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Sample records for carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  2. Vibrations of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formica, Giovanni; Lacarbonara, Walter; Alessi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    This work deals with a study of the vibrational properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites by employing an equivalent continuum model based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. The theory allows the calculation of the effective constitutive law of the elastic isotropic medium (matrix) with dispersed elastic inhomogeneities (carbon nanotubes). The devised computational approach is shown to yield predictions in good agreement with the experimentally obtained elastic moduli of composites reinforced with uniformly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The primary contribution of the present work deals with the global elastic modal properties of nano-structured composite plates. The investigated composite plates are made of a purely isotropic elastic hosting matrix of three different types (epoxy, rubber, and concrete) with embedded single-walled CNTs. The computations are carried out via a finite element (FE) discretization of the composite plates. The effects of the CNT alignment and volume fraction are studied in depth to assess how the modal properties are influenced both globally and locally. As a major outcome, the lowest natural frequencies of CNT-reinforced rubber composites are shown to increase up to 500 percent.

  3. MODELING FUNCTIONALLY GRADED INTERPHASE REGIONS IN CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, G. D.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of micromechanics methods and molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the effective properties of the carbon nanotube reinforced composites with functionally graded interphase regions. The multilayer composite cylinders method accounts for the effects of non-perfect load transfer in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer matrix composites using a piecewise functionally graded interphase. The functional form of the properties in the interphase region, as well as the interphase thickness, is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Results indicate that the functional form of the interphase can have a significant effect on all the effective elastic constants except for the effective axial modulus for which no noticeable effects are evident.

  4. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  5. Thermal expansion of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline silver matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Sharma, Vimal; Pal, Hemant

    2014-04-24

    Multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced silver matrix composite was fabricated by novel molecular level mixing method, which involves nucleation of Ag ions inside carbon nanotube dispersion at the molecular level. As a result the carbon nanotubes get embedded within the powder rather than on the surfaces. Micro structural characterization by X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes are homogeneously dispersed and anchored within the matrix. The thermal expansion of the composite with the multiwall nanotube content (0, 1.5 vol%) were investigated and it is found that coefficient of thermal expansion decreases with the addition of multiwall nanotube content and reduce to about 63% to that of pure Ag.

  6. Electrical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced fused silica composites.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changshu; Pan, Yubai; Liu, Xuejian; Shi, Xiaomei; Sun, Xingwei; Guo, Jingkun

    2006-12-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-fused silica composite powders were synthesized by solgel method and dense bulk composites were successfully fabricated via hot-pressing. This composite was characterized by XRD, HRTEM, and FESEM. MWCNTs in the hot-pressed composites are in their integrity observed by HRTEM. The electrical properties of MWCNT-fused silica composites were measured and analyzed. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with the increase in the amount of the MWCNT loading in the composite. When the volume percentage of the MWCNTs increased to 5 vol%, the electrical resistivity of the composite is 24.99 omega cm, which is a decrease of twelve orders of value over that of pure fused silica matrix. The electrical resistivity further decreases to 1.742 omega. cm as the concentration of the MWCNTs increased to 10 vol%. The dielectric properties of the composites were also measured at the frequency ranging from 12.4 to 17.8 GHz (Ku band) at room temperature. The experimental results reveal that the dielectric properties are extremely sensitive to the volume percentage of the MWCNTs, and the permittivities, especially the imaginary permittivities, increase dramatically with the increase in the concentration of the MWCNTs. The improvement of dielectric properties in high frequency region mainly originates from the greatly increasing electrical properties of the composite. PMID:17256338

  7. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  8. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-19

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. PMID:23011263

  9. Self-lubricating carbon nanotube reinforced nickel matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, T. W.; Neira, A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Banerjee, R.; Tiley, J.

    2009-07-01

    Nickel (Ni)--multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have been processed in a monolithic form using the laser-engineered net shape (LENS) processing technique. Auger electron spectroscopy maps determined that the nanotubes were well dispersed and bonded in the nickel matrix and no interfacial chemical reaction products were determined in the as-synthesized composites. Mechanisms of solid lubrication have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy spatial mapping of the worn surfaces to determine the formation of tribochemical products. The Ni-CNT composites exhibit a self-lubricating behavior, forming an in situ, low interfacial shear strength graphitic film during sliding, resulting in a decrease in friction coefficient compared to pure Ni.

  10. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-01

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  11. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  12. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  14. Free vibration of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite plates with cutout

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the past five years, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes act as an exceptional reinforcement for composites. For this reason, a large number of investigations have been devoted to analysis of fundamental, structural behavior of solid structures made of carbon-nanotube-reinforced composites (CNTRC). The present research, as an extension of the available works on the vibration analysis of CNTRC structures, examines the free vibration characteristics of plates containing a cutout that are reinforced with uniform or nonuniform distribution of carbon nanotubes. The first-order shear deformation plate theory is used to estimate the kinematics of the plate. The solution method is based on the Ritz method with Chebyshev basis polynomials. Such a solution method is suitable for arbitrary in-plane and out-of-plane boundary conditions of the plate. It is shown that through a functionally graded distribution of carbon nanotubes across the thickness of the plate, the fundamental frequency of a rectangular plate with or without a cutout may be enhanced. Furthermore, the frequencies are highly dependent on the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes and may be increased upon using more carbon nanotubes as reinforcement. PMID:27335742

  15. Free vibration of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite plates with cutout.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mostafa; Kiani, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    During the past five years, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes act as an exceptional reinforcement for composites. For this reason, a large number of investigations have been devoted to analysis of fundamental, structural behavior of solid structures made of carbon-nanotube-reinforced composites (CNTRC). The present research, as an extension of the available works on the vibration analysis of CNTRC structures, examines the free vibration characteristics of plates containing a cutout that are reinforced with uniform or nonuniform distribution of carbon nanotubes. The first-order shear deformation plate theory is used to estimate the kinematics of the plate. The solution method is based on the Ritz method with Chebyshev basis polynomials. Such a solution method is suitable for arbitrary in-plane and out-of-plane boundary conditions of the plate. It is shown that through a functionally graded distribution of carbon nanotubes across the thickness of the plate, the fundamental frequency of a rectangular plate with or without a cutout may be enhanced. Furthermore, the frequencies are highly dependent on the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes and may be increased upon using more carbon nanotubes as reinforcement. PMID:27335742

  16. A multiscale approach for estimating the chirality effects in carbon nanotube reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Unnati A.; Sharma, Satish C.; Harsha, S. P.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the multiscale representative volume element approach is proposed for modeling the elastic behavior of carbon nanotubes reinforced composites. The representative volume element incorporates the continuum approach, while carbon nanotube characterizes the atomistic approach. Space frame structure similar to three dimensional beams and point masses are employed to simulate the discrete geometrical constitution of the single walled carbon nanotube. The covalent bonds between carbon atoms found in the hexagonal lattices are assigned elastic properties using beam elements. The point masses applied on each node are coinciding with the carbon atoms work as mass of beam elements. The matrix phase is modeled as a continuum medium using solid elements. These two regions are interconnected by interfacial zone using beam elements. Analysis of nanocomposites having single walled carbon nanotube with different chiralities is performed, using an atomistic finite element model based on a molecular structural mechanics approach. Using the proposed multi scale model, the deformations obtained from the simulations are used to predict the elastic and shear moduli of the nanocomposites. A significant enhancement in the stiffness of the nanocomposites is observed. The effects of interfacial shear strength, stiffness, tensile strength, chirality, length of carbon nanotube, material of matrix, types of representative volume elements and types of loading conditions on the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposites are estimated. The finite element results are compared with the rule of mixtures using formulae. It is found that the results offered by proposed model, are in close proximity with those obtained by the rule of mixtures.

  17. Forced vibration analysis of functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced composite plates using a numerical strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Hasrati, E.; Faghih Shojaei, M.; Gholami, R.; Shahabodini, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear forced vibration behavior of composite plates reinforced by carbon nanotubes is investigated by a numerical approach. The reinforcement is considered to be functionally graded (FG) in the thickness direction according to a micromechanical model. The first-order shear deformation theory and von Kármán-type kinematic relations are employed. The governing equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived with the use of Hamilton's principle. The generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method is utilized to achieve a discretized set of nonlinear governing equations. A Galerkin-based scheme is then applied to obtain a time-varying set of ordinary differential equations of Duffing-type. Subsequently, a time periodic discretization is done and the frequency response of plates is determined via the pseudo-arc length continuation method. Selected numerical results are given for the effects of different parameters on the nonlinear forced vibration characteristics of uniformly distributed carbon nanotube- and FG carbon nanotube-reinforced composite plates. It is found that with the increase of CNT volume fraction, the flexural stiffness of plate increases; and hence its natural frequency gets larger. Moreover, it is observed that the distribution type of CNTs significantly affects the vibrational behavior of plate. The results also show that when the mid-plane of plate is CNT-rich, the natural frequency takes its minimum value and the hardening-type response of plate is intensified.

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  19. Strengthening behavior of chopped multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.E.; Bae, D.H.

    2013-09-15

    Strengthening behavior of the aluminum composites reinforced with chopped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or aluminum carbide formed during annealing at 500 °C has been investigated. The composites were fabricated by hot-rolling the powders which were ball-milled under various conditions. During the early annealing process, aluminum atoms can cluster inside the tube due to the diffusional flow of aluminum atoms into the tube, providing an increase of the strength of the composite. Further annealing induces the formation of the aluminum carbide phase, leading to an overall drop in the strength of the composites. While the strength of the composites can be evaluated according to the rule of mixture, a particle spacing effect can be additionally imparted on the strength of the composites reinforced with the chopped MWCNTs or the corresponding carbides since the reinforcing agents are smaller than the submicron matrix grains. - Highlights: • Strengthening behavior of chopped CNT reinforced Al-based composites is investigated. • Chopped CNTs have influenced the strength and microstructures of the composites. • Chopped CNTs are created under Ar- 3% H2 atmosphere during mechanical milling. • Strength can be evaluated by the rule of the mixture and a particle spacing effect.

  20. Consolidation of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites by High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Joo, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-08-01

    Al-3 vol pct carbon nanotube (CNT) composites are fabricated by consolidation through high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature. The densification behavior, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties of Al/CNT composites are studied. The results show that density and microstructural homogeneity increase with increasing number of revolutions under a high pressure of 6 GPa. Substantial grain refinement is achieved after 10 turns of HPT with an average grain thickness of ~38 nm perpendicular to the compression axis of HPT. The Al/CNT composite shows a considerable increase in hardness and strength compared to the Al matrix. The strengthening mechanisms of the Al/CNT composite are found to be (i) grain refinement of Al matrix and (ii) Orowan looping. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the structure of most of CNTs is changed during processing through mechanical milling and HPT.

