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Sample records for carbon nanotube-mediated delivery

  1. Carbon nanotube-mediated siRNA delivery for gene silencing in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tu; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Yaqiong

    2011-10-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is potentially a promising tool in influencing gene expression with a high degree of target specificity. However, its poor intracellular uptake, instability in vivo, and non-specific immune stimulations impeded its effect in clinical applications. In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with two types of phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) have shown capabilities to stabilize siRNA in cell culture medium during the transfection and efficiently deliver siRNA into neuroblastoma and breast cancer cells. Moreover, the intrinsic optical properties of CNTs have been investigated through absorption and fluorescence measurements. We have found that the directly-functionalized groups play an important role on the fluorescence imaging of functionalized CNTs. The unique fluorescence imaging and high delivery efficiency make CNTs a promising material to deliver drugs and evaluate the treatment effect simultaneously.

  2. Impact of carbondiimide crosslinker used for magnetic carbon nanotube mediated GFP plasmid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yuzhi; Xu, Peng; He, Chuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Min; Xing, James; Chen, Jie

    2011-07-01

    1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbondiimide hydrochloride (EDC) is commonly used as a crosslinker to help bind biomolecules, such as DNA plasmids, with nanostructures. However, EDC often remains, after a crosslink reaction, in the micro-aperture of the nanostructure, e.g., carbon nanotube. The remaining EDC shows positive green fluorescent signals and makes a nanostructure with a strong cytotoxicity which induces cell death. The toxicity of EDC was confirmed on a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and two leukemic cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1). The MCF-7 cells mainly underwent necrosis after treatment with EDC, which was verified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) annexin V staining, video microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). If the EDC was not removed completely, the nanostructures with remaining EDC produced a green fluorescent background that could interfere with flow cytometry (FACS) measurement and result in false information about GFP plasmid delivery. Effective methods to remove residual EDC on macromolecules were also developed.

  3. Impact of carbondiimide crosslinker used for magnetic carbon nanotube mediated GFP plasmid delivery.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuzhi; Xu, Peng; He, Chuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Min; Xing, James; Chen, Jie

    2011-07-15

    1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbondiimide hydrochloride (EDC) is commonly used as a crosslinker to help bind biomolecules, such as DNA plasmids, with nanostructures. However, EDC often remains, after a crosslink reaction, in the micro-aperture of the nanostructure, e.g., carbon nanotube. The remaining EDC shows positive green fluorescent signals and makes a nanostructure with a strong cytotoxicity which induces cell death. The toxicity of EDC was confirmed on a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and two leukemic cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1). The MCF-7 cells mainly underwent necrosis after treatment with EDC, which was verified by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) annexin V staining, video microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). If the EDC was not removed completely, the nanostructures with remaining EDC produced a green fluorescent background that could interfere with flow cytometry (FACS) measurement and result in false information about GFP plasmid delivery. Effective methods to remove residual EDC on macromolecules were also developed. PMID:21654030

  4. A new family of folate-decorated and carbon nanotube-mediated drug delivery system: synthesis and drug delivery response.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Yuan, Q; Shah, J S; Misra, R D K

    2011-11-01

    We describe here a new family of folate-decorated and carbon nanotube (CNT)-mediated drug delivery system that involves uniquely combining carbon nanotubes with anticancer drug (doxorubicin) for controlled drug release, which is gaining significant attention. The synthesis of nanocarrier involved attachment of doxorubicin (DOX) to CNT surface via π-π stacking interaction, followed by encapsulation of CNTs with folic acid-conjugated chitosan. The π-π stacking interaction, ascribed as a non-covalent type of functionalization, allows controlled release of drug. Furthermore, encapsulation of CNTs enhances the stability of the nanocarrier in aqueous medium because of the hydrophilicity and cationic charge of chitosan. The unique integration of drug targeting and visualization has high potential to address the current challenges in cancer therapy. Thus, it is attractive to consider the possibility of investigating a drug delivery system that combines the biodegradable chitosan and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). PMID:21514336

  5. Chitosan-functionalised single-walled carbon nanotube-mediated drug delivery of SNX-2112 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lixia; Wu, Shao; Tan, Li; Tan, Huo; Yu, Baodan

    2016-09-01

    Delivery of amphiphobic drugs (insoluble in both water and oil) has been a great challenge in drug delivery. SNX-2112, a novel inhibitor of Hsp90, is a promising drug candidate for treating various types of cancers; however, the insolubility greatly limits its clinical application. This study aimed to build a new type of drug delivery system using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable release of SNX-2112; chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently added to SWNTs to improve their biocompatibility. SWNTs-CHI demonstrated high drug-loading capability; the release of SNX-2112 was pH triggered and time related. The intracellular reactive oxygen species of SWNTs-CHI increased, compared with that of SWNTs, leading to higher mitogen-activated protein kinase and cell apoptosis. The results of western-blotting, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, and cell viability assay analyses indicated that apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in K562 cells and that the drug delivery system significantly inhibited K562 cells. Thus, SWNT-CHI/SNX-2112 shows great potential as a drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:27231263

  6. Water transport inside carbon nanotubes mediated by phonon-induced oscillating friction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Grey, François; Shen, Luming; Urbakh, Michael; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Liu, Yilun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of the field of nanofluidics in the last decade has led to the development of important applications including water desalination, ultrafiltration and osmotic energy conversion. Most applications make use of carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide. In particular, understanding water transport in carbon nanotubes is key for designing ultrafiltration devices and energy-efficient water filters. However, although theoretical studies based on molecular dynamics simulations have revealed many mechanistic features of water transport at the molecular level, further advances in this direction are limited by the fact that the lowest flow velocities accessible by simulations are orders of magnitude higher than those measured experimentally. Here, we extend molecular dynamics studies of water transport through carbon nanotubes to flow velocities comparable with experimental ones using massive crowd-sourced computing power. We observe previously undetected oscillations in the friction force between water and carbon nanotubes and show that these oscillations result from the coupling between confined water molecules and the longitudinal phonon modes of the nanotube. This coupling can enhance the diffusion of confined water by more than 300%. Our results may serve as a theoretical framework for the design of new devices for more efficient water filtration and osmotic energy conversion devices. PMID:26149236

  7. Advances in cancer therapy through the use of carbon nanotube-mediated targeted hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging versatile tools in nanomedicine applications, particularly in the field of cancer targeting. Due to diverse surface chemistry and unique thermal properties, CNTs can act as strong optical absorbers in near infrared light where biological systems prove to be highly transparent. The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized CNTs is frequently termed “nanophotothermolysis.” This paper illustrates the potential of engineered CNTs as laser-activated photothermal agents for the selective nanophotothermolysis of cancer cells. PMID:21904457

  8. Carbon Nanotube-Mediated Photothermal Disruption of Endosomes/Lysosomes Reverses Doxorubicin Resistance in MCF-7/ADR Cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chin-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chun; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Su, Hong-Lin; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of human death worldwide. Although many scientists work to fight this disease, multiple drug resistance is a predominant obstacle for effective cancer therapy. In drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells, the acidic organelles with lower pH value than normal one can cause the protonation of anthracycline drugs, inducing drug accumulation in these organelles. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes with polyethylene glycol phospholipids surface modification (PEGylated SWNTs) were utilized as near infrared-activated drug carriers for doxorubicin (DOX) delivery against MCF-7/ADR cells. Our results showed that a concentration-dependent temperature increase was observed in a solution of PEGylated SWNTs with 808 nm laser irradiation, whereas a water solution showed no significant changes in temperature under a thermal camera using the same irradiation dose. Interestingly, PEGylated DOX-SWNTs enhanced the nuclear accumulation of DOX with 808 nm irradiation whereas free DOX or PEGylated DOX-SWNTs revealed discrete red spots in MCF-7/ADR cells by confocal microscopic observation. Cell viability of PEGylated DOX-SWNTs-treated cells was also significantly decreased after 808 nm laser irradiation. Thus, photothermally activated PEGylated SWNTs can be a potential nanocarrier to deliver DOX into cancer cells and successfully overcome drug-resistant behavior in MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells. PMID:27301189

  9. Sub-second carbon-nanotube-mediated microwave sintering for high-conductivity silver patterns on plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunshin; Chun, Su Jin; Han, Joong Tark; Woo, Jong Seok; Shon, Cha-Hwa; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2016-02-01

    A method of microwave sintering that is mediated by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed to obtain high-conductivity Ag patterns on the top of heat-sensitive plastic substrates within a short time. The Ag patterns are printed on CNTs formed on plastic substrates and rapidly heated to a great extent by the heat transferred from the microwave-heated CNTs. The conductivity of the microwave-sintered Ag patterns reaches ~39% that of bulk Ag within 1 s without substrate deformation. Furthermore, microwave sintering enhances the adhesion of Ag patterns to the thermoplastic substrates because the sintering causes interfacial fusion between the Ag patterns and the substrates, and CNTs physically connect the patterns with the substrates.A method of microwave sintering that is mediated by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed to obtain high-conductivity Ag patterns on the top of heat-sensitive plastic substrates within a short time. The Ag patterns are printed on CNTs formed on plastic substrates and rapidly heated to a great extent by the heat transferred from the microwave-heated CNTs. The conductivity of the microwave-sintered Ag patterns reaches ~39% that of bulk Ag within 1 s without substrate deformation. Furthermore, microwave sintering enhances the adhesion of Ag patterns to the thermoplastic substrates because the sintering causes interfacial fusion between the Ag patterns and the substrates, and CNTs physically connect the patterns with the substrates. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Temperature difference in Ag/CNT/PC samples; the carbon content and electrical performance after microwave sintering; microwave sintering of Ag/CNT patterns; physical connection between the substrate and sintered Ag lines; touch-piano (figure and movie). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08082g

  10. Carbon-Nanotube-Mediated Electrochemical Transition in a Redox-Active Supramolecular Hydrogel Derived from Viologen and an l-Alanine-Based Amphiphile.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sougata; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2016-05-23

    A two-component hydrogelator (16-A)2 -V(2+) , comprising an l-alanine-based amphiphile (16-A) and a redox-active viologen based partner (V(2+) ), is reported. The formation the hydrogel depended, not only on the acid-to-amine stoichiometric ratio, but on the choice of the l-amino acid group and also on the hydrocarbon chain length of the amphiphilic component. The redox responsive property and the electrochemical behavior of this two-component system were further examined by step-wise chemical and electrochemical reduction of the viologen nucleus (V(2+) /V(+) and V(+) /V(0) ). The half-wave reduction potentials (E1/2 ) associated with the viologen ring shifted to more negative values with increasing amine component. This indicates that higher extent of salt formation hinders reduction of the viologen moiety. Interestingly, the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the electrochemically irreversible hydrogel (16-A)2 -V(2+) transformed it into a quasi-reversible electrochemical system. PMID:27059107

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review. PMID:24587993

  12. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Warren, Kaitlyn E; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  13. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution. PMID:26692360

  14. Carbon nanotubes for delivery of small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bin Sheng; Yoong, Sia Lee; Jagusiak, Anna; Panczyk, Tomasz; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-12-01

    In the realm of drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have gained tremendous attention as promising nanocarriers, owing to their distinct characteristics, such as high surface area, enhanced cellular uptake and the possibility to be easily conjugated with many therapeutics, including both small molecules and biologics, displaying superior efficacy, enhanced specificity and diminished side effects. While most CNT-based drug delivery system (DDS) had been engineered to combat cancers, there are also emerging reports that employ CNTs as either the main carrier or adjunct material for the delivery of various non-anticancer drugs. In this review, the delivery of small molecule drugs is expounded, with special attention paid to the current progress of in vitro and in vivo research involving CNT-based DDSs, before finally concluding with some consideration on inevitable complications that hamper successful disease intervention with CNTs. PMID:23954402

  15. Fluidic delivery of homogeneous solutions through carbon tube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikar, R.; Yarin, A. L.; Megaridis, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    A wide array of technological applications requires localized high-rate delivery of dissolved compounds (in particular, biological ones), which can be achieved by forcing the solutions or suspensions of such compounds through nano or microtubes and their bundled assemblies. Using a water-soluble compound, the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 610 chloride, frequently used as a model drug release compound, it is shown that deposit buildup on the inner walls of the delivery channels and its adverse consequences pose a severe challenge to implementing pressure-driven long-term fluidic delivery through nano and microcapillaries, even in the case of such homogeneous solutions. Pressure-driven delivery (3-6 bar) of homogeneous dye solutions through macroscopically-long (~1 cm) carbon nano and microtubes with inner diameters in the range 100 nm-1 µm and their bundled parallel assemblies is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the flow delivery gradually shifts from fast convection-dominated (unobstructed) to slow jammed convection, and ultimately to diffusion-limited transport through a porous deposit. The jamming/clogging phenomena appear to be rather generic: they were observed in a wide concentration range for two fluorescent dyes in carbon nano and microtubes, as well as in comparable transparent glass microcapillaries. The aim of the present work is to study the physics of jamming, rather than the chemical reasons for the affinity of dye molecules to the tube walls.

  16. Size control of magnetic carbon nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Oh, W-K; Yoon, H; Jang, J

    2010-02-01

    Carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles with controlled diameters were readily fabricated by the pyrolysis of polypyrrole nanoparticles. The carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles showed narrow size distribution, large micropore volume, and high surface area. Magnetic phases were introduced into the carbon nanoparticles during the pyrolysis without sophisticated process, which resulted in useful magnetic properties for selective nanoparticle separation. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometer, N(2) adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting interference device were employed for characterizing the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles. Hydrophobic guest molecules were incorporated into the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles by surface adsorption, pore filling, and surface covalent coupling. The carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles exhibited embedding capability using pyrene as a typical hydrophobic fluorescent molecule. In addition, ibuprofen was incorporated into the carbon nanoparticles, and drug-loaded carbon nanoparticles sustained release property. In addition, the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles revealed low toxicity at concentrations below 100 microg mL(-1) via cell viability test and were uptaken inside the cells. These results suggest a new platform for the drug delivery using carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles. PMID:19878989

  17. Interactions between carbon nanotubes and bioactives: a drug delivery perspective.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Palakurthi, Srinath

    2016-04-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the biomedical arena have gained increased attention over the past decade. Surface engineering of CNTs by covalent and noncovalent modifications enables site-specific drug delivery and targeting. CNTs are available as single-, double-, triple-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, DWCNTs, TWCNTs, and MWCNTs, respectively) and have unique physicochemical properties, including a high surface area, high loading efficiency, good biocompatibility, low toxicity, ultra lightweight, rich surface chemistry, non-immunogenicity, and photoluminescence. In this review, we highlight current understanding of the different types of physical and chemical interaction that occur between therapeutics and CNTs, and the potential application of the latter in drug delivery and imaging. Such understanding will aid exploration of the utility of multifunctional CNTs as pharmaceutical nanocarriers, and potential safety and toxicity issues. PMID:26657088

  18. Novel Carbon Nanomaterial Coating for Dispersibility, Delivery and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierczewska, Magdalena

    Carbon nanomaterials have been cited to provide great potential in biomedical applications such as in vivo imaging, drug delivery, and biomarker detection. Yet poor dispersibility in physiological conditions greatly limits their biomedical promise. As with most nanoparticles, the surface interaction with biological systems is the driving force towards effective activity in vivo, namely exhibiting dispersion, low cytotoxicity, and molecular targetability. Therefore, by surface engineering carbon nanomaterials with a distinct biocompatible coating, their applications in imaging, drug delivery, biomarker detection, and therapy can be empowered. We render carbon nanomaterials useful for such in vivo biomedical applications by providing dispersibility, delivery and sensing capabilities with a facile surface coating method. A single, yet multifunctional, hyaluronic acid-based biosurfactant was strategically chosen to meet the design criteria. The amphiphilic material, hyaluronic acid-5beta-cholanic acid (HACA), is an efficient dispersing agent for carbon nanomaterials, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in physiological conditions for a sustained period of time. Furthermore, the biological activity and cancer cell targeting of HACA wrapped SWCNTs (HACA-SWCNTs) were evaluated in vitro and in vivo utilizing imaging techniques intrinsic to SWCNTs, HACA, and HACA-SWCNTs. Fluorescent dye-labeled HACA-SWCNTs were designed to activate fluorescence signals intracelluarly, not only serving as an approach to image cellular uptake but also to determine the coating efficacy of HACA onto SWCNTs. SWCNT localization within cells was also confirmed by tracking the intrinsic Raman signals of carbon nanomaterials. In vivo photoacoustic, fluorescence, and positron emission tomography imaging display high tumor targeting capability of HACA-SWCNTs in a murine tumor model. Once targeted, HACA-SWCNTs have potential to serve as photothermal tumor ablation agents after laser

  19. Design of biomaterials for intracellular delivery of carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroshi; Fujita, Kenta; Ueno, Takafumi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is recognized as one of the most important gas signaling molecules involved in governing various therapeutic responses. Intracellular generation of CO is spatiotemporally controlled by catalytic reactions of heme oxygenases (HOs). Thus, the ability to control intracellular CO delivery with modulation of the CO-release rate in specific amounts and locations is expected to improve our fundamental understanding of the functions of CO and the development of clinical applications. For this purpose, CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) have been developed and investigated in vitro and in vivo. Most CORMs are based on transition metal carbonyl complexes. Recently, various biomaterials consisting of metal carbonyls with biomacromolecular scaffolds have been reported to improve the properties of bare metal carbonyls. In this mini-review, current progress in CO delivery, recent strategies for the development of CORMs, and future directions in this field are discussed. PMID:26252321

  20. Cisplatin@US-tube Carbon Nanocapsules For Enhanced Chemotherapeutic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Adem; Rusakova, Irene A.; Lewis, Michael T.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy is often limited by problems with administration such as insolubility, inefficient biodistribution, lack of selectivity, and inability of the drug to cross cellular barriers. To overcome these limitations, various types of drug delivery systems have been explored, and recently, carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have also garnered attention in the area of drug delivery. In this study, we describe the preparation, characterization, and in vitro testing of a new ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotube (US-tube)-based drug delivery system for the treatment of cancer. In particular, the encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP), a widely-used anticancer drug, within US-tubes has been achieved, and the resulting CDDP@US-tube material characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and inductively-coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Dialysis studies performed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C have demonstrated that CDDP release from CDDP@US-tubes can be controlled (retarded) by wrapping the CDDP@US-tubes with Pluronic-F108 surfactant. Finally, the anticancer activity of pluronic-wrapped CDDP@US-tubes has been evaluated against two different breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and found to exhibit enhanced cytotoxicity over free CDDP after 24 hours. These studies have laid the foundation for developing US-tube-based delivery of chemotherapeutics, with drug release mainly limited to within cancer cells only. PMID:22078812

  1. Carbon Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Kiseleva, Raisa; Vertegel, Alexey; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the most exciting disciplines and it incorporates physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. It can be applied to design cancer medicines with improved therapeutic indices. At the basic level, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are sp2 carbon nanomaterials. Their unique physical and chemical properties make them interesting candidates of research in a wide range of areas including biological systems and different diseases. Recent research has been focused on exploring the potential of the CNTs as a carrier or vehicle for intracellular transport of drugs, proteins, and targeted genes in vitro and in vivo. Several research groups are actively involved to find out a functional CNT carrier capable of transporting targeted drug molecules in animal models with least toxicity. Current investigations are also focused on graphene, an allotrope of carbon, which appears to be a promising agent for successful delivery of biomolecules in various animal models. But potential clinical implementations of CNTs are still hampered by distinctive barriers such as poor bioavailability and intrinsic toxicity, which pose difficulties in tumor targeting and penetration as well as in improving therapeutic outcome. This article presents recent progresses in the design and evaluation of closely related CNTs for experimental cancer therapy and explores their implications in bringing nanomedicines into the clinics. PMID:26369109

  2. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transporter for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Pu-Chun

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown great promises in integrating nanomaterials in biomedicine. To explore the feasibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as transporters for gene delivery, we have investigated the binding of SWNTs and RNA polymer poly(rU), and the diffusion and the translocation of the SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. Through single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we have found that the pi- stacking dominates the hydrophobic interactions between the carbon rings on tubes and the nitrogenous bases of RNA. Our diffusion study has further demonstrated the feasibility of tracking the motion of water soluble SWNT-poly(rU) complexes. The uptake of SWNT-poly(rU) by breast cancer cells MCF7 was observed using confocal scanning fluorescence microscopy. It was evident that the complexes could penetrate through cell membrane into cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Our cell culture, MTS assay, and radioisotope labeling showed the negligible cytotoxicity of surface modified SWNTs with RNA polymer and amino acids in cell growth medium. These studies have paved the way for gene transfection using SWNTs as transporters.

  3. Fabrication of carbon nanotube-polyimide composite hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Bradley J; Aria, Adrianus I; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a novel method for fabricating hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery using a composite of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes and polyimide. Patterned bundles of carbon nanotubes are used as a porous scaffold for defining the microneedle geometry. Polyimide resin is wicked through the carbon nanotube scaffold to reinforce the structure and provide the prerequisite strength for achieving skin penetration. The high aspect ratio and bottom-up assembly of carbon nanotubes allow the structure of the microneedles to be created in a single step of nanotube fabrication, providing a simple, scalable method for producing hollow microneedles. To demonstrate the utility of these microneedles, liquid delivery experiments are performed. Successful delivery of aqueous methylene blue dye into both hydrogel and swine skin in vitro is demonstrated. Electron microscopy images of the microneedles taken after delivery confirm that the microneedles do not sustain any structural damage during the delivery process. PMID:25095899

  4. Programmable Transdermal Clonidine Delivery through Voltage Gated Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Strasinger, Caroline; Paudel, Kalpana S; Wu, Ji; Hammell, Dana; Pinninti, Raghotham R.; Hinds, Bruce; Stinchcomb, Audra

    2014-01-01

    Oral dosage forms and traditional transdermal patches are inadequate for complex clonidine therapy dosing schemes, because of the variable dose/flux requirement for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro transdermal flux changes of clonidine in response to alterations in carbon nanotube (CNT) delivery rates by applying various electrical bias. Additional skin diffusion studies were carried out to demonstrate the therapeutic feasibility of the system. This study demonstrated that application of a small electrical bias (-600mV) to the CNT membrane on the skin resulted in a 4.7-fold increase in clonidine flux as compared to no bias (0mV) application. The high and low clonidine flux values were very close to the desired variable flux of clonidine for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Therapeutic feasibility studies demonstrated that CNT membrane served as the rate limiting step to clonidine diffusion and lag and transition times were suitable for the clonidine therapy. Skin elimination studies revealed that clonidine depletion from the skin would not negatively affect clonidine therapy. Overall, this study showed that clonidine administration difficulties associated with the treatment of opiate withdrawal symptoms can be reduced with the programmable CNT membrane transdermal system. PMID:24788096

  5. Carbon nanotubes buckypapers for potential transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Schwengber, Alex; Prado, Héctor J; Zilli, Darío A; Bonelli, Pablo R; Cukierman, Ana L

    2015-12-01

    Drug loaded buckypapers based on different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared and characterized in order to evaluate their potentialities for the design of novel transdermal drug delivery systems. Lab-synthesized CNTs as well as commercial samples were employed. Clonidine hydrochloride was used as model drug, and the influence of composition of the drug loaded buckypapers and processing variables on in vitro release profiles was investigated. To examine the influence of the drug nature the evaluation was further extended to buckypapers prepared with flurbiprofen and one type of CNTs, their selection being based on the results obtained with the former drug. Scanning electronic microscopy images indicated that the model drugs were finely dispersed on the CNTs. Differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction pointed to an amorphous state of both drugs in the buckypapers. A higher degree of CNT-drug superficial interactions resulted in a slower release of the drug. These interactions were in turn affected by the type of CNTs employed (single wall or multiwall CNTs), their functionalization with hydroxyl or carboxyl groups, the chemical structure of the drug, and the CNT:drug mass ratio. Furthermore, the application of a second layer of drug free CNTs on the loaded buckypaper, led to decelerate the drug release and to reduce the burst effect. PMID:26354234

  6. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery. PMID:20639882

  7. Synthesis of calcium carbonate nanocrystals and their potential application as vessels for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Carata, Elisabetta; Panzarini, Elisa; Baldassare, Francesca; Dini, Luciana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Pure and stable calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals were synthesized by spray drying method. We exploited the opportunity to use them as vessels for drug delivery studying the biocompatibility and the internalization in HeLa cells.

  8. Toward Carbon Monoxide-Based Therapeutics: Critical Drug Delivery and Developability Issues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xingyue; Damera, Krishna; Zheng, Yueqin; Yu, Bingchen; Otterbein, Leo E; Wang, Binghe

    2016-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an intrinsic signaling molecule with importance on par with that of nitric oxide. During the past decade, pharmacologic studies have amply demonstrated the therapeutic potential of carbon monoxide. However, such studies were mostly based on CO inhalation and metal-based CO-releasing molecules. The field is now at the stage that a major effort is needed to develop pharmaceutically acceptable forms of CO for delivery via various routes such as oral, injection, infusion, or topical applications. This review examines the state of the art, discusses the existing hurdles to overcome, and proposes developmental strategies necessary to address remaining drug delivery issues. PMID:26869408

  9. Multifunctional hybrid-carbon nanotubes: new horizon in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as an intriguing nanotechnological tool for numerous biomedical applications including biocompatible modules for the bioactives delivery ascribed to their unique properties, such as greater loading efficiency, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, high surface area and photoluminescence, that make them ideal candidate in pharmaceutical and biomedical science. The design of multifunctional hybrid-CNTs for drug delivery and targeting may differ from the conventional drug delivery system. The conventional nanocarriers have few limitations, such as inappropriate availability of surface-chemical functional groups for conjugation, low entrapment/loading efficiency as well as stability as per ICH guidelines with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) prominences. The multifunctional hybrid-CNTs will sparked and open a new door for researchers, scientist of the pharmaceutical and biomedical arena. This review summarizes the vivid aspects of CNTs like characterization, supramolecular chemistry of CNTs-dendrimer, CNTs-nanoparticles, CNTs-quantum dots conjugate for delivery of bioactives, not discussed so far. PMID:26147085

  10. Delivery of siRNA to ovarian cancer cells using laser-activated carbon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aritra; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The RNAi-mediated knockdown of gene expression is an attractive tool for research and therapeutic purposes but its implementation is challenging. Here we report on a new method based on photoacoustic delivery of siRNA developed to address some of these challenges. Materials & methods Physical properties and photoacoustic emission of carbon black (CB) particles upon near-infrared laser irradiation were characterized. Next, ovarian cancer cells Hey A8-F8 were exposed to near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses in the presence of siRNA targeting EGFR gene and CB particles. The intracellular delivery of siRNA and silencing of the target gene were determined by specific qPCR assays. Results & conclusion Laser-activated CB nanoparticles generated photoacoustic emission and enabled intracellular delivery of siRNA and significant knockdown of its target EGFR mRNA. This physical method represents a new promising approach to targeted therapeutic delivery of siRNA. PMID:26080699

  11. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  12. Corking Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube Cups with Gold Nanoparticles for Biodegradable Drug Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    Burkert, Seth C; Star, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have been proposed as effective drug delivery devices; however their perceived biopersistence and toxicological profile may hinder their applications in medical therapeutics. Nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes results in a unique "stacked-cup" structure, with cups held together through van der Waals forces. Disrupting these weak interactions yields individual and short-stacked nanocups that can subsequently be corked with gold nanoparticles, resulting in sealed containers for delivery of cargo. Peroxidase-catalyzed reactions can effectively uncork these containers, followed by complete degradation of the graphitic capsule, resulting in effective release of therapeutic cargo while minimizing harmful side effects. The protocols reported herein describe the synthesis of stacked nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups followed by effective separation into individual cups and gold nanoparticle cork formation resulting in loaded and sealed containers. PMID:26629615

  13. Carbon Nanotubes in Cancer Therapy and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Elhissi, Abdelbary M. A.; Ahmed, Waqar; Hassan, Israr Ul; Dhanak, Vinod. R.; D'Emanuele, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced recently as a novel carrier system for both small and large therapeutic molecules. CNTs can be functionalized (i.e., surface engineered) with certain functional groups in order to manipulate their physical or biological properties. In addition to the ability of CNTs to act as carriers for a wide range of therapeutic molecules, their large surface area and possibility to manipulate their surfaces and physical dimensions have been exploited for use in the photothermal destruction of cancer cells. This paper paper will discuss the therapeutic applications of CNTs with a major focus on their applications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22028974

  14. Carbon nanotubes part I: preparation of a novel and versatile drug-delivery vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mahdi; Solati, Navid; Amiri, Mohammad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Mohamed, Elmira; Taheri, Mahdiar; Hashemkhani, Mahshid; Saeidi, Ahad; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Kiani, Parnian; Ghasemi, Amir; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Aref, Amir R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is 23 years since carbon allotrope known as carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered by Iijima, who described them as “rolled graphite sheets inserted into each other”. Since then, CNTs have been studied in nanoelectronic devices. However, CNTs also possess the versatility to act as drug- and gene-delivery vehicles. Areas covered This review covers the synthesis, purification and functionalization of CNTs. Arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition are the principle synthesis methods. Non-covalent functionalization relies on attachment of biomolecules by coating the CNT with surfactants, synthetic polymers and biopolymers. Covalent functionalization often involves the initial introduction of carboxylic acids or amine groups, diazonium addition, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition or reductive alkylation. The aim is to produce functional groups to attach the active cargo. Expert opinion In this review, the feasibility of CNT being used as a drug-delivery vehicle is explored. The molecular composition of CNT is extremely hydrophobic and highly aggregation-prone. Therefore, most of the efforts towards drug delivery has centered on chemical functionalization, which is usually divided in two categories; non-covalent and covalent. The biomedical applications of CNT are growing apace, and new drug-delivery technologies play a major role in these efforts. PMID:25601356

  15. Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Pavitra

    CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

  16. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible. PMID:24870227

  17. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  18. Polyethylene-Glycol-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Intra-Articular Delivery to Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Cristiano; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Magrini, Andrea; Rosato, Nicola; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and debilitating degenerative disease of articular joints for which no disease-modifying medical therapy is currently available. Inefficient delivery of pharmacologic agents into cartilage-resident chondrocytes after systemic administration has been a limitation to the development of anti-OA medications. Direct intra-articular injection enables delivery of high concentrations of agents in close proximity to chondrocytes; however, the efficacy of this approach is limited by the fast clearance of small molecules and biomacromolecules after injection into the synovial cavity. Coupling of pharmacologic agents with drug delivery systems able to enhance their residence time and cartilage penetration can enhance the effectiveness of intra-articularly injected anti-OA medications. Herein we describe an efficient intra-articular delivery nanosystem based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains (PEG-SWCNTs). We show that PEG-SWCNTs are capable to persist in the joint cavity for a prolonged time, enter the cartilage matrix, and deliver gene inhibitors into chondrocytes of both healthy and OA mice. PEG-SWCNT nanoparticles did not elicit systemic or local side effects. Our data suggest that PEG-SWCNTs represent a biocompatible and effective nanocarrier for intra-articular delivery of agents to chondrocytes. PMID:25415768

  19. Glutathione-mediated mesoporous carbon as a drug delivery nanocarrier with carbon dots as a cap and fluorescent tracer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Han, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Chang, Yan-Qin; Chen, Xu-Wei; He, Rong-Huan; Shu, Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-09-01

    This work describes a novel and general redox-responsive controlled drug delivery-release nanocarrier with mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs) gated by customized fluorescent carbon dots (CDs). The modification of MCNs with a disulfide unit enables the system to be sensitive to intracellular glutathione (GSH). The CDs anchoring onto the surface of the MCNs via an electrostatic interaction block the mesopores and thus prevent the leakage of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded inside the channel of the MCNs. Upon the addition of GSH at the physiological environment, the integrity of the system is disrupted due to the dissociation of the disulfide bond; meanwhile stripping the CDs opens the gate and thus triggers the rapid release of the encapsulated DOX. The fluorescence of the CDs is quenched/'turned off' when linking to the MCNs, while it is restored/'turned on' when detaching the CDs from the surface of the MCNs. Thus the fluorescent CDs serve as both a controllable drug release gatekeeper and a fluorescent probe for the visualization of the drug delivery process. By combining these inherent capabilities, the present drug delivery system may be a promising route for designing custom-made visual controlled-release nanodevices specifically governed by in situ stimulus in the cells. PMID:27458235

  20. Glutathione-mediated mesoporous carbon as a drug delivery nanocarrier with carbon dots as a cap and fluorescent tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Han, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Chang, Yan-Qin; Chen, Xu-Wei; He, Rong-Huan; Shu, Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-09-01

    This work describes a novel and general redox-responsive controlled drug delivery-release nanocarrier with mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs) gated by customized fluorescent carbon dots (CDs). The modification of MCNs with a disulfide unit enables the system to be sensitive to intracellular glutathione (GSH). The CDs anchoring onto the surface of the MCNs via an electrostatic interaction block the mesopores and thus prevent the leakage of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded inside the channel of the MCNs. Upon the addition of GSH at the physiological environment, the integrity of the system is disrupted due to the dissociation of the disulfide bond; meanwhile stripping the CDs opens the gate and thus triggers the rapid release of the encapsulated DOX. The fluorescence of the CDs is quenched/‘turned off’ when linking to the MCNs, while it is restored/‘turned on’ when detaching the CDs from the surface of the MCNs. Thus the fluorescent CDs serve as both a controllable drug release gatekeeper and a fluorescent probe for the visualization of the drug delivery process. By combining these inherent capabilities, the present drug delivery system may be a promising route for designing custom-made visual controlled-release nanodevices specifically governed by in situ stimulus in the cells.

  1. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  2. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  3. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Coyuco, Jurja C; Liu, Yuanjie; Tan, Bee-Jen; Chiu, Gigi NC

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes), carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-PEG), using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Of the three CNMs, f SWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that f SWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that f SWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of f SWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with f SWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, f SWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug delivery, and the differential effects on the intestinal epithelium imparted by different types of CNMs would create unique opportunities for drug-specific oral

  4. Oral drug delivery of therapeutic gases - carbon monoxide release for gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Christoph; Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2014-09-10

    Deploying the therapeutic potential of carbon monoxide (CO) in various gastrointestinal diseases is challenged by inappropriate oral delivery modes. It is for this challenge, that we developed an easy to use tablet referred to as oral carbon monoxide release system (OCORS) providing precise, controlled, tunable and targeted CO delivery for the treatment of sequelae of gastrointestinal diseases. OCORS is an oral tablet based on sulfite induced CO release from the CO releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2). OCORS performance was detailed as a function of the presence of buffer within the tablet core and the composition of a semipermeable cellulose acetate coating, shielding the tablet core. OCORS delivered CO for up to 10h with a nearly linear release profile between approximately 30 to 240min. This controlled release system delivered the therapeutic gas independent of environmental pH for reliable CO generation at gastric, intestinal or colonic sites. In vivo experiments and toxicological assessments particularly with respect to observed ruthenium release of OCORS are required to demonstrate the pharmacokinetics and clinical potential of this oral delivery platform for therapeutic gases. PMID:24969354

  5. Carbon Nanotubes in Biology and Medicine: In vitro and in vivo Detection, Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuang; Tabakman, Scott; Welsher, Kevin; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit many unique intrinsic physical and chemical properties and have been intensively explored for biological and biomedical applications in the past few years. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the main results from our and other groups in this field and clarify that surface functionalization is critical to the behavior of carbon nanotubes in biological systems. Ultrasensitive detection of biological species with carbon nanotubes can be realized after surface passivation to inhibit the non-specific binding of biomolecules on the hydrophobic nanotube surface. Electrical nanosensors based on nanotubes provide a label-free approach to biological detection. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes opens up a method of protein microarray with detection sensitivity down to 1 fmol/L. In vitro and in vivo toxicity studies reveal that highly water soluble and serum stable nanotubes are biocompatible, nontoxic, and potentially useful for biomedical applications. In vivo biodistributions vary with the functionalization and possibly also size of nanotubes, with a tendency to accumulate in the reticuloendothelial system (RES), including the liver and spleen, after intravenous administration. If well functionalized, nanotubes may be excreted mainly through the biliary pathway in feces. Carbon nanotube-based drug delivery has shown promise in various In vitro and in vivo experiments including delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA), paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Moreover, single-walled carbon nanotubes with various interesting intrinsic optical properties have been used as novel photoluminescence, Raman, and photoacoustic contrast agents for imaging of cells and animals. Further multidisciplinary explorations in this field may bring new opportunities in the realm of biomedicine. PMID:20174481

  6. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  7. Carbon nanotubes part II: a remarkable carrier for drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mahdi; Solati, Navid; Ghasemi, Amir; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Hashemkhani, Mahshid; Kiani, Parnian; Mohamed, Elmira; Saeidi, Ahad; Taheri, Mahdiar; Avci, Pinar; Aref, Amir R; Amiri, Mohammad; Baniasadi, Fazel; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently been studied as novel and versatile drug and gene delivery vehicles. When CNT are suitably functionalized, they can interact with various cell types and are taken up by endocytosis. Areas covered Anti-cancer drugs cisplatin and doxorubicin have been delivered by CNT, as well as methotrexate, taxol and gemcitabine. The delivery of the antifungal compound amphotericin B and the oral administration of erythropoietin have both been assisted using CNT. Frequently, targeting moieties such as folic acid, epidermal growth factor or various antibodies are attached to the CNT-drug nanovehicle. Different kinds of functionalization (e.g., polycations) have been used to allow CNT to act as gene delivery vectors. Plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA and micro-RNA have all been delivered by CNT vehicles. Significant concerns are raised about the nanotoxicology of the CNT and their potentially damaging effects on the environment. Expert opinion CNT-mediated drug delivery has been studied for over a decade, and both in vitro and in vivo studies have been reported. The future success of CNTs as vectors in vivo and in clinical application will depend on achievement of efficacious therapy with minimal adverse effects and avoidance of possible toxic and environmentally damaging effects. PMID:25613837

  8. Innovative Delivery of siRNA to Solid Tumors by Super Carbonate Apatite

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Inoue, Akira; Tei, Mitsuyoshi; Hirose, Hajime; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Hossain, Sharif; Akaike, Toshihiro; Matsuura, Nariaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is currently being tested in clinical trials for a limited number of diseases. However, systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to solid tumors has not yet been achieved in clinics. Here, we introduce an in vivo pH-sensitive delivery system for siRNA using super carbonate apatite (sCA) nanoparticles, which is the smallest class of nanocarrier. These carriers consist simply of inorganic ions and accumulate specifically in tumors, yet they cause no serious adverse events in mice and monkeys. Intravenously administered sCA-siRNA abundantly accumulated in the cytoplasm of tumor cells at 4 h, indicating quick achievement of endosomal escape. sCA-survivin-siRNA induced apoptosis in HT29 tumors and significantly inhibited in vivo tumor growth of HCT116, to a greater extent than two other in vivo delivery reagents. With innovative in vivo delivery efficiency, sCA could be a useful nanoparticle for the therapy of solid tumors. PMID:25738937

  9. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors. PMID:26901756

  10. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  11. Dissolved and particulate organic carbon exports from 4 Venezuelan rivers: effects of developing world urbanization on coastal carbon delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, C. A.; Perez, T.; Giuliante, A.; Rasse, R. J.; Hockaday, W. C.; Barnes, R. T.; Hernandez, J.; Donoso, L.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical and subtropical rivers play an increasingly important role in the delivery of riverine material to the coasts, and South America is the single largest source of all forms of dissolved organic matter to the ocean [Harrison et al., 2005]. Like much of the developing world, South American countries are urbanizing rapidly, a process that is likely to alter the characteristics and amount of carbon exported by rivers to the coasts. Compounding the measurement challenges are issues of basin size: small rivers release disproportionately large amounts of material to the ocean, but monitoring individual small basins is typically challenging, especially in the tropics. Here we present 4 years of monthly measurements of DOC and POC export from the four South American rivers that drain into the Cariaco Basin: the Tuy, Unare, Neverí, and Manzanares. Three of these rivers (Tuy, Neverí, and Manzanares) are mountainous, sharing the same geologic parent material and ecosystem, but varying in degree of urbanization. The Tuy drains Caracas (> 4 million people), and is significantly impacted by untreated wastewater. The Neverí and Manzanares host small cities at their mouths (3-400,000 people). Wastewater from Cumaná, at the mouth of the Manzanares, is released offshore, reducing its impact on the river's carbon cycle. The Unare is a flat river draining an ecosystem dominated by agriculture and savannah. In this presentation we will discuss the effects of tropical urbanization on the carbon export from small, mountainous rivers, focusing on delivery of DOC and POC to the coasts.

