas sensors possess rapid recovery and self-regenerating ability, which could lead to realization of large arrays for sensitive electronic olfaction and disease diagnosis. For biological sensors, we present proof-of-concept experiments for developing highly sensitive and last-response miniaturized SWNT-FET biosensors for electrically detecting adenovirus using ligand-receptor-protein specificity. SWNTs are mildly oxidized to form carboxylic groups on the surfaces without compromising the electronic integrity of the nanotubes. Then the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is covalently functionalized onto the nanotube surface via diimide-activated amidation process. Upon exposure of the device to adenovirus protein, Ad12 Knob (Knob), specific binding of Knob to CAR decreases the current that flows through the SWNT-FET device. For control experiment, the CAR-SWNT device is exposed to YieF, which is a virus protein that does not bind specifically to CAR

  7. High-yield sorting of small-diameter carbon nanotubes for solar cells and transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Koleilat, Ghada I; Liu, Peng; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Lai, Ying-Chih; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Fang, Ya; Park, Steve; Houk, Kendall N; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-03-25

    We describe herein a high-yield method to selectively disperse semiconducting CoMoCAT (CO disproportionation on Co-Mo catalysts) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophenes) polymers. We observed that the dispersion yield was directly related to the length of the polymer's alkyl side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit toluene (real toluene molecules) indicate that polythiophenes with longer alkyl side chains bind strongly to SWNTs, due to the increased overall surface contact area with the nanotube. Furthermore, the sorting process selectively enriches smaller-diameter CoMoCAT SWNTs with larger bandgaps, which is ideal for solar cell applications. Compared to the larger diameter sorted HiPco (High-Pressure CO) SWNTs, solar cells fabricated using our sorted CoMoCAT SWNTs demonstrated higher open-circuit voltage (Voc) and infrared external quantum efficiency (EQE). The Voc achieved is the highest reported for solar cells based on SWNT absorbers under simulated AM1.5 solar illumination. Additionally, we employed the sorted CoMoCAT SWNTs to fabricate thin film transistors with excellent uniformity and device performance. PMID:24484388

  8. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kim, D. Y.; So, Franky; Rinzler, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  9. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-11-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors. PMID:26451806

  10. Highly Uniform Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors and Medium Scale Integrated Circuits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Panpan; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Qiu, Song; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-08-10

    Top-gated p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated in batch based on carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin films prepared from CNT solution and present high yield and highly uniform performance with small threshold voltage distribution with standard deviation of 34 mV. According to the property of FETs, various logical and arithmetical gates, shifters, and d-latch circuits were designed and demonstrated with rail-to-rail output. In particular, a 4-bit adder consisting of 140 p-type CNT FETs was demonstrated with higher packing density and lower supply voltage than other published integrated circuits based on CNT films, which indicates that CNT based integrated circuits can reach to medium scale. In addition, a 2-bit multiplier has been realized for the first time. Benefitted from the high uniformity and suitable threshold voltage of CNT FETs, all of the fabricated circuits based on CNT FETs can be driven by a single voltage as small as 2 V. PMID:27459084

  11. Evaluation of interface trap densities and quantum capacitance in carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, J; Choi, B; Choi, S; Lee, J; Lee, J; Jeon, M; Lee, Y; Han, J; Lee, J; Kim, D M; Kim, D H; Kim, S; Choi, S-J

    2016-07-22

    The interface trap density in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is a fundamental and important parameter for assessing the electronic performance of TFTs. However, the number of studies on the extraction of interface trap densities, particularly in SWNT TFTs, has been insufficient. In this work, we propose an efficient technique for extracting the energy-dependent interface traps in SWNT TFTs. From the measured dispersive, frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, the dispersive-free, frequency-independent C-V curve was obtained, thus enabling the extraction and analysis of the interface trap density, which was found to be approximately 8.2 × 10(11) eV(-1) cm(-2) at the valence band edge. The frequency-independent C-V curve also allows further extraction of the quantum capacitance in the SWNT network without introducing any additional fitting process or parameters. We found that the extracted value of the quantum capacitance in SWNT networks is lower than the theoretical value in aligned SWNTs due to the cross point of SWNTs on the SWNT network. Therefore, the method proposed in this work indicates that the C-V measurement is a powerful tool for obtaining deep physical insights regarding the electrical performance of SWNT TFTs. PMID:27285674

  12. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors with Non-Volatile Memory Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Akita, Seiji; Fujimura, Norifumi; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-10-01

    We describe the fabrication and electrical characteristics of single-wall carbon-nanotubes field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) with a non-volatile memory function using ferroelectric thin films as gate insulators. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs were fabricated using single-wall CNTs synthesized from alcohol by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and sol-gel derived PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 thin films. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs showed modulation of the drain current with the gate voltage and the threshold voltage shift (memory window) on the drain current-gate voltage characteristics. Moreover, the memory window was saturated around 1.1 V as the gate voltage sweeping range increased. These results indicate that carriers in CNTs are controlled by spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric films. Because ferroelectrics exhibit complex couplings between their electrical, structural, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, and because CNTs have unique mechanical and electrical properties, ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs offer promise as potentially useful nanoelectronics devices not only for non-volatile memory elements but also for high-sensitivity sensors.

  13. Evaluation of interface trap densities and quantum capacitance in carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Choi, B.; Choi, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Jeon, M.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, D. M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S.; Choi, S.-J.

    2016-07-01

    The interface trap density in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is a fundamental and important parameter for assessing the electronic performance of TFTs. However, the number of studies on the extraction of interface trap densities, particularly in SWNT TFTs, has been insufficient. In this work, we propose an efficient technique for extracting the energy-dependent interface traps in SWNT TFTs. From the measured dispersive, frequency-dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics, the dispersive-free, frequency-independent C–V curve was obtained, thus enabling the extraction and analysis of the interface trap density, which was found to be approximately 8.2 × 1011 eV‑1 cm‑2 at the valence band edge. The frequency-independent C–V curve also allows further extraction of the quantum capacitance in the SWNT network without introducing any additional fitting process or parameters. We found that the extracted value of the quantum capacitance in SWNT networks is lower than the theoretical value in aligned SWNTs due to the cross point of SWNTs on the SWNT network. Therefore, the method proposed in this work indicates that the C–V measurement is a powerful tool for obtaining deep physical insights regarding the electrical performance of SWNT TFTs.

  14. Strain effects on the performance of zero-Schottky-barrier double-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Md. Abdul; Khosru, Quazi D. M.

    2010-08-01

    Schrodinger's equation is solved using recursive Green's function algorithm self-consistently with Poisson's equation to study the transport physics of uniaxial and torsional strained double-walled (DW) carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) and to analyze their performance. The characteristics and performance of proposed DW CNTFET are compared with existing single-walled (SW) CNTFET. The strain has great impact on the I-V characteristics of both SW and DW CNT devices. Tensile and torsional strains improve greatly the off-state current and on/off current ratio of both devices. Compressive strain improves on-state current, but this improvement is comparatively small. The effect of strain on off-state current, on-state current, and on/off current ratio is higher in SW CNTFET. The inverse subthreshold slope of DW CNTFET is better than SW CNTFET. But the variation in inverse subthreshold slope with strain is smaller in DW CNTFET. Unlike SW CNTFET the on-state transconductance of DW CNTFET improves with tensile and torsional strains, and degrades with compressive strain. The on-state cut-off frequency of DW CNTFET also shows opposite behavior to SW CNTFET with strain following on-state transconductance. Concrete Physical description is provided to explain all above changes with strain.

  15. Enzyme assays using sensor arrays based on ion-selective carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Melzer, K; Bhatt, V Deep; Jaworska, E; Mittermeier, R; Maksymiuk, K; Michalska, A; Lugli, P

    2016-10-15

    In the fields of clinical diagnostics and point-of-care diagnosis as well as food and environmental monitoring there is a high demand for reliable high-throughput, rapid and highly sensitive assays for a simultaneous detection of several analytes in complex and low-volume samples. Sensor platforms based on solution-processable electrolyte-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are a simple and cost-effective alternative for conventional assays. In this work we demonstrate a selective as well as direct detection of the products of an enzyme-substrate interaction, here the for metabolic processes important urea-urease system, with sensors based on spray-coated CNT-FETs. The selective and direct detection is achieved by immobilizing the enzyme urease via certain surface functionalization techniques on the sensor surface and further modifying the active interfaces with polymeric ion-selective membranes as well as pH-sensitive layers. Thereby, we can avoid the generally applied approach for a field-effect based detection of enzyme reactions via detecting changes in the pH value due to an on-going enzymatic reaction and directly detect selectively the products of the enzymatic conversion. Thus, we can realize a buffering-capacity independent monitoring of changes in the substrate concentration. PMID:27140308

  16. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are derived and compared with those of the metal oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, which is the CNT diameter direction, and this makes the CNTFET characteristics quite different from those in MOSFETs. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and it is shown that the familiar relations are still valid because of the macroscopic number of states available in the CNTs. This is in sharp contrast to the cases of quantum dots. Using these relations, we derive an inversion threshold voltage V(sub Ti) and an accumulation threshold voltage V(sub Ta) as a function of the Fermi level E(sub F) in the channel, where E(sub F) is a measure of channel doping. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger dependence than that of MOSFETs, while V(sub Ta)s of both CNTFETs and MOSFETs depend quite weakly on E(sub F) with the same functional form. This means the transition from normally-off mode to normally-on mode is much sharper in CNTFETs as the doping increases, and this property has to be taken into account in circuit design.