  1. Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Hydroxyapatite Composites Consolidated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Yeon; Han, Young-Hwan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Jang, Byung-Koog; Kim, Sukyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pure HA and 1, 3, 5, and 10 vol% multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWNT-) reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) were consolidated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The relative density of pure HA increased with increasing sintering temperature, but that of the MWNT/HA composite reached almost full density at 900°C, and then decreased with further increases in sintering temperature. The relative density of the MWNT/HA composites increased with increasing MWNT content due to the excellent thermal conductivity of MWNTs. The grain size of MWNT/HA composites decreased with increasing MWNT content and increased with increasing sintering temperature. Pull-out toughening of the MWNTs of the MWNT/HA composites was observed in the fractured surface, which can be used to predict the improvement of the mechanical properties. On the other hand, the existence of undispersed or agglomerate MWNTs in the MWNT/HA composites accompanied large pores. The formation of large pores increased with increasing sintering temperature and MWNT content. The addition of MWNT in HA increased the hardness and fracture toughness by approximately 3~4 times, despite the presence of large pores produced by un-dispersed MWNTs. This provides strong evidence as to why the MWNTs are good candidates as reinforcements for strengthening the ceramic matrix. The MWNT/HA composites did not decompose during SPS sintering. The MWNT-reinforced HA composites were non-toxic and showed a good cell affinity and morphology in vitro for 1 day. PMID:24724100

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced composites: processing and mechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2002-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been the subject of considerable attention because of their exceptional physical and mechanical properties. These properties observed at the nanoscale have motivated researchers to utilize carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in composite materials. In this research, a micro-scale twin-screw extruder was used to achieve dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a polystyrene matrix. Highly aligned nanocomposite films were produced by extruding the polymer melt through a rectangular die and drawing the film prior to cooling. Randomly oriented nanocomposites were produced by achieving dispersion first with the twin-screw extruder followed by pressing a film using a hydraulic press. The tensile behaviour of the aligned and random nanocomposite films with 5 wt.{%} loading of nanotubes were characterized. Addition of nanotubes increased the tensile modulus, yield strength and ultimate strengths of the polymer films, and the improvement in elastic modulus with the aligned nanotube composite is five times greater than the improvement for the randomly oriented composite.

  3. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-12-15

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%.

  4. A novel processing route for carbon nanotube reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the establishment of a novel feasible way for processing glass- and ceramic- matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique is based on high shear compaction of glass/ceramic and CNT blends in the presence of polymeric binders for the production of flexible green bodies which are subsequently sintered and densified by spark plasma sintering. The method was successfully applied on a borosilicate glass / multi-wall CNT composite with final density identical to that of the full-dense ceramic. Preliminary non-destructive evaluation of dynamic mechanical properties such as Young's and shear modulus and Poisson's ratio by ultrasonics show that property improvement maximizes up to a certain CNT loading; after this threshold is exceeded, properties degrade with further loading increase.

  5. Stiffness predictions of carbon nanotube reinforced two and three-phase polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neer, Eric

    Carbon nanotubes are a relatively new area of research which has gained significant attention in published literature. One reason for this interest is their use in multi-phase composites, specifically where they can enhance traditional polymer matrices. Many authors have attempted to adapt conventional micromechanical analyses reserved for microfibers to the nano scale. A review of these works is presented. In depth analysis is provided on one of these two phase (nanotube and matrix) models, the Anumandla-Gibson model, originally published in 2006. A discussion of its strengths and sensitivities is given, with numerical data to support the conclusions. It is extended to three-phase composites through the use of classical laminated plate theory. A literature survey is conducted to gather published two and three-phase experimental results for comparison. Two phase experimental results agree well with the present model, whereas three phase data was limited, but initial comparisons were promising.

  6. Carbon nanotube-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite and their interaction with human osteoblast in vitro.

    PubMed

    Khalid, P; Hussain, M A; Rekha, P D; Arun, A B

    2015-05-01

    As a bone mineral component, hydroxyapatite (HA) has been an attractive bioceramic for the reconstruction of hard tissues. However, its poor mechanical properties, including low fracture toughness and tensile strength, have been a substantial challenge to the application of HA for the replacement of load-bearing and/or large bone defects. In this study, HA is reinforced with high-purity and well-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs; >99 wt%) having an average diameter of 15 nm and length from 10 to 20 μm. The cellular response of these functionalized CNTs and its composites were examined in human osteoblast sarcoma cell lines. Calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (Ca(NO3)2·4H2O) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate ((NH4)2HPO4) were used to synthesize HA in situ. MWCNTs were functionalized by heating at 100°C in 3:1 ratio of sulfuric acid and nitric acid for 60 min with stirring and dispersed in sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate by sonication. HA particles were produced in MWCNTs solution by adding Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4 under vigorously stirring conditions. The composite was dried and washed in distilled water followed by heat treatment at 250°C to obtain CNT-HA powder. Physiochemical characterization of the composite material was carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffractometer. Furthermore, this study investigates the cytotoxic effects of functionalized-MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs) and its composites with HA in human osteoblast sarcoma cell lines. Human osteoblast cells were exposed with different concentrations of f-MWCNTs and its composite with HA. The interactions of f-MWCNT and MWCNT-HA composites were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results indicate no detrimental effect on survival or mitochondrial activity of the osteoblast cells. Cell viability decreased with an increase in CNT

  7. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhan Jun; Yang, Ying Chao; Li, Kai Yuan; Tao, Xin Yong; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane Y; Zhang, Li Tong; Li, Xiao Dong; Pan, Zhengwei

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  8. Facile Synthesis and Electrical Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nanosilver Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal; Kumar, Rajesh; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-12-01

    Metal matrix nanocomposites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become popular in industrial applications. Due to their excellent thermophysical and mechanical properties, CNTs are considered as attractive filler for the improvement in properties of metals. In the present work, we have synthesized noncovalently functionalized CNT reinforced nanosilver composites by using a modified molecular level mixing method. The structure and morphology of nanocomposites are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity of silver-CNT nanocomposites measured by the four-point probe method is found to be more than that of the pure nanosilver. The significant improvement in electrical conductivity of Ag=CNT nanocomposites stems from homogenous and embedded distribution of CNTs in a silver matrix with intact structure resulting from noncovalent functionalization. The low temperature sintering also enhances the electrical conductivity of Ag=CNT nanocomposites.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of mechanical properties of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Mokhalingam, A.; Singh, Akhileshwar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Atomistic simulations were conducted to estimate the effect of the carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforcement on the mechanical behavior of CNT-reinforced aluminum (Al) nanocomposite. The periodic system of CNT-Al nanocomposite was built and simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite were investigated by the application of uniaxial load on one end of the representative volume element (RVE) and fixing the other end. The interactions between the atoms of Al were modeled using embedded atom method (EAM) potentials, whereas Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential was used for the interactions among carbon atoms and these pair potentials are coupled with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. The results show that the incorporation of CNT into the Al matrix can increase the Young's modulus of the nanocomposite substantially. In the present case, i.e. for approximately 9 with % reinforcement of CNT can increase the axial Young's modulus of the Al matrix up to 77 % as compared to pure Al.

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shilun

    This thesis is concerned with the development of high performance ultrahigh molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers reinforced using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A novel process has been developed, whereby, MWCNT/UHMWPE nanocomposite fibers with Young's modulus up to 137 GPa and tensile strength of ˜4.2 GPa has been produced. This fiber possesses the best specific mechanical properties amongst all current commercial high performance fibers. Systematic investigations were carried out to elucidate the mechanisms of reinforcement. Firstly, systematical experimental studies were carried out to investigate the CNT reinforcing effect on nanocomposite fibers prepared with different PE molecular orientations. The overall effect can be classified into three regions. At low molecular orientation levels, the CNTs act to toughen and strengthen the nanocomposites. At the intermediate molecular orientations, the CNTs have negligible effects on the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. At very high molecular orientations, the CNTs act to mainly stiffen and strengthen the nanocomposite. Secondly, systematic investigations were carried out to investigate the structure evolution as well as the load transfer between the embedded CNTs and that of the matrix PE. Thermal and morphological studies demonstrate that CNTs act as effective nucleation sites for PE crystal growth. The load transfer mechanisms in both the low and high molecular orientation fibers are similar. Major differences were related to CNT alignment effects. The highly oriented fibers show CNT alignment effect in the initial elastic regime, whereas the CNTs in the fibers of low molecular orientations show no appreciable alignment in the elastic regime. Finally, based on the experimental observations, a mechanistic model has been proposed to elucidate the reinforcement mechanisms. This model proposes that there exists an absorption layer surrounding CNTs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. Nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, Meisha Lei

    The inherent high strength, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity make nanotubes attractive reinforcements for polymer matrix composites. However, the structure that makes them desirable also causes highly anisotropic properties and limited reactivity with other materials. This thesis isolates these problems in two separate studies aimed at improving mechanical properties with single wall nanotube (SWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites. The two studies demonstrate the effect of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and chemical functionalization on anisotropy and limited reactivity, respectively. Both studies showed mechanical property improvements. The alignment study demonstrates a maximum increase of 93% in tensile modulus with single wall nanotubes (SWNTs). The chemical functionalization study shows a larger increase in storage modulus for functionalized SWNTs as compared to purified SVWNTs with respective increases of 9% and 44% in storage modulus. Improved interfacial properties are also observed as a decrease in mechanical damping. Maximum property increases in composites are obtained when nanotubes are aligned, requiring additional processing consideration to the anisotropic structure. Melt spinning and extrusion processing effectively align nanotubes, but the end product of these techniques, composite fibers, requires further processing to be incorporated into finished parts. Extrusion-based SFF is a novel technique for processing nanotube reinforced composites because it allows for the direct fabrication of finished parts containing aligned nanotubes. SFF processing produces parts containing preferentially oriented nanotubes with improved mechanical properties when compared to isotropic composites. Functionalization of the nanotube surface disrupts the rope structure to obtain smaller ropes and promote further interfacial bonding. The chemically inert nature of nanotubes resulting from a structure containing few defects and the

  12. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  13. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP. PMID:26447230

  14. Fabrication, characterization, and biocompatibility of single-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced alginate composite scaffolds manufactured using freeform fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Eda D; Yin, Xi; Nair, Kalyani; Sun, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Composite polymeric scaffolds from alginate and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) were produced using a freeform fabrication technique. The scaffolds were characterized for their structural, mechanical, and biological properties by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, tensile testing, and cell-scaffold interaction study. Three-dimensional hybrid alginate/SWCNT tissue scaffolds were fabricated in a multinozzle biopolymer deposition system, which makes possible to disperse and align SWCNTs in the alginate matrix. The structure of the resultant scaffolds was significantly altered due to SWCNT reinforcement, which was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Microtensile testing presented a reinforcement effect of SWCNT to the mechanical strength of the alginate struts. Ogden constitutive modeling was utilized to predict the stress-strain relationship of the alginate scaffold, which compared well with the experimental data. Cellular study by rat heart endothelial cell showed that the SWCNT incorporated in the alginate structure improved cell adhesion and proliferation. Our study suggests that hybrid alginate/SWCNT scaffolds are a promising biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. PMID:18506813

  15. Electrospun Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Mm; Hee Kim, Sung; Choi, Myong Soo; Lee, Jun Young

    2016-03-01

    We fabricated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) reinforced polyurethane (PU) nanofiber (MWNT-PU) web via electrospinning. In order to optimize the electrospinning conditions, we investigated the effects of various parameters including kind of solvent, viscosity of the spinning solution, and flow rate on the spinnability and properties of nanofiber. N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and their mixture with various volume ratio were used as the spinning solvent. Morphology of the nanofiber was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), confirming successful fabrication of MWNT-PU nanofiber web with uniform dispersion of MWNT in longitudinal direction of the fiber. The MWNT-PU nanofiber web exhibited two times higher tensile strength than PU nanofiber web. We also fabricated electrically conducting MWNT-PU nanofiber web by coating poly(3,4-ehtylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on the surface of MWNT-PU nanofiber web for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding application. The electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) was quite high as 25 dB in the frequency range from 50 MHz to 10 GHz. PMID:27455732

  16. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  17. Enhancement of strength and stiffness of Nylon 6 filaments through carbon nanotubes reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Adnan, Ashfaq; Rangari, Vijay K.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Jeelani, Shaik; Wright, Wendelin J.; DeTeresa, Steven J.