  12. PLGA-Carbon Nanotube Conjugates for Intercellular Delivery of Caspase-3 into Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qingsu; Blais, Marc-Olivier; Harris, Greg; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has arisen to be of the most prominent health care issues across the world in recent years. Doctors have used physiological intervention as well as chemical and radioactive therapeutics to treat cancer thus far. As an alternative to current methods, gene delivery systems with high efficiency, specificity, and safety that can reduce side effects such as necrosis of tissue are under development. Although viral vectors are highly efficient, concerns have arisen from the fact that viral vectors are sourced from lethal diseases. With this in mind, rod shaped nano-materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become an attractive option for drug delivery due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect in tumors as well as the ability to penetrate the cell membrane. Here, we successfully engineered poly (lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) functionalized CNTs to reduce toxicity concerns, provide attachment sites for pro-apoptotic protein caspase-3 (CP3), and tune the temporal release profile of CP3 within bone cancer cells. Our results showed that CP3 was able to attach to functionalized CNTs, forming CNT-PLGA-CP3 conjugates. We show this conjugate can efficiently transduce cells at dosages as low as 0.05 μg/ml and suppress cell proliferation up to a week with no further treatments. These results are essential to showing the capabilities of PLGA functionalized CNTs as a non-viral vector gene delivery technique to tune cell fate. PMID:24312611

  13. Potential of surface-eroding poly(ethylene carbonate) for drug delivery to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Adam; Water, Jorrit J; Wang, Yingya; Arnfast, Lærke; Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz

    2016-09-25

    Films composed of poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC), a biodegradable polymer, were compared with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) films loaded with and without the tuberculosis drug rifampicin to study the characteristics and performance of PEC as a potential carrier for controlled drug delivery to macrophages. All drug-loaded PLGA and PEC films were amorphous indicating good miscibility of the drug in the polymers, even at high drug loading (up to 50wt.%). Polymer degradation studies showed that PLGA degraded slowly via bulk erosion while PEC degraded more rapidly and near-linearly via enzyme mediated surface erosion (by cholesterol esterase). Drug release studies performed with polymer films indicated a diffusion/erosion dependent delivery behavior for PLGA while an almost zero-order drug release profile was observed from PEC due to the controlled polymer degradation process. When exposed to polymer degradation products the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 showed less susceptibility to PEC than to PLGA. However, when seeding the macrophages on PLGA and PEC films no relevant difference in cell proliferation/growth kinetics was observed. Overall, this study emphasizes that PEC is an attractive polymer for controlled drug release and could provide superior performance to PLGA for some drug delivery applications including the treatment of macrophage infections. PMID:27492019

  14. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using `bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6Chi monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6Chi monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  15. Polyamidoamine-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes for gene delivery: synthesis, transfection and intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Biao; Xue, Yanan; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Liming; Huang, Shiwen; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-11-16

    Functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWNTs) are of great interest and designed as a novel gene delivery system. In this paper, we presented synthesis of polyamidoamine-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PAA-g-MWNTs) and their application as a novel gene delivery system. The PAA-g-MWNTs, obtained from amide formation between PAA and chemically oxidized MWNTs, were stable in aqueous solution and much less toxic to cells than PAA and PEI 25KDa. More importantly, PAA-g-MWNTs showed comparable or even higher transfection efficiency than PAA and PEI at optimal w/w ratio. Intracellular trafficking of Cy3-labeled pGL-3 indicated that a large number of Cy3-labeled pGL-3 were attached to nucleus membrane, the majority of which was localized in nucleus after incubation with cells for 24 h. We have demonstrated that PAA modification of MWNTs facilitate higher DNA uptake and gene expression in vitro. All these facts suggest potential application of PAA-g-MWNTs as a novel gene vector with high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. PMID:21995530

  16. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc’h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3–57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55–1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for

  17. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  18. Dual-Responsive Carbon Dots for Tumor Extracellular Microenvironment Triggered Targeting and Enhanced Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Ai, Xiangzhao; Ong, Huimin; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-07-27

    In this work, pH/redox dual-responsive carbon dots (CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG) were fabricated for tumor extracellular microenvironment triggered targeting and enhanced anticancer drug delivery. The system consists of fluorescent carbon dots as imaging-guided drug nanocarriers, cisplatin(IV) as prodrug, and RGD peptide as active targeting ligand, which is covered by monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) through tumor extracellular pH (6.5-6.8) responsive benzoic-imine bond. The drug nanocarriers could be tracked by multicolor fluorescence of carbon dots. After the hydrolysis of benzoic-imine bond at the tumor extracellular pH to expose the inner targeting RGD peptide, the drug nanocarriers showed effective uptake by cancer cells through RGD-integrin αvβ3 (ligand-receptor) interaction. Upon the internalization, the loaded cisplatin(IV) prodrug was reduced to cytotoxic cisplatin in reductive cytosol of cancer cells to exhibit therapeutic effects. Confocal imaging, flow cytometry, and cell viability assays using CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG were performed to reveal the enhanced uptake and better therapeutic efficiency to cancer cells with high integrin αvβ3 expression at tumor extracellular pH than that in physiological condition. The developed CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG offers a new strategy to provide safe and effective therapeutic agents based on carbon dots for promising cancer therapy. PMID:27367152

  19. Silica-Based Carbon Source Delivery for In-situ Bioremediation Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, B.; Yang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal silica aqueous suspensions undergo viscosity increasing and gelation over time under favorable geochemical conditions. This property of silica suspension can potentially be applied to deliver remedial amendments to the subsurface and establish slow release amendment sources for enhanced remediation. In this study, silica-based delivery of carbon sources for in-situ bioremediation enhancement is investigated. Sodium lactate, vegetable oil, ethanol, and molasses have been studied for the interaction with colloidal silica in aqueous suspensions. The rheological properties of the carbon source amendments and silica suspension have been investigated. The lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica suspensions exhibited controllable viscosity increase and eventually became gels under favorable geochemical conditions. The gelation rate was a function of the concentration of silica, salinity, amendment, and temperature. The vegetable oil-silica suspensions increased viscosity immediately upon mixing, but did not perform gelation. The carbon source release rate from the lactate-, ethanol-, and molasses-silica gels was determined as a function of silica, salinity, amendment concentration. The microbial activity stimulation and in-situ bioremediation enhancement by the slow-released carbon from the amendment-silica gels will be demonstrated in future investigations planned in this study.

  20. Doxorubicin conjugated functionalizable carbon dots for nucleus targeted delivery and enhanced therapeutic efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Zheran; Wang, Ju; Jiang, Weihua; Jiang, Xuewei; Bai, Zhaoshi; He, Yunpeng; Jiang, Jianqi; Wang, Dongkai; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great potential in imaging and drug/gene delivery applications. In this work, CDs functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS-CDs) were employed to transport doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells for enhanced antitumor activity. DOX was coupled to NLS-CDs (DOX-CDs) through an acid-labile hydrazone bond, which was cleavable in the weakly acidic intracellular compartments. The cytotoxicity of DOX-CD complexes was evaluated by the MTT assay and the cellular uptake was monitored using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cell imaging confirmed that DOX-CDs were mainly located in the nucleus. Furthermore, the complexes could efficiently induce apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of DOX-CDs was investigated in an A549 xenograft nude mice model and the complexes exhibited an enhanced ability to inhibit tumor growth compared with free DOX. Thus, the DOX-CD conjugates may be exploited as promising drug delivery vehicles in cancer therapy.Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great potential in imaging and drug/gene delivery applications. In this work, CDs functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS-CDs) were employed to transport doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells for enhanced antitumor activity. DOX was coupled to NLS-CDs (DOX-CDs) through an acid-labile hydrazone bond, which was cleavable in the weakly acidic intracellular compartments. The cytotoxicity of DOX-CD complexes was evaluated by the MTT assay and the cellular uptake was monitored using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cell imaging confirmed that DOX-CDs were mainly located in the nucleus. Furthermore, the complexes could efficiently induce apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of DOX-CDs was investigated in an A549 xenograft nude mice model and the complexes exhibited an enhanced ability to inhibit tumor growth compared

  1. Carbon nanotubes and graphene as emerging candidates in neuroregeneration and neurodrug delivery

    PubMed Central

    John, Agnes Aruna; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadharshni; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Balaji, Arunpandian; Mohandas, Hemanth; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroregeneration is the regrowth or repair of nervous tissues, cells, or cell products involved in neurodegeneration and inflammatory diseases of the nervous system like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Nowadays, application of nanotechnology is commonly used in developing nanomedicines to advance pharmacokinetics and drug delivery exclusively for central nervous system pathologies. In addition, nanomedical advances are leading to therapies that disrupt disarranged protein aggregation in the central nervous system, deliver functional neuroprotective growth factors, and change the oxidative stress and excitotoxicity of affected neural tissues to regenerate the damaged neurons. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are allotropes of carbon that have been exploited by researchers because of their excellent physical properties and their ability to interface with neurons and neuronal circuits. This review describes the role of carbon nanotubes and graphene in neuroregeneration. In the future, it is hoped that the benefits of nanotechnologies will outweigh their risks, and that the next decade will present huge scope for developing and delivering technologies in the field of neuroscience. PMID:26170663

  2. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials as nanocarriers for loading and delivery of a poorly water-soluble anticancer drug: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Bao, Hongqian; Pan, Yongzheng; Pal, Mintu; Kakran, Mitali; Cheng, Henry Kuo Feng; Li, Lin; Tan, Lay Poh

    2011-05-14

    Carbon nanomaterials such as multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been functionalized by highly hydrophilic and biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) for loading and delivery of an anticancer drug, camptothecin (CPT). For the first time, CPT was loaded onto MWCNT-PVA and GO-PVA through π-π interactions and its capability to kill human breast and skin cancer cells was investigated. PMID:21451845

  3. In vivo drug delivery of gemcitabine with PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Razzazan, Ali; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Bahram; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-05-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) is an anticancer agent widely used in non-small cell lung and pancreatic cancers. The clinical use of GEM has been limited by its rapid metabolism and short plasma half-life. These restrictions lead to frequent administration of high drug doses which can cause severe side effects. Therefore, new delivery strategies are needed aiming toward improved therapeutic effects. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are emerging as promising carriers for drug delivery due to their unique properties including high drug loading capacities, notable cell membrane penetrability and prolonged circulation times. In this work, pristine SWCNTs were functionalized through carboxylation, acylation, amination, PEGylation and finally GEM conjugation. The prepared SWCNT-GEM and SWCNT-PEG-GEM conjugates were characterized by FTIR, NMR, DSC and TEM to confirm the successful functionalization. The amount of GEM bound to the conjugates was 43.14% (w/w) for the SWCNT-GEM and 37.32% for the SWCNT-PEG-GEM, indicating high loading capacity. MTT assay on the human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) and the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (MIA PaCa-2) demonstrated that the SWCNT-GEM was more cytotoxic than SWCNT-PEG-GEM and GEM. The SWCNT-PEG-GEM conjugates afford higher efficacy in suppressing tumor growth than SWCNT-GEM and GEM in B6 nude mice. The results demonstrate that the new formulation of GEM is useful strategy for improving the antitumor efficacy of GEM. PMID:26952465

  4. Hydrophilic mesoporous carbon nanospheres with high drug-loading efficiency for doxorubicin delivery and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Li, Xiangui; Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dan; Wang, Linzhao; Zhan, Jieqiong; She, Lan; Yang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a highly effective transmembrane delivery vehicle based on PEGylated oxidized mesoporous carbon nanosphere (oMCN@PEG) was successfully fabricated in a facile strategy. oMCN@PEG exhibited a narrow size distribution of 90 nm, excellent hydrophilicity, good biocompatibility, and a very high loading efficiency for doxorubicin (DOX). The drug system (oMCN@DOX@PEG) exhibited excellent stability under neutral pH conditions, but with dramatic releases of DOX at reduced pH conditions. Pharmacokinetics study revealed that oMCN@DOX@PEG could prolong the circulation of DOX in the blood stream. The endocytosis, cytotoxicity, and anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo of the drug-loaded nanoparticles were also evaluated. Our results showed that the nanoparticles efficiently penetrated the membrane of tumor cells, subsequently released drugs, and efficiently inhibited the growth of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Especially, oMCN@DOX@PEG also exhibited significant antimetastasis effect in advanced stage of malignant cancer, improving the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. The results suggested that oMCN@PEG might be a promising anticancer drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. PMID:27175077

  5. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  6. Novel application of Eudragit RL and cholesteryl oleyl carbonate to thermo-sensitive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Emel Oyku; Gundogdu, Evren; Baspinar, Yücel; Karasulu, Ercument; Kirilmaz, Levent

    2013-12-01

    The Eudragit RL 100 and propylene glycol (PG) membranes with and without cholesteryl oleyl carbonate (COC) were prepared by the solvent casting method to pioneer a novel application of a thermo-sensitive drug delivery system. After that, the properties of these membranes were investigated by thermal, scanning, and porosity studies. Drug permeation studies through all membranes were carried out using salbuthamol sulphate (SBS) at constant temperatures (25°C and 37°C), respectively. The permeability of SBS through the membranes with COC has been shown to be a discontinuous function of temperature, that is, their permeability increased steeply above the phase transition temperature (37°C) of the COC. The thermo-sensitive permeation mechanism for the membranes might be based on the structure change of the membranes caused by the phase transition, so that the membranes could absorb more water. Considering the high biological safety of Eudragit RL 100 and PG membranes with and without COC might be used to develop a novel thermo-sensitive drug delivery system. PMID:22397637

  7. Highly efficient siRNA delivery system into human and murine cells using single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeira, M. S.; Andrade, V. A.; Gomes, E. R. M.; Aguiar, C. J.; Moraes, E. R.; Soares, J. S.; Silva, E. E.; Lacerda, R. G.; Ladeira, L. O.; Jorio, A.; Lima, P.; Leite, M. Fatima; Resende, R. R.; Guatimosim, S.

    2010-09-01

    Development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology utilizing short interfering RNA sequences (siRNA) has focused on creating methods for delivering siRNAs to cells and for enhancing siRNA stability in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a novel approach for siRNA cellular delivery using siRNA coiling into carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The CNT-siRNA delivery system successfully demonstrates nonspecific toxicity and transfection efficiency greater than 95%. This approach offers the potential for siRNA delivery into different types of cells, including hard-to-transfect cells, such as neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. We also tested the CNT-siRNA system in a non-metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SKHep1). In all types of cells used in this work the CNT-siRNA delivery system showed high efficiency and apparent no side effects for various in vitro applications.

  8. Multi-functionalized carbon dots as theranostic nanoagent for gene delivery in lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Fen; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Jui; Wang, Li-Wen; Chang, Chien-Wen; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Theranostics, an integrated therapeutic and diagnostic system, can simultaneously monitor the real-time response of therapy. Different imaging modalities can combine with a variety of therapeutic moieties in theranostic nanoagents. In this study, a multi-functionalized, integrated theranostic nanoagent based on folate-conjugated reducible polyethylenimine passivated carbon dots (fc-rPEI-Cdots) is developed and characterized. These nanoagents emit visible blue photoluminescence under 360 nm excitation and can encapsulate multiple siRNAs (EGFR and cyclin B1) followed by releasing them in intracellular reductive environment. In vitro cell culture study demonstrates that fc-rPEI-Cdots is a highly biocompatible material and a good siRNA gene delivery carrier for targeted lung cancer treatment. Moreover, fc-rPEI-Cdots/pooled siRNAs can be selectively accumulated in lung cancer cells through receptor mediated endocytosis, resulting in better gene silencing and anti-cancer effect. Combining bioimaging of carbon dots, stimulus responsive property, gene silencing strategy, and active targeting motif, this multi-functionalized, integrated theranostic nanoagent may provide a useful tool and platform to benefit clinicians adjusting therapeutic strategy and administered drug dosage in real time response by monitoring the effect and tracking the development of carcinomatous tissues in diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:26880047

  9. Multi-functionalized carbon dots as theranostic nanoagent for gene delivery in lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Fen; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Kuan, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Jui; Wang, Li-Wen; Chang, Chien-Wen; Wang, Tzu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Theranostics, an integrated therapeutic and diagnostic system, can simultaneously monitor the real-time response of therapy. Different imaging modalities can combine with a variety of therapeutic moieties in theranostic nanoagents. In this study, a multi-functionalized, integrated theranostic nanoagent based on folate-conjugated reducible polyethylenimine passivated carbon dots (fc-rPEI-Cdots) is developed and characterized. These nanoagents emit visible blue photoluminescence under 360 nm excitation and can encapsulate multiple siRNAs (EGFR and cyclin B1) followed by releasing them in intracellular reductive environment. In vitro cell culture study demonstrates that fc-rPEI-Cdots is a highly biocompatible material and a good siRNA gene delivery carrier for targeted lung cancer treatment. Moreover, fc-rPEI-Cdots/pooled siRNAs can be selectively accumulated in lung cancer cells through receptor mediated endocytosis, resulting in better gene silencing and anti-cancer effect. Combining bioimaging of carbon dots, stimulus responsive property, gene silencing strategy, and active targeting motif, this multi-functionalized, integrated theranostic nanoagent may provide a useful tool and platform to benefit clinicians adjusting therapeutic strategy and administered drug dosage in real time response by monitoring the effect and tracking the development of carcinomatous tissues in diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:26880047

  10. Nanodiamond decorated liposomes as highly biocompatible delivery vehicles and a comparison with carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2013-11-01

    Studying interactions between nano-carbons and lipid membranes is important for multiplexed drug delivery, device fabrication and for understanding toxicity. Herein, we report that nanodiamond (ND, sp3 carbon) forms a complex with highly biocompatible zwitterionic liposomes based on hydrogen bonding, which is confirmed by pH-dependent and urea-dependent assays. Despite such weak interaction, the complex is highly stable. Comparisons were made with two sp2 carbons: nanoscale graphene oxide (NGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), where CNT adsorption is the weakest. Adsorption of the nano-carbons does not induce liposome leakage or affect lipid phase transition temperature. Therefore, the potential toxicity of nano-carbons is unlikely to be related to direct membrane damage. ND facilitates cellular uptake of liposomes and co-delivery of negatively charged calcein and positively charged doxorubicin has been demonstrated. ND has the lowest toxicity, while CNTs and NGO are slightly more toxic. The effect of introducing fusogenic lipids and cholesterol was further studied to understand the effect of lipid formulation.Studying interactions between nano-carbons and lipid membranes is important for multiplexed drug delivery, device fabrication and for understanding toxicity. Herein, we report that nanodiamond (ND, sp3 carbon) forms a complex with highly biocompatible zwitterionic liposomes based on hydrogen bonding, which is confirmed by pH-dependent and urea-dependent assays. Despite such weak interaction, the complex is highly stable. Comparisons were made with two sp2 carbons: nanoscale graphene oxide (NGO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), where CNT adsorption is the weakest. Adsorption of the nano-carbons does not induce liposome leakage or affect lipid phase transition temperature. Therefore, the potential toxicity of nano-carbons is unlikely to be related to direct membrane damage. ND facilitates cellular uptake of liposomes and co-delivery of negatively charged calcein and

  11. Carbon delivery to deep mineral horizons in Hawaiian rain forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Kramer, Marc; Carbone, Mariah S.

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to better understand the mechanisms for soil organic matter delivery to and accumulation in mineral horizons of tropical rain forest, volcanic soils. We used soil morphology, lysimetry, isotopes, and spectroscopy to investigate the role of preferential flow paths in the delivery of carbon (C) to the subsoil. High rainfall, high primary productivity, and the dominance of highly reactive, short-range-order minerals combine to sequester substantial stocks of soil C with long mean residence times. The soils have large peds, separated by wide cracks, which form a network of channels propagating downward through the top 40 to 60 cm, facilitating macropore flow. The channel infillings and crack surfaces were enriched in organic material (OM) with lower C:N ratios, and had higher ammonium oxalate-extractable Al, and lower ammonium oxalate-extractable Fe than the adjacent mineral bulk soil. CP MAS 13C-NMR spectra of OM accumulating at depth showed strong signal intensities in the carboxyl and carbonyl C regions, indicative of organic acids, while decaying roots showed greater contributions of aromatic and O-alkyl C. The ratios of alkyl-to-O-alkyl C in the organic infillings were more similar to those of the bulk Bh and to dissolved organic matter than to those of decaying roots. Radiocarbon-based ages of OM infillings at >50 cm depth were significantly younger than the mineral soil (2000 years versus 7000 years). Respired CO2 from incubated soils showed that OM accumulating at depth is a mixture of modern and much older C, providing further evidence for the downward movement of fresh C.

  12. A comparative study on non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by chitosan and its derivatives for delivery of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Mohammadi, Zahra; Aghamiri, Seyed Foad; Zarrabi, Ali; Talaie, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Three targeting drug delivery systems were formulated by functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using chitosan and its derivatives (Palmitoyl Chitosan and Carboxymethyl Chitosan) for delivery of doxorubicin, an anti-cancer drug. Loading efficiency was higher than 75% for all carriers. The systems were stable under neutral pH, while effectively released drug at reduced pH. The drug loading efficiency and the release rate were revealed to be dependent on the type of applied polymer and could be adjusted to a desired rate by changing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic substitution degree. Folic acid was attached and cytotoxicity of system was compared with free drug.

  13. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Stock, M.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients.

  14. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Stock, M; Vatnitsky, S

    2015-10-21

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients. PMID:26418366

  15. Controlled delivery of dopamine hydrochloride using surface modified carbon dots for neuro diseases.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Shahnawaz; Pandey, Sunil; Talib, Abou; Bhaisare, Mukesh Lavkush; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2015-10-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents using water-soluble, highly biocompatible Carbon dots (C-dots) is an efficient strategy to control drug release under physiological milieu. Dopamine hydrochloride (DA), the most important inotropic vasopressor agent used in neurological diseases. In our study DA is anchored to water-soluble carbon dots for controlled release under mimicked in vitro physiological conditions. The tenure of the DA release at pH 7.4 was greatly extended to 60 h for C-dots-DA, in comparison with the control DA alone. The statistical calculation was used to comprehend the release pattern of the DA, which exhibited the pattern of Hixson-Crowell model of release. In order to understand the impact of the C-dots-DA conjugate under physiological conditions, Neuro 2A cells were taken under consideration. The conjugate C-dots-DA was found to be biocompatible against Neuro 2A cells. The survival rate was found to be 74% at maximum concentration of 9 μg mL(-1). In vivo toxicity was studied using thin section of tissues after staining with Hematoxyline and Eosin Yellow (H&E). As per microscopic observations, conjugates did not inflict any anatomical distortions or hostile effects on tissues. Body weight of mice was also taken into consideration after injecting 20 μg mL(-1) of nano-conjugates via tail vein. The impact of nano-conjugate on body weight was found to be negligible after 45 days of observation. PMID:26186107

  16. One-step bulk preparation of calcium carbonate nanotubes and its application in anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Sun, Dong-Mei; Qian, Wen-Yu; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Wen-Rui; Li, Kun; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-06-01

    Bulk fabrication of ordered hollow structural particles (HSPs) with large surface area and high biocompatibility simultaneously is critical for the practical application of HSPs in biosensing and drug delivery. In this article, we describe a smart approach for batch synthesis of calcium carbonate nanotubes (CCNTs) based on supported liquid membrane (SLM) with large surface area, excellent structural stability, prominent biocompatibility, and acid degradability. The products were characterized by transmission electron micrograph, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopy, zeta potential, and particle size distribution. The results showed that the tube-like structure facilitated podophyllotoxin (PPT) diffusion into the cavity of hollow structure, and the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of CCNTs for PPT are as high as 38.5 and 64.4 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release study showed that PPT was released from the CCNTs in a pH-controlled and time-dependent manner. The treatment of HEK 293T and SGC 7901 cells demonstrated that PPT-loaded CCNTs were less toxic to normal cells and more effective in antitumor potency compared with free drugs. In addition, PPT-loaded CCNTs also enhanced the apoptotic process on tumor cells compared with the free drugs. This study not only provides a new kind of biocompatible and pH-sensitive nanomaterial as the feasible drug container and carrier but more importantly establishes a facile approach to synthesize novel hollow structural particles on a large scale based on SLM technology. PMID:22351100

  17. Photoluminescent carbon nanotags from harmful cyanobacteria for drug delivery and imaging in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Park, So Young; Park, Eun Sik; Son, Byoungchul; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Young-Chul; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Saehae; Huh, Yun Suk; Lee, Seung-Yeul; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Jouhahn

    2014-04-01

    Using a simple method of mass production of green carbon nanotags (G-tags) from harmful cyanobacteria, we developed an advanced and efficient imaging platform for the purpose of anticancer therapy. Approximately 100 grams of G-tags per 100 kilograms of harmful cyanobacteria were prepared using our eco-friendly approach. The G-tags possess high solubility, excellent photostability, and low cytotoxicity (<1.5 mg/mL for 24 h). Moreover, doxorubicin-conjugated G-tags (T-tags; >0.1 mg/mL) induced death in cancer cells (HepG2 and MCF-7) in-vitro at a higher rate than that of only G-tags while in-vivo mice experiment showed enhanced anticancer efficacy by T-tags at 0.01 mg/mL, indicating that the loaded doxorubicin retains its pharmaceutical activity. The cancer cell uptake and intracellular location of the G- and T-tags were observed. The results indicate that these multifunctional T-tags can deliver doxorubicin to the targeted cancer cells and sense the delivery of doxorubicin by activating the fluorescence of G-tags.

  18. Nanoparticle Based Delivery of Quercetin for the Treatment of Carbon Tetrachloride Mediated Liver Cirrhosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shashi Kant; Rastogil, Shweta; Arora, Indu; Javed, Kalim; Akhtar, Mohd; Samim, Mohd

    2016-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the common response to chronic liver injury and ultimately leads to cirrhosis. There is a pressing need in the pharmaceutical industry to develop efficient well-targeted drug delivery systems, which are lacking to date. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of a nanoquercetin NQ; i.e., quercetin encapsulated in PAG (p-aminophenyl-1-thio-β-D-galactopryranoside)-coated NIPAAM (N-isopropyl acrylamide) nanopolymer in liver compared with naked quercetin (Q) using a carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄)-mediated liver cirrhosis model. NQ was more effective at restoring liver membrane integrity as indicated by significantly reduced serum markers, including Alanine Transaminase (ALT), Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST), Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) and Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), compared with naked Q. The findings of reduced collagen and histopathology also show that the NQ effects were much better than those of naked Q. Biochemical parameters, including antioxidant defense enzymes, also provide supporting evidence. Furthermore, the decrease in NF-κB and NOS-2 expression in the NQ-treated groups was also much stronger than in the naked Q-treated group. Thus, the data clearly suggest that NQ not only provides significant hepatoprotection compared with naked Q, but it also substantially lowered the required concentration (1,000 to 10,000-fold lower) by increasing the bioavailability. PMID:27305761

  19. A new era of cancer treatment: carbon nanotubes as drug delivery tools

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Naderi, Naghmeh; Dissanayake, Oshani; Tan, Aaron; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term that encompasses a group of diseases characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of cells. There are over 200 different types of cancer, each of which gains its nomenclature according to the type of tissue the cell originates in. Many patients who succumb to cancer do not die as a result of the primary tumor, but because of the systemic effects of metastases on other regions away from the original site. One of the aims of cancer therapy is to prevent the metastatic process as early as possible. There are currently many therapies in clinical use, and recent advances in biotechnology lend credence to the potential of nanotechnology in the fight against cancer. Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), quantum dots, and dendrimers have unique properties that can be exploited for diagnostic purposes, thermal ablation, and drug delivery in cancer. CNTs are tubular materials with nanometer-sized diameters and axial symmetry, giving them unique properties that can be exploited in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In addition, CNTs have the potential to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. Alongside the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology-based materials, elucidating the toxicity of nanoparticles is also imperative. Hence, in this review, we seek to explore the biomedical applications of CNTs, with particular emphasis on their use as therapeutic platforms in oncology. PMID:22162655

  20. Photoluminescent carbon nanotags from harmful cyanobacteria for drug delivery and imaging in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Park, So Young; Park, Eun Sik; Son, Byoungchul; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Young-Chul; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Saehae; Huh, Yun Suk; Lee, Seung-Yeul; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Jouhahn

    2014-01-01

    Using a simple method of mass production of green carbon nanotags (G-tags) from harmful cyanobacteria, we developed an advanced and efficient imaging platform for the purpose of anticancer therapy. Approximately 100 grams of G-tags per 100 kilograms of harmful cyanobacteria were prepared using our eco-friendly approach. The G-tags possess high solubility, excellent photostability, and low cytotoxicity (<1.5 mg/mL for 24 h). Moreover, doxorubicin-conjugated G-tags (T-tags; >0.1 mg/mL) induced death in cancer cells (HepG2 and MCF-7) in-vitro at a higher rate than that of only G-tags while in-vivo mice experiment showed enhanced anticancer efficacy by T-tags at 0.01 mg/mL, indicating that the loaded doxorubicin retains its pharmaceutical activity. The cancer cell uptake and intracellular location of the G- and T-tags were observed. The results indicate that these multifunctional T-tags can deliver doxorubicin to the targeted cancer cells and sense the delivery of doxorubicin by activating the fluorescence of G-tags. PMID:24721805

  1. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  2. Non-Covalently Functionalized of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by DSPE-PEG-PEI for SiRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Siu, King Sun; Zhang, Yujuan; Zheng, Xiufen; Koropatnick, James; Min, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The expression of a gene can be specifically downregulated by small interfering RNA (SiRNA). Modified carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be used to protect SiRNA and facilitate its entry into cells. Regardless of that, simple and efficient functionalization of CNT is lacking. Effective SiRNA delivery can be carried out using non-covalently functionalized CNT, where non-covalent (versus covalent) functionalization is simpler and more expeditious. Non-covalently functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) that include a lipopolymer are described here. Polyethylenimine (PEI) conjugated to 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG) was generated and the products used to disperse CNT to form DSPE-PEG-PEI/CNT (DGI/C), an agent capable of facilitating SiRNA delivery to cells in vitro and organs and cells in vivo. PMID:26472449

  3. Effective Drug Delivery, in vitro and in vivo, By Carbon-Based Nanovectors Non-Covalently Loaded With Unmodified Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Leonard, Ashley D.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Marcano, Daniela C.; Yan, Shayou; Fiorentino, Stefania; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Katherine Price, B.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca M.; Wen, XiaoXia; Gabriela Raso, M.; Craig, Suzanne L.; Tran, Hai T.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Many new drugs have low aqueous solubility and high therapeutic efficacy. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a classic example of this type of compound. Here we show that extremely small (<40 nm) hydrophilic carbon clusters (HCCs) that are PEGylated (PEG-HCCs) are effective drug delivery vehicles when simply mixed with paclitaxel. This formulation of PTX sequestered in PEG-HCCs (PTX/PEG-HCCs) is stable for at least twenty weeks. The PTX/PEG-HCCs formulation was as effective as PTX in a clinical formulation in reducing tumor volumes in an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Preliminary toxicity and biodistribution studies suggest that the PEG-HCCs are not acutely toxic and, like many other nanomaterials, are primarily accumulated in the liver and spleen. This work demonstrates that carbon nanomaterials are effective drug delivery vehicles in vivo when non-covalently loaded with an unmodified drug. PMID:20681596

  4. The Use of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Possible Carrier in Drug Delivery System for Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Alias Mohd.; Buang, Nor Aziah; Yean, Lee Sze; Ibrahim, Mohd. Lokman

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised great interest in a number of applications, including field emission, energy storage, molecular electronics, sensors, biochips and drug delivery systems. This is due to their remarkable mechanical properties, chemical stability and biofunctionalizability. This nanomaterial is low in weight, has high strength and a high aspect ratio (long length compared to a small diameter). This paper will present a brief overview of drugs adsorbed onto the surface of carbon nanotubes via sonication method. The surface area of carbon nanotubes was measured by methylene blue method, Carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method were purified and functionalized in a mixture of concentrated acids (H2SO4:HNO3 = 3:1) at room temperature (25° C) via sonication in water bath, yielding carboxylic acid group on the CNTs' surface. CNT was successfully loaded with 48 %(w/w) aspirin molecules by suspending CNTs in a solution of aspirin in alcohol. Analysis of loaded CNTs by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum (FITR) and UV-visible Spectroscopy confirmed the loading of the drug onto the CNTs. The work presented is a prelude to the direction of using carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system to desired sites in human body.

  5. A New Carbon Nanotube-Based Breast Cancer Drug Delivery System: Preparation and In Vitro Analysis Using Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Paul, Arghya; Rodes, Laetitia; Prakash, Satya

    2015-04-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most important drugs for breast cancer; however, the drug effects are limited by its systematic toxicity and poor water solubility. Nanoparticles have been applied for delivery of cancer drugs to overcome their limitations. Toward this goal, a novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based drug delivery system was developed by conjugation of human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles for loading of antitumor agent PTX. The nanosized macromolecular SWNT-drug carrier (SWNT-HSA) was characterized by TEM, UV-Vis-NIR spectrometry, and TGA. The SWNT-based drug carrier displayed high intracellular delivery efficiency (cell uptake rate of 80%) in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, as examined by fluorescence-labeled drug carriers, suggesting the needle-shaped SWNT-HSA drug carrier was able to transport drugs across cell membrane despite its macromolecular structure. The drug loading on SWNT-based drug carrier was through high binding affinity of PTX to HSA proteins. The PTX formulated with SWNT-HSA showed greater growth inhibition activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells than PTX formulated with HSA nanoparticle only (cell viability of 63 vs 70% in 48 h and 53 vs 62% in 72 h). The increased drug efficacy could be driven by SWNT-mediated cell internalization. These data suggest that the developed SWNT-based antitumor agent is functional and effective. However, more studies for in vivo drug delivery efficacy and other properties are needed before this delivery system can be fully realized. PMID:27101155

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene: Nano-delivery of Gambogic acid increases its cytotoxicty in various cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Lamya M.

    Nanomedicine is a new branch of medicine that has been developed due to the critical need to treat challenging diseases, especially cancer since it remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the second most common cause of death after heart disease in the USA. One of the most important health care applications of nanomedicine concerns the development of drug delivery systems. Graphene (Gn), an atom-thick carbon monolayer of sp2- bonded carbon atoms arranged in a two dimensional (2D) honeycomb crystal lattice, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (1D, tubular) are among the most promising nanomaterials with the capability of delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to cancerous cells. For example, they have been used as vehicles for the anti-cancer, low-toxicity drug Gambogic acid (GA). Here, the cytotoxicity of GA in breast (MCF-7), pancreatic (PANC-1), cervical (HELA), ovarian (NCI/ADR), and prostate (PC3) cancer cells was assessed to determine what effect nanodelivery by either Gn or SWCNTs had on the efficacy of this promising drug. The nanomaterials showed no toxicity at the concentrations used. The inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis of the cells was due to the effects of GA which was significantly enhanced by nanodelivery. Such delivery of GA by either Gn or SWCNTs represents a first step toward assessing their effectiveness in more complex, targeted nano-delivery in vivo settings and signals their potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Lentinan-Modified Carbon Nanotubes as an Antigen Delivery System Modulate Immune Response in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jie; Liu, Zhenguang; Huang, Yifan; Qin, Tao; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Huang, Yee; Niu, Yale; Wang, Deyun

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvants enhance immunogenicity and sustain long-term immune responses. As vital components of vaccines, efficient adjuvants are highly desirable. Recent evidence regarding the potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to act as a support material has suggested that certain properties, such as their unique hollow structure, high specific surface area, and chemical stability, make CNTs desirable for a variety of antigen-delivery applications. Lentinan, a β-1,3-glucohexaose with β-1,6-branches that is extracted from the mushroom Lentinus edodes, is an effective immunostimulatory drug that has been clinically used in Japan and China, and recent studies have proved that specific beta-glucans can bind to various immune receptors. In this research, we covalently attached lentinan to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and tested their ability to enhance immune responses as a vaccine delivery system. In vitro study results showed that the nanotube constructs could rapidly enter dendritic cells and carry large amounts of antigen. Moreover, maturation markers were significantly upregulated versus the control. Thus, lentinan-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (L-MWCNTs) were regarded as an effective intracellular antigen depot and a catalyzer that could induce phenotypic and functional maturation of dendritic cells. Furthermore, compared with L-MWCNTs (35 μg/mL), a corresponding concentration of carboxylic carbon nanotubes (C-MWCNTs, 31.8 μg/mL) and an equivalent concentration of lentinan (3.2 μg/mL) did not remarkably influence the immune reaction in vitro or in vivo. Hence, we can hypothesize that the capability of L-MWCNTs was a consequence of the increased intracellular quantity of lentinan grafted onto the nanotubes. Overall, our studies demonstrated that L-MWCNTs significantly increased antigen accumulation in the cells and potentiated cellular and humoral immunity. In conclusion, L-MWCNTs constitute a potential vaccine delivery system to enhance immunogenicity

  8. Transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide– chitosan functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a potential drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Lanxia; Zhu, Dunwan; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based drug delivery vehicles might find great potential in cancer therapy via the combination of chemotherapy with photothermal therapy due to the strong optical absorbance of CNTs in the near-infrared region. However, the application of CNTs in cancer therapy was considerably constrained by their lack of solubility in aqueous medium, as well as the cytotoxicity caused by their hydrophobic surface. Intracellular delivery efficiency is another factor determining the application potential of CNTs in cancer therapy. In the present study, low-molecular-weight chitosan conjugated with transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide was used for noncovalent functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), aiming at providing a more efficient drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. The TAT–chitosan-conjugated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-TC) were further investigated for their water solubility, cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating capability, and accumulation in tumor. It was found that MWCNTs-TC were essentially nontoxic with satisfying water solubility, and they were more efficient in terms of cancer-targeted intracellular transport both in vitro and in vivo as compared with chitosan-modified MWCNTs (MWCNTs-CS), suggesting the great application potential of MWCNTs-TC in cancer therapy. PMID:26082633

  9. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Dual-Doped Hollow Carbon Dot as a Nanocarrier for Doxorubicin Delivery and Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Qingyan; Gao, Yifang; Shuang, Shaomin; Choi, Martin M F; Dong, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Innovative phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped hollow carbon dots (PNHCDs) have been fabricated for anticancer drug delivery and biological imaging. The functional groups of PNHCDs are introduced by simply mixing glucose, 1,2-ethylenediamine, and concentrated phosphoric acid. This is an automatic method without external heat treatment to rapidly produce large quantities of PNHCDs, which avoid high temperature, complicated operations, and long reaction times. The as-prepared PNHCDs possess small particle size, hollow structure, and abundant phosphate/hydroxyl/pyridinic/pyrrolic-like N groups, endowing PNHCDs with fluorescent properties, improving the accuracy of PNHCDs as an optical monitoring code both in vitro and in vivo. The investigation of PNHCDs as an anticancer drug nanocarrier for doxorubicin (DOX) indicates a better antitumor efficacy than free DOX owing to its enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, which results in highly effective tumor growth inhibition and improved targeted therapy for cancer in clinical medicine. PMID:27088972

  10. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy with an active scanned delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Furukawa, T; Inaniwa, T

    2014-10-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, secondary neutrons contribute to an undesired dose outside the target volume, and consequently the increase of secondary cancer risk is a growing concern. In this study, neutron ambient dose equivalents in carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) with an active beam delivery system were measured with a rem meter, WENDI-II, at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When the same irradiation target was assumed, the measured neutron dose with an active beam was at most ∼15 % of that with a passive beam. This percentage became smaller as larger distances from the iso-centre. Also, when using an active beam delivery system, the neutron dose per treatment dose in CIRT was comparable with that in proton radiotherapy. Finally, it was experimentally demonstrated that the use of an active scanned beam in CIRT can greatly reduce the secondary neutron dose. PMID:24126486

  11. Synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application in gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bifeng; Cui, Daxiang; Xu, Ping; Ozkan, Cengiz; Feng, Gao; Ozkan, Mihri; Huang, Tuo; Chu, Bingfeng; Li, Qing; He, Rong; Hu, Guohan

    2009-03-01

    With the aim of improving the amount and delivery efficiency of genes taken by carbon nanotubes into human cancer cells, different generations of polyamidoamine dendrimer modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (dMNTs) were fabricated, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the presence of dendrimer capped on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The dMNTs fully conjugated with FITC-labeled antisense c-myc oligonucleotides (asODN), those resultant asODN-dMNTs composites were incubated with human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells, and liver cancer cell line HepG2 cells, and confirmed to enter into tumor cells within 15 min by laser confocal microscopy. These composites inhibited the cell growth in time- and dose-dependent means, and down-regulated the expression of the c-myc gene and C-Myc protein. Compared with the composites of CNT-NH2-asODN and dendrimer-asODN, no. 5 generation of dendrimer-modified MNT-asODN composites exhibit maximal transfection efficiencies and inhibition effects on tumor cells. The intracellular gene transport and uptake via dMNTs should be generic for the mammalian cell lines. The dMNTs have potentials in applications such as gene or drug delivery for cancer therapy and molecular imaging.