  17. Compact model for ballistic MOSFET-like carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolkader, Tarek M.; Fikry, Wael

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a compact model for MOSFET-like ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) is presented. The model is based on calculating the charge and surface potential on the top of the barrier between source and drain using closed-form analytical formulae. The formula for the surface potential is obtained by merging two simplified expressions obtained in two extreme cases (very low and very high gate bias). Two fitting parameters are introduced whose values are extracted by best fitting model results with numerically calculated ones. The model has a continuous derivative and thus it is SPICE-compatible. Accuracy of the model is compared to previous analytical model presented in the literature with numerical results taken as a reference. Proposed model proves to give less relative error over a wide range of gate biases, and for a drain bias up to 0.5 V. In addition, the model enables the calculation of quantum and gate capacitance analytically reproducing the negative capacitance behaviour known in CNFETs.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, Md. Abdul Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-04

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5–22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5–16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ∼59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ∼ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) were found to be ∼0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  19. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. G.; Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H.; Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr; Kim, S. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Md. Abdul; Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-01

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5-22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5-16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ˜59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ˜ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were found to be ˜0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  1. Fluoropolymer coatings for improved carbon nanotube transistor device and circuit performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2014-09-01

    We report on the marked improvements in key device characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) by coating the active semiconductor with a fluoropolymer layer such as poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE). The observed improvements include: (i) A reduction in off-current by about an order of magnitude, (ii) a significant reduction in the variation of threshold voltage, and (iii) a reduction in bias stress-related instability and hysteresis present in device characteristics. These favorable changes in device characteristics also enhance circuit performance and the oscillation amplitude, oscillation frequency, and increase the yield of printed complementary 5-stage ring oscillators. The origins of these improvements are explored by exposing SWCNT FETs to a number of vapor phase polar molecules which produce similar effects on the FET characteristics as the PVDF-TrFE. Coating of the active SWCNT semiconductor layer with a fluoropolymer will be advantageous for the adoption of SWCNT FETs in a variety of printed electronics applications.

  2. Wafer scale fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors with high yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) are promising candidates for future high performance and low cost macro-electronics. However, most of the reported CNT-TFTs are fabricated in small quantities on a relatively small size substrate. The yield of large scale fabrication and the performance uniformity of devices on large size substrates should be improved before the CNT-TFTs reach real products. In this paper, 25 200 devices, with various geometries (channel width and channel length), were fabricated on 4-in. size ridged and flexible substrates. Almost 100% device yield were obtained on a rigid substrate with high out-put current (>8 μA/μm), high on/off current ratio (>105), and high mobility (>30 cm2/V.s). More importantly, uniform performance in 4-in. area was achieved, and the fabrication process can be scaled up. The results give us more confidence for the real application of the CNT-TFT technology in the near future.

  3. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  4. Detection of the Odor Signature of Ovarian Cancer using DNA-Decorated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Christopher; Kybert, Nicholas; Yodh, Jeremy; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Carbon nanotubes are low-dimensional materials that exhibit remarkable chemical and bio-sensing properties and have excellent compatibility with electronic systems. Here, we present a study that uses an electronic olfaction system based on a large array of DNA-carbon nanotube field effect transistors vapor sensors to analyze the VOCs of blood plasma samples collected from patients with malignant ovarian cancer, patients with benign ovarian lesions, and age-matched healthy subjects. Initial investigations involved coating each CNT sensor with single-stranded DNA of a particular base sequence. 10 distinct DNA oligomers were used to functionalize the carbon nanotube field effect transistors, providing a 10-dimensional sensor array output response. Upon performing a statistical analysis of the 10-dimensional sensor array responses, we showed that blood samples from patients with malignant cancer can be reliably differentiated from those of healthy control subjects with a p-value of 3 x 10-5. The results provide preliminary evidence that the blood of ovarian cancer patients contains a discernable volatile chemical signature that can be detected using DNA-CNT nanoelectronic vapor sensors, a first step towards a minimally invasive electronic diagnostic technology for ovarian cancer.

  5. Electronic transport properties of inner and outer shells in near ohmic-contacted double-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuchun; Zhou, Liyan; Zhao, Shangqian; Wang, Wenlong; Liang, Wenjie; Wang, Enge

    2014-06-14

    We investigate electronic transport properties of field-effect transistors based on double-walled carbon nanotubes, of which inner shells are metallic and outer shells are semiconducting. When both shells are turned on, electron-phonon scattering is found to be the dominant phenomenon. On the other hand, when outer semiconducting shells are turned off, a zero-bias anomaly emerges in the dependence of differential conductance on the bias voltage, which is characterized according to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid model describing tunneling into one-dimensional materials. We attribute these behaviors to different contact conditions for outer and inner shells of the double-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model combining Luttinger liquid model for inner metallic shells and electron-phonon scattering in outer semiconducting shells is given here to explain our transport data at different temperatures.

  6. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  7. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  8. Improving Contact Interfaces in Fully Printed Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changyong; Andrews, Joseph B; Kumar, Abhinay; Franklin, Aaron D

    2016-05-24

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) printed into thin films have been shown to yield high mobility, thermal conductivity, mechanical flexibility, and chemical stability as semiconducting channels in field-effect, thin-film transistors (TFTs). Printed CNT-TFTs of many varieties have been studied; however, there has been limited effort toward improving overall CNT-TFT performance. In particular, contact resistance plays a dominant role in determining the performance and degree of variability in the TFTs, especially in fully printed devices where the contacts and channel are both printed. In this work, we have systematically investigated the contact resistance and overall performance of fully printed CNT-TFTs employing three different printed contact materials-Ag nanoparticles, Au nanoparticles, and metallic CNTs-each in the following distinct contact geometries: top, bottom, and double. The active channel for each device was printed from the dispersion of high-purity (>99%) semiconducting CNTs, and all printing was carried out using an aerosol jet printer. Hundreds of devices with different channel lengths (from 20 to 500 μm) were fabricated for extracting contact resistance and determining related contact effects. Printed bottom contacts are shown to be advantageous compared to the more common top contacts, regardless of contact material. Further, compared to single (top or bottom) contacts, double contacts offer a significant decrease (>35%) in contact resistance for all types of contact materials, with the metallic CNTs yielding the best overall performance. These findings underscore the impact of printed contact materials and structures when interfacing with CNT thin films, providing key guidance for the further development of printed nanomaterial electronics. PMID:27097302

  9. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  10. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (+/-2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec-1), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm2 V-1 s-1) and high on/off ratio (104-107). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge

  11. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors.Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed

  12. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  13. Radio Frequency Transistors Using Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with Current-Gain Cutoff Frequency and Maximum Oscillation Frequency Simultaneously Greater than 70 GHz.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Brady, Gerald J; Gui, Hui; Rutherglen, Chris; Arnold, Michael S; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we report record radio frequency (RF) performance of carbon nanotube transistors based on combined use of a self-aligned T-shape gate structure, and well-aligned, high-semiconducting-purity, high-density polyfluorene-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which were deposited using dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly method. These transistors show outstanding direct current (DC) performance with on-current density of 350 μA/μm, transconductance as high as 310 μS/μm, and superior current saturation with normalized output resistance greater than 100 kΩ·μm. These transistors create a record as carbon nanotube RF transistors that demonstrate both the current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) greater than 70 GHz. Furthermore, these transistors exhibit good linearity performance with 1 dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 14 dBm and input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 22 dBm. Our study advances state-of-the-art of carbon nanotube RF electronics, which have the potential to be made flexible and may find broad applications for signal amplification, wireless communication, and wearable/flexible electronics. PMID:27327074

  14. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption. PMID:26847814

  15. Enhanced ambipolar charge injection with semiconducting polymer/carbon nanotube thin films for light-emitting transistors.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, Michael C; Jakubka, Florian; Gannott, Florentina; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zaumseil, Jana

    2012-01-24

    We investigate the influence of small amounts of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in polyfluorenes such as poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (F8) on device characteristics of bottom contact/top gate ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistors (LEFETs) based on these conjugated polymers. We find that the presence of SWNTs within the semiconducting layer at concentrations below the percolation limit significantly increases both hole and electron injection, even for a large band gap semiconductor like F8, without leading to significant luminescence quenching of the conjugated polymer. As a result of the reduced contact resistance and lower threshold voltages, larger ambipolar currents and thus brighter light emission are observed. We examine possible mechanisms of this effect such as energy level alignment, reduced bulk resistance above the contacts, and field-enhanced injection at the nanotube tips. The observed ambipolar injection improvement is applicable to most conjugated polymers in staggered transistor configurations or similar organic electronic devices where injection barriers are an issue. PMID:22142143

  16. Unipolar p-type single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors using TTF-TCNQ as the contact material.

    PubMed

    Xian, Xiaojun; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Wei; Jiao, Liying; Wu, Zhongyun; Liu, Zhongfan

    2009-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that organic metal tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) can serve as an ideal material for source and drain electrodes to build unipolar p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) field-effect transistors (FETs). SWNTs were synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on silicon wafer and then TTF-TCNQ was deposited by thermal evaporation through a shadow mask to form the source and drain contacts. An SiO2 layer served as the gate dielectric and Si was used as the backgate. Transfer characteristics show that these TTF-TCNQ contacted devices are Schottky barrier transistors just like conventional metal contacted SWNT-FETs. The most interesting characteristic of these SWNT transistors is that all devices demonstrate the unipolar p-type transport behavior. This behavior originates from the unique crystal structure and physical properties of TTF-TCNQ and this device may have potential applications in carbon nanotube electronics. PMID:19923654

  17. Unipolar p-type single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors using TTF-TCNQ as the contact material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Xiaojun; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Wei; Jiao, Liying; Wu, Zhongyun; Liu, Zhongfan

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate herein that organic metal tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) can serve as an ideal material for source and drain electrodes to build unipolar p-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) field-effect transistors (FETs). SWNTs were synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on silicon wafer and then TTF-TCNQ was deposited by thermal evaporation through a shadow mask to form the source and drain contacts. An SiO2 layer served as the gate dielectric and Si was used as the backgate. Transfer characteristics show that these TTF-TCNQ contacted devices are Schottky barrier transistors just like conventional metal contacted SWNT-FETs. The most interesting characteristic of these SWNT transistors is that all devices demonstrate the unipolar p-type transport behavior. This behavior originates from the unique crystal structure and physical properties of TTF-TCNQ and this device may have potential applications in carbon nanotube electronics.