    2006-02-01

    We report a method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced Nylon filaments through an extrusion process. In this process, Nylon 6 and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are first dry mixed and then extruded in the form of continuous filaments by a single screw extrusion method. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies have indicated that there is a moderate increase in Tg without a discernible shift in the melting endotherm. Tensile tests on single filaments have demonstrated that Young's modulus and strength of the nanophased filaments have increased by 220% and 164%, respectively with the addition of only 1wt.% MWCNTs. SEM studies and micromechanics based calculations have shown that the alignment of MWCNTs in the filaments, and high interfacial shear strength between the matrix and the nanotube reinforcement was responsible for such a dramatic improvement in properties.

  18. Carbon nanotube reinforced polyacrylonitrile and poly(etherketone) fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rahul

    The graphitic nature, continuous structure, and high mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them good candidate for reinforcing polymer fiber. The different types of CNTs including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), few-wall carbon nanotubes (FWNTs), and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) differ in terms of their diameter and number of graphitic walls. The desire has been to increase the concentration of CNTs as much as possible to make next generation multi-functional materials. The work in this thesis is mainly focused on MWNT and CNF reinforced polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite fibers, and SWNT, FWNT, and MWNT reinforced poly(etherketone) (PEK) composite fibers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the spinning of 20% MWNT or 30% CNF reinforced polymer fiber spun using conventional fiber spinning. Also, this is the first study to report the PEK/CNT composite fibers. The fibers were characterized for their thermal, tensile, mechanical, and dynamic mechanical properties. The fiber structure and morphology was studied using WAXD and SEM. The effect of two-stage heat drawing, sonication time for CNF dispersion, fiber drying temperature, and molecular weight of PAN was also studied. Other challenges associated with processing high concentrations of solutions for making composite fibers have been identified and reported. The effect of CNT diameter and concentration on fiber spinnability and electrical conductivity of composite fiber have also been studied. This work suggests that CNT diameter controls the maximum possible concentration of CNTs in a composite fiber. The results show that by properly choosing the type of CNT, length of CNTs, dispersion of CNTs, fiber spinning method, fiber draw ratio, and type of polymer, one can get electrically conducting fibers with wide range of conductivities for different applications. The PEK based control and composite fibers possess high thermal

  19. Irradiation studies on carbon nanotube-reinforced boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; McCarthy, Michael C.; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Shao, Lin

    2012-02-01

    Radiation response of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced boron carbide composite has been studied for its application as a structural component in nuclear engineering. The composite was bombarded by 140 keV He ions at room temperature to a fluence ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 1 × 10 17 cm -2. Two-dimensional Raman mapping shows inhomogeneous distribution of CNTs, and was used to select regions of interest for damage characterization. For CNTs, the intensities ratio of D-G bands ( ID/ IG) increased with fluence up to a certain value, and decreased at the fluence of 5 × 10 16 cm -2. This fluence also corresponds to a trend break in the plot of FWHM (full width at half maximum) of G band vs. ID/ IG ratio, which indicates amorphization of CNTs. The study shows that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to quantitatively characterize radiation damage in CNT-reinforced composites.

  20. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  1. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  2. Preparation and characterization of water-soluble carbon nanotube reinforced Nafion membranes and so-based ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Jie; Wang, Yanjie; Chang, Longfei; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we developed a new kind of ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuator by doping water-soluble sulfonated multi-walled carbon nanotube (sMWCNT) into Nafion matrix to overcome some major drawbacks of traditional IPMCs, such as relatively low bending deformation and carring capacity at low driving voltages. Firstly, sMWCNT was synthesized via diazotization coupling reaction, and then doped into Nafion matrix by casting method. Subsequently, the electrochemical and electromechanical properties of sMWCNT-reinforced Nafion membranes and the corresponding IPMCs were investigated. Finally, the effects of sMWCNT on the performances of IPMCs were evaluated and analyzed systematacially. The results showed that sMWCNT was homogeneously dispersed in Nafion matrix without any entangled structure or obvious agglomeration. The main factors for superior actuation performances, like water-uptake ratio, proton conductivity and elastic modulus, increased significantly. Compared to the pure Nafion IPMC and MWCNT/Nafion IPMC, much superior electrochemical and electromechanical performances were achieved in the sMWCNT/Nafion IPMC, which were attributed to the numerous insertion sites, high surface conductivity and excellent mechanical strength as well as the homogeneous dispersity of the incorporated sMWCNT. Herein, a trace amount of sMWCNT can improve the performances of IPMCs significantly for realistic applications.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  4. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  5. Analytical model to evaluate interface characteristics of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analytical method to investigate the effect of volume fraction and the number of outer walls of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) reinforcement on load carrying capability in the aluminum oxide matrix. Interfacial shear stress transfer and energy dissipation have been estimated using the Cox model. Critical energy release rate for the debonding of MWNT from the matrix is also estimated based on the crack deflection. The computed results sufficiently manifest that MWNT pullout and crack deflection contributes greatly to improved fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum oxide nanocomposites.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  7. Influence of gamma irradiation on carbon nanotube-reinforced polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Castell, P; Medel, F J; Martinez, M T; Puértolas, J A

    2009-10-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have been incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix in different concentrations (range: 0.25-2.5 wt%). The nanotubes were blended with PP particles (approximately 500 microm in size) before mixing in an extruder. Finally, rectangular plates were obtained by compression moulding. PP-SWNT composites were gamma irradiated at different doses, 10 and 20 kGy, to promote crosslinking in the matrix and potentially enhance the interaction between nanotubes and PP. Extensive thermal, structural and mechanical characterization was conducted by means of DSC, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, uniaxial tensile tests and dynamic mechanical thermal (DMTA) techniques. DSC thermograms reflected higher crystallinity with increasing nanotube concentration. XRD analysis confirmed the only presence of a monoclinic crystals and proved unambiguously that CNTs generated a preferred orientation. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the intercalation of the polymer between bundles is favored at low CNTs contents. Elastic modulus results confirmed the reinforcement of the polypropylene matrix with increasing SWNT concentration, although stiffness saturation was observed at the highest concentration. Loss tangent DMTA curves showed three transitions for raw polypropylene. While gamma relaxation remained practically unchanged in all the samples, beta relaxation temperatures showed an increase with increasing CNT content due to the reduced mobility of the system. Gamma-irradiated PP exhibited an increase in the beta relaxation temperature, associated with changes in glass transition due to radiation-induced crosslinking. On the contrary, gamma-irradiated nanocomposites did not show this effect probably due to the reaction of radiative free radicals with CNTs. PMID:19908494

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated. PMID:27200527

  9. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum based nanocomposite fabricated by thermal spray forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Tapas

    The present research concentrates on the fabrication of bulk aluminum matrix nanocomposite structures with carbon nanotube reinforcement. The objective of the work was to fabricate and characterize multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced hypereutectic Al-Si (23 wt% Si, 2 wt% Ni, 1 wt% Cu, rest Al) nanocomposite bulk structure with nanocrystalline matrix through thermal spray forming techniques viz. plasma spray forming (PSF) and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray forming. This is the first research study, which has shown that thermal spray forming can be successfully used to synthesize carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Microstructural characterization based on quantitative microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms (i) retention and macro/sub-macro level homogenous distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the Al-Si matrix and (ii) evolution of nanostructured grains in the matrix. Formation of ultrathin beta-SiC layer on MWCNT surface, due to chemical reaction of Si atoms diffusing from Al-Si alloy and C atoms from the outer walls of MWCNTs has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally. The presence of SiC layer at the interface improves the wettability and the interfacial adhesion between the MWCNT reinforcement and the Al-Si matrix. Sintering of the as-sprayed nanocomposites was carried out in an inert environment for further densification. As-sprayed PSF nanocomposite showed lower microhardness compared to HVOF, due to the higher porosity content and lower residual stress. The hardness of the nanocomposites increased with sintering time due to effective pore removal. Uniaxial tensile test on CNT-bulk nanocomposite was carried out, which is the first ever study of such nature. The tensile test results showed inconsistency in the data attributed to inhomogeneous

  10. Carbon nanotube reinforced polylactide-caprolactone copolymer: mechanical strengthening and interaction with human osteoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, D; Rouzaud, F; Namin, S; Keshri, A K; Valdés, J J; Kos, L; Tsoukias, N; Agarwal, A

    2009-11-01

    This study proposes the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of a polylactide-caprolactone copolymer (PLC) matrix. Biological interaction of PLC-CNT composites with human osteoblast cells is also investigated. Addition of 2 wt % CNT shows very uniform dispersion in the copolymer matrix, whereas 5 wt % CNT shows severe agglomeration and high porosity. PLC-2 wt % CNT composite shows an improvement in the mechanical properties with an increase in the elastic modulus by 100% and tensile strength by 160%, without any adverse effect on the ductility up to 240% elongation. An in vitro biocompatibility study on the composites shows an increase in the viability of human osteoblast cells compared to the PLC matrix, which is attributed to the combined effect of CNT content and surface roughness of the composite films. PMID:20356116

  11. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites. PMID:17450788

  12. Fractal model for estimating fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rishabh, Abhishek; Joshi, Milind R.; Balani, Kantesh

    2010-06-15

    The current work focuses on predicting the fracture toughness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic matrix composites using a modified Mandelbrot's fractal approach. The first step confirms that the experimental fracture toughness values fluctuate within the fracture toughness range predicted as per the modified fractal approach. Additionally, the secondary reinforcements [such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs)] have shown to enhance the fracture toughness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Conventional fractural toughness evaluation via fractal approach underestimates the fracture toughness by considering the shortest crack path. Hence, the modified Mandelbrot's fractal approach considers the crack propagation along the CNT semicircumferential surface (three-dimensional crack path propagation) for achieving an improved fracture toughness estimation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CNT composite. The estimations obtained in the current approach range within 4% error regime of the experimentally measured fracture toughness values of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CNT composite.