  12. Fatal respiratory thermal injury following accidental administration of carbon dioxide using the circle system for a cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Aghdashi, M M; Abbasivash, R; Hassani, E; Pirnejad, H

    2009-10-01

    A 37-year-old parturient underwent emergency cesarean delivery because of severe preeclampsia. After induction of general anesthesia, the oxygen saturation decreased. Volatile anesthetics were discontinued and examination of the anesthetic circuit and machine revealed a soda lime canister that was extremely hot. The patient was detached from the anesthetic machine and hand-ventilated with an external oxygen cylinder. The surgery was cancelled and the patient was extubated. Analysis of the cylinder connected to the anesthesia machine displayed 100% carbon dioxide. The patient developed progressive respiratory failure. Bronchoscopic examination revealed burn scars from the carina to the main bronchi. The patient died within four months of the incident. PMID:19734035

  13. PEGylated Carbon Nanocapsule: A Universal Reactor and Carrier for In Vivo Delivery of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rammohan, Amritha; Mishra, Gargi; Mahaling, Binapani; Tayal, Lokesh; Mukhopadhyay, Ahana; Gambhir, Sanjay; Sharma, Ashutosh; Sivakumar, Sri

    2016-01-13

    We have developed PEGylated mesoporous carbon nanocapsule as a universal nanoreactor and carrier for the delivery of highly crystalline hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanoparticles (NPs) which shows superior biocompatibility, dispersion in body fluids, good biodistribution and NPs independent cellular uptake mechanism. The hydrophobic/hydrophilic NPs without surface modification were synthesized in situ inside the cavities of mesoporous carbon capsules (200-850 nm). Stable and inert nature of carbon capsules in a wide range of reaction conditions like high temperature and harsh solvents, make it suitable for being used as nano/microreactors for the syntheses of a variety of NPs for bioimaging applications, such as NaYF4:Eu(3+)(5%), LaVO4:Eu(3+)(10%), GdVO4:Eu(3+)(10%), Y2O3:Eu(3+)(5%), GdF3:Tb(3+)(10%), Mo, Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag. Multiple types of NPs (Y2O3:Eu(3+)(5%) (hydrophobic) and GdF3:Tb(3+)(10%) (hydrophilic)) were coloaded inside the carbon capsules to create a multimodal agent for magneto-fluorescence imaging. Our in vivo study clearly suggests that carbon capsules have biodistribution in many organs including liver, heart, spleen, lungs, blood pool, and muscles. PMID:26646711

  14. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOEpatents

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  15. The LandCarbon Web Application: Advanced Geospatial Data Delivery and Visualization Tools for Communication about Ecosystem Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Galey, B.; Zhu, Z.; Sleeter, B. M.; Lehmer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The LandCarbon web application (http://landcarbon.org) is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey and U.C. Berkeley's Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF). The LandCarbon project is a national assessment focused on improved understanding of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas fluxes in and out of ecosystems related to land use, using scientific capabilities from USGS and other organizations. The national assessment is conducted at a regional scale, covers all 50 states, and incorporates data from remote sensing, land change studies, aquatic and wetland data, hydrological and biogeochemical modeling, and wildfire mapping to estimate baseline and future potential carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes. The LandCarbon web application is a geospatial portal that allows for a sophisticated data delivery system as well as a suite of engaging tools that showcase the LandCarbon data using interactive web based maps and charts. The web application was designed to be flexible and accessible to meet the needs of a variety of users. Casual users can explore the input data and results of the assessment for a particular area of interest in an intuitive and interactive map, without the need for specialized software. Users can view and interact with maps, charts, and statistics that summarize the baseline and future potential carbon storage and fluxes for U.S. Level 2 Ecoregions for 3 IPCC emissions scenarios. The application allows users to access the primary data sources and assessment results for viewing and download, and also to learn more about the assessment's objectives, methods, and uncertainties through published reports and documentation. The LandCarbon web application is built on free and open source libraries including Django and D3. The GIF has developed the Django-Spillway package, which facilitates interactive visualization and serialization of complex geospatial raster data. The underlying LandCarbon data is available through an open application

  16. Unzipping and binding of small interfering RNA with single walled carbon nanotube: A platform for small interfering RNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Sood, A. K.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to design efficient platform for siRNA delivery, we combine all atom classical and quantum simulations to study the binding of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by pristine single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Our results show that siRNA strongly binds to SWCNT surface via unzipping its base-pairs and the propensity of unzipping increases with the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs. The unzipping and subsequent wrapping events are initiated and driven by van der Waals interactions between the aromatic rings of siRNA nucleobases and the SWCNT surface. However, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of double strand DNA (dsDNA) of the same sequence show that the dsDNA undergoes much less unzipping and wrapping on the SWCNT in the simulation time scale of 70 ns. This interesting difference is due to smaller interaction energy of thymidine of dsDNA with the SWCNT compared to that of uridine of siRNA, as calculated by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. After the optimal binding of siRNA to SWCNT, the complex is very stable which serves as one of the major mechanisms of siRNA delivery for biomedical applications. Since siRNA has to undergo unwinding process with the effect of RNA-induced silencing complex, our proposed delivery mechanism by SWCNT possesses potential advantages in achieving RNA interference.

  17. In vivo optical monitoring of transcutaneous delivery of calcium carbonate microcontainers.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Svenskaya, Yulia I; Yanina, Irina Yu; Dolotov, Leonid E; Navolokin, Nikita A; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Terentyuk, Georgy S; Bucharskaya, Alla B; Maslyakova, Galina N; Gorin, Dmitry A; Tuchin, Valery V; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method for delivery of biocompatible CaCO3 microcontainers (4.0 ± 0.8 µm) containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles (14 ± 5 nm) into skin in vivo using fractional laser microablation (FLMA) provided by a pulsed Er:YAG laser system. Six laboratory rats have been used for the microcontainer delivery and weekly monitoring implemented using an optical coherence tomography and a standard histological analysis. The use of FLMA allowed for delivery of the microcontainers to the depth about 300 μm and creation of a depot in dermis. On the seventh day we have observed the dissolving of the microcontainers and the release of nanoparticles into dermis. PMID:27375927

  18. In vivo optical monitoring of transcutaneous delivery of calcium carbonate microcontainers

    PubMed Central

    Genina, Elina A.; Svenskaya, Yulia I.; Yanina, Irina Yu.; Dolotov, Leonid E.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for delivery of biocompatible CaCO3 microcontainers (4.0 ± 0.8 µm) containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles (14 ± 5 nm) into skin in vivo using fractional laser microablation (FLMA) provided by a pulsed Er:YAG laser system. Six laboratory rats have been used for the microcontainer delivery and weekly monitoring implemented using an optical coherence tomography and a standard histological analysis. The use of FLMA allowed for delivery of the microcontainers to the depth about 300 μm and creation of a depot in dermis. On the seventh day we have observed the dissolving of the microcontainers and the release of nanoparticles into dermis. PMID:27375927

  19. The next generation cell-penetrating peptide and carbon dot conjugated nano-liposome for transdermal delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-03-01

    To overcome the problems associated with conventional liposomes in transdermal drug delivery like limited penetration ability and poor stability, in this article we report a new generation of cell penetrating peptide polyarginine containing nano-liposomes conjugated with carbon dots. The newly synthesized, cost-effective liposomic precursors were used for the fabrication of liposomes. The resulting liposomes have a bilayer structure like that of conventional liposomes with much smaller size, higher stability, and high penetration ability. The nano-liposomes show high stability at room temperature for three months without any change in size or encapsulation efficiency. The incorporation of carbon dots also opens up their application in fluorescence cell imaging studies, which is very well supported by the fluorescence microscopic analysis of the liposome skin penetration. The as-prepared nano-liposomes do not show any cytotoxicity for MCF-7 cells, even at high concentrations; however, when drug loaded liposomes are applied, they can kill the cancer cells with a high rate. The synthesized nano-liposomes have the potential to be used as an efficient, stable, biocompatible nanocarrier for transdermal drug delivery. PMID:26631310

  20. A review on engineering of cellulosic cigarette paper to reduce carbon monoxide delivery of cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Li, Jinsong; Qian, Xueren; Ren, Wanshan; Fatehi, Pedram

    2014-01-30

    In cigarette production, the cellulosic paper essentially derived from flax fibers or other fiber materials is used as the wrapping material. During smoking of cigarettes, the highly toxic carbon monoxide is produced. To decrease the amount of carbon monoxide emission in the mainstream smoke, the engineering of all cigarette components including cellulosic cigarette paper and tobacco column is critical. This review summarizes the concepts related to engineering of cigarette paper. These mainly include permeability control, increased use of burn additives, optimization of fiber basis weight, engineering of calcium carbonate fillers, and incorporation of catalysts/oxidants. In particular, catalytic and/or oxidative conversion of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide has been very widely reported. The control of permeability/diffusivity of cigarette paper is also of critical importance for enhanced diffusion of carbon monoxide out of the cigarette. The development of new concepts and combination of various concepts may lead to breakthroughs in this area. PMID:24299837

  1. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  2. Basin-Scale Exports vs. Coastal Delivery of Carbon, Nutrients and Particulates Above and Below Arctic River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegl, R. G.; Tank, S. E.; Weeks, G.; Holmes, R. M.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have substantially improved our understanding of water, sediment and materials exports by arctic rivers. Seasonality of exports, particularly during the spring freshet, is better quantified, as are the inland sources of water and sediment discharge and the source and chemical character of other material exports, including carbon and nutrients. Measurements on small rivers discharging directly to the Arctic Ocean and lacking complex deltas can accurately quantify local inputs to coastal regions. However, the majority of hydrologic inputs to the Arctic Ocean derive from 6 major Eurasian and North American rivers. Water, sediment, and chemical exports from these rivers are typically measured above head of tide, far inland, and commonly above large river deltas. These deltas settle particles and provide favorable environments for deposition, storage, and biogeochemical consumption, production, and transformation of aquatic carbon and nutrients. Consequently, basin exports measured above river deltas likely misrepresent actual delivery to coastal regions. In addition to accumulating sediment, observed and modeled arctic delta effects include enrichment of the organic content of suspended solids, increased dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC; DON) concentration, decreased inorganic nutrient concentration, and settling and likely increased bioavailability of particle associated contaminants, such as mercury. Increased DOC concentration in the Mackenzie River delta has also been associated with a change in DOC quality, with increased potential for biodegradation of DOC and decreased potential for photodegradation of DOC from head of tide to within the delta. For the most part, assessments of differences between head of tide basin exports and coastal delivery tend to be qualitative rather than quantitative, largely because of difficulties quantifying tidally affected flow. This points to the need to resolve data gaps, improve quantitative assessments

  3. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  4. Sustainable mesoporous carbons as storage and controlled-delivery media for functional molecules.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Payzant, E Andrew; Kumbhar, Amar S; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-06-26

    Here, we report the synthesis of surfactant-templated mesoporous carbons from lignin, which is a biomass-derived polymeric precursor, and their potential use as a controlled-release medium for functional molecules such as pharmaceuticals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of lignin for chemical-activation-free synthesis of functional mesoporous carbon. The synthesized carbons possess the pore widths within the range of 2.5-12.0 nm. In this series of mesoporous carbons, our best result demonstrates a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 418 m(2)/g and a mesopore volume of 0.34 cm(3)/g, which is twice the micropore volume in this carbon. Because of the dominant mesoporosity, this engineered carbon demonstrates adsorption and controlled release of a representative pharmaceutical drug, captopril, in simulated gastric fluid. Large-scale utilization of these sustainable mesoporous carbons in applications involving adsorption, transport, and controlled release of functional molecules is desired for industrial processes that yield lignin as a coproduct. PMID:23731336

  5. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (δ13C) and radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the δ13C and Δ14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, δ13C and Δ14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the δ13C and Δ14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both δ13C and Δ14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in δ13C and Δ14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of δ13C and Δ14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal δ13C and Δ14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change.

  6. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (??13C) and radiocarbon (??14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the ??13C and ??14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, ??13C and ??14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the ??13C and ??14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both ??13C and ??14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in ??13C and ??14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of ??13C and ??14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal ??13C and ??14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change. ?? 2011 United States Geological Survey.

  7. Octa-ammonium POSS-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes as vehicles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Naghmeh; Madani, Seyed Y.; Mosahebi, Afshin; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, novel properties can be developed by attachment or encapsulation of functional groups. These unique properties facilitate the use of CNTs in drug delivery. We developed a new nanomedicine consisting of a nanocarrier, cell-targeting molecule, and chemotherapeutic drug and assessed its efficacy in vitro. Methods The efficacy of a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-based nanoconjugate system is assessed in the targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. SWCNTs were oxidized and reacted with octa-ammonium polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (octa-ammonium POSS) to render them biocompatible and water dispersable. The functionalized SWCNTs were loaded with PTX, a chemotherapeutic agent toxic to cancer cells, and Tn218 antibodies for cancer cell targeting. The nanohybrid composites were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared (UV–Vis–NIR). Additionally, their cytotoxic effects on Colon cancer cell (HT-29) and Breast cancer cell (MCF-7) lines were assessed in vitro. Results TEM, FTIR, and UV–Vis–NIR studies confirmed side-wall functionalization of SWCNT with COOH-groups, PTX, POSS, and antibodies. Increased cell death was observed with PTX–POSS–SWCNT, PTX–POSS–Ab–SWCNT, and free PTX compared to functionalized-SWCNT (f-SWCNT), POSS–SWCNT, and cell-only controls at 48 and 72 h time intervals in both cell lines. At all time intervals, there was no significant cell death in the POSS–SWCNT samples compared to cell-only controls. Conclusion The PTX-based nanocomposites were shown to be as cytotoxic as free PTX. This important finding indicates successful release of PTX from the nanocomposites and further reiterates the potential of SWCNTs to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. PMID:26356347

  8. Efficient in vitro and in vivo pulmonary delivery of nucleic acid by carbon dot-based nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Philippe; Wang, Rongrong; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Lux, Marie; Didier, Pascal; Kichler, Antoine; Pons, Françoise; Lebeau, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Cationic carbon dots were fabricated by pyrolysis of citric acid and bPEI25k under microwave radiation. Various nanoparticles were produced in a 20-30% yield through straightforward modifications of the reaction parameters (stoichiometry of the reactants and energy supply regime). Particular attention was paid to the purification of the reaction products to ensure satisfactory elimination of the residual starting polyamine. Intrinsic properties of the particles (size, surface charge, photoluminescence and quantum yield) were measured and their ability to form stable complexes with nucleic acid was determined. Their potential to deliver plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA to various cell lines was investigated and compared to that of bPEI25k. The pDNA in vitro transfection efficiency of these carbon dots was similar to that of the parent PEI, as was their cytotoxicity. The higher cytotoxicity of bPEI25k/siRNA complexes when compared to that of the CD/siRNA complexes however had marked consequences on the gene silencing efficiency of the two carriers. These results are not fully consistent with those in some earlier reports on similar nanoparticles, revealing that toxicity of the carbon dots strongly depends on their protocol of fabrication. Finally, these carriers were evaluated for in vivo gene delivery through the non-invasive pulmonary route in mice. High transgene expression was obtained in the lung that was similar to that obtained with the golden standard formulation GL67A, but was associated with significantly lower toxicity. Post-functionalization of these carbon dots with PEG or targeting moieties should significantly broaden their scope and practical implications in improving their in vivo transfection efficiency and biocompatibility. PMID:25771019

  9. Nano-Carbon-Based Systems for the Delivery of Bioactive Agents:. Pros and Cons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Tapas R.; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-09-01

    Nanotechnology has become a distinctive field of research, aimed to modernize the way scientists have addressed urgent needs and sophisticated problems, towards the achievement of unprecedented discoveries. Amidst the myriad of materials extensively used in the modern society, carbon-based systems seem to embody a significant role especially where endurance and strength are required: carbon nanoparticles, nanotubes, graphite, diamonds and fullerenes et al. In addition to the above advantages, this review also emphasizes some concerns on the carbonnanosystems and which are mainly attributable to the lack of an exhaustive characterization and to the potential hazardous effects deriving from their potential accumulation in the environment and inside the body.

  10. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver–oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars–van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes. PMID:27406595

  11. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes. PMID:27406595

  12. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  13. Targeted Killing of Cancer Cells In vivo and In vitro with EGF-directed Carbon Nanotube-based Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bhirde, Ashwin A.; Patel, Vyomesh; Gavard, Julie; Zhang, Guofeng; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Leapman, Richard D.; Weigert, Roberto; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based drug delivery holds great promise for cancer therapy. Herein we report the first targeted, in vivo killing of cancer cells using a drug-single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bioconjugate, and demonstrate efficacy superior to non-targeted bioconjugates. First line anti-cancer agent cisplatin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were attached to SWNTs to specifically target squamous cancer, and the non-targeted control was SWNT-cisplatin without EGF. Initialin vitro imaging studies with head and neck squamous carcinoma cells (HNSCC) overexpressing EGF receptors (EGFR) using Qdot luminescence and confocal microscopy showed that SWNT-Qdot-EGF bioconjugates internalized rapidly into the cancer cells. Limited uptake occurred for control cells without EGF, and uptake was blocked by siRNA knockdown of EGFR in cancer cells, revealing the importance of EGFEGFR binding. Three color, two-photon intra-vital video imagingin vivo showed that SWNT-Qdot-EGF injected into live mice was selectively taken up by HNSCC tumors, but SWNT-Qdot controls with no EGF were cleared from the tumor region in <20 min. HNSCC cells treated with SWNT-cisplatin-EGF were also killed selectively, while control systems that did not feature EGF-EGFR binding did not influence cell proliferation. Most significantly, regression of tumor growth was rapid in mice treated with targeted SWNT-cisplatin-EGF relative to non-targeted SWNT-cisplatin. PMID:19236065

  14. Utilization of bio-degradable fermented tapioca to synthesized low toxicity of carbon nanotubes for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurulhuda, I.; Poh, R.; Mazatulikhma, M. Z.; Salman, A. H. A.; Haseeb, A. K.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have potential biomedical applications, and investigations are shifting towards the production of such nanotubes using renewable natural sources. CNTs were synthesized at various temperatures of 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C, respectively, using a local fermented food known as "tapai ubi" or fermented tapioca as a precursor. The liquid part of this fermented food was heated separately at 80°C and channeled directly into the furnace system that employs the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Ferrocene, which was the catalyst was placed in furnace 1 in the thermal CVD process. The resulting CNTs produced from the process were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and raman spectroscopy. The FESEM images showed the growth morphology of the CNTs at the different temperatures employed. It was observed that the higher the synthesis temperature up to a point, the diameter of CNTs produced, after which the diameter increased. CNTs with helical structures were observed at 700 °C with a diameter range of 111 - 143 nm. A more straightened structure was observed at 750 °C with a diameter range of 59 - 121 nm. From 800 °C onwards, the diameters of the CNTs were less than 60 nm. Raman analysis revealed the present of D, G and G' peak were observed at 1227-1358, 1565-1582, and 2678-2695 cm-1, respectively. The highest degree of crystallity of the carbon nanotubes synthesized were obtained at 800 °C. The radial breathing mode (RBM) were in range between 212-220 and 279-292 cm-1. Carbon nanotubes also being functionalized with Polyethylene bis(amine) Mw2000 (PEG 2000-NH2) and showed highly cells viability compared to non-functionalized CNT. The nanotubes synthesized will be applied as drug delivery in future study.

  15. In Vivo Delivery of Nitric Oxide-Sensing, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Nicole M; Strano, Michael S; Wogan, Gerald N

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo by single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is based on the fluorescent properties of SWNT and the ability of NO to quench the fluorescence signal. Alterations of the signal can be utilized to detect a small molecule in vivo that has not previously been possible by other assay techniques. The protocols described here explain the techniques used to prepare NO-detecting SWNTs and to administer them to mice by both intravenous and subcutaneous routes. These techniques can also be utilized with other SWNT sensors as well as non-SWNT sensors. PMID:26344235

  16. Dual stimulation of antigen presenting cells using carbon nanotube-based vaccine delivery system for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hatem A F M; Smyth, Lesley; Wang, Julie T-W; Costa, Pedro M; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Diebold, Sandra S; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-10-01

    Although anti-cancer immuno-based combinatorial therapeutic approaches have shown promising results, efficient tumour eradication demands further intensification of anti-tumour immune response. With the emerging field of nanovaccinology, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have manifested prominent potentials as tumour antigen nanocarriers. Nevertheless, the utilization of MWNTs in co-delivering antigen along with different types of immunoadjuvants to antigen presenting cells (APCs) has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that harnessing MWNT for concurrent delivery of cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) and anti-CD40 Ig (αCD40), as immunoadjuvants, along with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) could potentiate immune response induced against OVA-expressing tumour cells. We initially investigated the effective method to co-deliver OVA and CpG using MWNT to the APC. Covalent conjugation of OVA and CpG prior to loading onto MWNTs markedly augmented the CpG-mediated adjuvanticity, as demonstrated by the significantly increased OVA-specific T cell responses in vitro and in C57BL/6 mice. αCD40 was then included as a second immunoadjuvant to further intensify the immune response. Immune response elicited in vitro and in vivo by OVA, CpG and αCD40 was significantly potentiated by their co-incorporation onto the MWNTs. Furthermore, MWNT remarkably improved the ability of co-loaded OVA, CpG and αCD40 in inhibiting the growth of OVA-expressing B16F10 melanoma cells in subcutaneous or lung pseudo-metastatic tumour models. Therefore, this study suggests that the utilization of MWNTs for the co-delivery of tumour-derived antigen, CpG and αCD40 could be a competent approach for efficient tumours eradication. PMID:27475727

  17. Sustained Release of Naproxen in a New Kind Delivery System of Carbon Nanotubes Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiahui; Zhuang, Qiang; Peng, Dongming; Dong, Qiuli; Tan, Lini; Jiao, Feipeng; Liu, Linqi; Liu, jingyu; Zhao, Chenxi; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added into chitosan (CS) hydrogels in the form of chitosan modified CNTs (CS-CNTs) composites to prepare carbon nanotubes hydrogels (CNTs-GEL). The products, named CS-MWCNTs, were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Swelling properties and effect of pH on controlled release performance of the two kinds of hydrogels, CNTs- GEL and pure chitosan hydrogels without CNTs (GEL), were investigated respectively. The results showed that CNTs-GEL possess better controlled release performance than GEL. The releasing equilibrium time of CNTs-GEL was longer than that of GEL in both pH = w7.4 and pH=1.2 conditions, although the release ratios of the model drug are similar in the same pH buffer solutions. It is found that release kinetics is better fitted Ritger-Peppas empirical model indicating a fick-diffusion process in pH = 1.2, while in pH = 7.4 it was non-fick diffusion involving surface diffusion and corrosion diffusion processes. PMID:24523738

  18. Targeted delivery and controlled release of Paclitaxel for the treatment of lung cancer using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baodan; Tan, Li; Zheng, Runhui; Tan, Huo; Zheng, Lixia

    2016-11-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controlled-release of the anti-cancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX) was constructed in this study. Chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently attached to the SWNTs to improve biocompatibility. Biocompatible hyaluronan was also combined to the outer CHI layer to realise the specific targeting property. The results showed that the release of PTX was pH-triggered and was better at lower pH (pH5.5). The modified SWNTs showed a significant improvement in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may have enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and further promoted cell apoptosis. The results of western blotting indicated that the apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in A549 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and cell viability assay demonstrated that PTX-loaded SWNTs could destroy cell membrane integrity, thus inducing lower cell viability of the A549 cells. Thus, this targeting DDS could effectively inhibit cell proliferation and kill A549 cells, is a promising system for cancer therapy. PMID:27524057

  19. Regulation of angiogenesis through the efficient delivery of microRNAs into endothelial cells using polyamine-coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Masotti, Andrea; Miller, Mark R; Celluzzi, Antonella; Rose, Lorraine; Micciulla, Federico; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Bellucci, Stefano; Caporali, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) directly regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level and represent an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Here, we report a novel strategy for delivering miRNAs to endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate angiogenesis, using polymer functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs were coated with two different polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) or polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM), followed by conjugation of miR-503 oligonucleotides as recognized regulators of angiogenesis. We demonstrated a reduced toxicity for both polymer-coated CNTs, compared with pristine CNTs or polymers alone. Moreover, polymer-coated CNT stabilized miR-503 oligonucleotides and allowed their efficient delivery to ECs. The functionality of PAMAM-CNT-miR-503 complexes was further demonstrated in ECs through regulation of target genes, cell proliferation and angiogenic sprouting and in a mouse model of angiogenesis. This comprehensive series of experiments demonstrates that the use of polyamine-functionalized CNTs to deliver miRNAs is a novel and effective means to regulate angiogenesis. PMID:27013131

  20. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted amplified delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from the circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pretargeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and are shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody-nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle-generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo.

  1. Polyethyleneimine-modified calcium carbonate nanoparticles for p53 gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Han, Huafeng; Yang, Wei; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles with spherical structure were regulated by arginine and successfully synthesized via a facile co-precipitation method. The average particle size of as-prepared CaCO3 was about 900 nm. The properties of nanostructured CaCO3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and size distribution. After modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI), the ability of PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles to carry GFP-marked p53 gene (pEGFP-C1-p53) into cancer cells to express P53 protein were studied. Meanwhile, the cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, cells growth inhibition and the ability to induce apoptosis by expressed P53 protein were conducted to evaluate the performances of PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles. The results show that prepared PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles had good biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity in a certain concentration range. PEI-CaCO3 effectively transfected pEGFP-C1 gene into epithelial-like cancer cells. And with the expression of GFP-P53 fusion protein, pEGFP-C1-p53-gene-loaded PEI-CaCO3 particles significantly reduced the proliferation of cancer cells. These findings indicate that our PEI-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles are potential to be successfully used as carriers for gene therapy. PMID:26816656

  2. Polyethyleneimine-modified calcium carbonate nanoparticles for p53 gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cen; Han, Huafeng; Yang, Wei; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles with spherical structure were regulated by arginine and successfully synthesized via a facile co-precipitation method. The average particle size of as-prepared CaCO3 was about 900 nm. The properties of nanostructured CaCO3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and size distribution. After modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI), the ability of PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles to carry GFP-marked p53 gene (pEGFP-C1-p53) into cancer cells to express P53 protein were studied. Meanwhile, the cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, cells growth inhibition and the ability to induce apoptosis by expressed P53 protein were conducted to evaluate the performances of PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles. The results show that prepared PEI-CaCO3 nanoparticles had good biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity in a certain concentration range. PEI-CaCO3 effectively transfected pEGFP-C1 gene into epithelial-like cancer cells. And with the expression of GFP-P53 fusion protein, pEGFP-C1-p53-gene-loaded PEI-CaCO3 particles significantly reduced the proliferation of cancer cells. These findings indicate that our PEI-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles are potential to be successfully used as carriers for gene therapy. PMID:26816656

  3. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted, amplified delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pre-targeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and were shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody/nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo. PMID:24077028

  4. Effects of transferrin conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in lung cancer delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Sonali; Singh, Sanjay; Patne, Shashikant C U; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) which were covalently conjugated with transferrin by carbodiimide chemistry and loaded with docetaxel as a model drug for effective treatment of lung cancer in comparison with the commercial docetaxel injection (Docel™). d-Alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was used as amphiphilic surfactant to improve the aqueous dispersity and biocompatibility of MWCNT. Human lung cancer cells (A549 cells) were employed as an in-vitro model to access cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the docetaxel/coumarin-6 loaded MWCNT. The cellular uptake results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT showed higher efficiency in comparison with free C6. The IC50 values demonstrated that the transferrin conjugated MWCNT could be 136-fold more efficient than Docel™ after 24h treatment with the A549 cells. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that cancerous cells appeared significantly (P<0.05) in the sub-G1 phase for transferrin conjugated MWCNT in comparison with Docel™. Results of transferrin conjugated MWCNT have showed better efficacy with safety than Docel™. PMID:27287127

  5. Fabrication and Intracellular Delivery of Doxorubicin/Carbonate Apatite Nanocomposites: Effect on Growth Retardation of Established Colon Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque; Wu, Xin; Hirose, Hajime; Haque, Amranul; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    In continuing search for effective treatments of cancer, the emerging model aims at efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutics into tumor cells in order to increase the drug concentration. However, the implementation of this strategy suffers from inefficient cellular uptake and drug resistance. Therefore, pH-sensitive nanosystems have recently been developed to target slightly acidic extracellular pH environment of solid tumors. The pH targeting approach is regarded as a more general strategy than conventional specific tumor cell surface targeting approaches, because the acidic tumor microclimate is most common in solid tumors. When nanosystems are combined with triggered release mechanisms in endosomal or lysosomal acidic pH along with endosomolytic capability, the nanocarriers demonstrated to overcome multidrug resistance of various tumors. Here, novel pH sensitive carbonate apatite has been fabricated to efficiently deliver anticancer drug Doxorubicin (DOX) to cancer cells, by virtue of its pH sensitivity being quite unstable under an acidic condition in endosomes and the desirable size of the resulting apatite-DOX for efficient cellular uptake as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Florescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated significant uptake of drug (92%) when complexed with apatite nanoparticles. In vitro chemosensitivity assay revealed that apatite-DOX nanoparticles executed high cytotoxicity in several human cancer cell lines compared to free drugs and consequently apatite-DOX-facilitated enhanced tumor inhibitory effect was observed in colorectal tumor model within BALB/cA nude mice, thereby shedding light on their potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:23613726

  6. Targeted killing of cancer cells in vivo and in vitro with IGF-IR antibody-directed carbon nanohorns based drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Zhao, Qian; Shu, Chang; Ma, Xiaona; Li, Ruixin; Shen, Hongjun; Zhong, Wenying

    2015-01-30

    Oxidized single-wall carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) have shown great potential in drug delivery. The purpose of this study was to design an effective targeted drug delivery system (DDS) based on oxSWNHs, which could carry high dose of drug to tumor sites and improve the therapeutic efficacy with less adverse effects. OxSWNHs incorporated the anticancer drug vincristine (VCR) via physical adsorption, then wrapped DSPE-PEG-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody (mAb) through an amide liker to obtain the drug delivery system, VCR@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb. The in vitro release behavior study indicated that the DDS had good sustained release and the cumulative release of VCR was 80% at 144h. Compared with free VCR, the tumor targeting drug delivery efficiently enhanced the cytotoxicity in cultured MCF-7 cells in vitro, and afforded higher antitumor efficacy without obvious toxic effects to normal organs in tumor mice in vivo. In addition, the targeted DDS could reduce the toxicity of VCR to the living mice. This study demonstrated that VCR@oxSWNHs-PEG-mAb might be promising for high treatment efficacy with minimal side effects in future cancer therapy. PMID:25510600

  7. SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE–MEDIATED SMALL INTERFERING RNA DELIVERY AND SILENCING GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingbo; Hong, Tu; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Chung, Dai H.

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has the potential to influence expression with a high degree of target gene specificity. However, the clinical application of siRNA therapeutics has proven to be less promising as evidenced by poor intracellular uptake, instability in vivo, and non-specific immune stimulations. Recently, we have demonstrated that single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-mediated siRNA delivery can enhance the efficiency of siRNA-mediated gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) gene silencing by stabilizing siRNA while selectively targeting tumor tissues. Based on our recent findings, we introduce a novel technique to silence specific gene(s) in human neuroblastoma through SWNT-mediated siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23749575

  8. Tumor Acidity-Induced Sheddable Polyethylenimine-Poly(trimethylene carbonate)/DNA/Polyethylene Glycol-2,3-Dimethylmaleicanhydride Ternary Complex for Efficient and Safe Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Caiyan; Shao, Leihou; Lu, Jianqing; Deng, Xiongwei; Wu, Yan

    2016-03-16

    Amphiphilic PEI derivatives/DNA complexes are widely used for DNA delivery, but they are unstable in vivo and have cytotoxicity due to the excess cationic charge. PEGylation of cationic complexes can improve sterical stability and biocompatibility. However, PEGylation significantly inhibits cellular uptake and endosomal escape. In this work, sheddable ternary complexes were developed by coating a tumor acidity-sensitive β-carboxylic amide functionalized PEG layer on the binary complexes of amphiphilic cationic polyethylenimine-poly(trimethylene carbonate) nanoparticles/DNA (PEI-PTMC/DNA). Such sheddable ternary complexes markedly reduced their nonspecific interactions with serum protein in the bloodstream and obtained minimal cytotoxicity due to the protection of the PEG shell. At the tumor site, the PEG layer was deshielded by responding to the tumor acidic microenvironment and the positively charged complexes re-exposed that had higher affinity with negatively charged cell membranes. Meanwhile the positively charged complexes facilitated endosomal escape. Accordingly, this delivery system improved the biocompatibility of gene-loaded complexes and enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. Such PEGylated complexes with the ability to deshield the PEG layer at the target tissues hold great promise for efficient and safe gene delivery in vivo. PMID:26904916

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes noncovalently functionalized with lipid modified polyethylenimine for siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Siu, King S; Zheng, Xiufen; Liu, Yanling; Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Xusheng; Chen, Di; Yuan, Ken; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Koropatnick, James; Min, Wei-Ping

    2014-10-15

    siRNA can downregulate the expression of specific genes. However, delivery to specific cells and tissues in vivo presents significant challenges. Modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to protect siRNA and facilitate its entry into cells. However, simple and efficient methods to functionalize CNTs are needed. Here, noncovalent functionalization of CNTs is performed and shown to effectively deliver siRNA to target cells. Specifically, single-walled CNTs were functionalized by noncovalent association with a lipopolymer. The lipopolymer (DSPE-PEG) was composed of a phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Three different ratios of polyethylenimine (PEI) to DSPE-PEG were synthesized and characterized and the products were used to disperse CNTs. The resulting materials were used for siRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. The structural, biophysical, and biological properties of DGI/C and their complexes formed with siRNA were investigated. Cytotoxicity of the materials was low, and effective gene silencing in B16-F10 cells was demonstrated in vitro. In addition, significant uptake of siRNA as well as gene silencing in the liver was found following intravenous injection. This approach provides a new strategy for siRNA delivery and could provide insight for the development of noncovalently functionalized CNTs for siRNA therapy. PMID:25216445

  10. The use of halloysite clay and carboxyl-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for recombinant LipL32 antigen delivery enhanced the IgG response

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Daiane D; Bacelo, Kátia L; Oliveira, Thaís L; Schuch, Rodrigo; Seixas, Fabiana K; Collares, Tiago; Rodrigues, Oscar; Hartleben, Cláudia P; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of using halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs) and carboxyl-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs) as antigen carriers to improve immune responses against a recombinant LipL32 protein (rLipL32). Immunisation using the HNTs or COOH-MWCNTs significantly increased the rLipL32-specific IgG antibody titres (p < 0.05) of Golden Syrian hamsters. None of the vaccines tested conferred protection against a challenge using a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain. These results demonstrated that nanotubes can be used as antigen carriers for delivery in hosts and the induction of a humoral immune response against purified leptospiral antigens used in subunit vaccine preparations. PMID:25742273

  11. Evidence for a plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase in the lumen of salmon heart that may enhance oxygen delivery to the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Sarah L; Harter, Till S; Wilson, Jonathan M; Supuran, Claudiu T; Farrell, Anthony P; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen supply to the heart of most teleosts, including salmonids, relies in part or in whole on oxygen-depleted venous blood. Given that plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in red muscle of rainbow trout has recently been shown to facilitate oxygen unloading from arterial blood under certain physiological conditions, we tested the hypothesis that plasma-accessible CA is present in the lumen of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) hearts, and may therefore assist in the luminal oxygen supply to the spongy myocardium, which has no coronary circulation. We demonstrate a widespread distribution of CA throughout the heart chambers, including lumen-facing cells in the atrium, and confirm that the membrane-bound isoform ca4 is expressed in the atrium and ventricle of the heart. Further, we confirm that CA catalytic activity is available to blood in the atrial lumen using a modified electrometric ΔpH assay in intact atria in combination with either a membrane-impermeable CA inhibitor or specific cleavage of the Ca4 membrane anchor. Combined, these results support our hypothesis of the presence of an enhanced oxygen delivery system in the lumen of a salmonid heart, which could help support oxygen delivery when the oxygen content of venous blood becomes greatly reduced, such as after burst exercise and during environmental hypoxia. PMID:26936639

  12. Carbon Dots Embedded Magnetic Nanoparticles @Chitosan @Metal Organic Framework as a Nanoprobe for pH Sensitive Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Singh, Tanya; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, nanoscale metal organic frameworks (NMOFs) have been demonstrated as a promising carrier for drug delivery, as they possess many advantages like large surface area, high porosity, and tunable functionality. However, there are no reports about the functionalization of NMOFs, which combines cancer-targeted drug delivery/imaging, magnetic property, high drug loading content, and pH-sensitive drug release into one system. Existing formulations for integrating target molecules into NMOF are based on multistep synthetic processes. However, in this study, we report an approach that combines NMOF (IRMOF-3) synthesis and target molecule (Folic acid) encapsulation on the surface of chitosan modified magnetic nanoparticles in a single step. A noticeable feature of chitosan is control and pH responsive drug release for several days. More importantly, doxorubicin (DOX) was incorporated into magnetic NMOF formulation and showed high drug loading (1.63 g DOX g(-1) magnetic NMOFs). To demonstrate the optical imaging, carbon dots (CDs) are encapsulated into the synthesized magnetic NMOF, thereby endowing fluorescence features to the nanoparticles. These folate targeted magnetic NMOF possess more specific cellular internalization toward folate-overexpressed cancer (HeLa) cells in comparison to normal (L929) cells. PMID:27305490

  13. Poly(amino carbonate urethane)-based biodegradable, temperature and pH-sensitive injectable hydrogels for sustained human growth hormone delivery.