  18. Probing Biological Processes on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose Manuel; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2006-03-01

    We have formed supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) by small unilamellar vesicle fusion on substrates containing single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs). We are able to detect the self-assembly of SLBs electrically with SWNT-FETs since their threshold voltages are shifted by this event. The SLB fully covers the NT surface and lipid molecules can diffuse freely in the bilayer surface across the NT. To study the interactions of important biological entities with receptors imbedded within the membrane, we have also integrated a membrane protein, GT1b ganglioside, in the bilayer. While bare gangliosides can diffuse freely across the NT, interestingly the NT acts as a diffusion barrier for the gangliosides when they are bound with tetanus toxin. This experiment opens the possibility of using SWNT-FETs as biosensors for label-free detection.

  19. Low voltage, high performance inkjet printed carbon nanotube transistors with solution processed ZrO2 gate insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-08-01

    High-performance single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors are fabricated by single-pass inkjet printing of SWCNTs on high-κ solution-processed ZrO2 gate dielectric. We demonstrate that an ultraviolet ozone treatment of the ZrO2 substrate is critical in achieving a uniform dispersion of sorted SWCNTs in the semiconducting channel. The resulting devices exhibit excellent performance with mobility and on/off current ratio exceeding 30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 105, respectively, at low operating voltages (<5 V). The single-pass inkjet printing process demonstrated in this letter shows great promise as a reliable and scalable method for SWCNT based high performance electronics.

  20. Accurate extraction of mobility in carbon nanotube network transistors using C-V and I-V measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Dongil; Kim, Chaewon; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Bongsik; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Mijung; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2014-11-01

    The mobility of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is an essential parameter. Previous extraction methods for mobility encountered problems in extracting accurate intrinsic mobility due to the uncertainty of the SWNT density in the network channel and the existence of contact resistance at the source/drain electrodes. As a result, efficient and accurate extraction of the mobility in SWNT TFTs is challenging using previous methods. We propose a direct method of extracting accurate intrinsic mobility in SWNT TFTs by employing capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements. Consequently, we simply obtain accurate intrinsic mobility within the ink-jet printed SWNT TFTs without any complicated calculations.

  1. Single charge detection in capacitively coupled integrated single electron transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Ishibashi, Koji

    2012-09-01

    Single charge detection is demonstrated in the capacitively coupled integrated single electron transistors (SETs) in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) quantum dots. Two SETs are fabricated based on two different SWCNTs aligned in parallel, by taking advantage of the aligned growth of SWCNTs and subsequent transfer-printed techniques. In order to make both two SETs be capacitively coupled, a metal finger is fabricated on the top of them. The charge sensing is proved by the response of a detector current in one SWCNT-SET when the number of electrons in the other SWCNT-SET is changed by sweeping the corresponding gate voltages. In this integrated device, shifts of Coulomb oscillation peaks due to the single electron event are also observed.

  2. Thin-film transistors using DNA-wrapped semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with selected chiralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuki; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Selected semiconducting chiralities, (7,5), (7,6), and (8,4), of DNA-wrapped single-wall carbon nanotubes (DNA-SWCNTs) were used for thin-film transistors (TFTs). Chirality separation was carried out by ion exchange chromatography (IEX) with the ssDNA of the (TAT)4 sequence. An on/off ratio of 3.8 × 106 with a carrier mobility of 11 cm2/(V·s) was successfully achieved in the fabricated SWCNT-TFTs. The comparison between the on/off ratios obtained before (101-102) and after IEX (104-107) indicated that the IEX separation process sufficiently improves the performance of SWCNT-TFTs because of the reducing metallic SWCNT pathways in the TFT channel.

  3. Attachment of a Genetically Engineered Antibody to a Carbon Nanotube Transistor for Detection of Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Dailey, Jennifer; Goldsmith, Brett; Robinson, Matthew; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel detection method for osteopontin (OPN) by attaching an engineered single chain variable fragment (scFv) protein with high binding affinity for OPN to a carbon nanotube transistor. Osteopontin is a potential new biomarker for prostate cancer; its presence in humans is already associated with several forms of cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis and stress. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and as such represents a major public health issue. Detection of early-stage cancer often results in successful treatment, with long term disease-free survival in 60-90% of patients. Electronic transport measurements are used to detect the presence of OPN in solution at clinically relevant concentrations.

  4. Role of hybridization on the Schottky barrier height of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casterman, D.; de Souza, M. M.; Tahraoui, A.; Durkan, C.; Milne, W. I.

    2009-03-01

    The impact of hybridization on the Schottky barrier height (SBH) for holes at a metal/nanotube contact is investigated using ab initio density-functional theory. For small diameters, the impact of hybridization is a deviation of the SBH in comparison to that calculated using the “ 1/d ” rule, where d is the diameter of the carbon nanotube (CNT). In the hybridization region, the SBH reduces with chiral angle, suggesting that CNTs in this region may well be suited to microelectronic applications due to small SBH and large band gaps. Hybridization also causes a difference between the effective mass of electrons and holes, supposed to be identical within the tight-binding approximation. A strongly patterned behavior of the effective mass dependent on chirality and diameter is also reported here.

  5. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm2 (V s)-1 and an on/off ratio up to 107. Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their

  6. Contact and channel resistances of ballistic and non-ballistic carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Myeon; Hong, Shin-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Recently, many research has been conducted on the carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) in expectation that the CNFETs could replace metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in the sub-10-nm era. In consideration of both ballistic conduction and nonballistic conduction, including elastic scattering, optical phonon scattering, and acoustic phonon scattering, this paper presents the simulated dependence of the coaxially-gated single-walled semiconducting CNFET characteristics on the contact and the channel lengths. When the contact length was longer than 100 nm, the CNFETs showed a constant minimal value of the contact resistance. In this case, the saturated drain current was higher than that of CNFETs with a shorter contact length. When the channel was longer than 600 nm, the channel resistance was significantly increased due to acoustic phonon scattering. When the channel was shorter than 200 - 250 nm with optical scattering, acoustic scattering or all three scattering mechanisms taken into account, the contact resistance began to become larger than channel resistance.

  7. Transistors: Chemically Functionalized, Well-Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Doped Zinc Oxide for Low-Cost, High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors (Small 14/2016).

    PubMed

    Son, Gi-Cheol; Chee, Sang-Soo; Jun, Ji-Hyun; Son, Myungwoo; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2016-04-01

    A simple, wet-chemical method for the surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes with hydrophilic groups is introduced in Li-doped ZnO by S. Jeong, M. H. Ham, and co-workers, on page 1859. This results in the uniform spatial distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in ultrathin ZnO-based matrix oxides, and facilitates high-mobility, low-cost metal-oxide-based thin-film transistors. This approach is compatible with various film formation processes, even printing processes, and enables the realization of high-performance, cost-effective, large-area electronics and displays based on metal oxides. PMID:27061455

  8. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  9. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  10. From transistor to nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudenot, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    We present here the main steps in the evolution of the transistor, since the tremendous invention of such a device and the introduction of the integrated circuit. We will then recall the main steps of Moore's law development. Nanotechnology began at the very beginning of the 21st century. Two aspects are presented in this article: the first, called 'More Moore', consists in continuing the laws of scale up to the physical limits; the second aspect, called 'beyond CMOS' explores new concepts such as spintronics, moletronics, nanotronics and other types of molecular electronics. To cite this article: J.-C. Boudenot, C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  11. Direct growth of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes between electrodes and its application to field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Jang, B; Iijima, T; Tokunaga, T; Hayashi, A; Tanemura, M; Amaratunga, G A J

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents direct growth of horizontally-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) between two predefined various inter-spacing up to tens of microns of electrodes (pads) and its use as CNT field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs). Using the conventional photolithography technique followed by thin film evaporation and lift off, the catalytic electrodes (pads) were prepared, consisting of Pt, Al and Fe triple layers on SiO2/Si substrate. The grown CNTs were horizontally-aligned across the catalytic electrodes on the modified gold image furnace hot stage (thermal CVD) at 800 degrees C by using an alcohol vapor as the carbon source. Scanning and transmission electron microcopies (SEM/TEM) were used to observe the structure, growth direction and density of CNTs, while Raman spectrum analysis was used to indicate the degree of amorphous impurity and diameter of CNTs. Both single- and multi-wall CNTs with diameters of 1.1-2.2 nm were obtained and the CNT density was controlled by thickness of Fe catalytic layer. Following horizontally-aligned growth of CNTs, the electrical properties of back-gate CNT-FETs were measured and showd p-type conduction behaviors of FET. PMID:22409045

  12. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  13. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V−1 sec−1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  14. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V‑1 sec‑1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process.