  13. Pull-out simulations of a capped carbon nanotube in carbon nanotube-reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, N.; Han, X.; Zhou, L.; Ning, H.; Wu, L.; Alamusi, Yamamoto, G.; Chang, C.; Hashida, T.; Atobe, S.; Fukunaga, H.

    2013-04-01

    Systematic atomic simulations based on molecular mechanics were conducted to investigate the pull-out behavior of a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) in CNT-reinforced nanocomposites. Two common cases were studied: the pull-out of a complete CNT from a polymer matrix in a CNT/polymer nanocomposite and the pull-out of the broken outer walls of a CNT from the intact inner walls (i.e., the sword-in-sheath mode) in a CNT/alumina nanocomposite. By analyzing the obtained relationship between the energy increment (i.e., the difference in the potential energy between two consecutive pull-out steps) and the pull-out displacement, a set of simple empirical formulas based on the nanotube diameter was developed to predict the corresponding pull-out force. The predictions from these formulas are quite consistent with the experimental results. Moreover, the much higher pull-out force for a capped CNT than that of the corresponding open-ended CNT implies a significant contribution from the CNT cap to the interfacial properties of the CNT-reinforced nanocomposites. This finding provides a valuable insight for designing nanocomposites with desirable mechanical properties.

  14. Pull-out simulations of a capped carbon nanotube in carbon nanotube-reinforced nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, N.; Ning, H.; Wu, L.; Alamusi; Han, X.; Zhou, L.; Yamamoto, G.; Hashida, T.; Chang, C.; Atobe, S.; Fukunaga, H.

    2013-04-14

    Systematic atomic simulations based on molecular mechanics were conducted to investigate the pull-out behavior of a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) in CNT-reinforced nanocomposites. Two common cases were studied: the pull-out of a complete CNT from a polymer matrix in a CNT/polymer nanocomposite and the pull-out of the broken outer walls of a CNT from the intact inner walls (i.e., the sword-in-sheath mode) in a CNT/alumina nanocomposite. By analyzing the obtained relationship between the energy increment (i.e., the difference in the potential energy between two consecutive pull-out steps) and the pull-out displacement, a set of simple empirical formulas based on the nanotube diameter was developed to predict the corresponding pull-out force. The predictions from these formulas are quite consistent with the experimental results. Moreover, the much higher pull-out force for a capped CNT than that of the corresponding open-ended CNT implies a significant contribution from the CNT cap to the interfacial properties of the CNT-reinforced nanocomposites. This finding provides a valuable insight for designing nanocomposites with desirable mechanical properties.

  15. Enhanced bone regeneration with carbon nanotube reinforced hydroxyapatite in animal model.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Susmita; Nandi, Samit Kumar; Kundu, Biswanath; Chanda, Abhijit; Sen, Swarnendu; Das, Pradip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    In order to improve the inherently poor mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and to increase its feasibility as load bearing implant material, in the present investigation, functionalised (HFC1 and HFC2) and non-functionalized (HC1 and HC2) multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used as reinforcing material with HAp. Significant improvement with respect to fracture toughness, flexural strength and impact strength of the composites was noticed. In vitro biological properties of HAp-carbon nanotube (CNT) biocomposites have also favored uniform and systematic apatite growth on their surface. Subsequently, in vivo osseous ingrowth at bone defect of rabbit femur was evaluated and compared using radiology, push out test, fluorochrome labeling, histology and scanning electron microscopy after 2 and 4 months respectively. The results demonstrated growth of web like soft callus from the host bone towards the implant, ensuring strong host bone interaction. Toxicological studies of the liver and kidney cells exhibited no abnormality, thereby confirming non-toxicity of the CNT in the animal body. Host-implant biomechanical strength showed high interfacial strength of the composites, indicating their high potentials to be used for bone remodeling applications. PMID:26907099

  16. Mode I Fracture Toughness Prediction for Multiwalled-Carbon-Nanotube Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2015-08-27

    This article develops a multiscale model to predict fracture toughness of multiwalled-carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramics. The model bridges different scales from the scale of a MWCNT to that of a composite domain containing a macroscopic crack. From the nano, micro to meso scales, Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka models combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach are explored to predict the elastic damage behavior of the composite as a function of MWCNT volume fraction. MWCNTs are assumed to be randomly dispersed in a ceramic matrix subject to cracking under loading. A damage variable is used to describe matrix cracking that causes reduction of the elastic modulus of the matrix. This damage model is introduced in a modified boundary layer modeling approach to capture damage initiation and development at a tip of a pre-existing crack. Damage and fracture are captured only in a process window containing the crack tip under plane strain Mode I loading. The model is validated against the published experimental fracture toughness data for a MWCNT 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia composite system. In addition, crack resistance curves as a function of MWCNT content are predicted and fitted by a power law as observed in the experiments on zirconia.

  17. Inorganic nanotubes reinforced polyvinylidene fluoride composites as low-cost electromagnetic interference shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Eswaraiah, Varrla; Sankaranarayanan, Venkataraman; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2011-01-01

    Novel polymer nanocomposites comprising of MnO2 nanotubes (MNTs), functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were synthesized. Homogeneous distribution of f-MWCNTs and MNTs in PVDF matrix were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on these polymer composites using four probe technique. The addition of 2 wt.% of MNTs (2 wt.%, f-MWCNTs) to PVDF matrix results in an increase in the electrical conductivity from 10-16S/m to 4.5 × 10-5S/m (3.2 × 10-1S/m). Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) was measured with vector network analyzer using waveguide sample holder in X-band frequency range. EMI SE of approximately 20 dB has been obtained with the addition of 5 wt.% MNTs-1 wt.% f-MWCNTs to PVDF in comparison with EMI SE of approximately 18 dB for 7 wt.% of f-MWCNTs indicating the potential use of the present MNT/f-MWCNT/PVDF composite as low-cost EMI shielding materials in X-band region. PMID:21711633

  18. Inorganic nanotubes reinforced polyvinylidene fluoride composites as low-cost electromagnetic interference shielding materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Novel polymer nanocomposites comprising of MnO2 nanotubes (MNTs), functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were synthesized. Homogeneous distribution of f-MWCNTs and MNTs in PVDF matrix were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on these polymer composites using four probe technique. The addition of 2 wt.% of MNTs (2 wt.%, f-MWCNTs) to PVDF matrix results in an increase in the electrical conductivity from 10-16S/m to 4.5 × 10-5S/m (3.2 × 10-1S/m). Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) was measured with vector network analyzer using waveguide sample holder in X-band frequency range. EMI SE of approximately 20 dB has been obtained with the addition of 5 wt.% MNTs-1 wt.% f-MWCNTs to PVDF in comparison with EMI SE of approximately 18 dB for 7 wt.% of f-MWCNTs indicating the potential use of the present MNT/f-MWCNT/PVDF composite as low-cost EMI shielding materials in X-band region. PMID:21711633

  19. Inorganic nanotubes reinforced polyvinylidene fluoride composites as low-cost electromagnetic interference shielding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, Varrla; Sankaranarayanan, Venkataraman; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2011-12-01

    Novel polymer nanocomposites comprising of MnO2 nanotubes (MNTs), functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes ( f-MWCNTs), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were synthesized. Homogeneous distribution of f-MWCNTs and MNTs in PVDF matrix were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on these polymer composites using four probe technique. The addition of 2 wt.% of MNTs (2 wt.%, f-MWCNTs) to PVDF matrix results in an increase in the electrical conductivity from 10-16S/m to 4.5 × 10-5S/m (3.2 × 10-1S/m). Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) was measured with vector network analyzer using waveguide sample holder in X-band frequency range. EMI SE of approximately 20 dB has been obtained with the addition of 5 wt.% MNTs-1 wt.% f-MWCNTs to PVDF in comparison with EMI SE of approximately 18 dB for 7 wt.% of f-MWCNTs indicating the potential use of the present MNT/ f-MWCNT/PVDF composite as low-cost EMI shielding materials in X-band region.

  20. Chemical, mechanical, and thermal expansion properties of a carbon nanotube-reinforced aluminum nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Sharma, Vimal

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the chemical and mechanical properties and the thermal expansion of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based crystalline nano-aluminum (nano Al) composite were reported. The properties of nanocomposites were tailored by incorporating CNTs into the nano Al matrix using a physical mixing method. The elastic moduli and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the nanocomposites were also estimated to understand the effects of CNT reinforcement in the Al matrix. Microstructural characterization of the nanocomposite reveals that the CNTs are dispersed and embedded in the Al matrix. The experimental results indicate that the incorporation of CNTs into the nano Al matrix results in the increase in hardness and elastic modulus along with a concomitant decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The hardness and elastic modulus of the nanocomposite increase by 21% and 20%, respectively, upon CNT addition. The CTE of CNT/Al nanocomposite decreases to 70% compared with that of nano Al.

  1. Electrospinning of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced aligned fibrils and yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Hoa Le

    Commercial carbon fibers produced from a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor have reached their performance limit. The approach in this study involves the use of single carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with an ultra-high elastic modulus of approximately ˜1 TPa and tensile strength of ˜37 GPa at a breaking strain of ˜6% to reinforce PAN. In order to translate these extraordinary properties to a higher order structure, the need for a media to carry and assemble the SWNT into continuous fibers or yarns is necessary. Effective translation of properties can only be achieved through uniform distribution of SWNT and their alignment in the fiber axis. This has been one of the major challenges since SWNTs tend to agglomerate due to high van der Waals attraction between tubes. It is the goal of this study to develop dispersion technique(s) for the SWNT and process them into aligned fibers utilizing the electrospinning process. The electrospun nanofibers were then characterized by various techniques such as ESEM, Raman microspectroscopy, HRTEM, and tensile testing. Composite nanofibers containing various contents of SWNT up to 10 wt. % with diameter ranging from 40--300 nm were successfully electrospun through varying the polymer concentration and spinning parameters. The inclusion of SWNTs and their alignment in the fiber axis were confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy, polarized Raman and HRETEM. The failure mechanism of the nanofibers was investigated by HRTEM through fiber surface fracture. A two stage rupture mechanism was observed where crazing initiates at a surface defect followed by SWNTs pulling out of the PAN matrix. Such mechanisms consume energy therefore strengthening and toughening the fibers. Mechanical drawing of the fiber prior to heat treatment induced molecular orientation resulting in oriented graphite layers in the carbonized fibers. This study has established a processing base and characterization techniques to support the design and development of SWNT

  2. Investigation of Thermal Expansion and Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nanocrystalline Aluminum Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Sharma, Vimal

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites are fabricated by a simple and effective physical mixing method with sonication. In this study, the microstructural characterisations and property evaluations of the nanocomposites were performed. The structural characterisations revealed that CNTs were dispersed, embedded, and anchored within the metal matrix. A strong interfacial adhesion appeared between CNTs and nanocrystalline aluminum as a result of the fabrication process. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies also confirmed the surface adherence of CNTs with nanocrystalline aluminum matrix during the fabrication process. Thermal expansion behaviour of CNT-reinforced aluminum matrix composites was investigated up to 240°C using a dilatometer. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the nanocomposites decreased continuously with the increasing content of CNTs. The maximum reduction of 82% was found for 4 wt% CNTs in the nanocomposite. The coefficient of thermal expansion variation with CNTs was also compared with the predictions from the thermoelastic models. The expansion behaviour of the nanocomposites was correlated to the microstructure, internal stresses, and phase segregations. The electrical and thermal conductivity was also studied and was observed to decrease for all reinforced CNT weight fractions.