    PubMed

    Phan, V H Giang; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new pH-/temperature-sensitive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable hydrogel based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(amino carbonate urethane) (PEG-PACU) copolymers has been developed for the sustained delivery of human growth hormone (hGH). In aqueous solutions, PEG-PACU-based copolymers existed as sols at low pH and temperature (pH 6.0, 23 °C), whereas they formed gels in the physiological condition (pH 7.4, 37 °C). The physicochemical characteristics, including gelation rate, mechanical strength and viscosity, of the PEG-PACU hydrogels could be finely tuned by varying the polymer weight, pH and temperature of the copolymer. An in vivo injectable study in the back of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats indicated that the copolymer could form an in situ gel, which exhibited a homogenous porous structure. In addition, an in vivo biodegradation study of the PEG-PACU hydrogels showed controlled degradation of the gel matrix without inflammation at the injection site and the surrounding tissue. The hGH-loaded PEG-PACU copolymer solution readily formed a hydrogel in SD rats, which subsequently inhibited the initial hGH burst and led to the sustained release of hGH. Overall, the PEG-PACU-based copolymers prepared in this study are expected to be useful biomaterials for the sustained delivery of hGH. PMID:27436576

  14. Poly(amino carbonate urethane)-based biodegradable, temperature and pH-sensitive injectable hydrogels for sustained human growth hormone delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phan, V. H. Giang; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new pH-/temperature-sensitive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable hydrogel based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(amino carbonate urethane) (PEG-PACU) copolymers has been developed for the sustained delivery of human growth hormone (hGH). In aqueous solutions, PEG-PACU-based copolymers existed as sols at low pH and temperature (pH 6.0, 23 °C), whereas they formed gels in the physiological condition (pH 7.4, 37 °C). The physicochemical characteristics, including gelation rate, mechanical strength and viscosity, of the PEG-PACU hydrogels could be finely tuned by varying the polymer weight, pH and temperature of the copolymer. An in vivo injectable study in the back of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats indicated that the copolymer could form an in situ gel, which exhibited a homogenous porous structure. In addition, an in vivo biodegradation study of the PEG-PACU hydrogels showed controlled degradation of the gel matrix without inflammation at the injection site and the surrounding tissue. The hGH-loaded PEG-PACU copolymer solution readily formed a hydrogel in SD rats, which subsequently inhibited the initial hGH burst and led to the sustained release of hGH. Overall, the PEG-PACU-based copolymers prepared in this study are expected to be useful biomaterials for the sustained delivery of hGH. PMID:27436576

  15. Poly(amino carbonate urethane)-based biodegradable, temperature and pH-sensitive injectable hydrogels for sustained human growth hormone delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, V. H. Giang; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a new pH-/temperature-sensitive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable hydrogel based on poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(amino carbonate urethane) (PEG-PACU) copolymers has been developed for the sustained delivery of human growth hormone (hGH). In aqueous solutions, PEG-PACU-based copolymers existed as sols at low pH and temperature (pH 6.0, 23 °C), whereas they formed gels in the physiological condition (pH 7.4, 37 °C). The physicochemical characteristics, including gelation rate, mechanical strength and viscosity, of the PEG-PACU hydrogels could be finely tuned by varying the polymer weight, pH and temperature of the copolymer. An in vivo injectable study in the back of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats indicated that the copolymer could form an in situ gel, which exhibited a homogenous porous structure. In addition, an in vivo biodegradation study of the PEG-PACU hydrogels showed controlled degradation of the gel matrix without inflammation at the injection site and the surrounding tissue. The hGH-loaded PEG-PACU copolymer solution readily formed a hydrogel in SD rats, which subsequently inhibited the initial hGH burst and led to the sustained release of hGH. Overall, the PEG-PACU-based copolymers prepared in this study are expected to be useful biomaterials for the sustained delivery of hGH.

  16. Development of Novel Drug and Gene Delivery Carriers Composed of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Designed Peptides With PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takahisa; Hashida, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2016-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) attract great interest in biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. In this study, we developed a novel delivery system using SWCNTs associated with designed polycationic and amphiphilic peptides. Wrapping of SWCNTs with H-(-Lys-Trp-Lys-Gly-)7-OH [(KWKG)7] resulted in stable dispersion in water, but the composite aggregated in the buffered solution. This dispersion instability was also evident in a cell culture medium with fetal bovine serum. To improve the aqueous dispersibility, the SWCNTs-(KWKG)7 composite was further modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at the lysine residues via amide bond formation and the highest modification extent of 13.3% of the amino groups which corresponded to 2 PEG chains in each peptide molecule was achieved with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled carboxyl-PEG12. The uptake of the SWCNTs composite by A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells was evaluated by visual observation and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis for SWCNTs wrapped with a mixture of (KWKG)7 with PEGylation and H-(-Cys-Trp-Lys-Gly-)-OH-(KWKG)6 [CWKG(KWKG)6] labeled with fluorescent boron-dipyrromethene tetramethylrhodamine and 7-fold higher uptake comparing with SWCNTs-peptide composite without PEGylation was obtained suggesting the importance of dispersibility in addition to a cationic charge. The superior potential of SWCNTs composites assisted by polycationic and amphiphilic peptides with PEGylation was thus demonstrated. PMID:27179670

  17. Vesicular (liposomal and nanoparticulated) delivery of curcumin: a comparative study on carbon tetrachloride–mediated oxidative hepatocellular damage in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Das, Nirmalendu; Ghosh, Swarupa; Ghosh, Debasree; Chakraborty, Somsuta; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a vital role in biotransforming and extricating xenobiotics and is thus prone to their toxicities. Short-term administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) causes hepatic inflammation by enhancing cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, promoting mitochondrial dysfunction, and inducing cellular apoptosis. Curcumin is well accepted for its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and can be considered as an effective therapeutic agent against hepatotoxicity. However, its therapeutic efficacy is compromised due to its insolubility in water. Vesicular delivery of curcumin can address this limitation and thereby enhance its effectiveness. In this study, it was observed that both liposomal and nanoparticulated formulations of curcumin could increase its efficacy significantly against hepatotoxicity by preventing cellular oxidative stress. However, the best protection could be obtained through the polymeric nanoparticle-mediated delivery of curcumin. Mitochondria have a pivotal role in ROS homeostasis and cell survivability. Along with the maintenance of cellular ROS levels, nanoparticulated curcumin also significantly (P<0.0001) increased cellular antioxidant enzymes, averted excessive mitochondrial destruction, and prevented total liver damage in CCl4-treated rats. The therapy not only prevented cells from oxidative damage but also arrested the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In addition, it also decreased the fatty changes in hepatocytes, centrizonal necrosis, and portal inflammation evident from the histopathological analysis. To conclude, curcumin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles are more effective in comparison to liposomal curcumin in preventing CCl4-induced oxidative stress–mediated hepatocellular damage and thereby can be considered as an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:27274242

  18. Polycation-b-polyzwitterion copolymer grafted luminescent carbon dots as a multifunctional platform for serum-resistant gene delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lu; Li, Yongmao; Zhai, Xinyun; Xu, Bing; Cao, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wenguang

    2014-11-26

    Nanomaterials that integrate functions of imaging and gene delivery have been of great interest due to their potential use in simultaneous diagnosis and therapy. Herein, polycation-b-polysulfobetaine block copolymer, poly[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate]-b-poly[N-(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide] (PDMAEMA-b-PMPDSAH) grafted luminescent carbon dots (CDs) were prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and investigated as a multifunctional gene delivery system (denoted as CD-PDMA-PMPD) in which the CD cores acted as good multicolor cell imaging probes, the cationic PDMAEMA acted as a DNA condensing agent, and the outer shell of zwitterionic PMPDSAH block protected the vector against nonspecific interactions with serum components. As revealed by the fluorescent spectrum study, the photoluminescent attributes, especially the tunable emission property, were well inherited from the parent CDs. The CD-PDMA-PMPD could condense plasmid DNA into nanospheres with sizes of approximate 50 nm at a proper complex ratio, posing little cytotoxicity at higher ratios. It was shown that the hybrid vector exhibited significantly suppressed BSA protein adsorption and superior hemocompatibility compared to those of the widely used PEI25k. In the in vitro transfection assay, an increased serum concentration from 10 to 50% caused a dramatic drop in PEI25k transfection performance, whereas the transfection efficiency of CD-PDMA-PMPD was well maintained; CD-PDMA80-PMPD40 showed 13 and 28 times higher transfection efficiencies than PEI25k at 30 and 50% serum concentration, respectively. Intriguingly, the carbon dots in the transfected cells displayed excitation-dependent fluorescent emissions, portending that this polycation-polyzwitterion modified CD will be a promising theranostic vector with excellent stealth performance. PMID:25285670

  19. Carbon nanospheres mediated delivery of nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 to direct experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chemmannur, Sijo V; Bhagat, Prasad; Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Paknikar, Kishore M; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the suppression of immune responses and associated side effects, steroid based treatments for inflammatory encephalitis disease can be detrimental. Here, we demonstrate a novel carbon nanosphere (CNP) based treatment regime for encephalomyelitis in mice by exploiting the functional property of the nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1. A truncated part of SMAR1 ie, the DNA binding domain was conjugated with hydrothermally synthesized CNPs. When administered intravenously, the conjugate suppressed experimental animal encephalomyelitis in T cell specific conditional SMAR1 knockout mice (SMAR−/−). Further, CNP-SMAR1 conjugate delayed the onset of the disease and reduced the demyelination significantly. There was a significant decrease in the production of IL-17 after re-stimulation with MOG. Altogether, our findings suggest a potential carbon nanomaterial based therapeutic intervention to combat Th17 mediated autoimmune diseases including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PMID:27274234

  20. Coadsorption of Doxorubicin and Selected Dyes on Carbon Nanotubes. Theoretical Investigation of Potential Application as a pH-Controlled Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Tomasz; Wolski, Pawel; Lajtar, Leszek

    2016-05-17

    This work shows results of a theoretical survey, based on molecular dynamics simulation, of potential applicability of doxorubicin coadsorption with various dyes molecules on/in carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system. The central idea is to take advantage of the dyes charge distribution change upon switching the pH of the environment from neutral (physiological 7.4) to acidic one (∼5.5 which is typical for tumor tissues). This work discusses results obtained for four dye molecules revealing more or less interesting behavior. These were bromothymol blue, methyl red, neutral red, and p-phenylenediamine. All of them reveal pKa in the range 5-7 and thus will undergo protonation in that pH range. We considered coadsorption on external walls of carbon nanotubes and sequential filling of the nanotubes inner hollow space by drug and dyes. The latter approach, with the application of neutral red and p-phenylenediamine as blockers of doxorubicin, led to the most promising results. Closer analysis of these systems allowed us to state that neutral red can be particularly useful as a long-term blocker of doxorubicin encapsulated in the inner cavity of (30,0) carbon nanotube at neutral pH. At acidic pH we observed a spontaneous release of neutral red from the nanotube and unblocking of doxorubicin. We also confirmed, by analysis of free energy profiles, that unblocked doxorubicin can spontaneously leave the nanotube interior at the considered conditions. Thus, that system can realize pH controlled doxorubicin release in acidic environment of tumor tissues. PMID:27133585

  1. Organic Carbon Delivery to a High Arctic Watershed over the Late Holocene: Insights from Plant Biomarkers and Compound Specific δ13C and Δ14C Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Bianchi, T. S.; Eglinton, T. I.; Allison, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Colville River in Alaska is the largest river in North America which has a drainage basin that is exclusively underlain by permafrost, and as such provides a unique signal of historical changes in one of the world's most vulnerable areas to climate changes. Additionally, the Colville flows into Simpson's Lagoon, an area of the Alaskan Beaufort coast protected by a barrier island chain, lessening the impacts of Arctic storms and ice grounding on sediment mixing. Cores collected from the Colville river delta in August of 2010 were found to be composed of muddy, organic-rich, well-laminated sediments. The 2.5 to 3 meter length of each core spans about one to two thousand years of Holocene history, including the entire Anthropocene and much of the late Holocene. Two cores were sampled for this data set - one from close to the river mouth, and one from farther east in Simpson's Lagoon. Samples were taken every 2 cm for the entire length of both cores. In order to determine how the amount of terrestrial organic matter input changed over the Holocene, bulk analyses including percent organic carbon, percent nitrogen, and stable carbon isotopic analysis were performed, and biomarkers including lignin-phenols and fatty acids were measured. It was shown that lignin-phenol input is positively correlated with Alaskan North Slope temperature reconstructions. To determine whether the source of this increased terrestrial organic matter input was from fresh vegetation (for example, shrub encroachment onto tundra areas) or aged soil organic matter (potentially due to permafrost thawing and breakdown), selected samples were analyzed for compound-specific δ13C and Δ14C of fatty acids and lignin-phenols. These analyses show significant changes in carbon storage and in terrestrial carbon delivery to the Lagoon over time. These results represent the first fine-scale organic biomarker study in a high Arctic North American Lagoon, and have many implications for the future of carbon

  2. Changes in Terrestrial Organic Carbon Delivery to the Colville River Delta and Adjacent Simpson's Lagoon Over the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Bianchi, T. S.; Allison, M. A.; Miller, A. J.; Marcantonio, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Colville River in Alaska is the largest river in North America that drains only continuously permafrosted tundra, and as such provides a unique signal of historical changes in one of the world's most vulnerable areas to climate changes. Additionally, the Colville flows into Simpson's Lagoon, a shallow area of the Alaskan Beaufort coast protected by a barrier island chain, lessening the impacts of Arctic storms and ice grounding on sediment mixing. Cores collected from the Colville river delta in August of 2010 were found to be composed of muddy, organic-rich, well-laminated sediments. The 2.5 to 3 meter length of each core spans about one to two thousand years of Holocene history, including the entire Anthropocene and much of the late Holocene. Three cores were sampled for this data set, arranged latitudinally from the mouth of the Colville River east into Simpson's Lagoon. Samples were taken every 2 cm for the entire length of all cores. Bulk analyses including percent organic carbon, percent nitrogen, and stable carbon isotopic analysis were performed, and compound specific analyses including lignin-phenol and algal pigment analyses were performed. These analyses showed significant changes in carbon storage over the past one to two thousand years. There were also significant spatial differences in organic carbon inputs across the ~20km distance between the Colville mouth and the easternmost core. Lignin-phenol concentrations in surface sediments nearest to the river mouth correlated positively with reconstructed Alaskan North Slope temperatures, suggesting more terrestrial organic matter was delivered during higher temperature regimes. Molar C:N ratios and plant pigments correlated negatively and positively, respectively, with reconstructed Alaskan North Slope moisture regime, indicating greater algal inputs during wetter time periods. These data may in part be consistent with observed woody shrub encroachment and increasing expanse of permafrost lakes on the

  3. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Hasumura, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2013-01-01

    The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX) binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0), which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. PMID:23926428

  4. Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 maintains carbon delivery to Fusarium graminearum-infected roots and prevents reduction in biomass of barley shoots through systemic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Henkes, Gunnar J.; Jousset, Alexandre; Bonkowski, Michael; Thorpe, Michael R.; Scheu, Stefan; Lanoue, Arnaud; Schurr, Ulrich; Röse, Ursula S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Soil bacteria such as pseudomonads may reduce pathogen pressure for plants, both by activating plant defence mechanisms and by inhibiting pathogens directly due to the production of antibiotics. These effects are hard to distinguish under field conditions, impairing estimations of their relative contributions to plant health. A split-root system was set up with barley to quantify systemic and local effects of pre-inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens on the subsequent infection process by the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. One root half was inoculated with F. graminearum in combination with P. fluorescens strain CHA0 or its isogenic antibiotic-deficient mutant CHA19. Bacteria were inoculated either together with the fungal pathogen or in separate halves of the root system to separate local and systemic effects. The short-term plant response to fungal infection was followed by using the short-lived isotopic tracer 11CO2 to track the delivery of recent photoassimilates to each root half. In the absence of bacteria, fungal infection diverted carbon from the shoot to healthy roots, rather than to infected roots, although the overall partitioning from the shoot to the entire root system was not modified. Both local and systemic pre-inoculation with P. fluorescens CHA0 prevented the diversion of carbon as well as preventing a reduction in plant biomass in response to F. graminearum infection, whereas the non-antibiotic-producing mutant CHA19 lacked this ability. The results suggest that the activation of plant defences is a central feature of biocontrol bacteria which may even surpass the effects of direct pathogen inhibition. PMID:21561952

  5. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(5-benzyloxy-trimethylene carbonate) copolymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Faquan; Liu, Jubo; Allen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Amphiphilic diblock copolymers with various block compositions were synthesized with monomethoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (MePEG) as the hydrophilic block and poly(5-benzyloxy-trimethylene carbonate) (PBTMC) as the hydrophobic block. When the copolymerization was conducted using MePEG as a macroinitiator and stannous 2-ethylhexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) as a catalyst, the molecular weight of the second block was uncontrollable, and the method only afforded a mixture of homopolymer and copolymer with a broad molecular weight distribution. By contrast, the use of the triethylaluminum-MePEG initiator yielded block copolymers with controllable molecular weight and a more narrow molecular weight distribution than the copolymers obtained using Sn(Oct)2. GPC and 1H NMR studies confirmed that the macroinitiator was consumed and the copolymer composition was as predicted. Two of the newly synthesized MePEG-b-PBTMC copolymers were evaluated in terms of properties primarily relating to their use in micellar drug delivery. MePEG-b-PBTMC micelles with a narrow monomodal size distribution were prepared using a high-pressure extrusion technique. The MePEG-b-PBTMC copolymers were also confirmed to be biodegradable and noncytotoxic. PMID:15360292

  6. Negatively Charged Carbon Nanohorn Supported Cationic Liposome Nanoparticles: A Novel Delivery Vehicle for Anti-Nicotine Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Hu, Yun; Huang, Wei; de Villiers, Sabina; Pentel, Paul; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry; Ehrich, Marion; Zhang, Chenming

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco addiction is the second-leading cause of death in the world. Due to the nature of nicotine (a small molecule), finding ways to combat nicotine's deleterious effects has been a constant challenge to the society and the medical field. In the present work, a novel anti-nicotine vaccine based on nanohorn supported liposome nanoparticles (NsL NPs) was developed. The nano-vaccine was constructed by using negatively charged carbon nanohorns as a scaffold for the assembly of cationic liposomes, which allow the conjugation of hapten conjugated carrier proteins. The assembled bio-nanoparticles are stable. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with the nano-vaccine, which induced high titer and high affinity of nicotine specific antibodies in mice. Furthermore, no evidence of clinical signs or systemic toxicity followed multiple administrations of NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine. These results suggest that NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine is a promising candidate in treating nicotine dependence and could have potential to significantly contribute to smoking cessation. PMID:26510313

  7. The role of effective discharge in the ocean delivery of particulate organic carbon by small, mountainous river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Goni, M.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shown that small, mountainous river systems (SMRS) account for a significant fraction of the global flux of sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean. The enormous number of SMRS precludes intensive studies of the sort conducted on large systems, necessitating development of a conceptual framework that permits cross-system comparison and scaling up. Herein, we introduce the geomorphic concept of effective discharge to the problem of source-to-sink POC transport. This idea recognizes that transport effectiveness is the product of discharge frequency and magnitude, wherein the latter is quantified as a power-law relationship between discharge and load (the 'rating curve'). An analytical solution for effective discharge (Qe) identifies two key variables: the standard deviation of the natural logarithm of discharge (??q), and the rating exponent of constituent i (bi Data from selected SMRS are used to show that for a given river Qe-POC < Qesediment, Qe for different POC constituents (e.g., POCfossil vs. POC(modern) differs in predictable ways, and Qe for a particular constituent can vary seasonally. When coupled with the idea that discharge peaks of small rivers may be coincident with specific oceanic conditions (e.g., large waves, wind from a certain direction) that determine dispersal and burial, these findings have potentially important implications for POC fate on continental margins. Future studies of POC transport in SMRS should exploit the conceptual framework provided herein and seek to identify how constituent-specific effective discharges vary between rivers and respond to perturbations. ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  8. The role of hydrologic variability in the delivery of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen to surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. A.; Harrison, J.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologic connectivity expands and contracts within watersheds as moisture conditions change, with implications for in-stream water quality. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration has been shown to increase in streams during high flow events, presumably as sources of DOC in side-channels, riparian soils, and/or uplands are mobilized and transported to surface water. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) has been less well studied, but behavior of DON is often assumed to mirror that of DOC. However, because DOC- and DON-rich pools of organic matter may be mobilized at different times, and because DOC and DON may undergo unbalanced abiotic and biotic processing along flowpaths, there is reason to suspect that DOC and DON respond divergently to high flow events. We use a meta-analysis to address the following questions: 1) To what extent do high flow events affect in-stream DON concentration? And 2) To what extent are DOC and DON concentrations decoupled during these events? Across 47 systems that included 78 high flow events, flow-weighted mean DON concentration increased, on average, 1.58-fold from baseflow to high flow, with a maximum increase of 9.5-fold. DOC and DON exhibited a complex relationship, with DOC and DON concentrations peaking at different times in over half of the events, and molar DOC:DON ratios varying, on average, 4-fold during high flow. An intensive field investigation of a tile-drained agricultural system in eastern Washington indicates that DOC and DON concentrations increase in tile drain discharge during winter runoff relative to baseflow, consistent with the mobilization of novel sources of DOM. However, DOM characteristics, including DOC and DON concentrations, DOC:DON, and fluorescence indices, of tile drain discharge can vary widely from potential sources identified in the watershed (ground water, soil water). For example, during a base flow period, DOC:DON was 41 in ground water, 24 in water-extractable soil organic matter, but only 1

  9. Nanoparticles of 2-deoxy-D-glucose functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(trimethylene carbonate) for dual-targeted drug delivery in glioma treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Xin, Hongliang; Ren, Qiuyue; Gu, Jijin; Zhu, Lingjun; Du, Fengyi; Feng, Chunlai; Xie, Yike; Sha, Xianyi; Fang, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Based on the facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT) over-expression on both blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells, 2-deoxy-d-glucose modified poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(trimethylene carbonate) nanoparticles (dGlu-NP) were developed as a potential dual-targeted drug delivery system for enhancing the BBB penetration via GLUT-mediated transcytosis and improving the drug accumulation in the glioma via GLUT-mediated endocytosis. In vitro physicochemical characterization of the dual-targeted nanoparticulate system presented satisfactory size of 71 nm with uniform distribution, high encapsulation efficiency and adequate loading capacity of paclitaxel (PTX). Compared with non-glucosylated nanoparticles (NP), a significantly higher amount of dGlu-NP was internalized by RG-2 glioma cells through caveolae-mediated and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both of the transport ratios across the in vitro BBB model and the cytotoxicity of RG-2 cells after crossing the BBB were significantly greater of dGlu-NP/PTX than that of NP/PTX. In vivo fluorescent image indicated that dGlu-NP had high specificity and efficiency in intracranial tumor accumulation. The anti-glioblastoma efficacy of dGlu-NP/PTX was significantly enhanced in comparison with that of Taxol and NP/PTX. Preliminary safety tests showed no acute toxicity to hematological system, liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen in mice after intravenous administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg blank dGlu-NP per day for a week. Therefore, these results indicated that dGlu-NP developed in this study could be a potential dual-targeted vehicle for brain glioma therapy. PMID:24125772

  10. Preparation and binding study of a complex made of DNA-treated single-walled carbon nanotubes and antibody for specific delivery of a “molecular heater” platform

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Minoru; Yamazaki, Jun; Ohno, Jun; Fukushima, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been explored as heat-delivery vehicles for thermal ablation of tumors. To use single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as a “molecular heater” for hyperthermia therapy in cancer, stable dispersibility and smart-delivery potential will be needed, as well as lack of toxicity. This paper reports the preparation of a model complex comprising DNA-treated SWNT and anti-human IgG antibody and the specific binding ability of this model complex with the targeted protein, ie, human IgG. Treatment with double-stranded DNA enabled stable dispersibility of a complex composed of SWNT and the antibody under physiological conditions. Quartz crystal microbalance results suggest that there was one immobilized IgG molecule to every 21,700 carbon atoms in the complex containing DNA-treated SWNT and the antibody. The DNA-SWNT antibody complex showed good selectivity for binding to the targeted protein. Binding analysis revealed that treatment with DNA did not interfere with binding affinity or capacity between the immobilized antibody and the targeted protein. The results of this study demonstrate that the DNA-SWNT antibody complex is a useful tool for use as a smart “molecular heater” platform applicable to various types of antibodies targeting a specific antigen. PMID:22915857

  11. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    The structure and nanostructures of carbon phases from the Acapulco and Lodran meteorites and their carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition were investigated at the nanometer and micrometer scale using a systematic combination of Raman microspectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry to determine their origin and thermal evolution. Several morphological types were recognized belonging to roughly two isotopic and structural families: coarse carbon grains and rosettes, only found in Acapulco, and vein-like carbon occurrences present in both Acapulco and Lodran. Carbon phases in Acapulco are highly graphitized, and show a genetic relationship with metal indicative of metal-assisted graphitization. By contrast, carbon phases in Lodran are exclusively disordered mesoporous turbostratic carbons, in spite of their inclusion in metal and the higher peak temperature experienced by the Lodran parent body. δ13C values range between -59‰ and +37‰ in Acapulco and between -38‰ and -1‰ in Lodran and show in both cases a peak in their distribution at the value of chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM, -10‰ to -15‰). N concentrations together with δ15N values indicate a mixing between a component akin to chondritic IOM in Lodran with a δ15N value around +10‰ to +20‰ and a component akin to that in the most N-poor Acapulco graphites. The latter are systematically depleted in 15N with a δ15N value constant at ∼-140‰ for N concentrations below ∼1.4 wt%. These observations can be explained if carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran result from the late impact introduction of CI-CM like IOM, after significant cooling of the parent-body, and subsequent carbonization and graphitization of IOM by interaction with FeNi metal by the heat wave induced by the impact. Temperatures probably reached 900 °C in Acapulco, enough to achieve metal-assisted graphitization but were not significantly higher than 650 °C in

  12. Preparation and evaluation of polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes tagged with 5TR1 aptamer for targeted delivery of Bcl-xL shRNA into breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Sahar; HashemNia, Azadeh; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Askarian, Saeedeh; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were covalently attached to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) 10kDa, or its derivatives, to fabricate efficient carriers for gene delivery. PEI 10kDa was modified by alkylcarboxylation of its primary amines with a series of ω-bromo-alkylcarboxylic acids to provide a range of vectors with increased lipophilicity. PEI 10kDa or its alkylcarboxylate derivatives were conjugated to SWCNT-PEG to develop vectors possessing effective DNA condensation ability which can interact with cell membrane via both nano-needle mechanism and electrostatic interactions produced by SWCNT and PEI, respectively. The results demonstrated that SWCNT-PEG-PEI and SWCNT-PEG-derivatives of PEI could condense DNA into particle size less than 150nm with positive surface charges between 6.3-30.8mV. To improve the antitumor efficacy, we developed a targeted gene delivery system using a 5TR1 aptamer. The most efficient vector, which was prepared by attachment of SWCNT-PEG to modified PEI 10kDa with 10-bromodecanoic acid (10%), showed 8.5-10 folds enhancement in transfection activity at C/P ratio 6 as compared to the gold standard PEI 25kDa at C/P ratio of 0.8. We also showed that the selected polyplex could efficiently and selectively transfer plasmid shRNA to MUC1 positive cells. PMID:26731195

  13. Enriched Seawater Delivery System to Support In Situ Ocean Acidification Experiments using Carbon Dioxide for pH Adjustment of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, W. J.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Shane, F.; Kecy, C.; Headley, K. L.; Herlien, B.; Maughan, T.; Scholfield, J.; Salamy, K. A.; O'Reilly, T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    A series of Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) experiments are underway or are in planning to perform in situ ocean acidification research at a number of locations around the world. One of the most challenging locations is in Monterey Bay at the site of the Monterey Accelerated Research System, the United States test facility for cabled observatories. This site is located at 890 m deep and 4 0C within the local oxygen minimum zone and approximately 50 kilometers from shore. At this depth and temperature the behavior of liquid CO2 presents various challenges that had to be addressed in order to provide the low pH seawater needed for the FOCE apparatus to perform as desired. To solve this challenge a team of engineers and scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have developed a standalone device referred to as the Enriched Seawater Delivery System. Simple injections of seawater saturated at one atmosphere with CO2 demonstrated that the FOCE unit itself performs as designed. However, providing a consistent source of CO2 enriched pH altered seawater within the design criteria proved to be an imposing problem which when solved could have a broader impact in the oceanographic community. The decision was made to build a stand-alone device separate from the FOCE flume to perform in situ CO2 experiments in conditions where CO2 hydrate can form. Challenges to be over-come by this work included: (1) liquid CO2 is buoyant at the prescribed depth; (2) minimizing the formation of hydrates while manufacturing the CO2 enriched seawater. Because CO2 hydrate is denser than seawater, management of the phases and stability of liquid CO2 was necessary to prevent clogging within the delivery system. Our earliest field experiments demonstrated that containing and controlling the CO2 and the CO2-enriched seawater is difficult and makes the metering of the enriched fluid with on demand milliliter per second precision an extremely challenging problem. The Enriched

  14. Erosion of soil organic carbon at high latitudes and its delivery to Arctic Ocean sediments: New source to sink insight from radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jerome; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Grocke, Darren; Coxall, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over thousands of years and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Erosion processes can mobilise this pre-aged soil organic carbon from the landscape and supply it to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is delivered to the coastal ocean, this carbon may be sequestered for much longer periods of time (>104 yr) as a geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining the high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Using radiocarbon activity, we quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean. When combined with stable carbon isotopes and element ratios, the radiocarbon activity of POC allows us to distinguish inputs of POC from sedimentary rocks and quantify the average age of biospheric POC (from vegetation and soil) transported through the river system. We find that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 years. This is much older than large tropical rivers where we have equivalent data (Amazon River, Ganges River), and likely reflects the longer residence time of organic matter in cold, wet, high latitude soils. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr‑1 from the Mackenzie River. This is the largest input of aged organic carbon to the Arctic Ocean, more than the combined POC flux from the Eurasian Rivers. Offshore, we use a marine core to investigate organic carbon burial over the Holocene period. Radiocarbon measurements of bulk organic carbon reveal a significant offset from benthic foraminifera radiocarbon ages throughout the core, which is dependent upon the grain size of the sediments. Organic matter in sediments >63μm are offset from foraminifera by ˜ 6,000 14C years

  15. Physisorbed o-carborane onto lyso-phosphatidylcholine-functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes: a potential carrier system for the therapeutic delivery of boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopoulos, S. N.; Zouganelis, G. D.; Nurmohamed, S.; Smith, J. R.; Bouropoulos, N.; Calabrese, G.; Fatouros, D. G.; Tsibouklis, J.

    2010-02-01

    A combination of data from ICP-MS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential measurements and gel electorphoresis studies has shown that o-carborane may be immobilized on stable aqueous dispersions of lyso-phosphatidylcholine-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes, which in turn indicates the potential of such structures for deployment as carrier vehicles in boron neutron capture therapy.

  16. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  17. A facile Friedel-Crafts acylation for the synthesis of polyethylenimine-grafted multi-walled carbon nanotubes as efficient gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Nia, Azadeh Hashem; Amini, Abbas; Taghavi, Sahar; Eshghi, Hossein; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-04-11

    Low chemical reactivity of carbon nanotubes is one of the major obstacles in their functionalization via chemical reactions. As a non-destructive method, Friedel-Crafts acylation was suggested among the explored reactions for which only a few methods have been reported under harsh reaction conditions, e.g., high temperature all leading to low yields. In this study, we propose a novel method for the acylation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at a low temperature (i.e., 42°C), using SiO2-Al2O3 as a catalyst and 6-bromohexanoic acid as the acylating agent to produce high yield functionalized MWCNTs. After acylation, MWCNTs are conjugated with polyethylenimines (PEIs) with three molecular weights (1.8, 10 and 25kDa). Three different MWCNT-PEI conjugates are synthesized and evaluated for their condensation ability, viability, size and zeta potential properties. The transfection efficiency of the functionalized MWCNTs is evaluated using luciferase assay and flow cytometry in a Neuroblastoma cell line. MWCNT-PEI (10 kDa) conjugate shows the highest transfection efficacy compared to others. For this carrier transfection efficacy exceeds the amount of PEI 25 kDa at similar carrier to plasmid weight ratio (C/P) and is around 3 times higher compared to PEI 25 kDa at C/P=0.8 as positive control regarding its high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. PMID:26906459

  18. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  19. The Interaction of CORM-2 with Block Copolymers Containing Poly(4-vinylpyridine): Macromolecular Scaffolds for Carbon Monoxide Delivery in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diep; Adnan, Nik Nik M; Oliver, Susan; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-05-01

    CORM-2, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer (Ru2 Cl4 (CO)6 ), is a common carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM) studied both in vitro and in vivo, but this compound possesses poor water solubility and a short half-life, which hinders its clinical development. Herein, for the first time the conjugation of CORM-2 is reported with a copolymer containing poly(4-vinylpyridine) to yield water-soluble CO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles. CORM-2 is rapidly conjugated to copolymers through pyridine groups as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. In comparison with free CORM-2, the copolymers functionalized with CORM-2 display better water solubility and the CO release from the polymer-based CORM is slow and sustained. This study paves the way for the potential use of a copolymer encapsulating CORM-2 as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26945898

  20. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  1. Glacial and tectonic influence on terrestrial organic carbon delivery to high latitude deep marine systems: IODP Site U1417, Surveyor Fan, Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, L. B.; Ridgway, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial and tectonic processes on active margins are intrinsically coupled to the transport of sediment and associated organic carbon (OC). Glaciation/deglaciation and the formation of ice sheets can alter the quantity and composition of OC delivered to the marine environment. Over geologic time scales (>1 Ma), exhumation and mass wasting of sedimentary rock from uplifted accretionary wedges inject recycled OC (e.g. kerogen), along with modern OC into the marine environment. The sedimentary record of glacial and tectonic processes along the southern Alaska margin is particularly well preserved at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1417. Lithofacies of Site U1417 can be divided into 3 sedimentary packages that we interpret as linked to the onset of tidewater glaciation along, and tectonic convergence of the Yakutat Terrane with, the continental margin of northwestern Canada and southern Alaska. Based on previous studies linking the development of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet and the movement of the Yakutat Terrane to the development of the Surveyor Fan System, we hypothesize biogeochemical variations in the deposited sediments as a result of changing provenance. Preservation of terrestrial OC that has been documented in sediments of the Alaskan continental shelf margin and sediment routing through the deep-sea Surveyor Channel from the Pleistocene to modern time implies a long-term conduit for this OC to reach the distal portion of the Surveyor Fan system. To correlate marine deposits with terrestrial formations, bulk geochemical and detailed biomarker analyses are used to delineate source material. Preliminary bulk OC content and stable carbon isotope analyses of the Yakataga, Poul Creek, and Kultheith Fms. reveal notable differences. Detailed biomarker analysis by pyrolysis-gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry has revealed further differences between the three primary formations. Using the biogeochemical fingerprints of the Yakataga, Poul Creek, and coal

  2. Mapping the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes after targeted delivery to carcinoma cells using confocal Raman imaging as a label-free technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Gierlinger, N.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Plochberger, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Hild, S.; Ebner, A.

    2012-04-01

    The uptake of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by mammalian cells and their distribution within cells is being widely studied in recent years due to their increasing use for biomedical purposes. The two main imaging techniques used are confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The former, however, requires labeling of the CNTs with fluorescent dyes, while the latter is a work-intensive technique that is unsuitable for in situ bio-imaging. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, presents a direct, straightforward and label-free alternative. Confocal Raman microscopy can be used to image the CNTs inside cells, exploiting the strong Raman signal connected to different vibrational modes of the nanotubes. In addition, cellular components, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus, can be mapped. We first validate our method by showing that only when using the CNTs’ G band for intracellular mapping accurate results can be obtained, as mapping of the radial breathing mode (RBM) only shows a small fraction of CNTs. We then take a closer look at the exact localization of the nanotubes inside cells after folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and show that, after 8-10 h incubation, the majority of CNTs are localized around the nucleus. In summary, Raman imaging has enormous potential for imaging CNTs inside cells, which is yet to be fully realized. The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  3. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  4. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-β-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-β-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-β-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the mean plasma concentration–time curve (AUC[0→48]) of IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-β-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  5. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-β-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-β-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-β-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (C max) and the area under the mean plasma concentration-time curve (AUC[0→48]) of IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-β-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-β-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  6. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  7. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  8. Molecular aptamers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Weihong; Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhu, Haizhen; Yang, Chaoyong; Yang, Ronghua; Liu, Chen

    2011-12-01

    The active targeting of drugs in a cell-, tissue- or disease-specific manner represents a potentially powerful technology with widespread applications in medicine, including the treatment of cancers. Aptamers have properties such as high affinity and specificity for targets, easy chemical synthesis and modification, and rapid tissue penetration. They have become attractive molecules in diagnostics and therapeutics rivaling and, in some cases, surpassing other molecular probes, such as antibodies. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in aptamer-mediated delivery for therapeutics and disease-targeting based on aptamer integration with a variety of nanomaterials, such as gold nanorods, DNA micelles, DNA hydrogels and carbon nanotubes. PMID:21821299

  9. Immunosuppressive agent leflunomide: a SWNTs-immobilized dihydroortate dehydrogenase inhibitory effect and computational study of its adsorption properties on zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as controlled drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Raissi, Heidar; Mollania, Fariba

    2014-06-01

    Leflunomide [HWA 486 or RS-34821, 5-methyl-N-(4trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide] is an immunosuppressive agent effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Dihydroortate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.3.1) immobilization on the nanotubes was carried out and biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzyme was determined. In comparison with free enzyme, the immobilized DHODH showed improved stability and reusability for investigation of inhibition pattern of drugs such as leflunomide. The experimental data showed that, DHODH was inhibited by the active metabolite of leflunomide (RS-61980) with a Ki and KI of 0.82 and 0.06 mM, respectively. Results exhibited mixed-type inhibition kinetics towards dihydroorotate as a substrate in the free and immobilized enzyme. Furthermore, the behavior of anticancer drug leflunomide adsorbed on the external surface of zigzag single walled (6,0) carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (SWCNT and SWBNNT) was studied by means of DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(*) level of theory. The larger adsorption energies and charges transfer showed that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT is more stable than that the adsorption of leflunomide onto SWCNT. Frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) suggest that adsorption of leflunomide onto SWBNNT behave as charge transfer compounds with leflunomide as an electron donor and SWBNNT as an electron acceptor. Thus, nanotubes (NTs) have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative carriers for drug delivery and diagnostic application. The AIM theory has been also applied to analyze the properties of the bond critical points: their electron densities and their laplacians. Also, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to derive natural atomic orbital occupancies, and partial charges of the interacting atoms in the equilibrium tube-molecule distance. PMID:24566615

  10. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  11. Transdermal delivery of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Friend, D R

    1990-01-01

    Contraceptive agents are administered to the body through a variety of routes. Research has recently been directed at examining the transdermal route for systemic delivery of contraceptive agents, including estrogens and progestins. The transdermal route has several potential advantages over the other routes of administration: (1) improved compliance, (2) once-weekly administration, (3) delivery is easily terminated, and (4) some side effects can be alleviated based on more constant delivery rates. This article reviews the permeability of skin toward contraceptive steroids and how skin permeability is evaluated. The metabolism of contraceptive steroids is also considered. Transdermal delivery systems used to deliver contraceptives are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of several delivery systems for specific contraceptive agents such as levonorgestrel and estradiol. The potential problem of skin irritation is presented as it relates to transdermal contraceptive delivery systems, all of which will be worn chronically. PMID:2272099

  12. Antibiotic delivery by nanobioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ts Sampath; Madhumathi, K

    2016-08-01

    The role of nanotechnology has evinced remarkable interest in the field of drug delivery. Bioceramics are inorganic biomaterials which are frequently used as bone substitutes. They have been explored in drug delivery as carriers for antibiotics, anti-osteoporotic drugs and anticancer drugs. Bioceramic nanoparticles are excellent alternatives to polymers due to their bioactivity, pH and temperature stability, multifunctionality, biocompatibility and tunable biodegradability. The use of bioceramics for local drug delivery in the field of orthopedics offer an efficient, safe mode of drug delivery directly to the surgical site thereby overcoming the limitations of systemic drug delivery. This review focuses on the development and applications of various nanobioceramics employed as drug delivery systems for the treatment of bone infections. PMID:27444496

  13. Drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D H; Mauger, J W

    1991-10-01

    New and emerging drug delivery systems for traditional drugs and the products of biotechnology are discussed, and the role of the pharmacist in ensuring the appropriate use of these systems is outlined. Advantages of advanced drug delivery systems over traditional systems are the ability to deliver a drug more selectively to a specific site; easier, more accurate, less frequent dosing; decreased variability in systemic drug concentrations; absorption that is more consistent with the site and mechanism of action; and reductions in toxic metabolites. Four basic strategies govern the mechanisms of advanced drug delivery: physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical. Oral drug delivery systems use natural and synthetic polymers to deliver the product to a specific region in the gastrointestinal tract in a timely manner that minimizes adverse effects and increases drug efficacy. Innovations in injectable and implantable delivery systems include emulsions, particulate delivery systems, micromolecular products and macromolecular drug adducts, and enzymatic-controlled delivery. Options for noninvasive drug delivery include the transdermal, respiratory, intranasal, ophthalmic, lymphatic, rectal, intravaginal, and intrauterine routes as well as topical application. Rapid growth is projected in the drug delivery systems market worldwide in the next five years. Genetic engineering has mandated the development of new strategies to deliver biotechnologically derived protein and peptide drugs and chemoimmunoconjugates. The role of the pharmacist in the era of advanced drug delivery systems will be broad based, including administering drugs, compounding, calculating dosages based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic monitoring, counseling, and research. The advent of advanced drug delivery systems offers pharmacists a new opportunity to assume an active role in patient care. PMID:1772110

  14. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  15. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  16. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study. PMID:27301169

  17. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  18. Molecular aptamers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Weihong; Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhu, Haizhen; Yang, Chaoyong; Yang, Ronghua

    2011-01-01

    The active targeting of drugs in a cell-, tissue-, or disease-specific manner represents a potentially powerful technology with widespread applications in medicine, including the treatment of cancers. Aptamers, with properties such as high affinity and specificity to their targets, easy chemical synthesis and modification, as well as rapid tissue penetration, have become attractive molecules in diagnostics and therapeutics. They rival and, in some cases, surpass other molecular probes, such as antibodies. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in aptamer-mediated delivery for therapeutics and disease-targeting based on aptamer integration with a variety of nanomaterials, such as gold nanorods, DNA-micelles, DNA-hydrogels and carbon nanotubes. PMID:21821299

  19. Project Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    Describes project delivery methods that are replacing the traditional Design/Bid/Build linear approach to the management, design, and construction of new facilities. These variations can enhance construction management and teamwork. (SLD)

  20. Delivery by Cesarean Section

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Delivery by Cesarean Section Page Content Article Body More than one mother in three gives birth by Cesarean section in the United States (it is also called ...