  15. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-)1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 10(4)), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  16. Carbon nanotube feedback-gate field-effect transistor: suppressing current leakage and increasing on/off ratio.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhong, Donglai; Si, Jia; Yang, Yingjun; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-01-27

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on moderate or large diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) usually suffer from ambipolar behavior, large off-state current and small current on/off ratio, which are highly undesirable for digital electronics. To overcome these problems, a feedback-gate (FBG) FET structure is designed and tested. This FBG FET differs from normal top-gate FET by an extra feedback-gate, which is connected directly to the drain electrode of the FET. It is demonstrated that a FBG FET based on a semiconducting CNT with a diameter of 1.5 nm may exhibit low off-state current of about 1 × 10(-13) A, high current on/off ratio of larger than 1 × 10(8), negligible drain-induced off-state leakage current, and good subthreshold swing of 75 mV/DEC even at large source-drain bias and room temperature. The FBG structure is promising for CNT FETs to meet the standard for low-static-power logic electronics applications, and could also be utilized for building FETs using other small band gap semiconductors to suppress leakage current. PMID:25545108

  17. Selective Dispersion of Highly Pure Large-Diameter Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes by a Flavin for Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsuk; Kim, Somin; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Hong, Sukhyun; Im, Seongil; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Scalable and simple methods for selective extraction of pure, semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is of profound importance for electronic and photovoltaic applications. We report a new, one-step procedure to obtain respective large-diameter s- and metallic (m)-SWNT enrichment purity in excess of 99% and 78%, respectively, via interaction between the aromatic dispersing agent and SWNTs. The approach utilizes N-dodecyl isoalloxazine (FC12) as a surfactant in conjunction with sonication and benchtop centrifugation methods. After centrifugation, the supernatant is enriched in s-SWNTs with less carbonaceous impurities, whereas precipitate is enhanced in m-SWNTs. In addition, the use of an increased centrifugal force enhances both the purity and population of larger diameter s-SWNTs. Photoinduced energy transfer from FC12 to SWNTs is facilitated by respective electronic level alignment. Owing to its peculiar photoreduction capability, FC12 can be employed to precipitate SWNTs upon UV irradiation and observe absorption of higher optical transitions of SWNTs. A thin-film transistor prepared from a dispersion of enriched s-SWNTs was fabricated to verify electrical performance of the sorted sample and was observed to display p-type conductance with an average on/off ratio over 10(6) and an average mobility over 10 cm(2)/V·s. PMID:27538495

  18. Carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Postma, Henk W. Ch.; Balents, Leon; Dekker, Cees

    1999-11-01

    The ultimate device miniaturization would be to use individual molecules as functional devices. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for achieving this: depending on their diameter and chirality, they are either one-dimensional metals or semiconductors. Single-electron transistors employing metallic nanotubes and field-effect transistors employing semiconducting nanotubes have been demonstrated. Intramolecular devices have also been proposed which should display a range of other device functions. For example, by introducing a pentagon and a heptagon into the hexagonal carbon lattice, two tube segments with different atomic and electronic structures can be seamlessly fused together to create intramolecular metal-metal, metal-semiconductor, or semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. Here we report electrical transport measurements on SWNTs with intramolecular junctions. We find that a metal-semiconductor junction behaves like a rectifying diode with nonlinear transport characteristics that are strongly asymmetric with respect to bias polarity. In the case of a metal-metal junction, the conductance appears to be strongly suppressed and it displays a power-law dependence on temperatures and applied voltage, consistent with tunnelling between the ends of two Luttinger liquids. Our results emphasize the need to consider screening and electron interactions when designing and modelling molecular devices. Realization of carbon-based molecular electronics will require future efforts in the controlled production of these intramolecular nanotube junctions.

  19. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sung Hun E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A. E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  20. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  1. Highly sensitive potassium-doped polypyrrole/carbon nanotube-based enzyme field effect transistor (ENFET) for cholesterol detection.

    PubMed

    Barik, Md Abdul; Sarma, Manoj Kumar; Sarkar, C R; Dutta, Jiten Ch

    2014-10-01

    Highly sensitive potassium (K)-doped carbon nanotube (CNT) and polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite membrane-based enzyme field effect transistor (ENFET) has been fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) for detection of cholesterol. P-type graphene has been deposited as substrate on ITO glass electrochemically. N-type graphene has been deposited in source and drain regions. Zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) has been deposited on the channel region as gate insulator. K/PPy/CNT composite has been deposited as sensing membrane on the top of ZrO2 layer; 1 μl of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on K/PPy/CNT membrane via physical adsorption technique. The response of K/PPy/CNT/FET has been studied using Agilent 3458A digital multimeter in presence of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) of 50 mM, pH 7.0 and 0.9 % NaCl contained in a glass pot. During measurement, 20 μl cholesterol solutions (0.5 to 25 mM) were poured into the pot through micropipette each time. It has been found that K/PPy/CNT/FET has linearly varied from 0.5 to 20 mM. The sensitivity of this FET has been found to be ~400 μA/mM/mm(2) with regression coefficient (r) ~ 0.998. The proposed ENFET has response time of 1 s and stability up to 6 months. The experiment has been repeated 10 times, and only 2.0 % output variation has been observed. The limit of detection (LoD) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) were found to be ~1.4 and 2.5 mM, respectively. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference (3.7 %) with uric acid, glucose and urea. PMID:25005579

  2. Scalable and selective dispersion of semiconducting arc-discharged carbon nanotubes by dithiafulvalene/thiophene copolymers for thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Mei, Jianguo; Liu, Peng; Schmidt, Kristin; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Fang, Lei; Tassone, Christopher J; Zoombelt, Arjan Pieter; Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Houk, Kendall N; Toney, Michael F; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-03-26

    We report a simple and scalable method to enrich large quantities of semiconducting arc-discharged single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with diameters of 1.1-1.8 nm using dithiafulvalene/thiophene copolymers. Stable solutions of highly individualized and highly enriched semiconducting SWNTs were obtained after a simple sonication and centrifuge process. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of polymer backbone interactions with and without side chains indicated that the presence of long alkyl side chains gave rise to the selectivity toward semiconducting tubes, indicating the importance of the roles of the side chains to both solubilize and confer selectivity to the polymers. We found that, by increasing the ratio of thiophene to dithiafulvalene units in the polymer backbone (from pDTFF-1T to pDTFF-3T), we can slightly improve the selectivity toward semiconducting SWNTs. This is likely due to the more flexible backbone of pDTFF-3T that allows the favorable wrapping of SWNTs with certain chirality as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering. However, the dispersion yield was reduced from pDTFF-1T to pDTFF-3T. MD simulations showed that the reduction is due to the smaller polymer/SWNT contact area, which reduces the dispersion ability of pDTFF-3T. These experimental and modeling results provide a better understanding for future rational design of polymers for sorting SWNTs. Finally, high on/off ratio solution-processed thin film transistors were fabricated from the sorted SWNTs to confirm the selective dispersion of semiconducting arc-discharge SWNTs. PMID:23402644

  3. Polyfluorene-sorted, carbon nanotube array field-effect transistors with increased current density and high on/off ratio.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Joo, Yongho; Wu, Meng-Yin; Shea, Matthew J; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2014-11-25

    Challenges in eliminating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and in controlling their alignment have limited the development of high-performance SWCNT-based field-effect transistors (FETs). We recently pioneered an approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultra-high-purity semiconducting SWCNTs, isolated using polyfluorene derivatives, called dose-controlled floating evaporative self-assembly. Here, we tailor FETs fabricated from these arrays to achieve on-conductance (G(on)) per width and an on-off ratio (G(on)/G(off)) of 261 μS/μm and 2 × 10(5), respectively, for a channel length (L(ch)) of 240 nm and 116 μS/μm and 1 × 10(6), respectively, for an L(ch) of 1 μm. We demonstrate 1400× greater G(on)/G(off) than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable G(on) per width of ∼250 μS/μm and 30-100× greater G(on) per width at comparable G(on)/G(off) of 10(5)-10(7). The average G(on) per tube reaches 5.7 ± 1.4 μS at a packing density of 35 tubes/μm for L(ch) in the range 160-240 nm, limited by contact resistance. These gains highlight the promise of using ultra-high-purity semiconducting SWCNTs with controlled alignment for next-generation semiconductor electronics. PMID:25383880

  4. Chemically Functionalized, Well-Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Doped Zinc Oxide for Low-Cost, High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Son, Gi-Cheol; Chee, Sang-Soo; Jun, Ji-Hyun; Son, Myungwoo; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2016-04-13

    Surface-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are introduced into lithium-doped ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) as an alternative to the conventional incorporation of an expensive element, indium. The crucial role of surface functionalization of CNTs is clarified with the demonstration of indium-free ZnO-based TFTs with a field-effect mobility of 28.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 9 × 10(6) for low-cost, high-performance electronics. PMID:26856958

  5. Band-to-band tunneling in a carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is dominated by phonon-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Koswatta, Siyuranga O; Lundstrom, Mark S; Nikonov, Dmitri E

    2007-05-01

    Band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) devices have recently gained a lot of interest due to their potential for reducing power dissipation in integrated circuits. We have performed extensive simulations for the BTBT operation of carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CNT-MOSFETs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism for both ballistic and dissipative quantum transport. In comparison with recently reported experimental data (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 3518-3519), we have obtained strong evidence that BTBT in CNT-MOSFETs is dominated by optical phonon assisted inelastic transport, which can have important implications on the transistor characteristics. It is shown that, under large biasing conditions, two-phonon scattering may also become important. PMID:17388638

  6. A study of junction effect transistors and their roles in carbon nanotube field emission cathodes in compact pulsed power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Qiong