  3. Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrical response of carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites under static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeder, Nicholas J.

    The electrical response of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading is experimentally investigated. The objective of this project was to study the electrical response of CNT-reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading where the carbon nanotubes are used to create an internal sensory network within, capable of detecting important information such as strain and damage. Experimental techniques were developed to effectively obtain the bulk resistance change of the nanocomposite material while subjected to quasi-static and dynamic loading. A combination of shear mixing and ultrasonication was used to fabricate the low resistance nanocomposite material. The fabrication process parameters and the optimum weight fraction of MWCNTs for generating a well-dispersed percolation network were first determined. A screw-driven testing machine, a drop weight tower, and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus were utilized to load the specimens. Absolute resistance values were measured with a high-resolution four-point probe method for both quasi-static and dynamic loading. In addition to measuring the percentage change in electrical resistance, real-time damage was captured using high-speed photography. The real-time damage was correlated to both load and percentage change in resistance profiles to better understand the electrical behavior of CNT reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading. The experimental findings indicate that the bulk electrical resistance of the nanocomposites, under both quasi-static and drop weight loading conditions, initially decreased between 40%--60% during compression and then increased as damage initiated and propagated. Similarly, a 65%--85% decrease in resistance was observed when the nanocomposites were subjected to SHPB loading. Damage initiation and propagation was also captured by the resistance measurements owing to the ability of the CNTs to be

  5. Carbon nanotubes reinforced poly(L-lactide) scaffolds fabricated by thermally induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyun; Xue, Li

    2015-01-01

    In tissue engineering, porous nanocomposite scaffolds can potentially mimic aspects of the nanoscale architecture of the extra-cellular matrix, as well as enhance the mechanical properties required for successful weight-bearing implants. In this paper, we demonstrate that highly porous thermoplastic poly(L-lactide) nanocomposite scaffolds containing different types of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanocomposite scaffolds were manufactured by a thermally induced phase separation method. This experiment produced an uniform distribution of CNTs throughout the scaffold without obvious aggregations for funtionalized CNTs filled scaffolds by scanning electron microscope observation. The CNTs were frequently located on the pore surface, forming rough, hairy nano-textures. The pore size was reduced with the increasing of CNT loading. Parts of PLLA matrix was induced into nanofibrous structures from solid-walled state, which reduced the crystallinity of the PLLA characterized by DSC measurement. The CNT incorporation significantly improved the compression modulus of the nanocomposite scaffolds, especially the functionalized CNTs. The capacity of protein adsorption is significantly improved when the concentration of the CNTs was higher than 1.0 wt.% and the cell attachment was also enhanced by the addition of CNTs, especially N-CNT.

  6. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid microgels as scaffold materials for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-24

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three-dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  7. Carbon nanotubes reinforced poly(L-lactide) scaffolds fabricated by thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haiyun; Xue, Li

    2015-01-16

    In tissue engineering, porous nanocomposite scaffolds can potentially mimic aspects of the nanoscale architecture of the extra-cellular matrix, as well as enhance the mechanical properties required for successful weight-bearing implants. In this paper, we demonstrate that highly porous thermoplastic poly(L-lactide) nanocomposite scaffolds containing different types of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanocomposite scaffolds were manufactured by a thermally induced phase separation method. This experiment produced an uniform distribution of CNTs throughout the scaffold without obvious aggregations for funtionalized CNTs filled scaffolds by scanning electron microscope observation. The CNTs were frequently located on the pore surface, forming rough, hairy nano-textures. The pore size was reduced with the increasing of CNT loading. Parts of PLLA matrix was induced into nanofibrous structures from solid-walled state, which reduced the crystallinity of the PLLA characterized by DSC measurement. The CNT incorporation significantly improved the compression modulus of the nanocomposite scaffolds, especially the functionalized CNTs. The capacity of protein adsorption is significantly improved when the concentration of the CNTs was higher than 1.0 wt.% and the cell attachment was also enhanced by the addition of CNTs, especially N-CNT. PMID:25525708

  8. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M.; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication.

  9. Restriction of Phase Transformation in Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Mahato, Neelima; Balani, Kantesh

    2015-07-01

    The present research aims to investigate the effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) reinforcement on the mechanism of transformation toughening in zirconia matrix, and consequently, its fracture toughness. Monoclinic zirconia (un-doped ZrO2), partially stabilized zirconia (3 mol pct yttria-stabilized zirconia (3 mol pct YSZ)), and fully stabilized cubic zirconia (8 mol pct YSZ) with and without 6 vol pct MWNT-reinforced nanocomposites were processed via multi-stage spark plasma sintering. Phase analysis of powders, and sintered and crushed pellets performed using X-ray diffraction reveals the absence of any phase transformation in monoclinic ZrO2, 8 mol pct YSZ and their MWNT-reinforced nanocomposites upon application of stress by means of crushing. However, a significant decrease in the stress-induced phase transformation (81.1 pct metastable tetragonal phase retained with 6 vol pct MWNT reinforcement when compared to that of 68.4 pct tetragonal phase in 3 mol pct YSZ) is observed in the crushed pellet samples of partially stabilized zirconia upon 6 vol pct MWNT reinforcement. Transmission electron microscopy has been utilized for complementary phase analysis. Evaluation of mechanical properties indicates enhancement in fracture toughness (~23.6 to 26.4 pct) with the incorporation of 6 vol pct MWNT. Isolation of the net toughening contribution suggests that MWNT toughening mechanisms are ~3.8 times more effective than transformation toughening in enhancing the fracture toughness of YSZ/MWNT nanocomposites.

  10. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits.

    PubMed

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2014-04-11

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Bioprintable Vascular Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  12. Preparation and properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced vinyl ester/nanocomposite bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shu-Hang; Hung, Chih-Hung; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Yen, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Weng, Cheng-Chih

    Novel multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared using poly(oxypropylene)-backboned diamines of molecular weights M w 400 and 2000 to disperse acid-treated MWNTs, improving the performance of composite bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. A lightweight polymer composite bipolar plate that contained vinyl ester resin, graphite powder and MWNTs was fabricated using a bulk molding compound (BMC) process. Results demonstrate that the qualitative dispersion of MWNTs crucially determined the resultant bulk electrical conductivity, the mechanical properties and the physical properties of bipolar plates. The flexural strength of the composite bipolar plate with 1 phr of MWNTs was approximately 48% higher than that of the original composite bipolar plate. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite bipolar plate was reduced from 37.00 to 20.40 μm m -1 °C -1 by adding 1 phr of MWNTs, suggesting that the composite bipolar plate has excellent thermal stability. The porosity of the composite bipolar plate was also evaluated. Additionally, the bulk electrical conductivity of the composite bipolar plate with different MWNTs types and contents exceeds 100 S cm -1. The results of the polarization curves confirm that the addition of MWNTs leads to a significant improvement on the single cell performance.

  13. Carbon nanotubes-reinforced hollow fibre solid-phase microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of carbamate pesticides in apples.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin-Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Chen, Juan

    2013-08-15

    An effective and sensitive method to determinate five carbamate pesticides in apples was developed by using carbon nanotubes-reinforced hollow fibre solid-phase microextraction (CNTs-HF-SPME) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD). The CNTs were dispersed in water via adding surfactant, and then were held in the pores of HF supported by capillary forces and sonification. The SPME device, which was wetted with 1-octanol, was placed in a stirred apple samples to extract target analytes. After extraction, analytes were desorbed and analyzed using HPLC-DAD. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the enrichment factors were achieved in the range from 49 to 308 with good inter-fibre repeatability and batch-to-batch reproducibility, while good linearity ranges and recoveries were obtained. The limits of detection ranged from 0.09 to 6.00 ng/g. Therefore, the results demonstrated that this novel method was an efficient pretreatment and enrichment procedure for the determination of trace carbamate pesticides in apples. PMID:23561102

  14. Effect of processing parameter and filler content on tensile properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method using the Haake Rheomix internal mixer. In order to obtain the optimal processing parameter, the nanocomposite with 89 wt % of PLA was blended with 10 wt % of LNR and 1 wt % of MWCNTs were mixed with various mixing parameter condition; mixing temperature, mixing speed and mixing time. The optimum processing parameter of the composites was obtained at temperature of 190°C, rotation speed of 90 rpm and mixing time of 14 min. Next, the effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The nanocomposites were melt blended using the optimal processing parameter with MWCNTs loading of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4 wt %. The result showed that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs gave higher tensile strength and Young's modulus. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA nanocomposites. However, the elongation at break decreased with increasing the percentage of MWCNTs.

  15. Boron nitride nanotube reinforced polylactide-polycaprolactone copolymer composite: mechanical properties and cytocompatibility with osteoblasts and macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debrupa; Rouzaud, Francois; Richard, Tanisha; Keshri, Anup K; Bakshi, Srinivasa R; Kos, Lidia; Agarwal, Arvind

    2010-09-01

    Biodegradable polylactide-polycaprolactone copolymer (PLC) has been reinforced with 0, 2 and 5wt.% boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) for orthopedic scaffold application. Elastic modulus of the PLC-5wt.% BNNT composite, evaluated through nanoindentation technique, shows a 1370% increase. The same amount of BNNT addition to PLC enhances the tensile strength by 109%, without any adverse effect on the ductility up to 240% elongation. Interactions of the osteoblasts and macrophages with bare BNNTs prove them to be non-cytotoxic. PLC-BNNT composites displayed increased osteoblast cell viability as compared to the PLC matrix. The addition of BNNTs also resulted in an increase in the expression levels of the Runx2 gene, the main regulator of osteoblast differentiation. These results indicate that BNNT is a potential reinforcement for composites for orthopedic applications. PMID:20226282

  16. A novel silica nanotube reinforced ionic incorporated hydroxyapatite composite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L SS for implant application.