  1. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... having a repeat assisted vaginal delivery in a future pregnancy? If you have had one assisted vaginal ... a vacuum device. Vacuum Device: A metal or plastic cup that is applied to the fetus’ head ...

  2. Nanotransporters for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-06-01

    Soluble nanotransporters for drugs can be profiled for targeted delivery particularly to maximize the efficacy of highly potent drugs while minimizing off target effects. This article outlines on the use of biological carrier molecules with a focus on albumin, various drug linkers for site specific release of the drug payload from the nanotransporter and strategies to combine these in various ways to meet different drug delivery demands particularly the optimization of the payload per nanotransporter. PMID:26773302

  3. [Transdermal Delivery of NSAIDs].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takehisa; Makino, Kimiko

    2015-11-01

    Skin has been studied as administration site of drug for its systemic effects, since systemic therapeutic agents can be delivered for long time with a controlled ratio, escaping from the first pass effect by liver by the transdermal delivery, which can decrease the dosage form. The low permeability of drug molecules through stratum corneum has been the limiting factor for developing transdermal delivery system of therapeutic agents. To enhance the permeability of drug molecules, many studies have been reported. PMID:26689064

  4. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  5. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  6. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed. PMID:25879307

  7. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Polymers in Small-Interfering RNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Kaushik; Namgung, Ran

    2011-01-01

    This review will cover the current strategies that are being adopted to efficiently deliver small interfering RNA using nonviral vectors, including the use of polymers such as polyethylenimine, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), polypeptides, chitosan, cyclodextrin, dendrimers, and polymers-containing different nanoparticles. The article will provide a brief and concise account of underlying principle of these polymeric vectors and their structural and functional modifications which were intended to serve different purposes to affect efficient therapeutic outcome of small-interfering RNA delivery. The modifications of these polymeric vectors will be discussed with reference to stimuli-responsiveness, target specific delivery, and incorporation of nanoconstructs such as carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and silica nanoparticles. The emergence of small-interfering RNA as the potential therapeutic agent and its mode of action will also be mentioned in a nutshell. PMID:21749290

  9. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  10. Technological Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Don; And Others

    A section on technological delivery systems, presented as part of the second Australian National Workshop on Distance Education (Perth, 1983), contains four papers on using technological resources to provide educational services to persons in isolated locations. The first paper, by Don Kennedy, covers the use of satellite broadcasting of course…

  11. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  12. Document Delivery Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Nancy Melin

    1992-01-01

    Presents highlights of research that used industrywide surveys, focus groups, personal interviews, and industry-published data to explore the future of electronic information delivery in libraries. Topics discussed include CD-ROMs; prices; full-text products; magnetic tape leasing; engineering and technical literature; connections between online…

  13. Nanotopography applications in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Laura A; Allen, Jessica L; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-01-01

    Refinement of micro- and nanofabrication in the semiconductor field has led to innovations in biomedical technologies. Nanotopography, in particular, shows great potential in facilitating drug delivery. The flexibility of fabrication techniques has created a diverse array of topographies that have been developed for drug delivery applications. Nanowires and nanostraws deliver drug cytosolically for in vitro and ex vivo applications. In vivo drug delivery is limited by the barrier function of the epithelium. Nanowires on microspheres increase adhesion and residence time for oral drug delivery, while also increasing permeability of the epithelium. Low aspect ratio nanocolumns increase paracellular permeability, and in conjunction with microneedles increase transdermal drug delivery of biologics in vivo. In summary, nanotopography is a versatile tool for drug delivery. It can deliver directly to cells or be used for in vivo delivery across epithelial barriers. This editorial highlights the application of nanotopography in the field of drug delivery. PMID:26512871

  14. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  15. PECTIN IN CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled drug delivery remains a research focus for public health to enhance patient compliance, drug efficiency and to reduce the side effects of drugs. Pectin, an edible plant polysaccharide, has shown potential for the construction of drug delivery systems for site-specific drug delivery. Sev...

  16. Continuing Professional Education Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, James P.

    This investigation of delivery systems for continuing professional education provides an overview of current operational delivery systems in continuing professional education, drawing on experience as found in the literature. Learning theories and conclusions are woven into the descriptive text. Delivery systems profiled in the paper include the…

  17. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Punyani, Supriya; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yang, Hoichang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Kane, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugating proteins onto carbon nanotubes has numerous applications in biosensing, imaging and cellular delivery. However, remotely controlling the activity of proteins in these conjugates has never been demonstrated. Here we show that upon near-infrared irradiation, carbon nanotubes mediate the selective deactivation of proteins in situ by photochemical effects. We designed nanotube-peptide conjugates to selectively destroy the anthrax toxin, and also optically transparent coatings that can self-clean following either visible or near-infrared irradiation. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation may be broadly applicable to the selective destruction of pathogens and cells, and will have applications ranging from antifouling coatings to functional proteomics.

  18. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  19. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  20. Delivery strategies for antiparasitics.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Oliver; Kiderlen, Albrecht F

    2003-02-01

    Optimisation of drug carrier systems and drug delivery strategies that take into account the peculiarities of individual infectious agents and diseases are key elements of modern drug development. In the following, different aspects of a rational design for antiparasitic drug formulation will be reviewed, covering delivery systems such as nano- and microparticles, liposomes, emulsions and microemulsions, cochleates and bioadhesive macromolecules. Functional properties for each carrier system will be discussed as well as their therapeutic efficacy for parasitic diseases, including leishmaniasis, human African trypanosomiasis, human cryptosporidiosis, malaria and schistosomiasis. Critical issues for the application of drug carrier systems will be discussed, focusing on biopharmaceutical and pathophysiological parameters such as routes of application, improvement of body distribution and targeting intracellularly persisting pathogens. PMID:12556214

  1. Compact SPS - Power delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.

    1982-09-01

    The power deliverable by a compact solar Space Power Station (SPS) is a function of its outer surface shape. Methods of fitting the power delivery curve of such a system to different patterns of daily power demand are considered that involve the appropriate choice of the number of satellites, their maximal power, height to width ratio and the shift of longitude with respect to the receiving station. Changes in the daily delivery curve can be made by altering the longitudes and orientations of the satellites. Certain limitations to the choice of parameters exist, such as: the height to width ratio should be near 1.2, and the sum of longitude and orientation changes will probably not be greater than 50 deg. The optimization of the peak to average power ratio is also discussed.

  2. Terplex Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16243067

  3. Terplex gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16240997

  4. Monitoring and delivery of sedation.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, C G; Mathews, D M

    2014-12-01

    Sedation for medical procedures is provided in a variety of clinical settings by medical personnel with differing levels of education and training. Although generally a safe practice, there is a degree of morbidity and mortality associated with sedation practice. Monitoring standards continue to be refined by professional societies with the goal of improving care. The depth of sedation should be monitored with clinical criteria. Processed electroencephalographic monitors currently do not contribute significantly to sedation care. Monitoring ventilation using pulse oximetry should be abandoned for more direct methods, such as capnography-transcutaneous carbon dioxide, respiratory acoustical and thoracic impedance monitoring could also play a role. Propofol has become widely utilized for sedation, although there are concerns about its margin of safety and synergistic interactions with other agents. Dexmedetomidine and propofol/ketamine also have utility. Patient-controlled sedation pumps and target-controlled infusion devices have been developed to improve patient care and satisfaction. A computer-assisted propofol sedation device to be used by non-anaesthesiologists has been approved in the USA by the Food and Drug Administration. More computer-assisted sedation delivery devices are likely to be developed, but their clinical utility is unclear. PMID:25498581

  5. Reproductive health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Mark C; Ross, Lawrence S

    2014-02-01

    Most patients in the United States with reproductive health disorders are not covered by their health insurance for these problems. Health insurance plans consider reproductive care as a lifestyle choice not as a disease. If coverage is provided it is, most often, directed to female factor infertility and advanced reproductive techniques, ignoring male factor reproductive disorders. This article reviews the history of reproductive health care delivery and its present state, and considers its possible future direction. PMID:24286778

  6. Mucosal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-09-01

    Oral delivery represents one of the most pursued approaches for large-scale human vaccination. Due to the different characteristics of mucosal immune response, as compared with systemic response, oral immunization requires particular methods of antigen preparation and selective strategies of adjuvanticity. In this paper, we describe the preparation and use of genetically detoxified bacterial toxins as mucosal adjuvants and envisage the possibility of their future exploitation for human oral vaccines. PMID:10525451

  7. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  8. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  9. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  10. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  11. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barry S.; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotes, protozoans, and plants act as transmembrane heme delivery systems for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes. The complete topology of a representative from each of the three subfamilies was experimentally determined. Key histidinyl residues and a conserved tryptophan-rich region (designated the WWD domain) are positioned at the site of cytochrome c assembly for all three subfamilies. These histidinyl residues were shown to be essential for function in one of the subfamilies, an ABC transporter encoded by helABCD. We believe that a directed heme delivery pathway is vital for the synthesis of cytochromes c, whereby heme iron is protected from oxidation via ligation to histidinyl residues within the delivery proteins. PMID:9560218

  12. Revolutionary Impact of Nanodrug Delivery on Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Khanbabaie, Reza; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Brain research is the most expanding interdisciplinary research that is using the state of the art techniques to overcome limitations in order to conduct more accurate and effective experiments. Drug delivery to the target site in the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the most difficult steps in neuroscience researches and therapies. Taking advantage of the nanoscale structure of neural cells (both neurons and glia); nanodrug delivery (second generation of biotechnological products) has a potential revolutionary impact into the basic understanding, visualization and therapeutic applications of neuroscience. Current review article firstly provides an overview of preparation and characterization, purification and separation, loading and delivering of nanodrugs. Different types of nanoparticle bioproducts and a number of methods for their fabrication and delivery systems including (carbon) nanotubes are explained. In the second part, neuroscience and nervous system drugs are deeply investigated. Different mechanisms in which nanoparticles enhance the uptake and clearance of molecules form cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are discussed. The focus is on nanodrugs that are being used or have potential to improve neural researches, diagnosis and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23730260

  13. Revolutionary impact of nanodrug delivery on neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Khanbabaie, Reza; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2012-12-01

    Brain research is the most expanding interdisciplinary research that is using the state of the art techniques to overcome limitations in order to conduct more accurate and effective experiments. Drug delivery to the target site in the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the most difficult steps in neuroscience researches and therapies. Taking advantage of the nanoscale structure of neural cells (both neurons and glia); nanodrug delivery (second generation of biotechnological products) has a potential revolutionary impact into the basic understanding, visualization and therapeutic applications of neuroscience. Current review article firstly provides an overview of preparation and characterization, purification and separation, loading and delivering of nanodrugs. Different types of nanoparticle bioproducts and a number of methods for their fabrication and delivery systems including (carbon) nanotubes are explained. In the second part, neuroscience and nervous system drugs are deeply investigated. Different mechanisms in which nanoparticles enhance the uptake and clearance of molecules form cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are discussed. The focus is on nanodrugs that are being used or have potential to improve neural researches, diagnosis and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23730260

  14. Rationale for the selection of an aerosol delivery system for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Yvonne K; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Lengsfeld, Corinne S

    2006-01-01

    Genetic therapeutics show great promise toward the treatment of illnesses associated with the lungs; however, current methods of delivery such as jet and ultrasonic nebulization decrease the activity and effectiveness of these treatments. Extremely low transfection rates exhibited by non-complexed plasmid DNA in these nebulizers have been primarily attributed to poor translocation and loss of molecular integrity as a consequence of shear-induced degradation. Current research focusing on methods to increase transfection rates via the pulmonary delivery route has largely concentrated on the incorporation of carbon dioxide in the air stream to increase breath depth as well as the addition of cationic agents that condense DNA into compact, ordered complexes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several classic as well as the latest atomization devices on the structure of non-complexed DNA. Various sizes of plasmid and cosmid DNA were processed through an electrostatic spray, ultrasonic nebulizer, vibrating mesh nebulizer, and jet nebulizer. Results varied dramatically based upon atomization device as well as DNA size. This may explain the inefficiency experienced by genetic therapeutics during pulmonary delivery. More importantly, this suggests that the selection of an atomization device should consider DNA size in order to achieve optimal gene delivery to the lungs. PMID:17034312

  15. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  16. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  17. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  18. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  19. Vaporization as a smokeless cannabis delivery system: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Vizoso, H P; Shade, S B; Jay, C; Kelly, M E; Benowitz, N L

    2007-11-01

    Although cannabis may have potential therapeutic value, inhalation of a combustion product is an undesirable delivery system. The aim of the study was to investigate vaporization using the Volcano((R)) device as an alternative means of delivery of inhaled Cannabis sativa. Eighteen healthy inpatient subjects enrolled to compare the delivery of cannabinoids by vaporization to marijuana smoked in a standard cigarette. One strength (1.7, 3.4, or 6.8% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) and delivery system was randomly assigned for each of the 6 study days. Plasma concentrations of Delta-9-THC, expired carbon monoxide (CO), physiologic and neuropsychologic effects were the main outcome measures. Peak plasma concentrations and 6-h area under the plasma concentration-time curve of THC were similar. CO levels were reduced with vaporization. No adverse events occurred. Vaporization of cannabis is a safe and effective mode of delivery of THC. Further trials of clinical effectiveness of cannabis could utilize vaporization as a smokeless delivery system. PMID:17429350

  20. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  1. Hierarchical self-assembled structures based on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as advanced negative electrodes for Li-ion batteries and 3D microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Tiva; Valvo, Mario; Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Sandström, Robin; Edström, Kristina; Wågberg, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Hierarchical structures based on carbon paper and multi-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes were fabricated and subsequently decorated with hematite nanorods to obtain advanced 3D architectures for Li-ion battery negative electrodes. The carbon paper provides a versatile metal-free 3D current collector ensuring a good electrical contact of the active materials to its carbon fiber network. Firstly, the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes onto the carbon paper were studied and a high footprint area capacity of 2.1 mAh cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2 was obtained. The Li can be stored in the inter-wall regions of the nanotubes, mediated by the defects formed on their walls by the nitrogen atoms. Secondly, the incorporation of hematite nanorods raised the footprint area capacity to 2.25 mAh cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2. However, the repeated conversion/de-conversion of Fe2O3 limited both coulombic and energy efficiencies for these electrodes, which did not perform as well as those including only the N-doped carbon nanotubes at higher current densities. Thirdly, long-cycling tests showed the robust Li insertion mechanism in these N-doped carbonaceous structures, which yielded an unmatched footprint area capacity enhancement up to 1.95 mAh cm-2 after 60 cycles at 0.3 mA cm-2 and an overall capacity of 204 mAh g-1 referred to the mass of the entire electrode.

  2. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  3. Delivery methods for LVSD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasner, James H.; Brower, Bernard V.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present formats and delivery methods of Large Volume Streaming Data (LVSD) systems. LVSD systems collect TBs of data per mission with aggregate camera sizes in the 100 Mpixel to several Gpixel range at temporal rates of 2 - 60 Hz. We present options and recommendations for the different stages of LVSD data collection and delivery, to include the raw (multi-camera) data, delivery of processed (stabilized mosaic) data, and delivery of user-defined region of interest windows. Many LVSD systems use JPEG 2000 for the compression of raw and processed data. We explore the use of the JPEG 2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) for interactive client/server delivery to thick-clients (desktops and laptops) and MPEG-2 and H.264 to handheld thin-clients (tablets, cell phones). We also explore the use of 3D JPEG 2000 compression, defined in ISO 15444-2, for storage and delivery as well. The delivery of raw, processed, and region of interest data requires different metadata delivery techniques and metadata content. Beyond the format and delivery of data and metadata we discuss the requirements for a client/server protocol that provides data discovery and retrieval. Finally, we look into the future as LVSD systems perform automated processing to produce "information" from the original data. This information may include tracks of moving targets, changes of the background, snap shots of targets, fusion of multiple sensors, and information about "events" that have happened.

  4. Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Production upon Two-Photon Excitation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Functionalized Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Naveen; Chiu, Pui Lam; Li, Wenbing; Anderson, Yolanda R.; Mitra, Somenath; He, Huixin; Gao, Ruomei

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with -COOH (along with some sulphonation and nitration), and/or modified with chitosan were prepared and tested for their singlet oxygen (1O2) production. The emission from 1O2 observed upon SWNT irradiation at 532 nm was due to a two-photon process, while 1O2 production via excitation at 355 nm occurred through a conventional one-photon pathway. The relative quantum yield of 1O2 production at excitation wavelength of 532 nm was found to be 0.00, 0.07-0.13 and 0.24-0.54 for highly-functionalized, partially-functionalized and non-functionalized SWNT samples respectively. The nanotube-mediated generation of 1O2 may find applications in both targeted destruction of tumor cells and selective degradation of drug molecules. Our research provides a practical approach to modulate the production of reactive oxygen species from SWNTs via surface functionalization/modification. PMID:20046942

  5. Economical ground data delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, Richard W.; Byrne, Russell H.; Bromberg, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    Data delivery in the Deep Space Network (DSN) involves transmission of a small amount of constant, high-priority traffic and a large amount of bursty, low priority data. The bursty traffic may be initially buffered and then metered back slowly as bandwidth becomes available. Today both types of data are transmitted over dedicated leased circuits. The authors investigated the potential of saving money by designing a hybrid communications architecture that uses leased circuits for high-priority network communications and dial-up circuits for low-priority traffic. Such an architecture may significantly reduce costs and provide an emergency backup. The architecture presented here may also be applied to any ground station-to-customer network within the range of a common carrier. The authors compare estimated costs for various scenarios and suggest security safeguards that should be considered.

  6. Intrathecal delivery of analgesics.

    PubMed

    De Andres, Jose; Asensio-Samper, Juan Marcos; Fabregat-Cid, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intrathecal (IT) drug delivery systems (IDDS) are an option in algorithms for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe chronic refractory pain when more conservative options fail. This therapy is well established and supported by several publications. It has shown efficacy and is an important tool for the treatment of spasticity, and both cancer and nonmalignant pain. Recent technological advances, new therapeutic applications, reported complications, and the costs as well as maintenance required for this therapy require the need to stay up-to-date about new recommendations that may improve outcomes. This chapter reviews all technological issues regarding IDDS implantation with follow-up, and pharmacological recommendations published during recent years that provide evidence-based decision making process in the management of chronic pain and spasticity in patients. PMID:24567144

  7. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  8. Topical delivery of hexamidine.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Nicola; Paz-Alvarez, Miguel; Matts, Paul J; Lever, Rebecca; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2016-06-15

    Hexamidine diisethionate (HEX D) has been used for its biocidal actions in topical preparations since the 1950s. Recent data also suggest that it plays a beneficial role in skin homeostasis. To date, the extent to which this compound penetrates the epidermis has not been reported nor how its topical delivery may be modulated. In the present work we set out to characterise the interaction of HEX D with the skin and to develop a range of simple formulations for topical targeting of the active. A further objective was to compare the skin penetration of HEX D with its corresponding dihydrochloride salt (HEX H) as the latter has more favourable physicochemical properties for skin uptake. Candidate vehicles were evaluated by in vitro Franz cell permeation studies using porcine skin. Initially, neat solvents were investigated and subsequently binary systems were examined. The solvents and chemical penetration enhancers investigated included glycerol, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), 1,2-pentanol (1,2-PENT), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) and Transcutol(®)P (TC). Of a total of 30 binary solvent systems evaluated only 10 delivered higher amounts of active into the skin compared with the neat solvents. In terms of topical efficacy, formulations containing PGML far surpassed all other solvents or binary combinations. More than 70% of HEX H was extracted from the skin following application in PG:PGML (50:50). Interestingly, the same vehicle effectively promoted skin penetration of HEX D but demonstrated significantly lower uptake into and through the skin (30%). The findings confirm the unpredictable nature of excipients on delivery of actives with reference to skin even where there are minor differences in molecular structures. We also believe that they underline the ongoing necessity for fundamental studies on the interaction of topical excipients with the skin. PMID:27130367

  9. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  10. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challenges to delivering hydrogen for use as a widespread energy carrier, and the research goals for hydrogen delivery.

  11. Chemical Abstracts' Document Delivery Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    The Document Delivery Service offered by Chemical Abstracts is described in terms of the DIALORDER option on the Dialog information retrieval system, mail requests, and requests transmitted through OCLC's Interlibrary Loan system. Transmission costs, success rates, delivery rates, and other considerations in utilizing the service are included.…

  12. The Bankruptcy of Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, David S.

    The dominant concept of public education at present can be described as a "service delivery" model. The public wants its children educated, delegates the job to a government agency (the schools), and holds that agency responsible for the delivery of educational services. The problems in public education, however, will not be solved by holding the…

  13. Polymer Particulates in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Kumar, Virender; Kumar, Krishan; Rathor, Sandeep; Kumari, Parveen; Singh, Jasbir

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective drug delivery systems is important for medicine and healthcare. Polymer particulates (micro- and nanoparticles) have opened new opportunities in the field of drug delivery by overcoming various limitations of conventional delivery methods. The properties of polymeric particles can be readily tuned by precisely engineering the constituent blocks of polymers for improving drug loading, release rate, pharmacokinetics, targeting, etc. The end-groups of various polymers can be readily modified with ligands making them suitable for recognizing by cell-specific receptors, providing cellular specificity, and superior intracellular delivery. This review will mainly cover delivery of many potential drugs and biomolecules by means of polymeric microparticles, nanoparticles and copolymer micelles or assemblies. An overview about formulation methods of polymer particulates has also been addressed. Attempt has been made to cover all the potential polymers that are well known in pharmaceutical history. PMID:26898740

  14. Novel Delivery Strategies for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiangbing; Atsina, Kofi-Buaku; Himes, Benjamin T.; Strohbehn, Garth W.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Brain tumors—particularly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)—pose an important public health problem in the US. Despite surgical and medical advances, the prognosis for patients with malignant gliomas remains grim: current therapy for is insufficient with nearly universal recurrence. A major reason for this failure is the difficulty of delivering therapeutic agents to the brain: better delivery approaches are needed to improve treatment. In this article, we summarize recent progress in drug delivery to the brain, with an emphasis on convection-enhanced delivery of nanocarriers. We examine the potential of new delivery methods to permit novel drug- and gene-based therapies that target brain cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and discuss the use of nanomaterials for imaging of tumors and drug delivery. PMID:22290262

  15. Intelligent Nanoparticles for Advanced Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David S.; Puranik, Amey S.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer using nanoparticle-based approaches relies on the rational design of carriers with respect to size, charge, and surface properties. Polymer-based nanomaterials, inorganic materials such as gold, iron oxide, and silica as well as carbon based materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene are being explored extensively for cancer therapy. The challenges associated with the delivery of these nanoparticles depend greatly on the type of cancer and stage of development. This review highlights design considerations to develop nanoparticle-based approaches for overcoming physiological hurdles in cancer treatment, as well as emerging research in engineering advanced delivery systems for the treatment of primary, metastatic, and multidrug resistant cancers. A growing understanding of cancer biology will continue to foster development of intelligent nanoparticle-based therapeutics that take into account diverse physiological contexts of changing disease states to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25621200

  16. Laser-power delivery using chalcogenide glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Albert R., Sr.; Hilton, A. R., Jr.; McCord, James; Loretz, Thomas J.

    1997-04-01

    During the last 15 years, numerous programs have been carried out in the U.S., UK, France, Japan, Israel and Russia aimed at providing a flexible chalcogenide glass fiber suited for delivery of power from a carbon dioxide laser emitting at 10.6 micrometer. The success of these programs has been modest at best with output power limited to 10 watts or less. The purpose of this paper is to examine chalcogenide glasses used for fiber from a thermal lensing standpoint.

  17. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  18. Mineralized cyclodextrin nanoparticles for sustained protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Maharajan; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Park, Jae Hyung

    2013-09-12

    The extensive therapeutic potential of protein drugs has been severely limited by their instability and short biological half-lives in vivo. To prolong their therapeutic effects, a sustained delivery system is required. In this study, cyclodextrin-based polymeric nanoparticles (CD-NPs), mineralized by calcium phosphate as the diffusion barrier, were developed as a carrier for sustained protein delivery. Spherical CD-NPs were readily prepared by a conjugate, composed of β-CD as the protein-binding moiety and carboxymethyl dextran as the substrate for mineralization in a physiological solution. Owing to the presence of carboxylic acids in CD-NPs, they were effectively mineralized by sequential addition of calcium nitrate and ammonium phosphate. The physicochemical characteristics of mineralized CD-NPs were characterized using FT-IR, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mineralization reduced CD-NP particle size from 310 nm to 121 nm in PBS (pH 7.4) indicating the formation of compact nanoparticles. Carbonic anhydrase B (CAB), chosen as the model protein, was loaded into the mineralized CD-NPs with a high loading efficiency (80%) by a simple dialysis method. In vitro release tests showed that CAB was completely released from bare CD-NPs in 3 days. Interestingly, the mineralized CD-NPs released CAB in a sustained manner for 21 days, which was due to the stable calcium phosphate barrier inhibiting CAB release. The enzymatic activity of CAB, which was released from the nanoparticles, did not significantly deteriorate compared to native CAB. Overall, mineralized CD-NPs could be a promising carrier for sustained protein delivery. PMID:23911496

  19. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  20. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  1. Magnetic single-walled carbon nanotubes as efficient drug delivery nanocarriers in breast cancer murine model: noninvasive monitoring using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as sensitive imaging biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Shaik, Asma Sultana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Targeting doxorubicin (DOX) by means of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocarriers may help improve the clinical utility of this highly active therapeutic agent. Active targeting of SWCNTs using tumor-specific antibody and magnetic attraction by tagging the nanotubes with iron oxide nanoparticles can potentially reduce the unnecessary side effects and provide enhanced theranostics. In the current study, the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of DOX-loaded SWCNTs as theranostic nanoprobes was evaluated in a murine breast cancer model. Methods Iron-tagged SWCNTs conjugated with Endoglin/CD105 antibody with or without DOX were synthetized and extensively characterized. Their biocompatibility was assessed in vitro in luciferase (Luc2)-expressing 4T1 (4T1-Luc2) murine breast cancer cells using TiterTACS™ Colorimetric Apoptosis Detection Kit (apoptosis induction), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (marker for DNA damage), and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (oxidative stress generation) assays, and the efficacy of DOX-loaded SWCNTs was evaluated by measuring the radiance efficiency using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Tumor progression and growth were monitored after 4T1-Luc2 cells inoculation using noninvasive BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after subsequent injection of SWCNT complexes actively and magnetically targeted to tumor sites. Results Significant increases in apoptosis, DNA damage, and oxidative stress were induced by DOX-loaded SWCNTs. In addition, a tremendous decrease in bioluminescence was observed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Noninvasive BLI and MRI revealed successful tumor growth and subsequent attenuation along with metastasis inhibition following DOX-loaded SWCNTs injection. Magnetic tagging of SWCNTs was found to produce significant discrepancies in apparent diffusion coefficient values providing a higher contrast to detect treatment-induced variations as noninvasive imaging biomarker. In addition, it

  2. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli. PMID:21114841

  3. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  4. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  5. The delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Rudolph L

    2016-08-19

    The oligonucleotide therapeutics field has seen remarkable progress over the last few years with the approval of the first antisense drug and with promising developments in late stage clinical trials using siRNA or splice switching oligonucleotides. However, effective delivery of oligonucleotides to their intracellular sites of action remains a major issue. This review will describe the biological basis of oligonucleotide delivery including the nature of various tissue barriers and the mechanisms of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of oligonucleotides. It will then examine a variety of current approaches for enhancing the delivery of oligonucleotides. This includes molecular scale targeted ligand-oligonucleotide conjugates, lipid- and polymer-based nanoparticles, antibody conjugates and small molecules that improve oligonucleotide delivery. The merits and liabilities of these approaches will be discussed in the context of the underlying basic biology. PMID:27084936

  6. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A.; Robison, Thomas W.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  7. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  8. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems. PMID:18285745

  9. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, Sarah E.; O’Connor, Richard J.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Cummings, K. Michael; McNeill, Ann; Thrasher, James F.; Hammond, David; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) initially emerged in 2003 and have since become widely available globally, particularly over the Internet. Purpose Data on ENDS usage patterns are limited. The current paper examines patterns of ENDS awareness, use, and product-associated beliefs among current and former smokers in four countries. Methods Data come from Wave 8 of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey, collected July 2010 to June 2011 and analyzed through June 2012. Respondents included 5939 current and former smokers in Canada (n=1581); the U.S. (n=1520); the United Kingdom (UK; n=1325); and Australia (n=1513). Results Overall, 46.6% were aware of ENDS (U.S.: 73%, UK: 54%, Canada: 40%, Australia: 20%); 7.6% had tried ENDS (16% of those aware of ENDS); and 2.9% were current users (39% of triers). Awareness of ENDS was higher among younger, non-minority smokers with higher incomes who were heavier smokers. Prevalence of trying ENDS was higher among younger, nondaily smokers with a high income and among those who perceived ENDS as less harmful than traditional cigarettes. Current use was higher among both nondaily and heavy (≥20 cigarettes per day) smokers. In all, 79.8% reported using ENDS because they were considered less harmful than traditional cigarettes; 75.4% stated that they used ENDS to help them reduce their smoking; and 85.1% reported using ENDS to help them quit smoking. Conclusions Awareness of ENDS is high, especially in countries where they are legal (i.e., the U.S. and UK). Because trial was associated with nondaily smoking and a desire to quit smoking, ENDS may have potential to serve as a cessation aid. PMID:23415116

  10. Advances in Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of genes into cells, both in vitro and in vivo, is critical for studying gene function and conducting gene therapy. Methods that utilize viral and nonviral vectors, as well as physical approaches, have been explored. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer employs replication-deficient viruses such as retro-virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and herpes simplex virus. A major advantage of viral vectors is their high gene delivery efficiency. The nonviral vectors developed so far include cationic liposomes, cationic polymers, synthetic peptides and naturally occurring compounds. These nonviral vectors appear to be highly effective in gene delivery to cultured cells in vitro but are significantly less effective in vivo. Physical methods utilize mechanical pressure, electric shock or hydrodynamic force to transiently permeate the cell membrane to transfer DNA into target cells. They are simpler than viral- and nonviral-based systems and highly effective for localized gene delivery. The past decade has seen significant efforts to establish the most desirable method for safe, effective and target-specific gene delivery, and good progress has been made. The objectives of this review are to (i) explain the rationale for the design of viral, nonviral and physical methods for gene delivery; (ii) provide a summary on recent advances in gene transfer technology; (iii) discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of the most commonly used gene delivery methods; and (iv) provide future perspectives. PMID:22200988

  11. Gold Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ya; Jiang, Ziwen; Saha, Krishnendu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sung Tae; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an attractive and applicable scaffold for delivery of nucleic acids. In this review, we focus on the use of covalent and noncovalent gold nanoparticle conjugates for applications in gene delivery and RNA-interference technologies. We also discuss challenges in nucleic acid delivery, including endosomal entrapment/escape and active delivery/presentation of nucleic acids in the cell. PMID:24599278

  12. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  13. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification....

  14. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  15. Optimised transdermal delivery of pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Burger, Cornel; Gerber, Minja; du Preez, Jan L; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-12-30

    Wiechers' programme "Formulating for Efficacy" initiated a new strategy to optimise the oil phase of topical formulations in order to achieve optimal transdermal drug delivery. This new approach uses the "Delivery Gap Theory" on any active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to test if it could enhance transdermal drug delivery. The aim of the study was to formulate six different semi-solid formulations (three creams and three emulgels) with 2% pravastatin as the API in order to investigate the "Delivery Gap Principle", by determining which formulation would deliver pravastatin best to the target-site (system circulation). The three cream- and three emulgel formulations had different polarities, i.e. a formulation with polarity equal to that of the stratum corneum (optimised), a non-polar (lipophilic)- and a polar (hydrophilic)-formulation. Franz cell diffusion studies were executed over 12h and the optimised emulgel (2.578μg/cm(2)) had the highest median amount per area obtained. Tape stripping followed the diffusion studies and in the stratum corneum-epidermis, the hydrophilic emulgel (1.448μg/ml) contained the highest median pravastatin concentration and the epidermis-dermis the optimised emulgel (0.849μg/ml) depicted the highest pravastatin concentration. During this study, it was observed that when both emulgel and cream formulations were compared; the emulgels enhanced the delivery of pravastatin more than the creams. PMID:26505148

  16. Transdermal Insulin Delivery Using Microdermabrasion

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Transdermal insulin delivery is an attractive needle-free alternative to subcutaneous injection conventionally used to treat diabetes. However, skin’s barrier properties prevent insulin permeation at useful levels. Methods We investigated whether microdermabrasion can selectively remove skin’s surface layers to increase skin permeability as a method to administer insulin to diabetic rats. We further assessed the relative roles of stratum corneum and viable epidermis as barriers to insulin delivery. Results Pretreatment of skin with microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum did not have a significant effect on insulin delivery or reduction in blood glucose level (BGL). Removal of full epidermis by microdermabrasion significantly reduced BGL, similar to the positive control involving subcutaneous injection of 0.1U insulin. Significant pharmacokinetic differences between microdermabrasion and subcutaneous injection were faster time to peak insulin concentration after injection and larger peak insulin concentration and area-under-the-curve after microdermabrasion. Conclusions Microdermabrasion can increase skin permeability to insulin at levels sufficient to reduce BGL. Viable epidermis is a barrier to insulin delivery such that removal of full epidermis enables significantly more insulin delivery than removal of stratum corneum alone. PMID:21499837

  17. Nanoparticulate systems for polynucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Basarkar, Ashwin; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendously influenced gene therapy research in recent years. Nanometer-size systems have been extensively investigated for delivering genes at both local and systemic levels. These systems offer several advantages in terms of tissue penetrability, cellular uptake, systemic circulation, and cell targeting as compared to larger systems. They can protect the polynucleotide from a variety of degradative and destabilizing factors and enhance delivery efficiency to the cells. A variety of polymeric and non-polymeric nanoparticles have been investigated in an effort to maximize the delivery efficiency while minimizing the toxic effects. This article provides a review on the most commonly used nanoparticulate systems for gene delivery. We have discussed frequently used polymers, such as, polyethyleneimine, poly (lactide-co-glycolide), chitosan, as well as non-polymeric materials such as cationic lipids and metallic nanoparticles. The advantages and limitations of each system have been elaborated. PMID:18019834

  18. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  19. Recent advances in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana S; Alonso, María J

    2016-01-01

    The field of vaccination is moving from the use of attenuated or inactivated pathogens to safer but less immunogenic protein and peptide antigens, which require stronger adjuvant compositions. Antigen delivery carriers appear to play an important role in vaccine development, providing not only antigen protection and controlled release but also an intrinsic adjuvant potential. Among them, carriers based on polymers and lipids are the most representative ones. Patent applications in this area have disclosed, either the design and preparation methods for new biocompatible antigen delivery systems or the application of the previously developed systems for the delivery of novel antigens. Some of them have also reported the use of these technologies for modern therapeutic vaccination approaches. PMID:26667309

  20. Osmotic micropumps for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Simon; Spieth, Sven; Messner, Stephan; Zengerle, Roland

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews miniaturized drug delivery systems applying osmotic principles for pumping. Osmotic micropumps require no electrical energy and consequently enable drug delivery systems of smallest size for a broad field of new applications. In contrast to common tablets, these pumps provide constant (zero-order) drug release rates. This facilitates systems for long term use not limited by gastrointestinal transit time and first-pass metabolism. The review focuses on parenteral routes of administration targeting drug delivery either in a site-specific or systemic way. Osmotic pumps consist of three building blocks: osmotic agent, solvent, and drug. This is used to categorize pumps into (i) single compartment systems using water from body fluids as solvent and the drug itself as the osmotic agent, (ii) two compartment systems employing a separate osmotic agent, and (iii) multi-compartment architectures employing solvent, drug and osmotic agent separately. In parallel to the micropumps, relevant applications and therapies are discussed. PMID:22370615

  1. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  2. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  3. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  4. Carbon-Carbon Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon (C-C) Radiator was a success and proved that the technology can work to reduce Spacecraft weight. C-C has a niche, especially for high temperatures. C-C still needs further development: reduction in fabrication time and cost - high conductivity "traditional" composites are more competitive, and CTE interface issues with heat pipes. Redundancy a good idea - we flew the spare panel. CSRP was a success -informal inter-agency partnership. Possible follow-on: C-C foam for low CTE mirrors/optical benches.