    This thesis is focusing on a study of junction effect transistors (JFETs) in compact pulsed power applications. Pulsed power usually requires switches with high hold-off voltage, high current, low forward voltage drop, and fast switching speed. 4H-SiC, with a bandgap of 3.26 eV (The bandgap of Si is 1.12eV) and other physical and electrical superior properties, has gained much attention in high power, high temperature and high frequency applications. One topic of this thesis is to evaluate if 4H-SiC JFETs have a potential to replace gas phase switches to make pulsed power system compact and portable. Some other pulsed power applications require cathodes of providing stable, uniform, high electron-beam current. So the other topic of this research is to evaluate if Si JFET-controlled carbon nanotube field emitter cold cathode will provide the necessary e-beam source. In the topic of "4H-SiC JFETs", it focuses on the design and simulation of a novel 4H-SiC normally-off VJFET with high breakdown voltage using the 2-D simulator ATLAS. To ensure realistic simulations, we utilized reasonable physical models and the established parameters as the input into these models. The influence of key design parameters were investigated which would extend pulsed power limitations. After optimizing the key design parameters, with a 50-mum drift region, the predicted breakdown voltage for the VJFET is above 8kV at a leakage current of 1x10-5A/cm2 . The specific on-state resistance is 35 mO·cm 2 at VGS = 2.7 V, and the switching speed is several ns. The simulation results suggest that the 4H-SiC VJFET is a potential candidate for improving switching performance in repetitive pulsed power applications. To evaluate the 4H-SiC VJFETs in pulsed power circuits, we extracted some circuit model parameters from the simulated I-V curves. Those parameters are necessary for circuit simulation program such as SPICE. This method could be used as a test bench without fabricating the devices to

  7. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  8. The effect of local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin film on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Taichi; Miyato, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kei; Ishida, Kenji; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2008-01-23

    We produced local polarized domains of ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin films on a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CN-FET) channel by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The drain current versus gate voltage (I(d)-V(g)) curves measured after forming the local polarized domains showed a shift in the threshold voltages. We also found that the amount of the shifts in the threshold voltages gradually decreased during the measurement of this characteristic over 100 h after forming the polarized domains. The mechanisms of the shifts in the threshold voltages and their decreasing behaviour were explained in terms of the excessive charges that were induced upon the formation of the polarized domains. PMID:21817562

  9. Carbon Based Transistors and Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, Nima

    Carbon based materials (carbon nanotube and graphene) has been extensively researched during the past decade as one of the promising materials to be used in high performance device technology. In long term it is thought that they may replace digital and/or analog electronic devices, due to their size, near-ballistic transport, and high stability. However, a more realistic point of insertion into market may be the printed nanoelectronic circuits and sensors. These applications include printed circuits for flexible electronics and displays, large-scale bendable electrical contacts, bio-membranes and bio sensors, RFID tags, etc. In order to obtain high performance thin film transistors (as the basic building block of electronic circuits) one should be able to manufacture dense arrays of all semiconducting nanotubes. Besides, graphene synthesize and transfer technology is in its infancy and there is plenty of room to improve the current techniques. To realize the performance of nanotube and graphene films in such systems, we need to economically fabricate large-scale devices based on these materials. Following that the performance control over such devices should also be considered for future design variations for broad range of applications. Here we have first investigated carbon nanotube ink as the base material for our devices. The primary ink used consisted of both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes which resulted in networks suitable for moderate-resistivity electrical connections (such as interconnects) and rfmatching circuits. Next, purified all-semiconducting nanotube ink was used to fabricate waferscale, high performance (high mobility, and high on/off ratio) thin film transistors for printed electronic applications. The parameters affecting device performance were studied in detail to establish a roadmap for the future of purified nanotube ink printed thin film transistors. The trade of between mobility and on/off ratio of such devices was studied and the

  10. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  11. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  12. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  13. Simultaneous Improvement of Hole and Electron Injection in Organic Field-effect Transistors by Conjugated Polymer-wrapped Carbon Nanotube Interlayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Khim, Dongyoon; Xu, Yong; Kim, Juhwan; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Efficient charge injection is critical for flexible organic electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we investigated conjugated polymer-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) as solution-processable charge-injection layers in ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with poly(thienylenevinylene-co-phthalimide)s. The interlayers were prepared using poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) or poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) to wrap s-SWNTs. In the contact-limited ambipolar OFETs, the interlayer led to significantly lower contact resistance (Rc) and increased mobilities for both holes and electrons. The resulting PTVPhI-Eh OFETs with PFO-wrapped s-SWNT interlayers showed very well-balanced ambipolar transport properties with a hole mobility of 0.5 cm(2)V(-1)S(-1) and an electron mobility of 0.5 cm(2)V(-1)S(-1) in linear regime. In addition, the chirality of s-SWNTs and kind of wrapping of conjugated polymers are not critical to improving charge-injection properties. We found that the improvements caused by the interlayer were due to the better charge injection at the metal/organic semiconductor contact interface and the increase in the charge concentration through a detailed examination of charge transport with low-temperature measurements. Finally, we successfully demonstrated complementary ambipolar inverters incorporating the interlayers without excessive patterning. PMID:26001198

  14. Simultaneous Improvement of Hole and Electron Injection in Organic Field-effect Transistors by Conjugated Polymer-wrapped Carbon Nanotube Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Khim, Dongyoon; Xu, Yong; Kim, Juhwan; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-05-01

    Efficient charge injection is critical for flexible organic electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we investigated conjugated polymer-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) as solution-processable charge-injection layers in ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with poly(thienylenevinylene-co-phthalimide)s. The interlayers were prepared using poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) or poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) to wrap s-SWNTs. In the contact-limited ambipolar OFETs, the interlayer led to significantly lower contact resistance (Rc) and increased mobilities for both holes and electrons. The resulting PTVPhI-Eh OFETs with PFO-wrapped s-SWNT interlayers showed very well-balanced ambipolar transport properties with a hole mobility of 0.5 cm2V-1S-1 and an electron mobility of 0.5 cm2V-1S-1 in linear regime. In addition, the chirality of s-SWNTs and kind of wrapping of conjugated polymers are not critical to improving charge-injection properties. We found that the improvements caused by the interlayer were due to the better charge injection at the metal/organic semiconductor contact interface and the increase in the charge concentration through a detailed examination of charge transport with low-temperature measurements. Finally, we successfully demonstrated complementary ambipolar inverters incorporating the interlayers without excessive patterning.

  15. Plumbing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chuanhong; Suenaga, Kazu; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery, the possibility of connecting carbon nanotubes together like water pipes has been an intriguing prospect for these hollow nanostructures. The serial joining of carbon nanotubes in a controlled manner offers a promising approach for the bottom-up engineering of nanotube structures-from simply increasing their aspect ratio to making integrated carbon nanotube devices. To date, however, there have been few reports of the joining of two different carbon nanotubes. Here we demonstrate that a Joule heating process, and associated electro-migration effects, can be used to connect two carbon nanotubes that have the same (or similar) diameters. More generally, with the assistance of a tungsten metal particle, this technique can be used to seamlessly join any two carbon nanotubes-regardless of their diameters-to form new nanotube structures.

  16. Carbon nanotube devices: Sorting, Assembling, Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, Ralph

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively over the last decade. Various exceptional properties have been revealed which still drive the vision about using carbon nanotube in future electronics, for instance as molecular nanoscale transistors or electromigration resistant interconnects. For many years a major obstacle was the inability to grow nanotubes with defined dimensions (length, diameter) and electronic properties (metallic,semiconducting). Recently those problems have been solved to a large extent by advanced sorting techniques. Today the challenge is to assemble nanotubes devices with defined properties to form a complex circuitry. As progress is made in making highly-integrated nanotube device arrays new characterization techniques have to be developed which allow testing large number of devices within an acceptable time. Along this line I will report on the state-of-the-art of sorting of carbon nanotube, as a base for nanotube device fabrication [1]. I will then explain our strategy to assemble high-density arrays of nanotube devices [2] and discuss a new characterization technique for nanotube devices [3]. Finally I will introduce a novel device engineering tool [4]. [4pt] [1] R. Krupke et al., ``Separation techniques for carbon nanotubes'' in Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes, p.129-139, American Scientific Publishers 2008[0pt] [2] A. Vijayaraghavan et al., ``Ultra-Large-Scale Directed Assembly of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Devices'', Nano Lett. 7 (2007) 1556-1560[0pt] [3] A. Vijayaraghavan et al., ``Imaging Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes by Voltage-Contrast Scanning Electron Microscopy'', Nano Resarch 1 (2008) 321-332[0pt] [4] C. W. Marquardt et al., ``Reversible metal-insulator transitions in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes'', Nano Lett. 9 (2008) 2767-2772

  17. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  18. Influence of redox molecules on the electronic conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors: application to chemical and biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Boussaad, Salah; Diner, Bruce A; Fan, Janine

    2008-03-26

    In an effort to develop sensitive nanoscale devices for chemical and biological sensing, we have examined, using liquid gating, the conductance of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube-based field-effect transistors (SWCNT-FETs) in the presence of redox mediators. As examples, redox couples K3Fe(CN)6/K4Fe(CN)6 and K2IrCl6/K3IrCl6 are shown to modulate the SWCNT-FET conductance in part through their influence via the electrolyte gate on the electrostatic potential of the solution, as described by Larrimore et al. (Nano Lett. 2006, 6, 3129-1333) and in part through electron transfer between the redox mediators and the nanotubes. In the latter case, the rate of electron transfer is determined by the difference in chemical potential between the redox mediator and the SWCNTs and by the concentrations of the oxidized and reduced forms of the redox couple. Furthermore, these devices can detect the activity of redox enzymes through their sensitivity to the change in oxidation state of the enzyme substrate. An example is given for the blue copper oxidase, Trametes versicolor laccase, in which the rate of change of the SWCNT device conductance is linearly proportional to the rate of oxidation of the substrate 10-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenoxazine, varied over 2 orders of magnitude by the laccase concentration in the picomolar range. The behavior described in this work provides a highly sensitive means with which to do chemical and biological sensing using SWCNTs that is different from the amperometric, capacitive, and field-effect type sensing methods previously described in the literature for this material. PMID:18321094

  19. Highly enhanced gas sensing in single-walled carbon nanotube-based thin-film transistor sensors by ultraviolet light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingting; Wei, Liangming; Zhou, Zhihua; Shi, Diwen; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yuan; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) random networks are easily fabricated on a wafer scale, which provides an attractive path to large-scale SWCNT-based thin-film transistor (TFT) manufacturing. However, the mixture of semiconducting SWCNTs and metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) in the networks significantly limits the TFT performance due to the m-SWCNTs dominating the charge transport. In this paper, we have achieved a uniform and high-density SWCNT network throughout a complete 3-in. Si/SiO2 wafer using a solution-based assembly method. We further utilized UV radiation to etch m-SWCNTs from the networks, and a remarkable increase in the channel current on/off ratio ( I on/ I off) from 11 to 5.6 × 103 was observed. Furthermore, we used the SWCNT-TFTs as gas sensors to detect methyl methylphosphonate, a stimulant of benchmark threats. It was found that the SWCNT-TFT sensors treated with UV radiation show a much higher sensitivity and faster response to the analytes than those without treatment with UV radiation.