    PubMed

    Prem Ananth, K; Joseph Nathanael, A; Jose, Sujin P; Oh, Tae Hwan; Mangalaraj, D

    2016-02-01

    An attempt has been made to deposit a novel smart ion (Sr, Zn, Mg) substituted hydroxyapatite (I-HAp) and silica nanotube (SiNTs) composite coatings on polypyrrole (PPy) coated surgical grade 316L stainless steel (316L SS) to improve its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. The I-HAp/SiNTS/PPy bilayer coating on 316L SS was prepared by electrophoretic deposition technique. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies were carried out. These results confirmed the significant improvement of the corrosion resistance of the 316L SS alloy by the I-HAp/SiNTs/PPy bilayer composite coating. The adhesion strength and hardness test confirmed the anticipated mechanical properties of the composite. A low contact angle value revealed the hydrophilic nature. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used for the leach out analysis of the samples. Added to this, the bioactivity of the composite was analyzed by observing the apatite formation in the SBF solution for 7, 14, 21 and 28days of incubation. An enhancement of in vitro osteoblast attachment and cell viability was observed, which could lead to the optimistic orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:26652470

  17. A Comparative Study on Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of PMMA-Siloxane-Silica Anticorrosive Coatings.

    PubMed

    Harb, Samarah V; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V; Knowles, Kevin M; Hammer, Peter

    2016-06-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been used to reinforce PMMA-siloxane-silica nanocomposites considered to be promising candidates for environmentally compliant anticorrosive coatings. The organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by benzoyl peroxide (BPO)-induced polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) covalently bonded through 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPTS) to silica domains formed by hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide nanosheets were dispersed by surfactant addition and in a water/ethanol solution, respectively. These were added to PMMA-siloxane-silica hybrids at a carbon (CNT or GO) to silicon (TEOS and MPTS) molar ratio of 0.05% in two different matrices, both prepared at BPO/MMA molar ratios of 0.01 and 0.05. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed very smooth, homogeneous, and defect-free surfaces of approximately 3-7 μm thick coatings deposited onto A1020 carbon steel by dip coating. Mechanical testing and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that both additives CNT and GO improved the scratch resistance, adhesion, wear resistance, and thermal stability of PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings. Results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution, discussed in terms of equivalent circuits, showed that the reinforced hybrid coatings act as a very efficient anticorrosive barrier with an impedance modulus up to 1 GΩ cm(2), approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of bare carbon steel. In the case of GO addition, the high corrosion resistance was maintained for more than 6 months in saline medium. These results suggest that both carbon nanostructures can be used as structural reinforcement agents, improving the thermal and mechanical resistance of high performance anticorrosive PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings and thus extending their application range to abrasive environments. PMID:27266403

  18. A physical entrapment method for the preparation of carbon nanotube reinforced macroporous adsorption resin with enhanced selective extraction performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Wei; Song, Xin-Yue; Chen, Juan; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced macroporous adsorption resin (MAR) for the first time. The CNTs were dispersed in water via sonication, and then in situ physically entrapped in the pores of MAR by capillary forces and sonication. The resulting CNT reinforced MAR (CNT-MAR) was proved by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and subsequently applied to extract a mixture of 8 types, 14 natural products. For comparison, the extraction efficiency of original MAR without CNTs was also evaluated. After extraction, the supernatants were detected via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that the introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the pores of MAR can significantly improve the adsorptive selectivity of MAR for natural products. The original MAR without CNTs has almost the same adsorption capacity for selectively extracting 3 types of natural products (phenols, alkaloids and anthraquinones). However, the CNT-MAR only could selectively extract anthraquinones and the adsorption capacity for three anthraquinone natural products is 1.46-1.83 times higher than that of unmodified MAR. In order to achieve the highest extraction efficiency of CNT-MAR for anthraquinone natural products, the main extraction parameters such as the extraction time and the pH value were also optimized. The CNT-MAR demonstrated an excellent ability to extract anthraquinone natural products with high selectivity and adsorption capacity. Due to its low cost, easy preparation and use, and operational characteristics, it shows great potential for selective extraction of natural products.In this paper, we demonstrate a novel carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced macroporous adsorption resin (MAR) for the first time. The CNTs were dispersed in water via sonication, and then in situ physically entrapped in the pores of MAR by capillary forces and sonication. The resulting CNT reinforced MAR

  19. Tunable electromechanical coupling of a carbon nanotube-reinforced variable cross-section nanoswitch with a piezoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. D.; Li, Y. D.; Wang, X.

    2016-08-01

    An analytical method is presented to investigate the pull-in instability of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced variable cross-section nanoswitch with a piezoelectric effect. Governing equations with variable coefficients are derived based on the nonlocal beam model with geometrical nonlinearity and are solved using the shooting method. All the nonlinear effects of the piezoelectric voltage, van der Waals force, Casimir force, CNT volume fraction, nonlocal parameters and width ratio on the pull-in instability are investigated. The pull-in electrostatic voltage increases with the increment of nonlocal parameters, which exhibits the significant scale-dependent behavior of nanostructures. The results show that the variable cross-section improves the flexural rigidity of the cantilever-type nanoswitch effectively, and that the piezoelectric effect of the piezoelectric layer is utilized to control the electrostatic force induced by the voltage exerted on the elastic layer, owing to piezoelectric materials’ advantages of rapid response, light weight and low energy consumption.

  20. Wear Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Acetal Spur, Helical, Bevel and Worm Gears Using a TS Universal Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Samy; Osman, T. A.; Abdalla, Abdelrahman H.; Zohdy, Gamal A.

    2015-12-01

    Although the applications of nanotechnologies are increasing, there remains a significant barrier between nanotechnology and machine element applications. This work aims to remove this barrier by blending carbon nanotubes (CNT) with common types of acetal polymer gears (spur, helical, bevel and worm). This was done by using adhesive oil (paraffin) during injection molding to synthesize a flange and short bars containing 0.02% CNT by weight. The flanges and short bars were machined using hobbing and milling machines to produce nanocomposite polymer gears. Some defects that surfaced in previous work, such as the appearance of bubbles and unmelted pellets during the injection process, were avoided to produce an excellent dispersion of CNT in the acetal. The wear resistances of the gears were measured by using a TS universal test rig using constant parameters for all of the gears that were fabricated. The tests were run at a speed of 1420 rpm and a torque of 4 Nm. The results showed that the wear resistances of the CNT/acetal gears were increased due to the addition of CNT, especially the helical, bevel and worm gears.

  1. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Arash, B; Wang, Q; Varadan, V K

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  2. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-10-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region.

  3. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  4. Using molecular dynamics simulations and finite element method to study the mechanical properties of nanotube reinforced polyethylene and polyketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, S.; Alizadeh, Y.; Ansari, R.; Aryayi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube reinforced composites. Polyethylene and polyketone are selected as the polymer matrices. The effects of nanotube atomic structure and diameter on the mechanical properties of polymer matrix nanocomposites are investigated. It is shown that although adding nanotube to the polymer matrix raises the longitudinal elastic modulus significantly, the transverse tensile and shear moduli do not experience important change. As the previous finite element models could not be used for polymer matrices with the atom types other than carbon, molecular dynamics simulations are used to propose a finite element model which can be used for any polymer matrices. It is shown that this model can predict Young’s modulus with an acceptable accuracy.

  5. The influence of sintering on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapasztó, Orsolya; Lemmel, Hartmut; Markó, Márton; Balázsi, Katalin; Balázsi, Csaba; Tapasztó, Levente

    2014-10-01

    Optimizing the dispersion of carbon nanostructures in ceramic matrix composites is a fundamental technological challenge. So far most efforts have been focused on improving the dispersion of nanostructures during the powder phase processing, due to the limited information and control on their possible redistribution during the sintering. Here, we address this issue by comparing multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced Si3N4 composites prepared from the same starting powder dispersion but sintered using two different techniques. We employ ultra-small angle neutron scattering measurements to gain reliable information on the dispersion of nanostructures allowing a direct comparison of their redistribution during the sintering.

  6. Nanotube Reinforcement of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Saltysiak, Bethany

    2002-01-01

    Over the past five years there has been much excitement about the development of nanotubes and nanofibers and the potential that these materials may offer in enhancing electrical and mechanical properties of systems. The purpose of this paper is to present research into improving the mechanical performance of polymers by using nanofibers as a reinforcement to make high performance composite materials. This paper will present theoretical predictions of the composite modulus and then present the actual performance of the composite. Fabrication details will be given along with photos of the microstructure. The matrix material is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the nanofibers are vapor-grown carbon nanofibers produced by Pyrograph Products, Inc.

  7. Nanotube Reinforcement of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Saltysiak, Bethany

    2003-01-01

    Over the past five years there has been much excitement about the development of nanotubes and nanofibers and the potential that these materials may offer in enhancing electrical and mechanical properties of systems. The purpose of this paper is to present research into improving the mechanical performance of polymers by using nanofibers as a reinforcement to make high performance composite materials. This paper will present theoretical predictions of the composite modulus and then present the actual performance of the composite. Fabrication details will be given along with photos of the microstructure. The matrix material is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the nanofibers are vapor-grown carbon nanofibers produced by Pyrograph Products, Inc.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of reaction bonded silicon carbide/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2005-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated considerable excitement in the scientific and engineering communities because of their exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes possess exceptionally high stiffness and strength combined with high electrical and thermal conductivities. These novel material properties have stimulated considerable research in the development of nanotube-reinforced composites (Thostenson et al 2001 Compos. Sci. Technol. 61 1899, Thostenson et al 2005 Compos. Sci. Technol. 65 491). In this research, novel reaction bonded silicon carbide nanocomposites were fabricated using melt infiltration of silicon. A series of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (NT-CMCs) were fabricated and the structure and properties were characterized. Here we show that carbon nanotubes are present in the as-fabricated NT-CMCs after reaction bonding at temperatures above 1400 °C. Characterization results reveal that a very small volume content of carbon nanotubes, as low as 0.3 volume %, results in a 75% reduction in electrical resistivity of the ceramic composites. A 96% decrease in electrical resistivity was observed for the ceramics with the highest nanotube volume fraction of 2.1%.

  9. Fabrication and properties of aluminum-carbon nanotube accumulative roll bonded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, Sahar

    2011-12-01

    Accumulative roll bonding was adapted to fabricate a carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite. The microstructure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, and it was confirmed that the nanotubes were embedded into the metal matrix while maintaining their multiwalled structure. Measurements revealed that the as-received carbon nanotubes had a bimodal diameter size distribution, while only nanotubes with diameters >30 nm and more than 30 walls were retained during four consecutive rolling operations at 50% reduction. The elastic deflection and vibration damping properties of the laminated composite were investigated by cantilever bending test and by impulse excitation method in samples with different concentrations of carbon nanotubes. Measurements by both methods revealed that a 0.23wt% concentration of nanotubes increased the elastic modulus according to the rule of mixtures and the damping behavior of the composites increased by the addition of nanotubes up to 0.1wt%.