  5. Management of Spontaneous Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Dresang, Lee T; Yonke, Nicole

    2015-08-01

    Most of the nearly 4 million births in the United States annually are normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries. In the first stage of labor, normal birth outcomes can be improved by encouraging the patient to walk and stay in upright positions, waiting until at least 6 cm dilation to diagnose active stage arrest, providing continuous labor support, using intermittent auscultation in low-risk deliveries, and following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for group B streptococcus prophylaxis. Most women with a low transverse uterine incision are candidates for a trial of labor after cesarean delivery and should be counseled accordingly. Pain management during labor includes complementary modalities and systemic opioids, epidural anesthesia, and pudendal block. Outcomes in the second stage of labor can be improved by using warm perineal compresses, allowing women more time to push before intervening, and offering labor support. Delayed pushing increases the length of the second stage of labor and does not affect the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery. A tight nuchal cord can be clamped twice and cut before delivery of the shoulders, or the baby may be delivered using a somersault maneuver in which the cord is left nuchal and the distance from the cord to placenta minimized by pushing the head toward the maternal thigh. After delivery, skin-to-skin contact with the mother is recommended. Beyond 35 weeks' gestation, there is no benefit to bulb suctioning the nose and mouth. Postpartum maternal and neonatal outcomes can be improved through delayed cord clamping, active management to prevent postpartum hemorrhage, careful examination for external anal sphincter injuries, and use of absorbable synthetic suture for second-degree perineal laceration repair. Practices that will not improve outcomes and may result in negative outcomes include discontinuation of epidurals late in labor and routine episiotomy. PMID:26280140

  6. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  7. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  8. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  9. Surface-engineered graphene-based nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haiqing; Dong, Chunyan; Ren, Tianbin; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2014-09-01

    Graphene, as a newly discovered carbon allotrope, has attracted broad interest and intense attention since its discovery for both fundamental research and a vast array of industrial and biomedical applications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the nano-bio-interfaces of graphene-based materials for exploring their potential biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biosensing, biomedical imaging, stem cell technology, and photothermal therapy. This review summarizes the current studies on the physiological stability, enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, active targeting and drug carrying capability of graphene-based nanomaterials, and it provides a basic understanding about the mechanisms of drug and gene delivery by these nanomaterials. Also reviewed is the recent progress on photosensitizers and theranostics using graphene-based nanomaterials. The biosafety of graphene at the cellular and animal levels is discussed. The challenges and perspectives of the field are addressed. PMID:25992450

  10. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  11. Delivery System, 2003-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This workshop guide for financial aid administrators provides training in the federal student financial aid delivery system. An introduction enables the participant to share some information about his or her responsibilities and to reflect on the relevance of the training to the job. Session 1, "Application Systems," identifies methods of applying…

  12. Surfactant Delivery into the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James; Filoche, Marcel

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a multiscale, compartmentalized model of surfactant and liquid delivery into the lung. Assuming liquid plug propagation, the airway compartment accounts for the plug's volume deposition (coating) on the airway wall, while the bifurcation compartment accounts for plug splitting from the parent airway to the two daughter airways. Generally the split is unequal due to gravity and geometry effects. Both the deposition ratio RD (deposition volume/airway volume), and the splitting ratio, RS, of the daughters volumes are solved independently from one another. Then they are used in a 3D airway network geometry to achieve the distribution of delivery into the lung. The airway geometry is selected for neonatal as well as adult applications, and can be advanced from symmetric, to stochastically asymmetric, to personalized. RD depends primarily on the capillary number, Ca, while RS depends on Ca, the Reynolds number, Re, the Bond number, Bo, the dose volume, VD, and the branch angles. The model predicts the distribution of coating on the airway walls and the remaining plug volume delivered to the alveolar region at the end of the tree. Using this model, we are able to simulate and test various delivery protocols, in order to optimize delivery and improve the respiratory function.

  13. Document Delivery over the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses three innovative Internet-based electronic document delivery systems: Ariel, developed by the Research Libraries Group; Digitized Document Transmission Project, developed by North Carolina State University; and Network Fax Project, developed by Ohio State University. System are compared in terms of equipment, operation, advantages and…

  14. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  15. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  16. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  17. Special Delivery Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    The Special Delivery Systems project developed a curriculum for students with learning disabilities (LD) in an adult basic education program. The curriculum was designed to assist and motivate the students in the educational process. Fourteen students with LD were recruited and screened. The curriculum addressed varied learning styles combined…

  18. New Reference: Diversifying Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Imogen

    This paper describes the experiences of a recent change process that focused on the delivery of reference services at the University of Western Australia (UWA). UWA reference librarians felt that they could not fulfill all of their duties while working from the reference desk for a significant period of time each day; they wanted time away from…

  19. Delivery systems for intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Jarrahian, C; Zehrung, D; Mitragotri, S; Prausnitz, M R

    2012-01-01

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination can offer improved immunity and simpler logistics of delivery, but its use in medicine is limited by the need for simple, reliable methods of ID delivery. ID injection by the Mantoux technique requires special training and may not reliably target skin, but is nonetheless used currently for BCG and rabies vaccination. Scarification using a bifurcated needle was extensively used for smallpox eradication, but provides variable and inefficient delivery into the skin. Recently, ID vaccination has been simplified by introduction of a simple-to-use hollow microneedle that has been approved for ID injection of influenza vaccine in Europe. Various designs of hollow microneedles have been studied preclinically and in humans. Vaccines can also be injected into skin using needle-free devices, such as jet injection, which is receiving renewed clinical attention for ID vaccination. Projectile delivery using powder and gold particles (i.e., gene gun) have also been used clinically for ID vaccination. Building off the scarification approach, a number of preclinical studies have examined solid microneedle patches for use with vaccine coated onto metal microneedles, encapsulated within dissolving microneedles or added topically to skin after microneedle pretreatment, as well as adapting tattoo guns for ID vaccination. Finally, technologies designed to increase skin permeability in combination with a vaccine patch have been studied through the use of skin abrasion, ultrasound, electroporation, chemical enhancers, and thermal ablation. The prospects for bringing ID vaccination into more widespread clinical practice are encouraging, given the large number of technologies for ID delivery under development. PMID:21472533

  20. Sterile Product Packaging and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both conventional and more advanced product container and delivery systems are the focus of this brief article. Six different product container systems will be discussed, plus advances in primary packaging for special delivery systems and needle technology. PMID:26891564

  1. Waste feed delivery test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    O'TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-09-30

    This plan documents the Waste Feed Delivery Program test and evaluation planning and implementation approach. The purpose of this document is to define and communicate the Waste Feed Delivery Program Test and Evaluation scope, objectives, planning and implementation approach.

  2. The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesler, Wilbert M.

    1987-01-01

    This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

  3. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  4. Flexible Delivery of Training. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    Research on flexible delivery of training in Australia since 1990 was reviewed to identify main trends in the delivery of training, the adequacy of research on the topic, and topics that should be addressed in future studies. Selected conclusions of the review are as follows: (1) flexible delivery strategies are valuable in facilitating access to…

  5. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  6. Teletex Based Electronic Document Delivery (Project HERMES).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amy, Susan J.

    1985-01-01

    Project HERMES is characterized by participation of publishers, industrial and public libraries, and national government, and by use of Teletex for both document ordering and delivery. Provision of three facilities (electronic document ordering and delivery, automatic document delivery, electronic mail) to pilot group of 60 organizations is…

  7. Osteogenesis imperfecta: cesarean deliveries in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Dinges, E; Ortner, C; Bollag, L; Davies, J; Landau, R

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a congenital disorder resulting in multiple fractures and extremely short stature, usually necessitating cesarean delivery. Identical twins with severe osteogenesis imperfecta each of whom underwent a cesarean delivery with different anesthetic modalities are presented. A review of the literature and anesthetic options for cesarean delivery and postoperative analgesia for women with osteogenesis imperfecta are discussed. PMID:25433579

  8. RNase non-sensitive and endocytosis independent siRNA delivery system: delivery of siRNA into tumor cells and high efficiency induction of apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xinglu; Wang, Guobao; Liu, Ru; Wang, Yaling; Wang, Yongkui; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-07-01

    To date, RNase degradation and endosome/lysosome trapping are still serious problems for siRNA-based molecular therapy, although different kinds of delivery formulations have been tried. In this report, a cell penetrating peptide (CPP, including a positively charged segment, a linear segment, and a hydrophobic segment) and a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are applied together by a simple method to act as a siRNA delivery system. The siRNAs first form a complex with the positively charged segment of CPP via electrostatic forces, and the siRNA-CPP further coats the surface of the SWCNT via hydrophobic interactions. This siRNA delivery system is non-sensitive to RNase and can avoid endosome/lysosome trapping in vitro. When this siRNA delivery system is studied in Hela cells, siRNA uptake was observed in 98% Hela cells, and over 70% mRNA of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is knocked down, triggering cell apoptosis on a significant scale. Our siRNA delivery system is easy to handle and benign to cultured cells, providing a very efficient approach for the delivery of siRNA into the cell cytosol and cleaving the target mRNA therein.

  9. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein-Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  10. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  11. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  12. Detection and determination of solute carbon in grain interior to correlate with the overall carbon content and grain size in ultra-low-carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiling; He, Yinsheng; Lee, Chan-Gyu; Lee, Byungho; Yoon, Jeongbong; Shin, Keesam

    2013-08-01

    In this study, every effort was exerted to determine and accumulate data to correlate microstructural and compositional elements in ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steels to variation of carbon content (12-44 ppm), manganese (0.18-0.36%), and sulfur (0.0066-0.001%). Quantitative analysis of the ULC steel using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and three-dimensional atom probe revealed the decrease of grain size and dislocation density with the increase of carbon contents and/or increase of the final delivery temperature. For a given carbon content, the grain interior carbon concentration increases as the grain size increases. PMID:23920177

  13. AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Schotz, S.; Calkins, J.; Gockel, B.; Ortiz, C.; Peter, R.

    2012-12-01

    AWIPS II Technology Infusion is a multiphase program. The first phase is the migration of the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and River Forecast Centers (RFCs) AWIPS I capabilities into a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), referred to as AWIPS II. AWIPS II is currently being deployed to Operational Test and Evaluation (OTE) and other select deployment sites. The subsequent phases of AWIPS Technology Infusion, known as AWIPS II Extended, include several projects that will improve technological capabilities of AWIPS II in order to enhance the NWS enterprise and improve services to partners. This paper summarizes AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery project and reports on its status. Data Delivery enables AWIPS II users to discover, subscribe and access web-enabled data provider systems including the capability to subset datasets by space, time and parameter.

  14. The transdermal delivery of fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E

    2013-08-01

    The fentanyl patch is one of the great commercial successes in transdermal drug delivery. The suitability of this molecule for delivery through skin had been identified in the 1970s, and subsequently, a number of transdermal formulations became available on the market. This article reviews the development of fentanyl patch technology with particular emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and disposition of the drug when delivered through the skin. The various patch designs are considered as well as the bioequivalence of the different designs. The influence of heat on fentanyl permeation is highlighted. Post-mortem redistribution of fentanyl is discussed in light of the reported discrepancies in serum levels reported in patients after death compared with therapeutic levels in living subjects. Finally, alternatives to patch technology are considered, and recent novel transdermal formulations are highlighted. PMID:23419814

  15. [CAESAREAN DELIVERY: STANDARDIZING THE PRACTICES].

    PubMed

    Thellier, Élise; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Caesarean delivery was performed in 20% of all deliveries in France in 2010 and this rate has remained unchanged during the last 10 years. Indications to perform this procedure are well defined, especially in case of scarred uterus, twin pregnancies, macrosomia or breech presentation. Surgical (haemorrhage, urinary or intestinal tract injury) and anaesthetic (hypotension after regional anaesthesia, difficult intubation and aspiration after general anaesthesia) complications may occur during the procedure. Complications may also be encountered in the early postoperative period (haemorrhage, infection, venous thromboembolism) but also on the long-term, such as placenta accreta or uterine rupture which may significantly impact obstetric outcomes. Enhanced recovery after surgery promotes early recovery and rapid convalescence. It simplifies nursing practice after surgery and is the first important step toward a patient- and family-centred care. PMID:27538322

  16. [Fetal macrosomia: mode of delivery].

    PubMed

    Tatarova, S; Popov, I; Khristova, P

    2004-01-01

    This study was provided among 1847 deliveries from January, 1 to December, 31, 2003. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" and the mode of delivery. We found that among the cases with birth weight > or = 4000 g and antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" the rate of cesarean section was fourfold higher than among the cases without such a diagnosis. There weren't statistically significant correlation between the cases with antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia " and the cases with estimated birth weight < or = 3999g in reference to the mother's age and weight, parity, fundal height and abdominal circumference. There are insignificant differences between both of groups in reference to gestacional age and birth. PMID:15669645

  17. Nanoparticle Delivery Enhancement With Acoustically Activated Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, Lee B; Phillips, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The application of microbubbles and ultrasound to deliver nanoparticle carriers for drug and gene delivery is an area that has expanded greatly in recent years. Under ultrasound exposure, microbubbles can enhance nanoparticle delivery by increasing cellular and vascular permeability. In this review, the underlying mechanisms of enhanced nanoparticle delivery with ultrasound and microbubbles and various proposed delivery techniques are discussed. Additionally, types of nanoparticles currently being investigated in preclinical studies, as well as the general limitations and benefits of a microbubble-based approach to nanoparticle delivery are reviewed. PMID:23287914

  18. Ultrasound-Targeted Retroviral Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sarah L.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Bush, Nigel L.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Porter, Colin D.

    2007-05-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of focused ultrasound to target retroviral gene delivery. Key to our experiments was the use of non-infectious virus particles lacking the envelope protein required for receptor-mediated entry. The novelty of our approach is that spatial control at a distance is exerted upon viral delivery by subsequent exposure to ultrasound, leading to stable gene delivery. The technology is ideally suited to controlling gene delivery in vivo following systemic vector administration. Our data provide a solution to the critical issue of obtaining tissue specificity with retroviral vectors and impart stability of expression to ultrasound-mediated gene delivery.

  19. Biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Trehan, A

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, emphasis is being laid to development of controlled release dosage forms. Interest in this technology has increased steadily over the past few years. Although oral administration of drugs is a widely accepted route of drug delivery, bioavailability of drug often varies as a result of gastrointestinal absorption, degradation by first-pass effect, and hostile environment of gastrointestinal tract. Transdermal administration for percutaneous absorption of drug is limited by the impermeable nature of the stratum corneum. Ocular and nasal delivery is also unfavorable because of degradation by enzymes present in eye tissues and nasal mucosa. Hence, the parenteral route is the most viable approach in such cases. Of the various ways of achieving long-term parenteral drug delivery, biodegradable microspheres are one of the better means of controlling the release of drug over a long time. Because of the lipidic nature of liposomes, problems such as limited physical stability and difficulty of freeze-drying are encountered. Similarly, for emulsions, stability on long-term basis and in suspensions, rheological changes during filling, injecting, and storage poses limitation. Also, in all these systems, the release rate cannot be tailored to the needs of the patient. Parenteral controlled-release formulations based on biodegradable microspheres can overcome these problems and can control the release of drug over a predetermined time span, usually in the order of days to weeks to months. Various FDA-approved controlled-release parenteral formulations based on these biodegradable microspheres are available on the market, including Lupron Depot Nutropin Depot and Zoladex. This review covers various molecules encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres for parenteral delivery. PMID:16566705

  20. Cyclodextrins in delivery systems: Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rai, Awani K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a family of cyclic oligosaccharides with a hydrophilic outer surface and a lipophilic central cavity. CD molecules are relatively large with a number of hydrogen donors and acceptors and, thus in general, they do not permeate lipophilic membranes. In the pharmaceutical industry, CDs have mainly been used as complexing agents to increase aqueous solubility of poorly soluble drugs and to increase their bioavailability and stability. CDs are used in pharmaceutical applications for numerous purposes, including improving the bioavailability of drugs. Current CD-based therapeutics is described and possible future applications are discussed. CD-containing polymers are reviewed and their use in drug delivery is presented. Of specific interest is the use of CD-containing polymers to provide unique capabilities for the delivery of nucleic acids. Studies in both humans and animals have shown that CDs can be used to improve drug delivery from almost any type of drug formulation. Currently, there are approximately 30 different pharmaceutical products worldwide containing drug/CD complexes in the market. PMID:21814436

  1. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems. PMID:19925443

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  3. Carbon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed.

  4. Use and influence of Delivery and Birth Plans in the humanizing delivery process1

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Cortés, María; Armero-Barranco, David; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel; Martínez-Roche, María Emilia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: get to know, analyze and describe the current situation of the Delivery and Birth Plans in our context, comparing the delivery and birth process between women who presented a Delivery and Birth Plan and those who did not. METHOD: quantitative and cross-sectional, observational, descriptive and comparative cohort study, carried out over two years. All women who gave birth during the study period were selected, including 9303 women in the study. RESULTS: 132 Delivery and Birth Plans were presented during the first year of study and 108 during the second. Among the variables analyzed, a significant difference was found in "skin to skin contact", "choice of dilation and delivery posture", "use of enema", "intake of foods or fluids", "eutocic deliveries", "late clamping of the umbilical cord" and "perineal shaving". CONCLUSIONS: the Delivery and Birth Plans positively influence the delivery process and its outcome. Health policies are needed to increase the number of Delivery and Birth Plans in our hospitals. PMID:26155015

  5. Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  6. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  7. A duplex "Gemini" prodrug of naltrexone for transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hammell, Dana C; Hamad, Mohamed; Vaddi, Haranath K; Crooks, Peter A; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2004-06-18

    Transdermal naltrexone delivery is desirable in the treatment of narcotic dependence and alcoholism. The purpose of this study was to increase the delivery rate of naltrexone (NTX) across human skin by using a novel prodrug. A duplex "gemini" prodrug of naltrexone was synthesized and evaluated. In vitro human skin permeation rates of naltrexone and prodrug were measured using a flow-through diffusion cell system. Drug concentrations in the skin were quantitated at the end of the diffusion experiment. The prodrug was hydrolyzed on passing through the skin and appeared mainly as naltrexone in the receiver compartment. The prodrug provided a significantly higher naltrexone equivalent flux across human skin in vitro than naltrexone base. The naltrexone equivalent solubilities of naltrexone and the prodrug in the donor solution were not significantly different. No significant increase in drug concentration in the skin after prodrug treatment, as compared to naltrexone, was observed. The naltrexone equivalent permeability from the prodrug exceeded the permeability of naltrexone base by two-fold. Due to the design of this prodrug, toxicities associated with this compound should be nonexistent, because only naltrexone and carbon dioxide (carbonic acid) are released when the prodrug is cleaved. PMID:15196755

  8. Targeting delivery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Dunnett, Stephen B; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to halt the neurodegenerative process and to stimulate the protection, repair, and regeneration of dopaminergic neurons, remain a vital but unmet clinical need. Targeting the delivery of current and new therapeutics directly to the diseased brain region (in particular the nigrostriatal pathway) could result in greater improvements in the motor functions that characterise PD. Here, we highlight some of the opportunities and challenges facing the development of the next generation of therapies for patients with PD. PMID:27312875

  9. Medical care delivery in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Don F.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the delivery of medical care in space. The history of aviation medicine is reviewed. Medical support for the early space programs is discussed, including the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab programs. The process of training crew members for basic medical procedures for the Space Shuttle program is briefly described and medical problems during the Shuttle program are noted. Plans for inflight medical care on the Space Station are examined, including the equipment planned for the Health Maintenance Facility, the use of exercise to help prevent medical problems.

  10. Evaluation of Retrofit Delivery Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2013-07-01

    Residential energy retrofit activities are a critical component of efforts to increase energy efficiency in the U.S. building stock; however, retrofits account for a small percentage of aggregate energy savings at relatively high per unit costs. This report by Building America research team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), describes barriers to widespread retrofits and evaluates opportunities to improve delivery of home retrofit measures by identifying economies of scale in marketing, energy assessments, and bulk purchasing through pilot programs in portions of Sonoma, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties, CA. These targeted communities show potential and have revealed key strategies for program design, as outlined in the report.

  11. Opportunities in respiratory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Giles, Rachael D

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease products are soon to be released onto the inhaled therapies market and differentiation between these devices will help them to gain market share over their competitors. Current legislation is directing healthcare towards being more efficient and cost-effective in order to continually provide quality care despite the challenges of aging populations and fewer resources. Devices and drugs that can be differentiated by producing improved patient outcomes would, therefore, be likely to win market share. In this perspective article, the current and potential opportunities for the successful delivery and differentiation of new inhaled drug products are discussed. PMID:25531928

  12. Soil Delivery to Phoenix Oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows a view from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager's left eye after delivery of soil to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), taken on the 12th Martian day after landing (Sol 12, June $6, 2008).

    Soil is visible on both sides of the open doors of TEGA's #4 oven. Sensors inside the device indicate no soil passed through the screen and into the oven.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Aptamers and aptamer targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Amy C.; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    When aptamers first emerged almost two decades ago, most were RNA species that bound and tagged or inhibited simple target ligands. Very soon after, the ‘selectionologists’ developing aptamer technology quickly realized more potential for the aptamer. In recent years, advances in aptamer techniques have enabled the use of aptamers as small molecule inhibitors, diagnostic tools and even therapeutics. Aptamers are now being employed in novel applications. We review, herein, some of the recent and exciting applications of aptamers in cell-specific recognition and delivery. PMID:19458497

  14. Lipid Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nonviral vectors which offer a safer and versatile alternative to viral vectors have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. However, their transfection efficacy or level of expression is substantially lower than viral vectors. Among various nonviral gene vectors, lipid nanoparticles are an ideal platform for the incorporation of safety and efficacy into a single delivery system. In this chapter, we highlight current lipidic vectors that have been developed for gene therapy of tumors and other diseases. The pharmacokinetic, toxic behaviors and clinic trials of some successful lipids particles are also presented. PMID:25409602

  15. Planning health care delivery systems.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, M A; Bergwall, D F; Reeves, P N

    1975-01-01

    The increasing concern and interest in the health delivery system in the United States has placed the health system planners in a difficult position. They are inadequately prepared, in many cases, to deal with the management techniques that have been designed for use with system problems. This situation has been compounded by the failure, until recently, of educational programs to train new health professionals in these techniques. Computer simulation is a technique that allows the planners dynamic feedback on his proposed plans. This same technique provides the planning student with a better understanding of the systems planning process. PMID:1115292

  16. Parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to cells employing nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli V; Griffin, Guy D; Guillorn, Michael A; Merkulov, Vladimir L; Simpson, Michael L

    2015-03-31

    Systems and methods are described for parallel macromolecular delivery and biochemical/electrochemical interface to whole cells employing carbon nanostructures including nanofibers and nanotubes. A method includes providing a first material on at least a first portion of a first surface of a first tip of a first elongated carbon nanostructure; providing a second material on at least a second portion of a second surface of a second tip of a second elongated carbon nanostructure, the second elongated carbon nanostructure coupled to, and substantially parallel to, the first elongated carbon nanostructure; and penetrating a boundary of a biological sample with at least one member selected from the group consisting of the first tip and the second tip.

  17. Molecular Diagnostic and Drug Delivery Agents based on Aptamer-Nanomaterial Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Heon; Yigit, Mehmet V.; Mazumdar, Debapriya; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in an emerging area of designing aptamer and nanomaterial conjugates as molecular diagnostic and drug delivery agents in biomedical applications is summarized. Aptamers specific for a wide range of targets are first introduced and compared to antibodies. Methods of integrating these aptamers with a variety of nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, each with unique optical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties, are reviewed. Applications of these systems as fluorescent, colorimetric, magnetic resonance imaging, and electrochemical sensors in medical diagnostics are given, along with new applications as smart drug delivery agents. PMID:20338204

  18. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  19. Physically facilitating drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge I; Ambure, Sunny; Shi, Zhi-Dong; Yuan, Yuyu; Sun, Wei; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Facilitated/modulated drug-delivery systems have emerged as a possible solution for delivery of drugs of interest to pre-allocated sites at predetermined doses for predefined periods of time. Over the past decade, the use of different physical methods and mechanisms to mediate drug release and delivery has grown significantly. This emerging area of research has important implications for development of new therapeutic drugs for efficient treatments. This review aims to introduce and describe different modalities of physically facilitating drug-delivery systems that are currently in use for cancer and other diseases therapy. In particular, delivery methods based on ultrasound, electrical, magnetic and photo modulations are highlighted. Current uses and areas of improvement for these different physically facilitating drug-delivery systems are discussed. Furthermore, the main advantages and drawbacks of these technologies reviewed are compared. The review ends with a speculative viewpoint of how research is expected to evolve in the upcoming years. PMID:22485192

  20. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  1. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye. PMID:26501994

  2. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  3. Transdermal delivery of insulin via microneedles.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Roger J

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, also known as Type 1 diabetes mellitus, requires delivery of exogenous insulin via injection or pump. An alternative to syringe-based subcutaneous delivery of insulin involves use of microneedles. These < 300 μm diameter, 50-900 μm long needle shaped devices may be used for intradermal delivery of insulin. Benefits associated with microneedle-based delivery of insulin include minimal training for use, painless insertion, as well as the potential to combine microneedles with sensors and drug delivery devices to create an autonomous artificial pancreas. In this review, the efforts of academic and industrial researchers over the past decade to examine the functionality of microneedles for delivery of insulin, including insulin-containing nanomaterials, via in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies are considered. PMID:25992456

  4. Hydrogen production and delivery analysis in US markets : cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Gillette, J.; Elgowainy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen production cost conclusions are: (1) Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) is the least-cost production option at current natural gas prices and for initial hydrogen vehicle penetration rates, at high production rates, SMR may not be the least-cost option; (2) Unlike coal and nuclear technologies, the cost of natural gas feedstock is the largest contributor to SMR production cost; (3) Coal- and nuclear-based hydrogen production have significant penalties at small production rates (and benefits at large rates); (4) Nuclear production of hydrogen is likely to have large economies of scale, but because fixed O&M costs are uncertain, the magnitude of these effects may be understated; and (5) Given H2A default assumptions for fuel prices, process efficiencies and labor costs, nuclear-based hydrogen is likely to be more expensive to produce than coal-based hydrogen. Carbon taxes and caps can narrow the gap. Hydrogen delivery cost conclusions are: (1) For smaller urban markets, compressed gas delivery appears most economic, although cost inputs for high-pressure gas trucks are uncertain; (2) For larger urban markets, pipeline delivery is least costly; (3) Distance from hydrogen production plant to city gate may change relative costs (all results shown assume 100 km); (4) Pipeline costs may be reduced with system 'rationalization', primarily reductions in service pipeline mileage; and (5) Liquefier and pipeline capital costs are a hurdle, particularly at small market sizes. Some energy and greenhouse gas Observations: (1) Energy use (per kg of H2) declines slightly with increasing production or delivery rate for most components (unless energy efficiency varies appreciably with scale, e.g., liquefaction); (2) Energy use is a strong function of production technology and delivery mode; (3) GHG emissions reflect the energy efficiency and carbon content of each component in a production-delivery pathway; (4) Coal and natural gas production pathways have high energy consumption

  5. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed. PMID:23170959

  6. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  7. Nitrogen-doped, carbon-rich, highly photoluminescent carbon dots from ammonium citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Xu, Minghan; Liu, Yun; He, Fengjiao; Gao, Feng; Su, Yanjie; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Yafei

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of water-soluble nitrogen-doped carbon dots has received great attention, due to their wide applications in oxygen reduction reaction, cell imaging, sensors, and drug delivery. Herein, nitrogen-doped, carbon-rich, highly photoluminescent carbon dots have been synthesized for the first time from ammonium citrate under hydrothermal conditions. The obtained nitrogen-doped carbon dots possess bright blue luminescence, short fluorescence lifetime, pH-sensitivity and excellent stability at a high salt concentration. They have potential to be used for pH sensors, cell imaging, solar cells, and photocatalysis.The synthesis of water-soluble nitrogen-doped carbon dots has received great attention, due to their wide applications in oxygen reduction reaction, cell imaging, sensors, and drug delivery. Herein, nitrogen-doped, carbon-rich, highly photoluminescent carbon dots have been synthesized for the first time from ammonium citrate under hydrothermal conditions. The obtained nitrogen-doped carbon dots possess bright blue luminescence, short fluorescence lifetime, pH-sensitivity and excellent stability at a high salt concentration. They have potential to be used for pH sensors, cell imaging, solar cells, and photocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The curve of photoluminescence and absorbance of N-doped CDs and quinine sulfate, and the table showing XPS detailed information. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05380f

  8. Mobilization of Aquatic Carbon from Permafrost: Tracking the Ancient Carbon Signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegl, R. G.; Walvoord, M. A.; Minsley, B. J.; Drake, T.; Aiken, G.; Wickland, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological and carbon biogeochemical responses to permafrost thaw are well recognized and documented for arctic and subarctic river systems and include increased infiltration, groundwater flow, stream base flow, and yield of mineralized dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). However, the anticipated concomitant signal of increased export of aged dissolved organic carbon (14C depleted DOC) is conspicuously small or absent at the river basin scale. Delivery of permafrost-derived DOC to stream and river networks is controlled by combinations of the amount of carbon stored in permafrost soils; hydrologic connectivity; subsurface physical conditions, including the potential for rapid thaw; and the chemical composition and degradability of the DOC released from permafrost. We examine these conditions in the discontinuous permafrost region of Yukon Flats, Alaska. Results indicate variable coupling among the factors controlling carbon release from permafrost, with greatest aged DOC source and biodegradability in regions that have low potential for immediate thaw or development of well-connected hydrologic networks. Conversely, regions having high potential for impending thaw and enhanced hydrologic connectivity tend to have smaller aged DOC sources and/or are dominated by modern DOC sources. This emphasizes the importance of the water-surface to atmosphere emission of permafrost carbon, with a majority of thawed permafrost organic carbon mineralizing to carbon gases in isolated thaw depressions, wetlands, and upland lakes and limited downstream delivery to river networks.

  9. Pulmonary delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Birchall, James

    2007-11-01

    The lung is an appropriate present and future target for gene therapy approaches designed to treat inherited monogenic diseases, eradicate bronchial tumours, transfer pharmacologically active products to the general circulation, express enzymes to catabolise toxins, manage pulmonary hypertension and lung injury and vaccinate against infection. Despite 35 years of gene therapy research and some significant milestones in molecular biology, the clinical potential of gene therapy has yet to be realised. In pulmonary gene therapy the nucleic acid cargo needs to be delivered to cells in the target region of the lung, and even in cases when these targets are well defined this is severely limited by the pulmonary architecture, clearance mechanisms, immune activation, the presence of respiratory mucus and the availability of a truly representative biological model. The challenge from a drug delivery perspective is to consider the suitability of conventional nebulisers and inhalers for delivering DNA to the lung and design and apply integrated formulation and device solutions specific to nucleic acid delivery. PMID:17970661

  10. Transungual delivery: deliberations and creeds.

    PubMed

    Thatai, P; Sapra, B

    2014-10-01

    Although considered as trifling illness, nail diseases have a reasonably high occurrence and a noteworthy impact on the patients' quality of life. Furthermore, there is a need to improve the topical treatment for nail diseases to avoid drug interactions and to reduce side effects associated with oral therapy. Topical drug delivery to the nails has established amplified consideration lately. Strategies (such as chemical enhancers, formulation strategies, physical and mechanical methods) are being investigated in order to improve drug permeability across the nail plate. The rationale of this review is to present contemporary information on the structure of human nail along with its comparison with animal hooves. Precincts of nail permeability have been briefly discussed with respect to factors like permeant's molecular size, hydrophilicity, charge and the nature of the vehicle. These factors affect drug uptake and permeation through the nail. Formulations like nail lacquers which mimic cosmetic varnish and colloidal carriers along with nail substitutes that can be utilized for transungual delivery have also been discussed. PMID:24888698

  11. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate. PMID:22149347

  12. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  13. "Programmed packaging" for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, M; Sakurai, Y; Akita, H; Harashima, H

    2014-11-10

    We report on the development of a multifunctional envelope-type nano device (MEND) based on our packaging concept "Programmed packaging" to control not only intracellular trafficking but also the biodistribution of encapsulated compounds such as nucleic acids/proteins/peptides. Our strategy for achieving this is based on molecular mechanisms of cell biology such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, etc. In this review, we summarize the concept of programmed packaging and discuss some of our recent successful examples of using MENDs. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was applied as a new methodology for identifying a new ligand toward cell or mitochondria. The delivery of siRNA to tumors and the tumor vasculature was achieved using pH sensitive lipid (YSK05), which was newly designed and optimized under in vivo conditions. The efficient delivery of pDNA to immune cells such as dendritic cells has also been developed using the KALA ligand, which can be a breakthrough technology for DNA vaccine. Finally, ss-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like surfactant (ssPalm) which is a lipid like material with pH-activatable and SS-cleavable properties is also introduced as a proof of our concept. PMID:24780263

  14. Integrin Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics is defined in the sense, that is, to maximize the therapeutic index of a chemotherapeutic agent by strictly localizing its pharmacological activity to the site or tissue of action. Integrins are a family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins involved in a wide range of cell-to-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-to-cell interactions. As cell surface receptors, integrins readily interact with extracellular ligands and play a vital role in angiogenesis, leukocytes function and tumor development, which sets up integrins as an excellent target for chemotherapy treatment. The peptide ligands containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), which displays a strong binding affinity and selectivity to integrins, particularly to integrin αvβ3, have been developed to conjugate with various conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as small molecules, peptides and proteins, and nanoparticle-carried drugs for integtrin targeted therapeutic studies. This review highlights the recent advances in integrin targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents with emphasis on target of integrin αvβ3, and describes the considerations for the design of the diverse RGD peptide-chemotherapeutics conjugates and their major applications. PMID:21547159

  15. Gantries and dose delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David; Psoroulas, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Particle therapy is a field in remarkable development, with the goal of increasing the number of indications which could benefit from such treatments and the access to the therapy. The therapeutic usage of a particle beam defines the technical requirements of all the elements of the therapy chain: we summarize the main characteristics of accelerators, the beam line, the treatment room, the integrated therapy and imaging systems used in particle therapy. Aiming at a higher flexibility in the choice of treatments, an increasing number of centers around the world have chosen to equip their treatment rooms with gantries, rotating beam line structures that allow a complete flexibility in the choice of the treatment angle. We review the current designs. A particle therapy gantry though is a quite expensive structure, and future development will increasingly consider reducing the cost and the footprint. Increasing the number of indications also means development in the delivery techniques and solving some of the issues which traditionally affected particle therapy, for example the precision of the delivery in presence of motion and the large penumbras for low depths. We show the current strategies in these fields, focusing on pencil beam scanning (PBS), and give some hints about future developments.

  16. Nasal drug delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Christoph; Suter-Zimmermann, Katja; Surber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal administration is an attractive option for local and systemic delivery of many therapeutic agents. The nasal mucosa is--compared to other mucosae--easily accessible. Intranasal drug administration is noninvasive, essentially painless and particularly suited for children. Application can be performed easily by patients or by physicians in emergency settings. Intranasal drug delivery offers a rapid onset of therapeutic effects (local or systemic). Nasal application circumvents gastrointestinal degradation and hepatic first-pass metabolism of the drug. The drug, the vehicle and the application device form an undividable triad. Its selection is therefore essential for the successful development of effective nasal products. This paper discusses the feasibility and potential of intranasal administration. A series of questions regarding (a) the intended use (therapeutic considerations), (b) the drug, (c) the vehicle and (d) the application device (pharmaceutical considerations) are addressed with a view to their impact on the development of products for nasal application. Current and future trends and perspectives are discussed. PMID:21325837

  17. Carbon Multicharged Ion Generation from Laser Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2014-10-01

    Multicharged ions (MCI) have potential uses in different areas such as microelectronics and medical physics. Carbon MCI therapy for cancer treatment is considered due to its localized energy delivery to hard-to-reach tumors at a minimal damage to surrounding tissues. We use a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 40 ns pulse width operated at 1064 nm to ablate a graphite target in ultrahigh vacuum. A time-of-flight energy analyzer followed by a Faraday cup is used to characterize the carbon MCI extracted from the laser plasma. The MCI charge state and energy distribution are obtained. With increase in the laser fluence, the ion charge states and ion energy are increased. Carbon MCI up to C+9 are observed along with carbon clusters. When an acceleration voltage is applied between the carbon target and a grounded mesh, ion extraction is observed to increase with the applied voltage. National Science Foundation.

  18. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  19. Payment for deliveries in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, N. C.; Birkett, N. J.; Sengeh, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The type and amount of payment for deliveries were investigated in 1982 during a survey on health status in two districts. Data on the payments made for 83.5% of the 2591 deliveries in 535 randomly selected study villages showed that the most common method of payment was in cash only. Payments in kind were mostly given to trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs) (for 38.1% of their deliveries) and rare for professional staff (2.9% of deliveries). The total amount paid for a delivery differed significantly with the type of birth attendant (P less than 0.00001) and the place of delivery (hospital, peripheral health unit or home) (P less than 0.00001). The total average payment for a delivery was highest for professional birth attendants (Le 16.60) and lowest for untrained TBAs (Le 4.85) (Le 2 = approx. US+ 1 at the time of the study). The outcome of a delivery had a significant effect on the amount paid. Payments were significantly higher for stillbirths than for live births among professional and auxiliary birth attendants (P less than 0.0001). However, the trained and untrained TBAs received less payment for stillbirths (Le 2.25) than for live births (Le 4.89) (P = 0.0146). The results show that there are several levels of financial disincentives for pregnant women requiring the services of trained auxiliary or professional health workers at the time of delivery. PMID:2787215

  20. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes. PMID:26353470

  1. Fibrin Glue as a Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Patrick P.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin glue has been used surgically for decades for hemostasis as well as a sealant. It has also been researched as both a gel for cell delivery and a vehicle for drug delivery. The drug delivery applications for fibrin glue span tissue engineering to chemotherapy and involve several mechanisms for drug matrix interactions and control of release kinetics. Additionally, drugs or factors can be loaded in the gel via impregnation and tethering to the gel through covalent linkages or affinity based systems. This review highlights recent research of fibrin glue as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:20637815

  2. Vaccine Delivery Methods into the Future

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2016-01-01

    Several modes of vaccine delivery have been developed in the last 25 years, which induce strong immune responses in pre-clinical models and in human clinical trials. Some modes of delivery include, adjuvants (aluminum hydroxide, Ribi formulation, QS21), liposomes, nanoparticles, virus like particles, immunostimulatory complexes (ISCOMs), dendrimers, viral vectors, DNA delivery via gene gun, electroporation or Biojector 2000, cell penetrating peptides, dendritic cell receptor targeting, toll-like receptors, chemokine receptors and bacterial toxins. There is an enormous amount of information and vaccine delivery methods available for guiding vaccine and immunotherapeutics development against diseases. PMID:27043641

  3. Superhydrophobic materials for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohe, Stefan Thomas

    Superhydrophobicity is a property of material surfaces reflecting the ability to maintain air at the solid-liquid interface when in contact with water. These surfaces have characteristically high apparent contact angles, by definition exceeding 150°, as a result of the composite material-air surface formed under an applied water droplet. Superhydrophobic surfaces were first discovered on naturally occurring substrates, and have subsequently been fabricated in the last several decades to harness these favorable surface properties for a number of emerging applications, including their use in biomedical settings. This work describes fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic 3D materials, as well as their use as drug delivery devices. Superhydrophobic 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces in that air is maintained not just at the surface of the material, but also within the bulk. When the superhydrophobic 3D materials are submerged in water, water infiltrates slowly and continuously as a new water-air-material interface is formed with controlled displacement of air. Electrospinning and electrospraying are used to fabricate superhydrophobic 3D materials utilizing blends of the biocompatible polymers poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(caprolactone-co-glycerol monostearate) (PGC-C18). PGC-C18 is significantly more hydrophobic than PCL (contact angle of 116° versus 83° for flat materials), and further additions of PGC-C18 into electrospun meshes and electrosprayed coatings affords increased stability of the entrapped air layer. For example, PCL meshes alone (500 mum thick) take 10 days to fully wet, and with 10% or 30% PGC-C18 addition wetting rates are dramatically slowed to 60% wetted by 77 days and 4% by 75 days, respectively. Stability of the superhydrophobic materials can be further probed with a variety of physio-chemical techniques, including pressure, surfactant containing solutions, and solvents of varying surface tension

  4. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Jean; Khang, Dongwoo

    2012-01-01

    The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets) of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen. PMID:22915854

  5. Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall. Integrated delivery systems are going through changes that are focusing the provider organizations more on delivering care than managing risk, says Dean C. Coddington, one of the leading researchers into capitated organizations and a senior consultant with McManis Consulting in Denver. PMID:15889632

  6. 76 FR 77483 - Nationwide Change in Postal Delivery Service Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Nationwide Change in Postal Delivery Service Standards AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice... pair service standards would be modified to move overnight delivery to 2-day delivery, and to move a portion of 2-day delivery to 3-day delivery. Id. at 1. Although changes to service standards...

  7. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  8. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  9. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  10. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  11. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  12. Carrier Deformability in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Maria Jose; Romero, Eder Lilia

    2016-01-01

    Deformability is a key property of drug carriers used to increase the mass penetration across the skin without disrupting the lipid barrier. Highly deformable vesicles proved to be more effective than conventional liposomes in delivering drugs into and across the mammalian skin upon topical non occlusive application. In the past five years, highly deformable vesicles have been used for local delivery of drugs on joint diseases, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, would healing, psoriasis, scar treatment, fungal, bacteria and protozoa infections. Promising topical vaccination strategies rely also in this type of carriers. Here we provide an overview on the main structural and mechanical features of deformable vesicles, to finish with an extensive update on their latest preclinical applications. PMID:26675226

  13. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  14. Integrated delivery systems. Evolving oligopolies.