  20. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  1. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained.

  2. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  3. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ∼30 cm2 V−1 s−1, on/off ratio of 103–104, switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays. PMID:26173436

  4. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-07-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ~30 cm2 V-1 s-1, on/off ratio of 103-104, switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays.

  5. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  6. Investigation of light doping and hetero gate dielectric carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor for improved device and circuit-level performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yuan; Wang, Huan; Xu, Hongsong; Xu, Min; Jiang, Sitao; Yue, Gongshu

    2016-03-01

    We perform a comparative study (both for device and circuit simulations) of three carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor (CNT-TFET) designs: high-K gate dielectric TFETs (HK-TFETs), hetero gate dielectric TFETs (HTFETs) and a novel CNT-TFET-based combination of light doping and hetero gate dielectric TFETs (LD-HTFETs). At device level, the effects of channel and gate dielectric engineering on the switching and high-frequency characteristics for CNT-TFET have been theoretically investigated using a quantum kinetic model. This model is based on two-dimensional non-equilibrium Green’s functions solved self-consistently with Poisson’s equations. It is revealed that the proposed LD-HTFET structure can significantly reduce leakage current, enhance control ability of the gate on the channel, improve the switching speed, and is more suitable for use in low-power, high-frequency circuits. At circuit level, using HSPICE with look-up table-based Verilog-A models, the performance and reliability of CNT-TFET logic gate circuits is evaluated on the basis of power consumption, average delay, stability, energy consumption and power-delay product (PDP). Simulation results indicate that, compared to a traditional CNT-TFET-based circuit, the one based on LD-HTFET has a significantly better performance (static noise margin, energy, delay, PDP). It is also observed that our proposed design exhibits better robustness under different operational conditions by considering power supply voltage and temperature variations. Our results may be useful for designing and optimizing CNTFET devices and circuits.

  7. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 µm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 µm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm-1, increased to 0.7 S cm-1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  8. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mentus, Slavko; Cirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 degrees C min(-1) up to a maximum temperature of 800 degrees C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 microm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 microm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm(-1), increased to 0.7 S cm(-1) upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy. PMID:19471087

  9. Carbon nanomaterials: controlled growth and field-effect transistor biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Na; Hu, Ping-An

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, have been studied extensively due to their special structures, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability. With the development of nanotechnology and nanoscience, various methods have been developed to synthesize CNTs/graphene and to assemble them into microelectronic/sensor devices. In this review, we mainly demonstrate the latest progress in synthesis of CNTs and graphene and their applications in field-effect transistors (FETs) for biological sensors.

  10. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  11. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  12. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    These project will explore the functionalization of carbon nanotubes via the formation of molecular complexes with perylene diimide based systems. It is anticipated that these complexes would be soluble in organic solvent and enable the homogenous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer films. Molecular complexes will be prepared and characterized using standard spectroscopic and thermal analytical techniques. Polymer films will be prepared with these complexes and their properties (electrical and thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, stability) evaluated.

  13. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  15. Automated circuit fabrication and direct characterization of carbon nanotube vibrations.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, G; Shlafman, M; Tabachnik, T; Rogachevsky, Z; Rechnitz, S; Goldshtein, I; Shlafman, S; Gordon, N; Alchanati, G; Itzhak, M; Moshe, Y; Hajaj, E M; Nir, H; Milyutin, Y; Izraeli, T Y; Razin, A; Shtempluck, O; Kotchtakov, V; Yaish, Y E

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have fascinated many researchers due to their unprecedented properties. However, a major drawback in utilizing carbon nanotubes for practical applications is the difficulty in positioning or growing them at specific locations. Here we present a simple, rapid, non-invasive and scalable technique that enables optical imaging of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotube scaffold serves as a seed for nucleation and growth of small size, optically visible nanocrystals. After imaging the molecules can be removed completely, leaving the surface intact, and thus the carbon nanotube electrical and mechanical properties are preserved. The successful and robust optical imaging allowed us to develop a dedicated image processing algorithm through which we are able to demonstrate a fully automated circuit design resulting in field effect transistors and inverters. Moreover, we demonstrate that this imaging method allows not only to locate carbon nanotubes but also, as in the case of suspended ones, to study their dynamic mechanical motion. PMID:27396506

  16. Automated circuit fabrication and direct characterization of carbon nanotube vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeevi, G.; Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Rogachevsky, Z.; Rechnitz, S.; Goldshtein, I.; Shlafman, S.; Gordon, N.; Alchanati, G.; Itzhak, M.; Moshe, Y.; Hajaj, E. M.; Nir, H.; Milyutin, Y.; Izraeli, T. Y.; Razin, A.; Shtempluck, O.; Kotchtakov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-07-01

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have fascinated many researchers due to their unprecedented properties. However, a major drawback in utilizing carbon nanotubes for practical applications is the difficulty in positioning or growing them at specific locations. Here we present a simple, rapid, non-invasive and scalable technique that enables optical imaging of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotube scaffold serves as a seed for nucleation and growth of small size, optically visible nanocrystals. After imaging the molecules can be removed completely, leaving the surface intact, and thus the carbon nanotube electrical and mechanical properties are preserved. The successful and robust optical imaging allowed us to develop a dedicated image processing algorithm through which we are able to demonstrate a fully automated circuit design resulting in field effect transistors and inverters. Moreover, we demonstrate that this imaging method allows not only to locate carbon nanotubes but also, as in the case of suspended ones, to study their dynamic mechanical motion.

  17. Ambipolar transistors based on random networks of WS2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Mitsunari; Kawai, Hideki; Yomogida, Yohei; Maniwa, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    WS2 nanotubes are rolled multiwalled nanotubes made of a layered material, tungsten disulfide. Their fibril structures enable the fabrication of random network films; however, these films are nonconducting, and thus have not been used for electronic applications. Here, we demonstrate that carrier injection into WS2 networks using an electrolyte gating approach could cause these networks to act as semiconducting channels. We clarify the Raman characteristics of WS2 nanotubes under electrolyte gating and confirm the feasibility of the injection of electrons and holes. We reveal ambipolar behaviors of the WS2 nanotube networks in field-effect transistor setups with electrolyte gating.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail. PMID:26264684

  19. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Suspended Carbon Nanotube Devices in Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Stadermann, M; Stroeve, P; Bakajin, O; Noy, A

    2006-10-30

    Suspended carbon nanotube devices are a promising platform for future bio-electronic applications. Suspended carbon nanotube transistors have been previously fabricated in air; however all previous attempts to bring them into liquid failed. We analyze forces acting on the suspended nanotube devices during immersion into liquids and during device operation and show that surface tension forces acting on the suspended nanotubes during transfer into the liquid phase are responsible for the nanotube damage. We have developed a new strategy that circumvents these limitations by coating suspended nanotubes with a rigid inorganic shell in the gas phase. The coating reinforces the nanotubes and allows them to survive transfer through the interface. Subsequent removal of the coating in the solution phase restores pristine suspended nanotubes. We demonstrate that devices fabricated using this technique preserve their original electrical characteristics.

  1. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  2. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  3. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration. PMID:17450889

  4. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  5. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  6. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact. PMID:26377211

  7. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  8. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  9. A carbon nanotube immunosensor for Salmonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell B.; Goldsmith, Brett R.; McMillon, Ronald; Dailey, Jennifer; Pillai, Shreekumar; Singh, Shree R.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-functionalized carbon nanotube devices have been suggested for use as bacterial detectors for monitoring of food purity in transit from the farm to the kitchen. Here we report progress towards that goal by demonstrating specific detection of Salmonella in complex nutrient broth solutions using nanotube transistors functionalized with covalently-bound anti-Salmonella antibodies. The small size of the active device region makes them compatible with integration in large-scale arrays. We find that the on-state current of the transistor is sensitive specifically to the Salmonella concentration and saturates at low concentration (<1000 cfu/ml). In contrast, the carrier mobility is affected comparably by Salmonella and other bacteria types, with no sign of saturation even at much larger concentrations (108 cfu/ml).

  10. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  11. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  13. Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.; Shakerzadeh, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-06-01

    Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites are fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation with carbon nanotube forests as a template. The microstructure of the fabricated nanocomposites shows arrays of carbon nanotubes capped with amorphous carbon nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements show that both advancing and receding angles close to 180° can be achieved on the nanocomposites. The fabrication here does not require patterning of carbon nanotubes or deposition of conformal coatings with low surface energy, which are usually involved in conventional approaches for superhydrophobic surfaces. The relationship between the observed superhydrophobicity and the unique microstructure of the nanocomposites is discussed.