  10. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  11. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  12. Inter-wall bridging induced peeling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes during tensile failure in aluminum matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Li, Shufeng; Imai, Hisashi; Umeda, Junko; Takahashi, Makoto; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    In situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation of a tensile test was performed to investigate the fracturing behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in powder metallurgy Al matrix composites. A multiple peeling phenomenon during MWCNT fracturing was clearly observed. Its formation mechanism and resultant effect on the composite strength were examined. Through transition electron microscopy characterizations, it was observed that defective structures like inter-wall bridges cross-linked adjacent walls of MWCNTs. This structure was helpful to improve the inter-wall bonding conditions, leading to the effective load transfer between walls and resultant peeling behaviors of MWCNTs. These results might provide new understandings of the fracturing mechanisms of carbon nanotube reinforcements for designing high-performance nanocomposites. PMID:25437849

  13. Reinforcement and rupture behavior of carbon nanotubes-polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haihui; Lam, Hoa; Titchenal, Nick; Gogotsi, Yury; Ko, Frank

    2004-09-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of carbon nanotube-polyacrylonitrile composite fibers synthesized by electrospinning was conducted. Both single-wall carbon nanotubes and multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been used to reinforce the polymer fibers. A two-stage rupture behavior of the composite fibers under tension, including crazing of polymer matrix and pull-out of carbon nanotubes, has been observed. Carbon nanotubes reinforce the polymer fibers by hindering crazing extension, reducing stress concentration, and dissipating energy by pullout. Distribution of nanotubes in the polymer matrix and interfacial adhesion between nanotubes and polymers are two major factors to determine the reinforcement effect of carbon nanotubes in polymer fibers.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  15. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  16. Effect of Interface Structure on Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yong X.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown. PMID:20054466

  17. Carbon Fibers and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic nature of composite materials is considered. Carbon fiber composites and their area of current and planned application in civil aircraft are discussed, specifically within the framework of the various aspects of risk analysis.

  18. Tungsten disulfide nanotubes reinforced biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental group. Single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as the baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus and flexural yield strength) of WSNT-reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to the positive controls, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed at various concentrations. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed mechanical reinforcement better than (up to 127%) or equivalent to that of carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron-sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis was SWCNTs>MWCNTs>WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), the presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide) and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters

  19. Tungsten Disulfide Nanotubes Reinforced Biodegradable Polymers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M.; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental groups. Single- and multi- walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus, and flexural yield strength) of WSNT reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to positive controls, at various concentrations, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed a better (up to 127%) or equivalent mechanical reinforcement compared to carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by BET surface area analysis was SWCNTs > MWCNTs > WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis, and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide), and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters affecting the mechanical

  20. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  1. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  2. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  3. Polymer Matrix Composites: A Perspective for a Special Issue of Polymer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Michael R.

    2012-09-04

    Polymer matrix composites, with their high specific strength and stiffness, are used in a wide range of applications from large wind turbine blades to microelectronics. This perspective article provides a brief primer on polymer matrix composites, discusses some of their advantages and limitations, and describes a number of emerging trends in the field. In addition, it introduces four review articles on the topics of recent developments in carbon fibers, natural fiber reinforced composites, evaluation of the interface between the fiber reinforcement and polymer matrix, and carbon nanotube reinforced polymers.

  4. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  5. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  6. Randomly oriented carbon/carbon composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raunija, Thakur Sudesh Kumar; Babu, S.

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an alternate, rapid and cost effective process for the fabrication of carbon/carbon (C/C) composite. Slurry moulding technique is adopted for the fabrication of C/C composite. Randomly oriented hybrid discrete carbon fiber (CF) reinforced and mesophase pitch (MP) derived matrix C/C composite is fabricated. Process parameters are optimized and repeatability is proved. The electrical conductivity of the composite fabricated through the developed process is found to be better than that fabricated through conventional processes. The other properties are also found to be competent. The randomly oriented C/C composite because of its mouldability is found suitable for various applications which require complex shapes.

  7. Analytic and computational micromechanics of clustering and interphase effects in carbon nanotube composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Gary D.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2006-01-01

    Effective elastic properties for carbon nanotube reinforced composites are obtained through a variety of micromechanics techniques. Using the in-plane elastic properties of graphene, the effective properties of carbon nanotubes are calculated utilizing a composite cylinders micromechanics technique as a first step in a two-step process. These effective properties are then used in the self-consistent and Mori-Tanaka methods to obtain effective elastic properties of composites consisting of aligned single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polymer matrix. Effective composite properties from these averaging methods are compared to a direct composite cylinders approach extended from the work of Hashin and Rosen (1964) and Christensen and Lo (1979). Comparisons with finite element simulations are also performed. The effects of an interphase layer between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix as result of functionalization is also investigated using a multi-layer composite cylinders approach. Finally, the modeling of the clustering of nanotubes into bundles due to interatomic forces is accomplished herein using a tessellation method in conjunction with a multi-phase Mori-Tanaka technique. In addition to aligned nanotube composites, modeling of the effective elastic properties of randomly dispersed nanotubes into a matrix is performed using the Mori-Tanaka method, and comparisons with experimental data are made. Computational micromechanical analysis of high-stiffness hollow fiber nanocomposites is performed using the finite element method. The high-stiffness hollow fibers are modeled either directly as isotropic hollow tubes or equivalent transversely isotropic effective solid cylinders with properties computed using a micromechanics based composite cylinders method. Using a representative volume element for clustered high-stiffness hollow fibers embedded in a compliant matrix with the appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the effective elastic properties

  8. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  9. Mechanical behavior of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A general background, test plan, and some results of preliminary examinations of a carbon-carbon composite material are presented with emphasis on mechanical testing and inspection techniques. Experience with testing and evaluation was gained through tests of a low modulus carbon-carbon material, K-Karb C. The properties examined are the density - 1.55 g/cc; four point flexure strength in the warp - 137 MPa (19,800 psi) and the fill - 95.1 MPa (13,800 psi,) directions; and the warp interlaminar shear strength - 14.5 MPa (2100 psi). Radiographic evaluation revealed thickness variations and the thinner areas of the composite were scrapped. The ultrasonic C-scan showed attenuation variations, but these did not correspond to any of the physical and mechanical properties measured. Based on these initial tests and a survey of the literature, a plan has been devised to examine the effect of stress on the oxidation behavior, and the strength degradation of coated carbon-carbon composites. This plan will focus on static fatigue tests in the four point flexure mode in an elevated temperature, oxidizing environment.

  10. Resistivity of Carbon-Carbon Composites Halved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have become the material of choice for applications requiring strength and stiffness at very high temperatures (above 2000 C). These composites comprise carbon or graphite fibers embedded in a carbonized or graphitized matrix. In some applications, such as shielding sensitive electronics in very high temperature environments, the performance of these materials would be improved by lowering their electrical resistivity. One method to lower the resistivity of the composites is to lower the resistivity of the graphite fibers, and a proven method to accomplish that is intercalation. Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules into a host lattice. In this study the host fibers were highly graphitic pitch-based graphite fibers, or vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCF), and the intercalate was bromine. Intercalation compounds of graphite are generally thought of as being only metastable, but it has been shown that the residual bromine graphite fiber intercalation compound is remarkably stable, resisting decomposition even at temperatures at least as high as 1000 C. The focus of this work was to fabricate composite preforms, determine whether the fibers they were made from were still intercalated with bromine after processing, and determine the effect on composite resistivity. It was not expected that the resistivity would be lowered as dramatically as with graphite polymer composites because the matrix itself would be much more conductive, but it was hoped that the gains would be substantial enough to warrant its use in high-performance applications. In a collaborative effort supporting a Space Act Agreement between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, OH), laminar preforms were fabricated with pristine and bromine-intercalated pitch-based fibers (P100 and P100-Br) and VGCF (Pyro I and Pyro I-Br). The green preforms were carbonized at 1000 C and then heat treated to 3000 C. To determine whether the

  11. Process of making carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Kowbel, Witold (Inventor); Bruce, Calvin (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon composite structure, for example, an automotive engine piston, is made by preparing a matrix including of a mixture of non crystalline carbon particulate soluble in an organic solvent and a binder that has a liquid phase. The non crystalline particulate also contains residual carbon hydrogen bonding. An uncured structure is formed by combining the matrix mixture, for example, carbon fibers such as graphite dispersed in the mixture and/or graphite cloth imbedded in the mixture. The uncured structure is cured by pyrolyzing it in an inert atmosphere such as argon. Advantageously, the graphite reinforcement material is whiskered prior to combining it with the matrix mixture by a novel method involving passing a gaseous metal suboxide over the graphite surface.

  12. Properties Of Carbon/Carbon and Carbon/Phenolic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, John R.; Canfield, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents data on physical properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon-matrix and phenolic-matrix composite materials. Based on tests conducted on panels, cylinders, blocks, and formed parts. Data used by designers to analyze thermal-response and stress levels and develop structural systems ensuring high reliability at minimum weight.

  13. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  14. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  15. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  16. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon---carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  17. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  18. Tensile Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Aoi, Tatsuji; Kawahara, Itaru; Kogo, Yasuo; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to identify ruling mechanisms of tensile fracture of Carbon/Carbon composites (C/Cs), tensile tests were carried out for various C/Cs as functions of the density, heat treatment temperature, and interfacial strength between fiber and matrix. Three processing routes of preformed yarn, resin char, and HIP processes were adopted to densify C/Cs. These C/Cs were finally heat-treated at temperatures from 2273K to 3300K. The interfacial strength between fiber and matrix was varied by the selection of processing routes. As a result, two ruling failure mechanisms were identified. At density lower than 1.6g/cm3, the tensile fracture was controlled by stress transfer capability from the matrix to reinforcing fibers. However, at higher density than 1.6g/cm3, tensile strength was primarily governed by the interfacial strength between the matrix and fibers. Thus the latter mechanism is nearly same as ceramic matrix composites.

  19. Performance of Nanotube-Based Ceramic Composites: Modeling and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtin, W. A.; Sheldon, B. W.; Xu, J.

    2004-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon-nanotubes are driving research into the creation of new strong, tough nanocomposite systems. In this program, our initial work presented the first evidence of toughening mechanisms operating in carbon-nanotube- reinforced ceramic composites using a highly-ordered array of parallel multiwall carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) in an alumina matrix. Nanoindentation introduced controlled cracks and the damage was examined by SEM. These nanocomposites exhibit the three hallmarks of toughening in micron-scale fiber composites: crack deflection at the CNT/matrix interface; crack bridging by CNTs; and CNT pullout on the fracture surfaces. Furthermore, for certain geometries a new mechanism of nanotube collapse in shear bands was found, suggesting that these materials can have multiaxial damage tolerance. The quantitative indentation data and computational models were used to determine the multiwall CNT axial Young's modulus as 200-570 GPa, depending on the nanotube geometry and quality.