    PubMed

    Malone, T A

    1998-01-01

    The proliferation of Integrated Delivery Systems (IDSs) in regional health care markets has resulted in the movement of these markets from a monopolistic competitive model of behavior to an oligopoly. An oligopoly is synonymous with competition among the few, as a small number of firms supply a dominant share of an industry's total output. The basic characteristics of a market with competition among the few are: (1) A mutual interdependence among the actions and behaviors of competing firms; (2) competition tends to rely on the differentiation of products; (3) significant barriers to entering the market exist; (4) the demand curve for services may be kinked; and (5) firms can benefit from economies of scale. An understanding of these characteristics is essential to the survival of IDSs as regional managed care markets mature. PMID:10180497

  15. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  16. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  17. Nanostructures for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pachioni-Vasconcelos, Juliana de Almeida; Lopes, André Moreni; Apolinário, Alexsandra Conceição; Valenzuela-Oses, Johanna Karina; Costa, Juliana Souza Ribeiro; Nascimento, Laura de Oliveira; Pessoa, Adalberto; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Use of nanoscale devices as carriers for drugs and imaging agents has been extensively investigated and successful examples can already be found in therapy. In parallel, recombinant DNA technology together with molecular biology has opened up numerous possibilities for the large-scale production of many proteins of pharmaceutical interest, reflecting in the exponentially growing number of drugs of biotechnological origin. When we consider protein drugs, however, there are specific criteria to take into account to select adequate nanostructured systems as drug carriers. In this review, we highlight the main features, advantages, drawbacks and recent developments of nanostructures for protein encapsulation, such as nanoemulsions, liposomes, polymersomes, single-protein nanocapsules and hydrogel nanoparticles. We also discuss the importance of nanoparticle stabilization, as well as future opportunities and challenges in nanostructures for protein drug delivery. PMID:26580477

  18. Evaluating Student Perceptions of Course Delivery Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramorski, Tom; Madan, Manu S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate effectiveness of course delivery mode on three dimensions: values, networking opportunities and learning. While students and their future employers are two important customers for the business program, we focus on the perception of students regarding the effectiveness of course delivery mode on program performance. The…

  19. Information Delivery Options over Three Decades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, H. Edward

    1986-01-01

    The rate of new technology-driven innovations for information delivery has accelerated over the past three decades. New information delivery formats in the 1950s and 1960s included microforms and, in response to demands from librarians, indexing and abstracting services began to make their publications available on this medium. Electronic…

  20. Toward Effective Science Delivery among Recreation Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Arielle; Schneider, Ingrid E.

    2016-01-01

    Effective science delivery to practitioners can improve recreation experiences and environmental educational outcomes. This project explored U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service recreation personnel's research-based information sources, constraints to access and use of research, and opinions about how to improve science delivery to…

  1. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  2. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  3. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  4. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  5. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  6. 77 FR 44306 - Service Delivery Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Service Delivery Plan AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: We are requesting public input as we develop our Service Delivery Plan (SDP). We...) Deliver quality disability decisions and services; (2) provide quality service to the public; (3)...

  7. 78 FR 15797 - Service Delivery Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... provide the best possible service. (77 FR 44306 (2012)). We have incorporated those suggestions into this... ADMINISTRATION Service Delivery Plan AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: We are requesting public input as we finalize our Service Delivery Plan (SDP)....

  8. Negotiating the Digital Library: Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Neil; Morris, Anne

    1999-01-01

    The eLib-funded FIDDO (Focused Investigation of Document Delivery Options) project provides library managers/others with information to support policy decisions. Senior libraries were interviewed about the future of document delivery and interviews were analyzed with the support of NUD*IST (Nonnumerical Unstructured Data by Indexing, Searching and…

  9. Delivery system for laser medical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Cerny, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2003-10-01

    Investigation of the special constructed hollow glass waveguides was realized. Maximum mean power transmitted via this delivery system was 5.8 W (for alexandrite radiation) or 5.1 W (for mid infrared Er.YAG light). Maximum output intensity 173 GW/cm2 was reached for delivery of 55 psec long Nd:YAG pulses.

  10. Seven Steps to On-Time Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konchar, Mark; Sanvido, Victor

    1999-01-01

    Describes seven steps to consider when making project-delivery decisions that include defining the school district's goals and profile, selecting the project-delivery system and procurement method, selecting the project team and contract type, and developing and confirming the facility program. Concluding comments address the district review of…

  11. 12 CFR 18.8 - Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Delivery. 18.8 Section 18.8 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.8 Delivery. Each national bank shall, after receiving a request for an...

  12. 12 CFR 350.8 - Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Delivery. 350.8 Section 350.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY FDIC-INSURED STATE NONMEMBER BANKS § 350.8 Delivery. Each bank shall,...

  13. Health Service Delivery in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benyoussef, Amor

    1977-01-01

    Reviews recent work dealing with methodological and technical issues in health and development; presents examples of the application of social sciences, including health demography and economics, in questions of health services delivery; and analyzes delivery of health services to rural and nomadic populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.…

  14. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases. PMID:24325540

  15. Development of the Choctaw Health Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Binh N.

    The Choctaw Tribe is the first and only tribe to develop a health delivery system to take over an existing Indian Health Service inpatient facility. The takeover was accomplished in January 1984 under the Indian Self-Determination Act through a contract with the Indian Health Service. The Choctaw Health Delivery System includes a 35-bed general…

  16. Preparing a Course for Distance Education Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Thomas A.

    Duquesne University (Pennsylvania) has committed to the electronic delivery of an MBA (Masters in Business Administration) program to Northern Jiaotong University in Beijing, China. This paper describes the process of preparing a course for electronic delivery, along with related course preparation issues. The university's partnership with…

  17. International Document Delivery: The ADONIS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Barrie; Campbell, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a project to test whether publishers can gain copyright revenue by supplying their journals in machine readable form for document delivery centers. Areas discussed include technical considerations; document delivery centers involved; workstation development; and statistical analyses to be reported at the end of the…

  18. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100 nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  19. Nanomeniscus-induced delivery of liquid solutions for diverse nanofiber fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Kim, Bongsu; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Jongwoo; Ahn, Heejoon; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-07-01

    Nanomaterial-delivery fabrication expects high-potential impacts on nanoscience, technology and industry, but still faces limited applicability mainly due to high-field requirement for liquid delivery, complicated intermediate processes, and narrow ink selectivity. Here, we demonstrates a simple, non-template, non-contact and electric field-free fabrication of diverse nanofibers. The process consists of continuous, meniscus-assisted delivery of liquid solutions through a nanoapertured nozzle in ambient conditions, followed by subsequent evaporation of liquid and aggregation of nanoparticle residues. For example, the carbon-nanotube nanofibers of 500 nm diameter exhibit a high shear modulus of ~1.5 GPa and current density up to 104 A/cm2. The results provide a unique, universal and versatile tool with wide selectivity in both ink and substrate.

  20. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  1. Oral delivery of proteins: progress and prognostication.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rakhi B; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Khan, Mansoor A

    2002-01-01

    The delivery of proteins has gained momentum with the development of biotechnology sector that provided large-scale availability of therapeutic proteins. The availability is mostly due to the advances in recombinant DNA technology. The low oral bioavailability, however, continues to be a problem for several proteins because of their large molecular size, low permeation through biological membranes, and susceptibility to molecular changes in both biological and physical environments. The demand for effective delivery of proteins by the oral route has brought a tremendous thrust in recent years both in the scope and complexity of drug delivery technology. The important therapeutic proteins and peptides being explored for oral delivery include insulin, calcitonin, interferons, human growth hormone, glucagons, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, enkephalins, vaccines, enzymes, hormone analogs, and enzyme inhibitors. This article reviews the progress in oral delivery of these proteins, provides comments on the strategies to improve their oral bioavailability, and highlights their current market trends. PMID:12197608

  2. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. PMID:27235607

  3. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  4. Cyclodextrins in non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are naturally occurring cyclic oligosaccharides. They consist of (α-1,4)-linked glucose units, and possess a basket-shaped topology with an "inner-outer" amphiphilic character. Over the years, substantial efforts have been undertaken to investigate the possible use of CDs in drug delivery and controlled drug release, yet the potential of CDs in gene delivery has received comparatively less discussion in the literature. In this article, we will first discuss the properties of CDs for gene delivery, followed by a synopsis of the use of CDs in development and modification of non-viral gene carriers. Finally, areas that are noteworthy in CD-based gene delivery will be highlighted for future research. Due to the application prospects of CDs, it is anticipated that CDs will continue to emerge as an important tool for vector development, and will play significant roles in facilitating non-viral gene delivery in the forthcoming decades. PMID:24103652

  5. Mode of delivery and subsequent fertility

    PubMed Central

    Evers, E.C.; McDermott, K.C.; Blomquist, J.L.; Handa, V.L.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION When compared with vaginal delivery, is Cesarean delivery associated with reduced childbearing, a prolonged inter-birth interval or infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER Women whose first delivery was by Cesarean section were not significantly different from those who delivered vaginally with respect to subsequent deliveries, inter-birth interval or infertility after delivery. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Some studies have suggested that delivery by Cesarean section reduces subsequent fertility, while others have reported no association. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a planned secondary analysis of the Mothers' Outcomes After Delivery study, a longitudinal cohort study. This analysis included 956 women with 1835 deliveries, who completed a study questionnaire at 6–11 years (median [interquartile range]: 8.1 [7.1, 9.8]) after their first delivery. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Exclusion criteria regarding the first birth were: maternal age <15 or >50 years, delivery at <37 weeks gestation, placenta previa, multiple gestation, known fetal congenital abnormality, stillbirth, prior myomectomy and abruption. Of the 956 women included, the first delivery was by Cesarean section for 534 women and by vaginal birth for 422 women. Infertility was self-reported. To compare maternal characteristics by mode of first delivery, P-values were calculated using Fisher's exact test or Pearson's χ2 test for categorical variables and a Kruskall–Wallis test for continuous variables. We also considered whether, across all deliveries to date, a prior Cesarean is associated with decreased fertility. In this analysis, self-reported infertility after each delivery (across all participants) was considered as a function of one or more prior Cesarean births, using generalized estimating equations to control for within-woman correlation. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE No differences were observed between the Cesarean and vaginal groups (for first delivery) with respect

  6. Delivery materials for siRNA therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasty, Rosemary; Dorkin, Joseph Robert; Vegas, Arturo; Anderson, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has broad potential as a therapeutic to reversibly silence any gene. To achieve the clinical potential of RNAi, delivery materials are required to transport short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the site of action in the cells of target tissues. This Review provides an introduction to the biological challenges that siRNA delivery materials aim to overcome, as well as a discussion of the way that the most effective and clinically advanced classes of siRNA delivery systems, including lipid nanoparticles and siRNA conjugates, are designed to surmount these challenges. The systems that we discuss are diverse in their approaches to the delivery problem, and provide valuable insight to guide the design of future siRNA delivery materials.

  7. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition. PMID:27580019

  8. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  9. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  10. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects. PMID:27483234

  11. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  12. From Lab to Fab: Developing a Nanoscale Delivery Tool for Scalable Nanomanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Asmahan A.

    The emergence of nanomaterials with unique properties at the nanoscale over the past two decades carries a capacity to impact society and transform or create new industries ranging from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine. However, a gap in nanomanufacturing technologies has prevented the translation of nanomaterial into real-world commercialized products. Bridging this gap requires a paradigm shift in methods for fabricating structured devices with a nanoscale resolution in a repeatable fashion. This thesis explores the new paradigms for fabricating nanoscale structures devices and systems for high throughput high registration applications. We present a robust and scalable nanoscale delivery platform, the Nanofountain Probe (NFP), for parallel direct-write of functional materials. The design and microfabrication of NFP is presented. The new generation addresses the challenges of throughput, resolution and ink replenishment characterizing tip-based nanomanufacturing. To achieve these goals, optimized probe geometry is integrated to the process along with channel sealing and cantilever bending. The capabilities of the newly fabricated probes are demonstrated through two type of delivery: protein nanopatterning and single cell nanoinjection. The broad applications of the NFP for single cell delivery are investigated. An external microfluidic packaging is developed to enable delivery in liquid environment. The system is integrated to a combined atomic force microscope and inverted fluorescence microscope. Intracellular delivery is demonstrated by injecting a fluorescent dextran into Hela cells in vitro while monitoring the injection forces. Such developments enable in vitro cellular delivery for single cell studies and high throughput gene expression. The nanomanufacturing capabilities of NFPs are explored. Nanofabrication of carbon nanotube-based electronics presents all the manufacturing challenges characterizing of assembling nanomaterials precisely onto devices. The

  13. 77 FR 10529 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Delivery Schedules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Delivery Schedules AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General Services... requirement concerning delivery schedules. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this...- 0043, Delivery Schedules by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  14. Leveraging socially networked mobile ICT platforms for the last-mile delivery problem.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kyo; Smith, Timothy; Linhoff, Michelle

    2012-09-01

    Increasing numbers of people are managing their social networks on mobile information and communication technology (ICT) platforms. This study materializes these social relationships by leveraging spatial and networked information for sharing excess capacity to reduce the environmental impacts associated with "last-mile" package delivery systems from online purchases, particularly in low population density settings. Alternative package pickup location systems (PLS), such as a kiosk on a public transit platform or in a grocery store, have been suggested as effective strategies for reducing package travel miles and greenhouse gas emissions, compared to current door-to-door delivery models (CDS). However, our results suggest that a pickup location delivery system operating in a suburban setting may actually increase travel miles and emissions. Only once a social network is employed to assist in package pickup (SPLS) are significant reductions in the last-mile delivery distance and carbon emissions observed across both urban and suburban settings. Implications for logistics management's decades-long focus on improving efficiencies of dedicated distribution systems through specialization, as well as for public policy targeting carbon emissions of the transport sector are discussed. PMID:22877137

  15. Gastroretentive delivery systems: hollow beads.

    PubMed

    Talukder, R; Fassihi, R

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a floatable multiparticulate system with potential for intragastric sustained drug delivery. Cross-linked beads were made by using calcium and low methoxylated pectin (LMP), which is an anionic polysaccharide, and calcium, LMP, and sodium alginate. Beads were dried separately in an air convection type oven at 40 degrees C for 6 hours and in a freeze dryer to evaluate the changes in bead characteristics due to process variability. Riboflavin (B-2), tetracycline (TCN), and Methotrexate (MTX) were used as model drugs for encapsulation. Ionic and nonionic excipients were added to study their effects on the release profiles of the beads. The presence of noncross linking agents in low amounts (less than 2%) did not significantly interfere with release kinetics. For an amphoteric drug like TCN, which has pH dependent solubility, three different pHs (1.5, 5.0, and 8.0) of cross-linking media were used to evaluate the effects of pH on the drug entrapment capacity of the beads. As anticipated, highest entrapment was possible when cross-linking media pH coincided with least drug solubility. Evaluation of the drying process demonstrated that the freeze-dried beads remained buoyant over 12 hours in United States Pharmacopeia (USP) hydrochloride buffer at pH 1.5, whereas the air-dried beads remained submerged throughout the release study. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the presence of air-filled hollow spaces inside the freeze dried beads, which was responsible for the flotation property of the beads. However, the release kinetics from freeze dried beads was independent of hydrodynamic conditions. Calcium-pectinate-alginate beads released their contents at much faster rates than did calcium-pectinate beads (100% in 10 hours vs. 50% in 10 hours). It appears that the nature of cross-linking, drying method, drug solubility, and production approach are all important and provide the opportunity and potential for development of a

  16. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  17. Development of protein mimics for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Tew, Gregory N

    2015-07-01

    Designing delivery agents for therapeutics is an ongoing challenge. As treatments and desired cargoes become more complex, the need for improved delivery vehicles becomes critical. Excellent delivery vehicles must ensure the stability of the cargo, maintain the cargo's solubility, and promote efficient delivery and release. In order to address these issues, many research groups have looked to nature for design inspiration. Proteins, such as HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (TAT) and Antennapedia homeodomain protein, are capable of crossing cellular membranes. However, due to the complexities of their structures, they are synthetically challenging to reproduce in the laboratory setting. Being able to incorporate the key features of these proteins that enable cell entry into simpler scaffolds opens up a wide range of opportunities for the development of new delivery reagents with improved performance. This review charts the development of protein mimics based on cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and how structure-activity relationships (SARs) with these molecules and their protein counterparts ultimately led to the use of polymeric scaffolds. These scaffolds deviate from the normal peptide backbone, allowing for simpler, synthetic procedures to make carriers and tune chemical compositions for application specific needs. Successful design of polymeric protein mimics would allow researchers to further understand the key features in proteins and peptides necessary for efficient delivery and to design the next generation of more efficient delivery reagents. PMID:25858701

  18. Oral insulin delivery: how far are we?

    PubMed

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The mainbarriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  19. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system. PMID:25006687

  20. Recent advances in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Achouri, Djamila; Alhanout, Kamel; Piccerelle, Philippe; Andrieu, Véronique

    2013-11-01

    Amongst the various routes of drug delivery, the field of ocular drug delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing the pharmaceutical scientist. Recent research has focused on the characteristic advantages and limitations of the various drug delivery systems, and further research will be required before the ideal system can be developed. Administration of drugs to the ocular region with conventional delivery systems leads to short contact time of the formulations on the epithelium and fast elimination of drugs. This transient residence time involves poor bioavailability of drugs which can be explained by the tear production, non-productive absorption and impermeability of corneal epithelium. Anatomy of the eye is shortly presented and is connected with ophthalmic delivery and bioavailability of drugs. In the present update on ocular dosage forms, chemical delivery systems such as prodrugs, the use of cyclodextrins to increase solubility of various drugs, the concept of penetration enhancers and other ocular drug delivery systems such as polymeric gels, bioadhesive hydrogels, in-situ forming gels with temperature-, pH-, or osmotically induced gelation, combination of polymers and colloidal systems such as liposomes, niosomes, cubosomes, microemulsions, nanoemulsions and nanoparticles are discussed. Novel ophthalmic delivery systems propose the use of many excipients to increase the viscosity or the bioadhesion of the product. New formulations like gels or colloidal systems have been tested with numerous active substances by in vitro and in vivo studies. Sustained drug release and increase in drug bioavailability have been obtained, offering the promise of innovation in drug delivery systems for ocular administration. Combining different properties of pharmaceutical formulations appears to offer a genuine synergy in bioavailability and sustained release. Promising results are obtained with colloidal systems which present very comfortable

  1. Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles. PMID:24163786

  2. Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J

    2013-02-18

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles. PMID:24163786

  3. Synthesis of CaCO3 Nanobelts for Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongmei; Peng, Haibao; Wang, Shilong; Zhu, Dazhang

    2015-05-01

    Nanobelt carriers have demonstrated some advantages such as good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and strain-accommodating properties. We prepared an optimized nanobelt carrier formulation for drug (etoposide) as an oral delivery system and estimated the potential of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanobelts. The nanobelts were prepared by the method of binary solvent approach and were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay test exhibited that etoposide-loaded calcium carbonate nanobelts (ECCNBs) showed a higher cell kill ratio against SGC-7901 cells compared with free drug. The apoptosis test and cell cycle test analysis revealed that etoposide entrapped in calcium carbonate nanobelts (CCNBs) could enhance the delivery efficiencies of drug and improved inhibition effect. The present findings demonstrated that ECCNBs might induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and cell apoptosis in a p53-related manner. It can be foreseen that CCNBs are a promising drug carrier to store the anti-cancer drug for cancer therapy and drug delivery.

  4. Synthesis of CaCO3 Nanobelts for Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongmei; Peng, Haibao; Wang, Shilong; Zhu, Dazhang

    2015-12-01

    Nanobelt carriers have demonstrated some advantages such as good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and strain-accommodating properties. We prepared an optimized nanobelt carrier formulation for drug (etoposide) as an oral delivery system and estimated the potential of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanobelts. The nanobelts were prepared by the method of binary solvent approach and were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay test exhibited that etoposide-loaded calcium carbonate nanobelts (ECCNBs) showed a higher cell kill ratio against SGC-7901 cells compared with free drug. The apoptosis test and cell cycle test analysis revealed that etoposide entrapped in calcium carbonate nanobelts (CCNBs) could enhance the delivery efficiencies of drug and improved inhibition effect. The present findings demonstrated that ECCNBs might induce cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and cell apoptosis in a p53-related manner. It can be foreseen that CCNBs are a promising drug carrier to store the anti-cancer drug for cancer therapy and drug delivery. PMID:26055480

  5. Developments in carbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  6. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Carbon nanomaterials in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Pu Chun; Qiao, Rui

    2007-09-01

    This paper intends to reflect, from the biophysical viewpoint, our current understanding on interfacing nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, with biological systems. Strategies for improving the solubility, and therefore, the bioavailability of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions are summarized. In particular, the underlining mechanisms of attaching biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes and gallic acids onto fullerenes are analyzed. The diffusion and the cellular delivery of RNA-coated carbon nanotubes are characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The translocation of fullerenes across cell membranes is simulated using molecular dynamics to offer new insight into the complex issue of nanotoxicity. To assess the fate of nanomaterials in the environment, the biomodification of lipid-coated carbon nanotubes by the aquatic organism Daphnia magna is discussed. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the need for adopting multidisciplinary approaches in the field study of nanomaterials in biological systems and in the environment.

  8. Monolayer coated gold nanoparticles for delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Subinoy; Bajaj, Avinash; Mout, Rubul; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) provide attractive vehicles for delivery of drugs, genetic materials, proteins, and small molecules. AuNPs feature low core toxicity coupled with the ability to parametrically control particle size and surface properties. In this review, we focus on engineering of the AuNP surface monolayer, highlighting recent advances in tuning monolayer structures for efficient delivery of drugs and biomolecules. This review covers two broad categories of particle functionalization, organic monolayers and biomolecule coatings, and discusses their applications in drug, DNA/RNA, protein and small molecule delivery. PMID:21925556

  9. Implantable Devices for Sustained, Intravesical Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In clinical settings, intravesical instillation of a drug bolus is often performed for the treatment of bladder diseases. However, it requires repeated instillations to extend drug efficacy, which may result in poor patient compliance. To alleviate this challenge, implantable devices have been developed for the purpose of sustained, intravesical drug delivery. In this review, we briefly summarize the current trend in the development of intravesical drug-delivery devices. We also introduce the most recently developed devices with strong potential for intravesical drug-delivery applications. PMID:27377941

  10. Reduced active thyroid hormone levels after delivery.

    PubMed

    Banovac, K; Kekić, M; Bzik, L; Skreb, F; Sekso, M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of delivery on the serum concentration of thyroid hormones was studied in 25 euthyroid women. After delivery serum free and total T3 and T4 fell transiently with a simultaneous increase in reverse T3 while serum TSH and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) concentrations showed no significant variation. These data suggest that i) similar to what happens in other stressful situations, delivery influences peripheral T4 metabolism, and ii) an elevation of TBG in serum in the early puerperium does not prevent these changes. PMID:6798093

  11. Calcium phosphate ceramics in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Edgington, Joe; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) particulates, cements and scaffolds have attracted significant interest as drug delivery vehicles. CaP systems, including both hydroxyapaptite and tricalcium phosphates, possess variable stoichiometry, functionality and dissolution properties which make them suitable for cellular delivery. Their chemical similarity to bone and thus biocompatibility, as well as variable surface charge density contribute to their controlled release properties. Among specific research areas, nanoparticle size, morphology, surface area due to porosity, and chemistry controlled release kinetics are the most active. This article discusses CaP systems in their particulate, cements, and scaffold forms for drug, protein, and growth factor delivery toward orthopedic and dental applications.

  12. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  13. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  14. Vectors for airway gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Pamela B; Cooper, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of genes to the airway epithelium for therapeutic purposes seemed easy at first, because the epithelial cells interface with the environment and are therefore accessible. However, problems encountered were more substantial than were originally expected. Nonviral systems may be preferred for long-term gene expression, for they can be dosed repeatedly. Two nonviral gene transfer systems have been in clinical trials, lipid-mediated gene transfer and DNA nanoparticles. Both have sufficient efficiency to be candidates for correction of the cystic fibrosis defect, and both can be dosed repeatedly. However, lipid-mediated gene transfer in the first generation provokes significant inflammatory toxicity, which may be engineered out by adjustments of the lipids, the plasmid CpG content, or both. Both lipid-mediated gene transfer and DNA nanoparticles in the first generation have short duration of expression, but reengineering of the plasmid DNA to contain mostly eukaryotic sequences may address this problem. Considerable advances in the understanding of the cellular uptake and expression of these agents and in their practical utility have occurred in the last few years; these advances are reviewed here. PMID:17408235

  15. Race, genes and preterm delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    High rates of preterm delivery (PTD) among African Americans are the leading cause of excess infant mortality among African Americans. Failure to fully explain racial disparity in PTD has led to speculation that genetic factors might contribute to this disparity. Current evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute to PTD, but this does not imply that genetic factors contribute to racial disparity in PTD. Environmental factors clearly contribute to PTD. Many of these factors acting over a women's life prior to pregnancy disproportionately affect African Americans and contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Thus, inferring genetic contribution to racial disparity in PTD by attempting to control for environmental factors measured at a single point in time is flawed. There is emerging evidence of gene-environment interactions for PTD, some of which disproportionately affect African Americans. There is also evidence of racial differences in the prevalence of polymorphisms potentially related to PTD. However, to date there is no direct evidence that these differences contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Given the complexity of polygenic conditions such as PTD, the possibility of any single gene contributing substantially to racial disparity in PTD seems remote. PMID:16334498

  16. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  17. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  18. Starch Applications for Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant and economical renewable biopolymers in nature. Starch molecules are high molecular weight polymers of D-glucose linked by α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) glycosidic bonds, forming linear (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) structures. Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches (OSA-starch) are designed by carefully choosing a proper starch source, path and degree of modification. This enables emulsion and micro-encapsulation delivery systems for oil based flavors, micronutrients, fragrance, and pharmaceutical actives. A large percentage of flavors are encapsulated by spray drying in today's industry due to its high throughput. However, spray drying encapsulation faces constant challenges with retention of volatile compounds, oxidation of sensitive compound, and manufacturing yield. Specialty OSA-starches were developed suitable for the complex dynamics in spray drying and to provide high encapsulation efficiency and high microcapsule quality. The OSA starch surface activity, low viscosity and film forming capability contribute to high volatile retention and low active oxidation. OSA starches exhibit superior performance, especially in high solids and high oil load encapsulations compared with other hydrocolloids. The submission is based on research and development of Ingredion

  19. Coated microneedles for transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harvinder S.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Coated microneedles have been shown to deliver proteins and DNA into the skin in a minimally invasive manner. However, detailed studies examining coating methods and their breadth of applicability are lacking. This study’s goal was to develop a simple, versatile and controlled microneedle coating process to make uniform coatings on microneedles and establish the breadth of molecules and particles that can be coated onto microneedles. First, microneedles were fabricated from stainless steel sheets as single microneedles or arrays of microneedles. Next, a novel micron-scale dip-coating process and a GRAS coating formulation were designed to reliably produce uniform coatings on both individual and arrays of microneedles. This process was used to coat compounds including calcein, vitamin B, bovine serum albumin and plasmid DNA. Modified vaccinia virus and microparticles of 1 to 20 μm diameter were also coated. Coatings could be localized just to the needle shafts and formulated to dissolve within 20 s in porcine cadaver skin. Histological examination validated that microneedle coatings were delivered into the skin and did not wipe off during insertion. In conclusion, this study presents a simple, versatile, and controllable method to coat microneedles with proteins, DNA, viruses and microparticles for rapid delivery into the skin. PMID:17169459

  20. Carbon Dioxide Laser Fiber Optics In Endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Terry A.

    1982-12-01

    Carbon dioxide laser surgery has been limited to a great extent to surgical application on the integument and accessible cavities such as the cervix, vagina, oral cavities, etc. This limitation has been due to the rigid delivery systems available to all carbon dioxide lasers. Articulating arms (series of hollow tubes connected by articulating mirrors) have provided an effective means of delivery of laser energy to the patient as long as the lesion was within the direct line of sight. Even direct line-of-sight applications were restricted to physical dimension of the articulating arm or associated hand probes, manipulators and hollow tubes. The many attempts at providing straight endoscopic systems to the laser only stressed the need for a fiber optic capable of carrying the carbon dioxide laser wavelength. Rectangular and circular hollow metal waveguides, hollow dielectric waveguides have proven ineffective to the stringent requirements of a flexible surgical delivery system. One large diameter (1 cm) fiber optic delivery system, incorporates a toxic thalliumAbased fiber optic material. The device is an effective alternative to an articulating arm for external or conventional laser surgery, but is too large and stiff to use as a flexible endoscopic tool. The author describes the first highly flexible inexpensive series of fiber optic systems suitable for either conventional or endoscopic carbon dioxide laser surgery. One system (IRFLEX 3) has been manufactured by Medlase, Inc. for surgical uses capable of delivering 2000w, 100 mJ pulsed energy and 15w continuous wave. The system diameter is 0.035 inches in diameter. Surgically suitable fibers as small as 120 um have been manufactured. Other fibers (IRFLEX 142,447) have a variety of transmission characteristics, bend radii, etc.

  1. Excipient-free nanoporous microparticles of budesonide for pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Lorraine M; Tajber, Lidia; McDonald, Bernard F; Barham, Ahmad S; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2009-07-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of a spray-drying process for the production of nanoporous microparticles (NPMPs) to budesonide, and to characterise the particles produced in terms of their suitability for pulmonary delivery. Budesonide was spray dried with and without ammonium carbonate from ethanol/water or methanol/water solutions. The solid-state characteristics and micromeritic (particle size, density, surface area) properties of spray dried powders were assessed. In vitro deposition studies were performed to assess aerosol performance. The densities of the NPMPs were significantly lower and the surface areas significantly higher than for non-porous spray dried or micronised material. NPMPs of budesonide demonstrated improved aerosolisation properties compared to spray dried non-porous, micronised material and two budesonide commercial products. All spray dried materials were amorphous in nature. The glass transition temperature (approximately 90 degrees C) was sufficiently high to suggest good physical stability at room temperature. When stored at 25 degrees C/60% RH NPMPs showed a reduced tendency to recrystallise compared to the equivalent non-porous spray dried powder. The physical stability and amorphous nature of NPMPs was retained, under these storage conditions for at least one year and the in vitro aerosolisation properties were not affected by the storage conditions. Excipient-free porous microparticles, prepared by the novel process described, show good potential for drug delivery by oral inhalation with improved in vitro deposition properties compared to non-porous particles. PMID:19463948

  2. Development of antimigraine transdermal delivery systems of pizotifen malate.

    PubMed

    Serna-Jiménez, C E; del Rio-Sancho, S; Calatayud-Pascual, M A; Balaguer-Fernández, C; Femenía-Font, A; López-Castellano, A; Merino, V

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a transdermal delivery system of pizotifen malate. Pizotifen is frequently used in the preventive treatment of migraine, but is also indicated in eating disorders. In the course of the project, the effects of chemical enhancers such as ethanol, 1,8-cineole, limonene, azone and different fatty acids (decanoic, decenoic, dodecanoic, linoleic and oleic acids) were determined, first using a pizotifen solution. Steady state flux, diffusion and partition parameters were estimated by fitting the Scheuplein equation to the data obtained. Among the chemical enhancers studied, decenoic acid showed the highest enhancement activity, which seemed to be due to the length of its alkyl chain and unsaturation at the 9th carbon. The influence of iontophoresis and the involvement of electrotransport in said process was determined. The absorption profile obtained with iontophoresis was similar to that obtained with fatty acids and terpenes, though skin deposition of the drug was lower with the former. Transdermal delivery systems (TDS) of pizotifen were manufactured by including chemical enhancers, decenoic acid or oleic acid, and were subsequently characterized. When the results obtained with solutions were compared with those obtained with the TDS, a positive enhancement effect was observed with the latter with respect to the partitioning and diffusion of the drug across the skin. Our findings endorse the suitability of our TDS for delivering therapeutic amounts of pizotifen malate. PMID:26196273

  3. Cytotoxicity assessment of porous silicon microparticles for ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Eveliina; Rönkkö, Seppo; Hillebrand, Satu; Riikonen, Joakim; Xu, Wujun; Järvinen, Kristiina; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Kauppinen, Anu

    2016-03-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is a promising material for the delivery and sustained release of therapeutic molecules in various tissues. Due to the constant rinsing of cornea by tear solution as well as the short half-life of intravitreal drugs, the eye is an attractive target for controlled drug delivery systems, such as PSi microparticles. Inherent barriers ensure that PSi particles are retained in the eye, releasing drugs at the desired speed until they slowly break down into harmless silicic acid. Here, we have examined the in vitro cytotoxicity of positively and negatively charged thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally carbonized (TCPSi) porous silicon microparticles on human corneal epithelial (HCE) and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. In addition to ocular assessment under an inverted microscope, cellular viability was evaluated using the CellTiter Blue™, CellTiter Fluor™, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. CellTiter Fluor proved to be a suitable assay but due to non-specific and interfering responses, neither CellTiter Blue nor LDH assays should be used when evaluating PSi particles. Our results suggest that the toxicity of PSi particles is concentration-dependent, but at least at concentrations less than 200μg/ml, both positively and negatively charged PSi particles are well tolerated by human corneal and retinal epithelial cells and therefore applicable for delivering drug molecules into ocular tissues. PMID:26686646

  4. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-28

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  5. Darkening of Mercury's surface by cometary carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syal, Megan Bruck; Schultz, Peter H.; Riner, Miriam A.

    2015-05-01

    Mercury’s surface is darker than that of the Moon. Iron-bearing minerals and submicroscopic metallic iron produced by space weathering are the primary known darkening materials on airless bodies. Yet Mercury’s iron abundance at the surface is lower than the Moon’s; another material is therefore likely to be responsible for Mercury’s dark surface. Enhanced darkening by submicroscopic metallic iron particles under intense space weathering at Mercury’s surface is insufficient to reconcile the planet’s low reflectance with its low iron abundance. Here we show that the delivery of cometary carbon by micrometeorites provides a mechanism to darken Mercury’s surface without violating observational constraints on iron content. We calculate the micrometeorite flux at Mercury and numerically simulate the fraction of carbonaceous material retained by the planet following micrometeorite impacts. We estimate that 50 times as many carbon-rich micrometeorites per unit surface area are delivered to Mercury, compared with the Moon, resulting in approximately 3-6 wt% carbon at Mercury’s surface (in graphite, amorphous, or nanodiamond form). Spectroscopic analysis of products of hypervelocity impact experiments demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon effectively darkens and weakens spectral features, consistent with remote observations of Mercury. Carbon delivery by micrometeorites provides an explanation for Mercury’s globally low reflectance and may contribute to the darkening of planetary surfaces elsewhere.

  6. Nanotubes mediate niche-stem cell signaling in the Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Mayu; Buszczak, Michael; Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell niches provide resident stem cells with signals that specify their identity. Niche signals act over a short-range such that only stem cells but not their differentiating progeny receive the self-renewing signals1. However, the cellular mechanisms that limit niche signaling to stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) form previously unrecognized structures, microtubule-based (MT)-nanotubes, which extend into the hub, a major niche component. MT-nanotubes are observed specifically within GSC populations, and require IFT (intraflagellar transport) proteins for their formation. The BMP receptor Tkv localizes to MT-nanotubes. Perturbation of MT-nanotubes compromises activation of Dpp signaling within GSCs, leading to GSC loss. Moreover, Dpp ligand and Tkv receptor interaction is necessary and sufficient for MT-nanotube formation. We propose that MT-nanotubes provide a novel mechanism for selective receptor-ligand interaction, contributing to the short-range nature of niche-stem cell signaling. PMID:26131929

  7. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  8. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  10. Nanostructured materials for ocular delivery: nanodesign for enhanced bioadhesion, transepithelial permeability and sustained delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jean; Schlesinger, Erica B; Desai, Tejal A

    2016-01-01

    Effective drug delivery to the eye is an ongoing challenge due to poor patient compliance coupled with numerous physiological barriers. Eye drops for the front of the eye and ocular injections for the back of the eye are the most prevalent delivery methods, both of which require relatively frequent administration and are burdensome to the patient. Novel drug delivery techniques stand to drastically improve safety, efficacy and patient compliance for ocular therapeutics. Remarkable advances in nanofabrication technologies make the application of nanostructured materials to ocular drug delivery possible. This article focuses on the use of nanostructured materials with nanoporosity or nanotopography for ocular delivery. Specifically, we discuss nanotopography for enhanced bioadhesion and permeation and nanoporous materials for controlled release drug delivery. As examples, application of polymeric nanostructures for greater transepithelial permeability, nanostructured microparticles for enhanced preocular retention time and nanoporous membranes for tuning drug release profile are covered. PMID:26652282

  11. Nanospearing - Biomolecule Delivery and Its Biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dong; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Carnahan, David; Chiles, Thomas C.

    Introduction of exogenous DNA into mammalian cells represents a powerful approach for manipulating signal transduction. However, the currently available techniques have serious limits in terms of either low transduction efficiency or low cell viability. It is found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can mediate molecule transportations via various mechanisms. We have reported a highly efficient molecular delivery technique, called nanotube spearing, based on the penetration of Ni-particle-embedded nanotubes into cell membranes by magnetic field driving. DNA was immobilized onto the nanotubes and subsequently speared into targeted cells. We have achieved a high transduction efficiency in Bal 17 B-lymphoma cell line, ex vivo B cells, and primary neurons with high viability. This technique may provide a powerful tool for highly efficient gene transfer in a variety of cells, especially, in the hard-to-transfect cells. However, CNTs have been associated with environmental and public health concerns which arose in the course of research on possible biomedical applications. The disturbances CNTs cause in the immune system have been met with particular interest because any ideal in vivo application of CNTs should not trigger any undesirable bodily responses. It is imperative to unravel the effects of CNTs on B cells, which represent the humoral component of acquired immunity, so that the potential risk of CNTs to public health can be thoroughly understood and advanced strategies can be employed to develop safe applications. We investigated the compatibility of the PECVD nanotubes and the nanospearing procedure in terms of cell viability, growth, and intracellular signal pathways by means of flow cytometry and biochemical analysis. No additional cell death was observed after the spearing treatment, nor had B cell activation been indicated by changes in cell size, growth, CD69 expression, and kinase phosphorylation. The post-spearing cells preserve the ability to respond to

  12. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  13. Controlling subcellular delivery to optimize therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Dixon, Andrew S; Lim, Carol S

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on drug targeting to specific cellular organelles for therapeutic purposes. Drugs can be delivered to all major organelles of the cell (cytosol, endosome/lysosome, nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes and proteasomes) where they exert specific effects in those particular subcellular compartments. Delivery can be achieved by chemical (e.g., polymeric) or biological (e.g., signal sequences) means. Unidirectional targeting to individual organelles has proven to be immensely successful for drug therapy. Newer technologies that accommodate multiple signals (e.g., protein switch and virus-like delivery systems) mimic nature and allow for a more sophisticated approach to drug delivery. Harnessing different methods of targeting multiple organelles in a cell will lead to better drug delivery and improvements in disease therapy. PMID:21113240

  14. Synthetic micro/nanomotors in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Joseph

    2014-09-21

    Nanomachines offer considerable promise for the treatment of diseases. The ability of man-made nanomotors to rapidly deliver therapeutic payloads to their target destination represents a novel nanomedicine approach. Synthetic nanomotors, based on a multitude of propulsion mechanisms, have been developed over the past decade toward diverse biomedical applications. In this review article, we journey from the use of chemically powered drug-delivery nanovehicles to externally actuated (fuel-free) drug-delivery nanomachine platforms, and conclude with future prospects and challenges for such practical propelling drug-delivery systems. As future micro/nanomachines become more powerful and functional, these tiny devices are expected to perform more demanding biomedical tasks and benefit different drug delivery applications. PMID:25096021

  15. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation. PMID:24936306

  16. A practical approach for intracellular protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Biri, Stéphanie; Adib, Abdennaji; Erbacher, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Protein delivery represents a powerful tool for experiments in live cells including studies of protein-protein interactions, protein interference with blocking antibodies, intracellular trafficking and protein or peptide biological functions. Most available reagents dedicated to the protein delivery allow efficient crossing of the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the major disadvantage for these reagents is a weak release of the delivered protein into the cytoplasm. In this publication we demonstrate efficient protein delivery with a non-peptide based reagent, in human epithelial carcinoma HeLa cells and primary human skin fibroblasts. Using a fluorescent protein in combination with fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analysis, we show that the delivered protein is indeed released effectively in the cytoplasm, as expected for a dedicated carrier. Furthermore, we present a step-by-step method to optimize conditions for successful intracellular protein delivery. PMID:19002840

  17. FastStats: Births -- Method of Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... MB] More data Birth Data Births in the United States, 2014 Maternal Morbidity for Vaginal and Cesarean Deliveries, According to Previous Cesarean History: New Data From the Birth Certificate, 2013 [PDF - ...