  14. Spin-based Optomechanics with Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-01-01

    A simple scheme for determination of spin-orbit coupling strength in spinbased optomechanics with carbon nanotubes is introduced, under the control of a strong pump field and a weak signal field. The physical mechanism comes from the phonon induced transparency (PIT), by relying on the coherent coupling of electron spin to vibrational motion of the nanotube, which is analogous to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in atom systems. Based on this spin-nanotube optomechanical system, we also conceptually design a single photon router and a quantum microwave transistor, with ultralow pump power (~ pW) and tunable switching time, which should provide a unique platform for the study of spin-based microwave quantum optics and quantum information processing. PMID:23198093

  15. Spin-based optomechanics with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-01-01

    A simple scheme for determination of spin-orbit coupling strength in spinbased optomechanics with carbon nanotubes is introduced, under the control of a strong pump field and a weak signal field. The physical mechanism comes from the phonon induced transparency (PIT), by relying on the coherent coupling of electron spin to vibrational motion of the nanotube, which is analogous to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in atom systems. Based on this spin-nanotube optomechanical system, we also conceptually design a single photon router and a quantum microwave transistor, with ultralow pump power (~ pW) and tunable switching time, which should provide a unique platform for the study of spin-based microwave quantum optics and quantum information processing. PMID:23198093

  16. Multiscale simulation of carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adessi, C.; Avriller, R.; Blase, X.; Bournel, A.; Cazin d'Honincthun, H.; Dollfus, P.; Frégonèse, S.; Galdin-Retailleau, S.; López-Bezanilla, A.; Maneux, C.; Nha Nguyen, H.; Querlioz, D.; Roche, S.; Triozon, F.; Zimmer, T.

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, the understanding and accurate simulation of carbon nanotube-based devices has become very challenging. Conventional simulation tools of microelectronics are necessary to envision the performance and use of nanotube transistors and circuits, but the models need to be refined to properly describe the full complexity of such novel type of devices at the nanoscale. Indeed, many issues such as contact resistance, low dimensional electrostatics and screening effects, as well as nanotube doping or functionalization, demand for more accurate quantum approaches. In this article, we review our recent progress on multiscale simulations which aim at bridging first principles calculations with compact modelling, including the comparison between semi-classical Monte Carlo and quantum transport approaches. To cite this article: C. Adessi et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  17. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  18. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  19. Carbon nanotube network varactor.

    PubMed

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Erdmanis, M; Lioubtchenko, D V; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G; Räisänen, A V

    2015-01-30

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. PMID:25556375

  20. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  1. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  2. Flexible high-performance carbon nanotube integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-ming; Timmermans, Marina Y; Tian, Ying; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Mizutani, Takashi; Ohno, Yutaka

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotube thin-film transistors are expected to enable the fabrication of high-performance, flexible and transparent devices using relatively simple techniques. However, as-grown nanotube networks usually contain both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes, which leads to a trade-off between charge-carrier mobility (which increases with greater metallic tube content) and on/off ratio (which decreases). Many approaches to separating metallic nanotubes from semiconducting nanotubes have been investigated, but most lead to contamination and shortening of the nanotubes, thus reducing performance. Here, we report the fabrication of high-performance thin-film transistors and integrated circuits on flexible and transparent substrates using floating-catalyst chemical vapour deposition followed by a simple gas-phase filtration and transfer process. The resulting nanotube network has a well-controlled density and a unique morphology, consisting of long (~10 µm) nanotubes connected by low-resistance Y-shaped junctions. The transistors simultaneously demonstrate a mobility of 35 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off ratio of 6 × 10(6). We also demonstrate flexible integrated circuits, including a 21-stage ring oscillator and master-slave delay flip-flops that are capable of sequential logic. Our fabrication procedure should prove to be scalable, for example, by using high-throughput printing techniques. PMID:21297625

  3. Gate-voltage induced trions in suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Popert, A.; Kato, Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    We observe trion emission from suspended carbon nanotubes where carriers are introduced electrostatically using field-effect transistor structures. The trion peak emerges below the E11 emission energy at gate voltages that coincide with the onset of bright exciton quenching. By investigating nanotubes with various chiralities, we verify that the energy separation between the bright exciton peak and the trion peak becomes smaller for larger diameter tubes. Trion binding energies that are significantly larger compared to surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes are obtained, and the difference is attributed to the reduced dielectric screening in suspended tubes.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  5. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  6. Thermoelectric power in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mavrinskiy, A. V. Baitinger, E. M.

    2009-04-15

    The theoretical results for the temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power of graphite and semimetal carbon nanotubes are reported. In the calculations, the cylindrical superatomic range structure of nanotubes is taken into account. The Boltzmann equation and the {pi}-electron model of semimetal carbon nanotubes are used. The basic parameters of the calculation are the concentration of electrons, the Fermi energy, and the energy of the local level associated with the cylindrical structure of carbon nanotubes. The theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data.

  7. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  8. CARBON NANOTUBES AS MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exploratory Research Program Project - Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are formed from graphite (or graphene) sheets rolled into tubes, typically with diameters of 1 - 10 nm and lengths of 200 - 500 nm. Carbon nanotubes have unique electrical properties that have led to interest in thei...

  9. Conduction in Carbon Nanotube Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A. B.; Rogers, S. A.

    2003-10-01

    Recent measurements of the resistivity of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks are consistent with our model of metallic conduction interrupted by barriers. We extend our model of thermopower nonlinearities due to peaks in the density of electronic states and apply it to recent thermopower data for carbon nanotube networks.

  10. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  11. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  12. MoS{sub 2} nanotube field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Strojnik, M. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si; Mrzel, A.; Buh, J.; Strle, J.; Kovic, A.; Mihailovic, D. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si

    2014-09-15

    We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs), fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo{sub 6}S{sub x}I{sub 9-x} nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET) devices, and compared with MoS{sub 2} layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with previously reported WS{sub 2} nanotube FETs, but materials defects and imperfections apparently limit their performance compared with multilayer MoS{sub 2} FETs with similar number of layers.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  14. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  15. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  17. Gas detection mechanism for single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony; Dube, Isha; Fedorov, Georgy; Paranjape, Makarand; Barbara, Paola; Georgetown/RRC Kurchatov Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    We study field-effect transistors fabricated with carbon nanotube (CNT) networks to determine whether the gas sensing mechanism is due to molecules adsorbed on the nanotubes, or changes at the interface between the nanotubes and the contacts. Our previous work showed that in devices made with isolated CNT, the response to nitrogen dioxide was mainly due to the contact interfaces. Here, we focus on CNT networks and use SU-8 layers patterned with e-beam lithography to passivate the contact interfaces, while leaving the network exposed. We look to investigate possible differences in sensing mechanism for devices made with isolated tubes versus networks. Work funded by NSF, DMR 1008242.

  18. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  19. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  20. Carbon nanotube based photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudanski, Ludovic; Minoux, Eric; Gangloff, Laurent; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Xavier, Stephane; Robertson, John; Milne, William I.; Pribat, Didier; Legagneux, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a novel photocathode which is an array of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), each MWCNT being associated with one p-i-n photodiode. Unlike conventional photocathodes, the functions of photon-electron conversion and subsequent electron emission are physically separated. Photon-electron conversion is achieved with p-i-n photodiodes and the electron emission occurs from the MWCNTs. The current modulation is highly efficient as it uses an optically controlled reconfiguration of the electric field at the MWCNT locations. Such devices are compatible with high frequency and very large bandwidth operation and could lead to their application in compact, light and efficient microwave amplifiers for satellite telecommunication. To demonstrate this new photocathode concept, we have fabricated the first carbon nanotube based photocathode using silicon p-i-n photodiodes and MWCNT bunches. Using a green laser, this photocathode delivers 0.5 mA with an internal quantum efficiency of 10% and an ION/IOFF ratio of 30.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  2. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  3. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  4. Bolometric-Effect-Based Wavelength-Selective Photodetectors Using Sorted Single Chirality Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Shi, Rongmei; Miao, Jinshui; Wei, Li; Chen, Yuan; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits the chirality-dependent optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes for applications in wavelength-selective photodetectors. We demonstrate that thin-film transistors made with networks of carbon nanotubes work effectively as light sensors under laser illumination. Such photoresponse was attributed to photothermal effect instead of photogenerated carriers and the conclusion is further supported by temperature measurements. Additionally, by using different types of carbon nanotubes, including a single chirality (9,8) nanotube, the devices exhibit wavelength-selective response, which coincides well with the absorption spectra of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. This is one of the first reports of controllable and wavelength-selective bolometric photoresponse in macroscale assemblies of chirality-sorted carbon nanotubes. The results presented here provide a viable route for achieving bolometric-effect-based photodetectors with programmable response spanning from visible to near-infrared by using carbon nanotubes with pre-selected chiralities. PMID:26643777

  5. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  6. High performance organic transistors: Percolating arrays of nanotubes functionalized with an electron deficient olefin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Mandakini; Malliaras, George G.; Blanchet, Graciela B.

    2010-08-01

    Precise control over the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes is key to their application in plastic electronics. In the present work, we have functionalized carbon nanotubes with an electron withdrawing nonfluorinated olefins via a 2-2 cycloaddition reaction. Our results suggest that the formation of cyclobutanelike four-member ring at the functionalization site is a fairly general approach, independent of specifics of the addend, to converting the grown mixture of metal and semiconductor tubes into high mobility semiconducting tubes without tedious separation requirements. Thin film transistors fabricated from such functionalized tubes exhibit mobilities of ˜30 cm2/V s and on/off ratios in excess of 106. This simple functionalization represents a low cost path to high performance semiconducting inks for printable electronics.