  18. WEDDS: The WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J.; Backes, P.

    1999-01-01

    WEDDS, the WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System, is a framework for supporting distributed mission operations by automatically transferring sensitive mission data in a secure and efficient manner to and from remote mission participants over the internet.

  19. Web Portal for Multicast Delivery Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannaert, H.; De Gruyter, B.; Adriaenssens, P.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a Web portal for multicast communication management, which provides fully automatic service management with integrated provisioning of hardware equipment. Describes the software architecture, the implementation, and the application usage of the Web portal for multicast delivery. (Author/AEF)

  20. Drug Delivery Strategies of Chemical CDK Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Daniel; Mondragón, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological use of new therapeutics is often limited by a safe and effective drug-delivery system. In this sense, new chemical CDK inhibitors are not an exception. Nanotechnology may be able to solve some of the main problems limiting cancer treatments such as more specific delivery of therapeutics and reduction of toxic secondary effects. It provides new delivery systems able to specifically target cancer cells and release the active molecules in a controlled fashion. Specifically, silica mesoporous supports (SMPS) have emerged as an alternative for more classical drug delivery systems based on polymers. In this chapter, we describe the synthesis of a SMPS containing the CDK inhibitor roscovitine as cargo molecule and the protocols for confirmation of the proper cargo release of the nanoparticles in cell culture employing cell viability, cellular internalization, and cell death induction studies. PMID:26231714

  1. Transmucosal delivery systems for calcitonin: a review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lugo, M; Peppas, N A

    2000-06-01

    The commercial availability of peptides and proteins and their advantages as therapeutic agents have been the basis for tremendous efforts in designing delivery systems for such agents. The protection of these agents from biological fluids and physiological interactions is crucial for the treatment efficacy. One such agent is salmon calcitonin, a 32 amino-acid polypeptide hormone used in the treatment of bone diseases such as Paget's disease, hypercalcemia and osteoporosis. Researchers have studied different routes to deliver salmon calcitonin more effectively, including nasal, oral, vaginal and rectal delivery. These systems are designed to protect the polypeptide from the biological barriers that each delivery route imposes. Oil-based and polymer-based delivery systems are discussed. PMID:10811300

  2. Role of microemuslsions in advanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman Kumar; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-06-01

    Microemulsions have gained significant attention from formulation scientists since the time they have been discovered, because of their excellent properties related to their stability, solubility, simplicity, and formulation aspects. The application of microemulsions is not limited to drug delivery via the oral, topical or ocular routes, but may also be seen in cosmetics, immunology, sensor devices, coating, textiles, analytical chemistry, and spermicide. Finally, the objective of this review is to discuss briefly the applications of microemulsions in advanced drug delivery. PMID:25711493

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  4. Toward the redesign of nutrition delivery.

    PubMed

    Lamppa, John W; Horn, Greg; Edwards, David

    2014-09-28

    In the facilitation of widespread access to low-cost, good tasting food, the global food system has relied on the use of fat, sugar, chemical processing aids and plastics, among other elements potentially detrimental to human health and the environment. This contrasts starkly with the strategies of natural nutrition delivery systems. Rich in vitamins, minerals, and other substances of functional benefit to human health, natural delivery systems, such as fruits and vegetables, retain their physical and chemical stability in a range of conditions over relatively long times through protective skins and shells that can either be eaten or degrade rapidly and fully in nature. Frequently natural foods can be delivered in small (even extremely small) portions, as with berries, insects, plankton and krill, permitting portion control and the rapid and efficient delivery of functional nutrition in inherently mobile circumstances. These and other qualities, which have insured the sustainable and healthy nourishment of animals and humans for at least tens of thousands of years, are often absent from today's man-made food and beverage delivery systems. With growing awareness of the liabilities to maintaining the food system of today, efforts are now underway to redesign nutrition delivery so as to provide the contemporary benefits of global access while retrieving the health and environmental benefits associated with natural delivery systems. We review these here, with special attention to recently commercialized nutritional delivery systems emerging from the drug delivery field aimed at reducing waste in food and beverage (nutritional aerosols) and eliminating waste in food and beverage packaging (edible skins). We briefly discuss the potential ramifications to how we will eat tomorrow. PMID:24878187

  5. Emerging hydrogel designs for controlled protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-08-19

    Hydrogels have evolved into indispensable biomaterials in the fields of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. This minireview aims to highlight the recent advances in the hydrogel design for controlled release of bioactive proteins. The latest developments of enzyme-responsive and externally regulated drug delivery systems are summarized. The design strategies and applications of phase-separated hydrogel systems are also described. We expect that these emerging approaches will enable expanded use of hydrogels in biomedicine and healthcare. PMID:27374633

  6. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Iouri Balachov, PhD

    2007-10-15

    In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

  7. Ultrasonic Drug Delivery – A General Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Staples, Bryant J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents including genetic material, proteins, and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies such as microbubbles are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilize cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Delivery of genetic material is greatly enhanced by ultrasound in the presence of microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles or to gas-containing liposomes enhances gene uptake even further. US-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumor and even fetal tissue. US-enhanced delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal delivery of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; it also makes the cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has upon cells and drug-carrying vesicles. PMID:16296719

  8. Novel drug delivery systems for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavik, E; Kuehn, M H; Kwon, Y H

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by pharmaceutical or surgical means has long been the standard treatment for glaucoma. A number of excellent drugs are available that are effective in reducing IOP. These drugs are typically applied as eye drops. However, patient adherence can be poor, thus reducing the clinical efficacy of the drugs. Several novel delivery systems designed to address the issue of adherence and to ensure consistent reduction of IOP are currently under development. These delivery systems include contact lenses-releasing glaucoma medications, injectables such as biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles, and surgically implanted systems. These new technologies are aimed at increasing clinical efficacy by offering multiple delivery options and are capable of managing IOP for several months. There is also a desire to have complementary neuroprotective approaches for those who continue to show progression, despite IOP reduction. Many potential neuroprotective agents are not suitable for traditional oral or drop formulations. Their potential is dependent on developing suitable delivery systems that can provide the drugs in a sustained, local manner to the retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery systems have the potential to improve patient adherence, reduce side effects, increase efficacy, and ultimately, preserve sight for glaucoma patients. In this review, we discuss benefits and limitations of the current systems of delivery and application, as well as those on the horizon. PMID:21475311

  9. Recent advances in ophthalmic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B; Kadam, Rajendra S; Lee, Vincent HL

    2011-01-01

    Topical ocular drug bioavailability is notoriously poor, in the order of 5% or less. This is a consequence of effective multiple barriers to drug entry, comprising nasolacrimal drainage, epithelial drug transport barriers and clearance from the vasculature in the conjunctiva. While sustained drug delivery to the back of the eye is now feasible with intravitreal implants such as Vitrasert™ (~6 months), Retisert™ (~3 years) and Iluvien™ (~3 years), currently there are no marketed delivery systems for long-term drug delivery to the anterior segment of the eye. The purpose of this article is to summarize the resurgence in interest to prolong and improve drug entry from topical administration. These approaches include mucoadhesives, viscous polymer vehicles, transporter-targeted prodrug design, receptor-targeted functionalized nanoparticles, iontophoresis, punctal plug and contact lens delivery systems. A few of these delivery systems might be useful in treating diseases affecting the back of the eye. Their effectiveness will be compared against intravitreal implants (upper bound of effectiveness) and trans-scleral systems (lower bound of effectiveness). Refining the animal model by incorporating the latest advances in microdialysis and imaging technology is key to expanding the knowledge central to the design, testing and evaluation of the next generation of innovative ocular drug delivery systems. PMID:21399724

  10. Drug Delivery Research: The Invention Cycle.

    PubMed

    Park, Kinam

    2016-07-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been successful in introducing improved formulations for better use of existing drugs and novel delivery of biologicals. The initial success of producing many oral products and some injectable depot formulations, however, reached a plateau, and the progress over the past three decades has been slow. This is likely due to the difficulties of formulating hydrophilic, high molecular weight drugs, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for targeting specific cells, month-long sustained delivery, and pulsatile release. Since the approaches that have served well for delivery of small molecules are not applicable to large molecules, it is time to develop new methods for biologicals. The process of developing future drug delivery systems, termed as the invention cycle, is proposed, and it starts with clearly defining the problems for developing certain formulations. Once the problems are well-defined, creative imagination examines all potential options and selects the best answer and alternatives. Then, innovation takes over to generate unique solutions for developing new formulations that resolve the previously identified problems. Ultimately, the new delivery systems will have to go through a translational process to produce the final formulations for clinical use. The invention cycle also emphasizes examining the reasons for success of certain formulations, not just the reasons for failure of many systems. Implementation of the new invention cycle requires new mechanisms of funding the younger generation of scientists and a new way of identifying their achievements, thereby releasing them from the burden of short-termism. PMID:26962897

  11. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M.; Brugge, William R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26491078

  12. Alternative delivery systems in rural areas.

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, J B

    1989-01-01

    Alternative delivery systems, such as HMOs, PPOs, and primary care case-management programs, have a long history in rural America despite significant impediments to their development. However, little is known about the effect of these systems on rural communities and their medical care delivery systems. Existing studies, which focus on rural HMOs, are qualitative in nature and generally are directed at identifying factors that facilitate or retard HMO development. Despite their limitations, the studies do raise a variety of issues deserving of quantitative analysis. Research is now needed that (1) investigates the effect of rural alternative delivery systems on the cost and quality of care received by rural residents, (2) assesses the effectiveness of different mechanisms used by these systems to contain costs, (3) estimates the effect of alternative delivery systems on rural providers, (4) determines the extent to which the presence or absence of alternative delivery systems influences physician decisions to locate in rural areas, (5) identifies factors that are important in consumer decisions to enroll or not enroll in a rural alternative delivery system, and (6) analyzes the diffusion patterns of these systems in rural areas. PMID:2645250

  13. Targeting the brain: advances in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Blumling Iii, James P; Silva, Gabriel A

    2012-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a significant obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Many therapeutics with potential for treating neurological conditions prove incompatible with intravenous delivery simply because of this barrier. Rather than modifying drugs to penetrate the BBB directly, it has proven more efficacious to either physically bypass the barrier or to use specialized delivery vehicles that circumvent BBB regulatory mechanisms. Controlled-release intracranial polymer implants and particle injections are the clinical state of the art with regard to localized delivery, although these approaches can impose significant surgical risks. Focused ultrasound provides a non-invasive alternative that may prove more desirable for acute treatment of brain tumors and other conditions requiring local tissue necrosis. For targeting the brain as a whole, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and molecular trojan horses (MTHs) have demonstrated particular ability as delivery molecules and will likely see increased application. CPPs are not brain specific but offer the potential for efficient traversal of the BBB, and tandem systems with targeting molecules may produce extremely effective brain drug delivery tools. Molecular trojan horses utilize receptor-mediated transcytosis to transport cargo and are thus limited by the quantity of relevant receptors; however, they can be very selective for the BBB endothelium and have shown promise in gene therapy. PMID:23016646

  14. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  15. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  16. Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery - 12507

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Our discussion of the Tank Farms and Waste Feed Delivery will cover progress made to date with Base and Recovery Act funding in reducing the risk posed by tank waste and in preparing for the initiation of waste treatment at Hanford. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The underground storage tanks range in capacity from 55,000 gallons to more than 1 million gallons. The tanks were constructed with carbon steel and reinforced concrete. There are eighteen groups of tanks, called 'tank farms', some having as few as two tanks and others up to sixteen tanks. Between 1943 and 1964, 149 single-shell tanks were built at Hanford in the 200 West and East Areas. Heat generated by the waste and the composition of the waste caused an estimated 67 of these single-shell tanks to leak into the ground. Washington River Protection Solutions is the prime contractor responsible for the safe management of this waste. WRPS' mission is to reduce the risk to the environment that is posed by the waste. All of the pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks and transferred to the double-shell tanks. What remains in the single-shell tanks are

  17. 75 FR 17789 - Nationwide Change in Frequency of Postal Delivery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ...) for the elimination of Saturday delivery.\\1\\ Section 3661(c) requires that such service changes... (Request). The Postal Service proposes to eliminate Saturday delivery nationally, except for delivery of... mail processing, and service standards (except for adding a non-delivery day). Id. at 15-16. \\2\\ Two...

  18. 27 CFR 28.230 - Consignment, shipment, and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... delivery. 28.230 Section 28.230 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Drawback Consignment, Shipment, and Delivery § 28.230 Consignment, shipment, and delivery. The consignment, shipment, and delivery of taxpaid beer removed under this subpart shall be made under the provisions...

  19. 48 CFR 52.211-17 - Delivery of Excess Quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery of Excess....211-17 Delivery of Excess Quantities. As prescribed in 11.703(b), insert the following clause: Delivery of Excess Quantities (SEP 1989) The Contractor is responsible for the delivery of each...

  20. 48 CFR 252.237-7016 - Delivery tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery tickets. 252.237... Clauses 252.237-7016 Delivery tickets. As prescribed in 237.7101(e), use the following clause: Delivery Tickets (DEC 1991) (a) The Contractor shall complete delivery tickets in the number of copies required...

  1. 7 CFR 27.52 - Delivery without certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Delivery without certification. 27.52 Section 27.52... Delivery without certification. If upon the date fixed for delivery in accordance with subsection 15b(f) of... the Marketing Services Office for the time hereinafter prescribed, the delivery of such cotton may...

  2. 48 CFR 552.211-94 - Time of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time of delivery. 552.211... of delivery. As prescribed at 511.404(d), insert the following clause: Time of Delivery (JAN 2010) An... points identified in the delivery order at its discretion in order to maintain the required stock...

  3. 49 CFR 663.31 - Post-delivery audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Post-delivery audit requirements. 663.31 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.31 Post-delivery audit requirements. A recipient purchasing revenue service...

  4. 49 CFR 663.31 - Post-delivery audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Post-delivery audit requirements. 663.31 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.31 Post-delivery audit requirements. A recipient purchasing revenue service...

  5. 49 CFR 663.31 - Post-delivery audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Post-delivery audit requirements. 663.31 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.31 Post-delivery audit requirements. A recipient purchasing revenue service...

  6. 49 CFR 663.31 - Post-delivery audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Post-delivery audit requirements. 663.31 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.31 Post-delivery audit requirements. A recipient purchasing revenue service...

  7. 49 CFR 663.31 - Post-delivery audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Post-delivery audit requirements. 663.31 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.31 Post-delivery audit requirements. A recipient purchasing revenue service...

  8. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  9. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  10. Improved soil fumigation by Telone C35 using carbonation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trial was conducted to investigate whether carbonating Telone C35 (1,3-dichloropropene with 35% chloropicrin) would improve the delivery of the fumigant to such an extent that the application rate could be decreased without sacrificing efficacy. The plastic films used were black virtually impe...

  11. Manual of carbonate sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Reijers, T.J.; Hsu, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    This manual, organised along encycolopaedic/lexicographic lines, summarizes information on the properties and characteristics of carbonates and their environments. Part 1 deals with the elements of carbonates; Part 2 with environments, settings, and carbonate bodies; Part 3 with carbonate diagenesis, and Part 4 with carbonate reservoirs. Contents include: Elements of carbonates; Carbonate Environments, Settings and Bodies; Carbonate diagenesis; Carbonate reservoirs; Alphabetical Indices; English, Dutch, German, Spanish, French Computer Compatible Codes; Commonly Used (Informal) abbreviations.

  12. Intracellular delivery of nanomaterials for sub-cellular imaging and tracking of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medepalli, Krishna Kiran

    Nanomaterials have many intriguing applications in biology and medicine. Unique properties such as enhanced electrical properties, increased chemical reactivity and resistance to degradation, novel optical properties and comparable size to that of biological systems have led to their use in various biomedical applications. The most important applications of nanomaterials for medicine are in drug delivery and imaging. This research focuses on utilizing the biocompatibility of single walled Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and optical properties colloidal quantum dots (QDs) for cellular drug delivery and imaging of biomolecules. The first part of this research deals with single walled carbon nanotubes which are excellent candidates for targeted drug delivery applications due their unique structural and functional properties. However, prior to their use in therapeutics, their biocompatibility needs to be thoroughly investigated. The objectives of this research were to establish the biocompatibility of SWCNTs and demonstrate their use as drug delivery carriers into cells. Blood, a living tissue, is chosen as the biological system as it contains various cells which can potentially interact with SWCNTs during the delivery mechanism. The interactions of these cells in the blood (specifically white blood cells or leukocytes) with the SWCNTs provide vital information regarding the immune response of the host to the nanotubes. This research investigates the immune response of white blood cells due to SWCNTs via (a) direct interaction---presence of nanotubes in the blood and, (b) indirect interaction---presentation of nanotubes by antigen-presenting-cells to white blood cells. These two interactions recreate the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in the body to any foreign substance. SWCNTs are functionalized with single stranded DNA (ss-DNA), which serves as a dispersant of nanotubes as well as a backbone for further attachment of other biomolecules of interest

  13. Exploring the Limits of Methane Storage and Delivery in Nanoporous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Wilmer, CE; Farha, OK; Hupp, JT; Snurr, RQ

    2014-04-03

    The physical limits for methane storage and delivery in nanoporous materials were investigated, with a focus on whether it is possible to reach a methane deliverable capacity of 315 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) in line with the adsorption target established by the ARPA-E agency. Our efforts focused on how both geometric and chemical properties, such as void fraction (V-f), volumetric surface area (S-v), and heat of adsorption (Q(st)), impact methane deliverable capacity, i.e., the amount of methane adsorbed at some storage pressure minus the amount adsorbed at the delivery pressure. With the aid of grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, we studied methane adsorption and delivery properties in a population of 122 835 hypothetical pcu metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and 39 idealized carbon-based porous materials. From the simulation results, we developed an analytical equation that helped us delimit the necessary material properties to reach specific methane deliverable capacity targets. The maximum deliverable capacity between 65 and 5.8 bar among the hypothetical MOFs was 206 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3) at 298 K. We found that artificially increasing the methane MOF interaction strength by increasing the Lennard-Jones e parameters of the MOF atoms by 2- and 4-fold only improved the maximum deliverable capacity up to 223 and 228 cm(3)(STP)/cm(3), respectively. However, the effect on the amount stored at 65 bar was more significant, which suggested another strategy; raising the temperature of the system by 100 K can recover 70% of the methane stranded at the delivery pressure. By increasing the delivery temperature to 398 K, the ARPA-E target was reached by a few hypothetical MOFs with quadrupled e values. This work shows the difficulty in reaching the ARPA-E target but also suggests that a strategy that combines a material with a large volumetric density of sites that interact strongly with methane and raising the delivery temperature can greatly improve the performance of

  14. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses. PMID:27048557

  15. Novel cyclodextrin nanosponges for delivery of calcium in hyperphosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Deshmukh, Kiran; Trotta, Fransesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2013-11-01

    Cyclodextrin nanosponges are solid, porous nanoparticulate three dimensional structures, have been used as delivery system of different drugs. In this work, new cyclodextrin-based nanosponges of calcium carbonate were prepared by polymer condensation method to release the calcium in controlled manner in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia as novel carriers. SEM measurements revealed their roughly spherical shape, porous nature and mean particle size of about 400 nm. Zeta potentials of the nanosponges were sufficiently high to obtain stable formulations. The encapsulation efficiencies of calcium in nanosponge formulations were found to be 81-95%. The moisture contents of the nanosponges were in the range of 0.1-0.7%. The optimized formulation produces enteric and controlled release kinetics of calcium in the management and treatment of hyperphosphatemia. It was also observed that calcium ions bound efficiently to free phosphate in a pH-dependent fashion especially at pH 7. In accelerated stability study no significant changes occurred in physical appearance, size and nature of drug in formulation for 3 months. The results of FTIR and DSC confirmed that calcium carbonate was encapsulated in nanosponges structure. PMID:23954237

  16. Pulsed nutrient delivery for control of pore plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.M.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Nutrient cycling has been shown to enhance the degradation rate of carbon tetrachloride in anaerobic batch cultures. In addition, nutrient pulsing has been suggested as a method for controlling near-bore biofouling in application of in-situ bioremediation. To determine the effects of nutrient pulsing on biomass accumulation, soil columns were fed with nitrate and acetate to develop a denitrifying biofilm within a porous sand matrix to compare two nutrient delivery strategies. The strategies that were compared were continuous nutrient feeding and pulsed nutrient feeding. Acetate, as the sole carbon and energy source, was fed to the columns continuously at 83 mg/L or pulsed at 2,222 mg/L for 30 minutes every 12 hours. This resulted in the same time-averaged substrate loading to the soil columns. Final biomass profiles indicate a much more uniform biomass accumulation profile using a pulsed nutrient strategy. Also, notable differences in the effluent suspended cell concentrations were measured. These data were used to help calibrate a detailed model for bacterial transport in porous media, which will be used to aid in the design and implementation of in-situ bioremediation at the Hanford site.

  17. In situ synthesis of luminescent carbon nanoparticles toward target bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Sharker, Shazid Md; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Jung Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; In, Insik; Lee, Kang Dea; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Sung Young

    2015-03-12

    This paper describes the in situ synthesis of single fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (FCNs) for target bioimaging applications derived from biocompatible hyaluronic acid (HA) without using common conjugation processes. FCNs formed via the dehydration of hyaluronic acid, which were obtained by carbonizing HA, and partially carbonized HA fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (HA-FCNs), formed by a lower degree of carbonization, show good aqueous solubility, small particle size (<20 nm) and different fluorescence intensities with a red shift. After confirming the cytotoxicity of HA-FCNs and FCNs, we carried out in vitro and in vivo bioimaging studies where HA-FCNs themselves functioned as single particle triggers in target imaging. The converted nanocrystal carbon particles from HA provide outstanding features for in vitro and in vivo new targeted delivery and diagnostic tools. PMID:25732701

  18. Carbon tetrachloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon tetrachloride ; CASRN 56 - 23 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  19. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  20. Fiberoptic Microneedles: Novel Optical Diffusers for Interstitial Delivery of Therapeutic Light

    PubMed Central

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A.; Hood, Robert L.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Grant, David C.; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L.; Rylander, M. Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area. This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. Materials and Methods A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper. Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1064 nm, (5 W CW) irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Results The acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. Conclusions We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target

  1. Alkali metal carbon dioxide electrochemical system for energy storage and/or conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, Norman H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal, such as lithium, is the anodic reactant; carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is the cathodic reactant; and carbonate of the alkali metal is the electrolyte in an electrochemical cell for the storage and delivery of electrical energy. Additionally, alkali metal-carbon dioxide battery systems include a plurality of such electrochemical cells. Gold is a preferred catalyst for reducing the carbon dioxide at the cathode. The fuel cell of the invention produces electrochemical energy through the use of an anodic reactant which is extremely energetic and light, and a cathodic reactant which can be extracted from its environment and therefore exacts no transportation penalty. The invention is, therefore, especially useful in extraterrestrial environments.

  2. In situ synthesis of luminescent carbon nanoparticles toward target bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharker, Shazid Md.; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Jung Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; in, Insik; Lee, Kang Dea; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Sung Young

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the in situ synthesis of single fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (FCNs) for target bioimaging applications derived from biocompatible hyaluronic acid (HA) without using common conjugation processes. FCNs formed via the dehydration of hyaluronic acid, which were obtained by carbonizing HA, and partially carbonized HA fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (HA-FCNs), formed by a lower degree of carbonization, show good aqueous solubility, small particle size (<20 nm) and different fluorescence intensities with a red shift. After confirming the cytotoxicity of HA-FCNs and FCNs, we carried out in vitro and in vivo bioimaging studies where HA-FCNs themselves functioned as single particle triggers in target imaging. The converted nanocrystal carbon particles from HA provide outstanding features for in vitro and in vivo new targeted delivery and diagnostic tools.This paper describes the in situ synthesis of single fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (FCNs) for target bioimaging applications derived from biocompatible hyaluronic acid (HA) without using common conjugation processes. FCNs formed via the dehydration of hyaluronic acid, which were obtained by carbonizing HA, and partially carbonized HA fluorescence carbon nanoparticles (HA-FCNs), formed by a lower degree of carbonization, show good aqueous solubility, small particle size (<20 nm) and different fluorescence intensities with a red shift. After confirming the cytotoxicity of HA-FCNs and FCNs, we carried out in vitro and in vivo bioimaging studies where HA-FCNs themselves functioned as single particle triggers in target imaging. The converted nanocrystal carbon particles from HA provide outstanding features for in vitro and in vivo new targeted delivery and diagnostic tools. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07422j

  3. Modeling of diffusion controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Juergen; Siepmann, Florence

    2012-07-20

    Mathematical modeling of drug release can be very helpful to speed up product development and to better understand the mechanisms controlling drug release from advanced delivery systems. Ideally, in silico simulations can quantitatively predict the impact of formulation and processing parameters on the resulting drug release kinetics. The aim of this article is to give an overview on the current state of the art of modeling drug release from delivery systems, which are predominantly controlled by diffusional mass transport. The inner structure of the device, the ratio "initial drug concentration:drug solubility" as well as the device geometry determine which type of mathematical equation must be applied. A straightforward "road map" is given, explaining how to identify the appropriate equation for a particular type of drug delivery system. The respective equations for a broad range of devices are indicated, including reservoir and matrix systems, exhibiting or not an initial excess of drug and the geometry of slabs, spheres and cylinders. The assumptions the models are based on as well as their limitations are pointed out. Practical examples illustrate the usefulness of mathematical modeling of diffusion controlled drug delivery. Due to the advances in information technology the importance of in silico optimization of advanced drug delivery systems can be expected to significantly increase in the future. PMID:22019555

  4. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  5. Microneedles for intradermal and transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tuan-Mahmood, Tuan-Mazlelaa; McCrudden, Maeliosa T.C.; Torrisi, Barbara M.; McAlister, Emma; Garland, Martin J; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2014-01-01

    The formidable barrier properties of the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum impose significant limitations for successful systemic delivery of a broad range of therapeutic molecules, particularly macromolecules and genetic material. Microneedle delivery has been proposed as a strategy to breach the SC barrier function in order to facilitate effective transport of molecules across the skin. This strategy involves the use of micron sized needles fabricated from different materials and using different geometries to create transient aqueous conduits across the skin. Microneedles in isolation, or in combination with other enhancing strategies, have been shown to dramatically enhance the skin permeability of numerous therapeutic molecules including biopharmaceuticals either in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo. Progress in the areas of microneedle design, development and manufacture have proven promising in terms of the potential use of this emerging delivery method in clinical applications such as insulin delivery, transcutaneous immunisations and cutaneous gene delivery. This review article focuses on recent and potential future developments in microneedle technologies. This will include the detailing of progress made in microneedle design, an exploration of the challenges faced in this field and potential forward strategies to embrace the exploitation of microneedle methodologies, while considering the inherent safety aspects of such therapeutic tools. PMID:23680534

  6. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action. PMID:19569979

  7. Electrostatic Surface Modifications to Improve Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Ron B.; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Gene therapy has the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including genetic diseases and cancer. Areas covered in this review This review introduces biomaterials used for gene delivery and then focuses on the use of electrostatic surface modifications to improve gene delivery materials. These modifications have been used to stabilize therapeutics in vivo, add cell-specific targeting ligands, and promote controlled release. Coatings of nanoparticles and microparticles as well as non-particulate surface coatings are covered in this review. Electrostatic principles are crucial for the development of multilayer delivery structures fabricated by the layer-by-layer method. What the reader will gain The reader will gain knowledge about the composition of biomaterials used for surface modifications and how these coatings and multilayers can be utilized to improve spatial control and efficiency of delivery. Examples are shown for the delivery of nucleic acids, including DNA and siRNA, to in vitro and in vivo systems. Take home message The versatile and powerful approach of electrostatic coatings and multilayers will lead to the development of enhanced gene therapies. PMID:20201712

  8. Documenting data delivery: design, deployment, and decision.

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, M. S.; Hammond, W. E.; Lobach, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Developing and deploying informatics solutions which are useful and acceptable to busy physicians are challenging tasks. We describe the design, deployment, and evaluation process by which the delivery of routine clinical laboratory reports is automated using electronic mail. Data from TMR, an operational computer-based patient record (CPR), are presented to providers using an individualized, modern interface. This system is compared to the existing, paper-based system for delivery of data from the same CPR. Differences between the two systems of data delivery are analyzed, with emphases on 1) electronic documentation of data delivery and receipt, 2) electronic and/or paper documentation of clinical action taken as a result of laboratory reports, 3) timeliness of report availability, 4) costs, 5) workflow compatibility, and 6) physician satisfaction. The new delivery system employs inexpensive, commercially available software applications and entails only trivial changes to the proprietary CPR. Built into the new system are features which allow quantitative measurements of its performance for analysis along with survey-based user satisfaction data. The open systems design is deliberately non-proprietary, inexpensive, and generalizable. Accordingly, it offers practical possibilities for settings in which clinical information systems are just being planned, as well as for those in which such systems are already established. PMID:8947777

  9. Transdermal Delivery of Nisoldipine: Refinement of Vehicles.

    PubMed

    El Maghraby, Gamal M; Ahmed, Amal A; Osman, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Nisoldipine is used for the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris. However, it has very low bioavailabil-ty, which is attributed to extensive pre-systemic metabolism. In addition, nisol-ipine is highly potent (used at a low dose). Taking into consideration the fact that transdermal delivery avoids the pre-systemic metabolism and is only suit-ble for potent drugs, nisoldipine can be considered as an excellent candidate for transdermal delivery. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to optimize nisoldipine transdermal delivery. That was achieved initially by investigating the effect of vehicles on skin penetration. The tested vehicles were ranked with respect to transdermal flux of nisoldipine as isopropyl myristate > oleic acid > propylene glycol > water > polyethylene glycol 400. A combination of oleic acid with propylene glycol was synergistic with a ratio of 1:2 w/w being the best. These results were taken further to develop microemulsion systems using either oleic acid or isopropyl myristate as the oil phase. Both cases employed polyoxy-thylene sorbitan monooleate as a surfactant with propylene glycol being uti-ized as a cosurfactant in the case of oleic acid and ethanol in the case of isopropyl myristate. The developed microemulsions produced significant enhancement in nisoldipine transdermal delivery with the flux being even greater than that obtained from the corresponding pure vehicles. This achieve-ent was recorded in optimum microemulsion formulations which contained a cosurfactant. The study provided stepwise optimization of a vehicle for trans-ermal delivery of nisoldipine. PMID:26685495

  10. Carbohydrate polymers for nonviral nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M; Srinivasachari, Sathya; Reineke, Theresa M

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  11. A pulsed mode electrolytic drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ying; Buttner, Ulrich; Carreno, Armando A. A.; Conchouso, David; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the design of a proof-of-concept drug delivery device that is actuated using the bubbles formed during electrolysis. The device uses a platinum (Pt) coated nickel (Ni) metal foam and a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach to improve the device’s performance. This electrochemically-driven pump has many features that are unlike conventional drug delivery devices: it is capable of pumping periodically and being refilled automatically; it features drug release control; and it enables targeted delivery. Pt-coated metal foam is used as a catalytic reforming element, which reduces the period of each delivery cycle. Two methods were used for fabricating the Pt-coated metal: sputtering and electroplating. Of these two methods, the sputtered Pt-coated metal foam has a higher pumping rate; it also has a comparable recombination rate when compared to the electroplated Pt-coated metal foam. The only drawback of this catalytic reformer is that it consumes nickel scaffold. Considering long-term applications, the electroplated Pt metal foam was selected for drug delivery, where a controlled drug release rate of 2.2 μg  ±  0.3 μg per actuation pulse was achieved using 4 mW of power.

  12. Hydrogels for combination delivery of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, K H; Alsberg, E; Mooney, D J

    2001-10-01

    The systemic delivery of anticancer agents has been widely investigated during the past decade but localized delivery may offer a safer and more effective delivery approach. We have designed and synthesized a novel hydrogel to locally deliver antineoplastic agents, and demonstrate the different types of release that can be achieved from these hydrogels using three model drugs: methotrexate, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone. Alginate was chemically modified into low molecular weight oligomers and cross-linked with a biodegradable spacer (adipic dihydrazide) to form biodegradable hydrogels. The model antineoplastic agents were loaded into the hydrogel via three different mechanisms. Methotrexate was incorporated within the pores of the hydrogel and was released by diffusion into the surrounding medium. Doxorubicin was covalently attached to the polymer backbone via a hydrolytically labile linker and was released following the chemical hydrolysis of the linker. Mitoxantrone was ionically complexed to the polymer and was released after the dissociation of this complex. These three release mechanisms could potentially be used to deliver a wide selection of antineoplastic agents, based on their chemical structure. This novel delivery system allows for the release of single or combinations of antineoplastic agents, and may find utility in localized antineoplastic agent delivery. PMID:11519782

  13. Perspectives on transdermal ultrasound mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2007-01-01

    The use of needles for multiple injection of drugs, such as insulin for diabetes, can be painful. As a result, prescribed drug noncompliance can result in severe medical complications. Several noninvasive methods exist for transdermal drug delivery. These include chemical mediation using liposomes and chemical enhancers or physical mechanisms such as microneedles, iontophoresis, electroporation, and ultrasound. Ultrasound enhanced transdermal drug delivery offers advantages over traditional drug delivery methods which are often invasive and painful. A broad review of the transdermal ultrasound drug delivery literature has shown that this technology offers promising potential for noninvasive drug administration. From a clinical perspective, few drugs, proteins or peptides have been successfully administered transdermally because of the low skin permeability to these relatively large molecules, although much work is underway to resolve this problem. The proposed mechanism of ultrasound has been suggested to be the result of cavitation, which is discussed along with the bioeffects from therapeutic ultrasound. For low frequencies, potential transducers which can be used for drug delivery are discussed, along with cautions regarding ultrasound safety versus efficacy. PMID:18203426

  14. Microfabrication Technologies for Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Tao, Sarah L.; Fisher, Omar; Xu, Qiaobing; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Micro-/nanoscale technologies such as lithographic techniques and microfluidics offer promising avenues to revolutionalize the fields of tissue engineering, drug discovery, diagnostics and personalized medicine. Microfabrication techniques are being explored for drug delivery applications due to their ability to combine several features such as precise shape and size into a single drug delivery vehicle. They also offer to create unique asymmetrical features incorporated into single or multiple reservoir systems maximizing contact area with the intestinal lining. Combined with intelligent materials, such microfabricated platforms can be designed to be bioadhesive and stimuli-responsive. Apart from drug delivery devices, microfabrication technologies offer exciting opportunities to create biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models incorporating physiological cell types, flow patterns and brush-border like structures. Here we review the recent developments in this field with a focus on the applications of microfabrication in the development of oral drug delivery devices and biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models that can be used to evaluate the drug delivery efficacy. PMID:22166590

  15. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  16. Methods of Drug Delivery in Neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Deng-Bryant, Ying; Readnower, Ryan; Leung, Lai Yee; Tortella, Frank; Shear, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier that limit toxic agents and most molecules from penetrating the brain and spinal cord. However, these barriers also prevent most pharmaceuticals from entering into the CNS. Drug delivery to the CNS following neurotrauma is complicated. Although studies have shown BBB permeability increases in various TBI models, it remains as the key mitigating factor for delivering drugs into the CNS. The commonly used methods for drug delivery in preclinical neurotrauma studies include intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular delivery. It should be noted that for a drug to be successfully translated into the clinic, it needs to be administered preclinically as it would be anticipated to be administered to patients. And this likely leads to better dose selection of the drug, as well as recognition of any possible side effects, prior to transition into a clinical trial. Additionally, novel approach that is noninvasive and yet circumvents BBB, such as drug delivery through nerve pathways innervating the nasal passages, needs to be investigated in animal models, as it may provide a viable drug delivery method for patients who sustain mild CNS injury or require chronic treatments. Therefore, the focus of this chapter is to present rationales and methods for delivering drugs by IV infusion via the jugular vein, and intranasally in preclinical studies. PMID:27604714

  17. Outcome of 306 twin deliveries according to first twin presentation and method of delivery.

    PubMed

    Grisaru, D; Fuchs, S; Kupferminc, M J; Har-Toov, J; Niv, J; Lessing, J B

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to examine the effect of presentation of the first twin and mode of delivery on perintal outcome in twin deliveries. We reviewed all records of twin deliveries at a gestational age of 32 weeks and more from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1995. Study cases were divided according to the first twin presentation (vertex = group A, nonvertex = group B) and then subdivided according to the planned mode of delivery, vaginal trial of labor (VTOL), and cesarean section (CS). The protocol for group A facilitated an attempt at vaginal delivery and for group B, vaginal delivery was considered as for a singleton fetus in breech presentation. Of 306 pairs of twins, 235 were in group A and 71 in group B. In group A, 219 women (93.2%) were eligible for VTOL, and the remaining 16 underwent CS. Thirty-three group B women were eligible for VTOL (46.5%; p<0.001) and 38 had CS. In group A, of the 219 candidates for VTOL, 199 (90.9%) delivered vaginally and 20 underwent a CS. In group B, of the 33 VTOL candidates 18 (54.5%) delivered vaginally and 15 underwent CS. Neonatal outcome did not differ in relation to the presentation of the first twin or the planned/actual mode of delivery. There were no cases of birth trauma, neurological complications, or perinatal mortality. Trial of vaginal labor is safe in twin deliveries with the first twin in vertex presentation. Provided criteria for vaginal breech delivery are adhered to, this also appears to be a reasonable option in twin deliveries with the first twin in nonvertex presentation. PMID:11144312

  18. Liposome-like Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-01-01

    Liposomes are a class of well-established drug carriers that have found numerous therapeutic applications. The success of liposomes, together with recent advancements in nanotechnology, has motivated the development of various novel liposome-like nanostructures with improved drug delivery performance. These nanostructures can be categorized into five major varieties, namely: (1) polymer-stabilized liposomes, (2) nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes, (3) core-shell lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, (4) natural membrane-derived vesicles, and (5) natural membrane coated nanoparticles. They have received significant attention and have become popular drug delivery platforms. Herein, we discuss the unique strengths of these liposome-like platforms in drug delivery, with a particular emphasis on how liposome-inspired novel designs have led to improved therapeutic efficacy, and review recent progress made by each platform in advancing healthcare. PMID:24392221

  19. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Campbell, Heather L.; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  20. Targeted Delivery of Immunomodulators to Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Jamil; Yin, Qian; Uehara, Mayuko; Ohori, Shunsuke; Tang, Li; Cai, Kaimin; Ichimura, Takaharu; McGrath, Martina; Maarouf, Omar; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Loughhead, Scott; Petr, Jarolim; Sun, Qidi; Kwon, Mincheol; Tullius, Stefan; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Cheng, Jianjun; Abdi, Reza

    2016-05-10

    Active-targeted delivery to lymph nodes represents a major advance toward more effective treatment of immune-mediated disease. The MECA79 antibody recognizes peripheral node addressin molecules expressed by high endothelial venules of lymph nodes. By mimicking lymphocyte trafficking to the lymph nodes, we have engineered MECA79-coated microparticles containing an immunosuppressive medication, tacrolimus. Following intravenous administration, MECA79-bearing particles showed marked accumulation in the draining lymph nodes of transplanted animals. Using an allograft heart transplant model, we show that targeted lymph node delivery of microparticles containing tacrolimus can prolong heart allograft survival with negligible changes in tacrolimus serum level. Using MECA79 conjugation, we have demonstrated targeted delivery of tacrolimus to the lymph nodes following systemic administration, with the capacity for immune modulation in vivo. PMID:27134176