  7. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  8. Electronic and Ionic Transport in Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Di

    This thesis describes several experiments based on carbon nanotube nanofludic devices and field-effect transistors. The first experiment detected ion and molecule translocation through one single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) that spans a barrier between two fluid reservoirs. The electrical ionic current is measured. Translocation of small single stranded DNA oligomers is marked by large transient increases in current through the tube and confirmed by a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis. Carbon nanotubes simplify the construction of nanopores, permit new types of electrical measurement, and open new avenues for control of DNA translocation. The second experiment constructed devices in which the interior of a single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET) acts as a nanofluidic channel that connects two fluid reservoirs, permitting measurement of the electronic properties of the SWCNT as it is wetted by an analyte. Wetting of the inside of the SWCNT by water turns the transistor on, while wetting of the outside has little effect. This finding may provide a new method to investigate water behavior at nanoscale. This also opens a new avenue for building sensors in which the SWCNT functions as an electronic detector. This thesis also presents some experiments that related to nanofabrication, such as construction of FET with tin sulfide (SnS) quantum ribbon. This work demonstrates the application of solution processed IV-VI semiconductor nanostructures in nanoscale devices.

  9. Trion electroluminescence from semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jakubka, Florian; Grimm, Stefan B; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Zaumseil, Jana

    2014-08-26

    Near-infrared emission from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) usually results from radiative relaxation of excitons. By binding an additional electron or hole through chemical or electrochemical doping, charged three-body excitons, so-called trions, are created that emit light at lower energies. The energy difference is large enough to observe weak trion photoluminescence from doped SWNTs even at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate strong trion electroluminescence from electrolyte-gated, light-emitting SWNT transistors with three different polymer-sorted carbon nanotube species, namely, (6,5), (7,5) and (10,5). The red-shifted trion emission is equal to or even stronger than the exciton emission, which is attributed to the high charge carrier density in the transistor channel. The possibility of trions as a radiative relaxation pathway for triplets and dark excitons that are formed in large numbers by electron-hole recombination is discussed. The ratio of trion to exciton emission can be tuned by the applied voltages, enabling voltage-controlled near-infrared light sources with narrow line widths that are solution-processable and operate at low voltages (<3 V). PMID:25029479

  10. Cantilevered carbon nanotube hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyanagi, Toshinori; Terada, Yuki; Takei, Kuniharu; Akita, Seiji; Arie, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effects of humidity on the vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using two types of CNT cantilevers: open-ended and close-ended CNT cantilevers. As the humidity increases, the resonant frequency of the open-ended CNT cantilever decreases due to the adsorption of water molecules onto the CNT tip, whereas that of the close-ended CNT cantilever increases probably due to the change in the viscosity of the air surrounding the CNT cantilever, which is negatively correlated with the humidity of air. Our findings suggest that a close-ended CNT cantilever is more suitable for a quick-response and ultrasensitive hygrometer because it continuously reads the viscosity change of moist air in the vicinity of the CNT.

  11. On carbon nanotube resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruntu, Dumitru I.; Salinas Trevino, Cone S.

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with electrostatically actuated Carbon NanoTubes (CNT) cantilevers for sensor applications. There are three kinds of forces acting on the CNT cantilever: electrostatic, elastostatic, and van der Waals. The van der Waals forces are significant for values of 50 nm or lower of the gap between the CNT and the ground plate. As both forces, electrostatic and van der Waals, are nonlinear, and the CNT electrostatic actuation is given by AC voltage, the CNT dynamics is nonlinear parametric. The method of multiple scales is used to investigate the system under soft excitations and/or weakly nonlinearities. The frequency-amplitude and frequency-phase behavior are found in the case of primary resonance.

  12. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  13. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  15. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  16. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes as Thermionic Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutfy, R. O.; Samandi, M.; Moravsky, A.; Strange, S.

    2004-02-01

    Thermionic converters are an interesting option for lightweight and long-life power generators due to a number of compelling advantages, including all solid construction, no moving parts, and waste heat rejection at high temperature. An experimental set up has been built that allows the screening of thermionic coatings and new nanomaterials from room temperature to 2000 K in high vacuum and at gap sizes as small as 1 μm. A new class of very high temperature compatible materials, carbon nanotubes, has been investigated for their performance as cathodes. Seven different types of carbon nanotubes have been screened as thermionic emitter cathodes and compared to tungsten and nitrogen doped diamond. It has been found that some carbon nanotubes combine excellent temperature stability with good thermal emission performance. Yet, other carbon nanotubes exhibited exceptional combined thermal and field enhanced emission performance.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Nanocrystal Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.; Wong, S.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of generating carbon nanotube-nanoparticle heterostructures is that these composites ought to take advantage of and combine the unique physical and chemical properties of both carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles in one discrete structure. These materials have potential applicability in a range of diverse fields spanning heterogeneous catalysis to optoelectronic device development, of importance to chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and engineers. In this critical review, we present a host of diverse, complementary strategies for the reliable synthesis of carbon nanotube-nanoparticle heterostructures using both covalent as well as non-covalent protocols, incorporating not only single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes but also diverse classes of metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles.

  19. PECVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAninch, Ian; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using inductively coupled plasma, has been used to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCF) on substrates sputtered with aluminum and iron catalyst. The capacitive plasma's power has been shown to cause a transition from nanotubes to nanofibers, depending on the strength of the plasma. The temperature, placement, and other factors have been shown to affect the height and density of the tube and fiber growth.

  20. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  1. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  2. Connecting carbon nanotubes using Sn.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Jagjiwan; Lin, Kwang Lung

    2013-08-01

    Process of Sn coating on mutiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and formation of interconnections among nanotubes are studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Surface oxidation of nanotubes during heating with HNO3 prior to the SnCl2 treatment and the bonding between functional groups and Sn are found to be responsible for the coating and its stability. Open nanotubes are filled as well as coated during tin chloride treatment. Coating and filling are converted into the coatings on the inner as well as outer walls of the nanotubes during reduction with H2/N2. EDX studies show the formation of intermetallic compounds e.g., Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn at the joints between nanotubes. Formation of intermetallic compounds is supposed to be responsible for providing the required strength for bending and twisting of nanotubes joining of nanotubes. Paper presents a detailed mechanism of coating and filling processes, and interconnections among nanotubes. PMID:23882800

  3. Electrical and optical characterization of carbon nanotube diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malapanis, Argyrios

    Carbon nanotubes are good candidates for future applications, including nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Their quasi-one dimensional (1D) character offers appealing device properties. These include reduced carrier scattering, carrier mobility up to two orders of magnitude higher than that of materials used in state-of-the-art computer chips today, current densities rivaling those of the best semiconductors, enhanced optical absorption, and band gaps tunable with tube diameter and doping. Recent breakthroughs in research point to the possibility of placing nanotubes precisely on substrates with densities approaching that of transistors on today's computer chips in a way that's integratable with existing Si-based technology. Such advances may accelerate the day when high-speed and power-efficient applications using carbon nanotubes as the transistor channel can become a reality. Thus the need to explore the fundamental properties of carbon nanotubes becomes more pressing. Using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) p-n diodes as the medium, the purpose of this work is to examine SWNT fundamental properties that little experimental work has dealt with measuring. These properties include the band-gap of a SWNT, band-gap renormalization (shrinkage) as a function of doping, and optical absorption in the infrared region of the spectrum. This dissertation also shows the extreme sensitivity of carbon nanotubes to their environment (i.e. exposure to air). In addition, it demonstrates a new technique---current annealing---that can reverse the degradation of the electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotube diodes due to ambient exposure

  4. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  6. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  7. Carbon nanotube network embroidered graphene films for monolithic all-carbon electronics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Enzheng; Li, Hongbian; Yang, Long; Hou, Junfeng; Li, Yuanchang; Li, Li; Cao, Anyuan; Fang, Ying

    2015-01-27

    A unique cage growth of graphene is developed by using carbon nanotube (CNT) spider webs as porous templates, resulting in CNT/graphene hybrids with high conductivity and mechanical flexibility. Furthermore, monolithic all-carbon transistors with graphene as active elements and CNT/graphene hybrids as contacts and interconnects are directly formed by chemical synthesis, and flexible all-carbon bioelectronics are subsequently demonstrated for in vivo mapping of cardiac signals. PMID:25607917

  8. Length-Sorted, Large-Diameter, Polyfluorene-Wrapped Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Density, Short-Channel Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Frank; Li, Wenshan; Fischer, Regina; Lebedkin, Sergei; Krupke, Ralph; Kappes, Manfred M

    2016-02-23

    Samples of highly enriched semiconducting SWCNTs with average diameters of 1.35 nm have been prepared by combining PODOF polymer wrapping with size-exclusion chromatography. The purity of the material was determined to be >99.7% from the transfer characteristics of short-channel transistors comprising densely aligned sc-SWCNTs. The transistors have a hole mobility of up to 297 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1) and an On/Off ratio as high as 2 × 10(8). PMID:26792404

  9. Electronic Sensitivity of Carbon Nanotubes to Internal Water Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Di; Pang, Pei; He, Jin; Luo, Tao; Park, Jae Hyun nmn; Krstic, Predrag S; Nuckolls, Colin; Tang, Jinyao; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed devices in which the interior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistor acts as a nanofluidic channel that connects two fluid reservoirs, permitting measurement of the electronic properties of the SWCNT as it is wetted by an analyte. Wetting of the inside of the SWCNT by water turns the transistor on, while wetting of the outside has little effect. These observations are consistent with theoretical simulations that show that internal water both generates a large dipole electric field, causing charge polarization of the tube and metal electrodes, and shifts the valance band of the SWCNT, while external water has little effect.

  10. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... composed of engineered nanoparticles, such as metal oxides, nanotubes, nanowires, quantum dots, and carbon fullerenes (buckyballs), among ...