  20. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  1. Method for fabricating composite carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  2. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  3. Multifunctional carbon nano-paper composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Chu, Hetao; Wang, Kuiwen; Liu, Yanjv; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Carbon Nanotube (CNT), for its excellent mechanical, electrical properties and nano size, large special surface physical property, become the most promising material. But carbon nanotube can still fabricated in micro dimension, and can't be made into macro size, so to the carbon nanotube filled composite can't explore the properties of the CNT. Carbon nano-paper is made of pure CNT, with micro pore, and it turn micro sized CNT into macro shaped membrane. Based on the piezo-resistivity and electrical conductivity of the carbon nano-paper, we used the carbon nano-paper as functional layers fabricate functional composite, and studies its strain sensing, composite material deicing and shape memory polymer (SMP) material electric actuation performance. The results shown that the resin can pregnant the nano paper, and there was good bond for nano paper and composite. The functional composite can monitoring the strain with high sensitivity comparing to foil strain gauge. The functional composite can be heated via the carbon nano paper with low power supply and high heating rate. The composite has good deicing and heat actuation performance to composite material. For the good strain sensing, electric conductivity and self-heating character of the carbon nano-paper composite, it can be used for self sensing, anti lightning strike and deicing of composite materials in aircrafts and wind turbine blades.

  4. Response of carbon-carbon composites to challenging environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Barrett, David M.; Ransone, Philip O.; Sawyer, J. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results from material performance evaluations of oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites intended for multiuse aerospace applications, which cover the effects of the following environmental parameters: the oxidizing nature of the environments (including both high and low oxygen partial pressures), high temperatures, moisture, cyclic temperature service, and foreign-object impact. Results are presented for the carbon-carbon material currently in use as the thermal-protection-system material on Space Shuttle, as well as for newer and more advanced structural forms of carbon-carbon composites.

  5. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1997-07-15

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

  7. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon carbide ceramics reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, A.; Bortnikova, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kornev, V.; Lurie, S.; Solyaev, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A microstructure, a composition and mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon of nanotube-reinforced silicon carbide ceramics were examined. The amount of carbon nanotubes was up to 1% wt. Samples was prepared by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that the optimal sintering temperature is 2000°C with an exposure duration of 5 minutes and a pressure of 50 MPa. The effect of the CNT mass fraction on the Young modulus of silicon carbide ceramics composites was investigated for different temperatures and processing conditions of samples using ultrasonic techniques. It has been established that Young's modulus of ceramics decreases due to addition of CNT. Elastic properties of the composites cross section were characterized using nano-indentation. It has been revealed that the stiffness of the ceramics intergranular phase decreases due to addition of CNT.

  9. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  10. [Study on implant material of carbon/carbon composites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohui; Yu, Shu; Zhu, Shaihong; Liu, Yong; Miu, Yunliang; Huang, Boyun

    2010-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility and mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites. At first, carbon/carbon composites were prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and the mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites was tested. The biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites was evaluated by cytotoxicity test, sensitization test, micronucleus test and implantation test. Mechanical property test showed such carbon/carbon composites are of good compression property and tension property. Cytotoxicity test showed that the leaching liquor of samples has no effect on the growth and proliferation of L-929 cells. The medullary micronucleus frequency of mouse was 2.3 per thousand +/- 0.7 per thousand in experiment group. The sensitization test showed that the skin of the subjects of experiment group had slight erythema and edema, which was 0.188 +/- 0.40 according to Magnusson and Kligman classification. Implantation test revealed that there was slight inflammation around the tissue after the implantation of sample. At 12 weeks, scanning electron microscopy and histopathological exam indicated that the samples of experiment group were of good histocompatibility; and in comparison with control group, there was no significant differences (P > 0.05). So these kinds of samples have good biocompatibility, mechanical property and prospects of clinical application. PMID:21374980

  11. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  12. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  13. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  14. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  15. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  16. Structural investigation of carbon/carbon composites by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prem, Manfred; Krexner, Gerhard; Peterlik, Herwig

    2006-11-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material was investigated by means of small-angle as well as wide-angle elastic neutron scattering. The C/C-composites were built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN-based carbon fibers. Pre-impregnation with phenolic resin was followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000 °C and a final heat treatment at either 1800 or 2400 °C. Measurements of the samples were performed in orientations arranging the carbon fibers, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam. Structural features of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores are presented and the influence of the heat treatment is discussed. The results are compared to earlier X-ray investigations of carbon fibers and C/C-composites.

  17. Free Vibration and Bending Behaviour of CNT Reinforced Composite Plate using Different Shear Deformation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehar, K.; Panda, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the free vibration and the bending behaviour of carbon nanotube reinforced composite plate are computed using three different shear deformation theories under thermal environment. The material properties of carbon nanotube and matrix are assumed to be temperature-dependent, and the extended rule of mixture is used to compute the effectivematerial properties of the composite plate. The convergence and validity of the present modelalso have been checked by computing the wide variety of the numerical example. The applicability of the proposed higher-order models has been highlighted by solving the wide variety of examples for different geometrical and material parameters underelevated thermal environment.The responses are also examined using the simulation model developed in commercial finite element package (ANSYS).

  18. Sensors for monitoring the processing of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Yen, C. Eric

    1995-04-01

    Carbon-carbon composite are used in many applications including aircraft disk brakes, space shuttle leading edges, rocket inlet nozzles and exit cones, and are currently being considered for future aircraft structural components, because of their mechanical stability under adverse temperature conditions. Unfortunately, the processing of carbon-carbon composites, especially the first carbonizations, has a relatively low yield, because of in-process interply failure leading to catastrophic delaminations. Considerable amount of man-power, equipment time and material are lost. Here we report on the progress in the development of sensors for monitoring these catastrophic events during the first carbonization. Specifically, acoustic emission sensors and gas sensors are singled out as the most promising ones for monitoring the evolution of micro and macro-structural changes during the first carbonization. Analysis of the high temperature waveguide was undertaken to determine the optimum waveguide geometry so that only a single mode is allowed to propagate in the waveguide.

  19. Carbon-carbon composites: Emerging materials for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1989-01-01

    An emerging class of high temperature materials called carbon-carbon composites are being developed to help make advanced aerospace flight become a reality. Because of the high temperature strength and low density of carbon-carbon composites, aerospace engineers would like to use these materials in even more advanced applications. One application of considerable interest is as the structure of the aerospace vehicle itself rather than simply as a protective heat shield as on Space Shuttle. But suitable forms of these materials have yet to be developed. If this development can be successfully accomplished, advanced aerospace vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and other hypersonic vehicles will be closer to becoming a reality. A brief definition is given of C-C composites. Fabrication problems and oxidation protection concepts are examined. Applications of C-C composites in the Space Shuttle and in advanced hypersonic vehicles as well as other applications are briefly discussed.

  20. Fundamental properties of thermoset resin with boron nitride nanotube reinforcement for radiation shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, Joseph Evans

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT's), like carbon nanotubes (CNT's), have properties beneficial for the application in various fields of science including materials, electronics, and medicine. B10 has one of the largest neutron capture cross sections of any isotope and presents an opportunity to incorporate radiation shielding in composite materials by infusing the matrix with BNNT's. However, due to the challenges in synthesizing quality BNNT's, little research has been done to further the technology. The aim of this research is to: 1) Create theoretical models to substantiate that there is no detrimental effects on the fundamental properties, such as: modulus, strength and glass transition temperature. 2) Acquire structural information on the BNNT's and the resin system infused with BNNT's and 3) Generate experimental data which will verify the computational models. Structural information has been obtained on the BNNT's and nanocomposites by analytical and microscopic techniques. Calculations of the fundamental mechanical material properties of BNNT's are performed utilizing molecular dynamics simulations via Material Studio by Accelrys Inc. After the full characterization of the BNNT's, BNNT's have been dispersed into the Epon862/W thermoset resin system. Glass transition temperature has been predicted by simulating the annealing process and monitoring the density of the material at various temperatures. Also, interfacial information between the BNNT's and resin system has been described to provide a foundation for engineers in the fabrication of nanocomposites. Experimental data, from the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), of glass transition temperature confirms the accuracy of the computational models. Also, models in which the BNNT's undergo hydrogenation have been performed to understand the effects of hydrogenation on the properties of the BNNT's and the nanocomposite. Previous studies have demonstrated that CNT's have improved the mechanical and thermal

  1. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  2. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  3. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  4. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  5. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  6. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g(-1), far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g(-1)) and Kevlar (78 J g(-1)). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs. PMID:22337128

  7. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g-1, far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g-1) and Kevlar (78 J g-1). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs.

  8. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g−1, far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g−1) and Kevlar (78 J g−1). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs. PMID:22337128

  9. The effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. ); Hollenberg, G. W.; Slagle, O.D. ); Watson, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper irradiation behavior of carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites are discussed in terms on simple microstructural models. Previous data are discussed in terms of these models. New data are presented for the irradiation-induced dimensional changes of selected carbon-carbon composites. The influence of fiber precursor on carbon- carbon irradiation performance is discussed.

  10. Multiwalled Carbon nanotube - Strength to polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravin, Jagdale; Khan, Aamer. A.; Massimo, Rovere; Carlo, Rosso; Alberto, Tagliaferro

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a rather fascinating material, are among the pillars of nanotechnology. CNTs exhibit unique electrical, mechanical, adsorption, and thermal properties with high aspect ratio, exceptional stiffness, excellent strength, and low density, which can be exploited in the manufacturing of revolutionary smart nano composite materials. The demand for lighter and stronger polymer composite material in various applications is increasing every day. Among all the possibilities to research and exploit the exceptional properties of CNTs in polymer composites we focused on the reinforcement of epoxy resin with different types of multiwalled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs). We studied mechanical properties such as stress, strain, ultimate tensile strength, yield point, modulus and fracture toughness, and Young's modulus by plotting and calculating by means of the off-set method. The mechanical strength of epoxy composite is increased intensely with 1 and 3 wt.% of filler.

  11. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  12. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  13. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  14. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-02

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  15. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-16

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  16. WAXS investigations on Polyethylene -- Carbon Nanofibers Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian; Li, Jianhua; Benitez, Rogelio; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Mircea; Cristian Chipara, Alin; Dorina Chipara, Magdalena; Sellmyer, David J.

    2008-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been obtained by high-shear mixing of isotactic polyethylene with various amounts of purified nanofiller (vapor grown carbon nanofibers type PR-24AG from Pyrograf Products, Inc) by utilizing a HAAKE Rheomix at 65 rpm and 180 ^oC for 9 min followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 min. Composites loaded with various amounts of vapor grown carbon nanofibers have been prepared. Various spectroscopic techniques have been used to assess the interactions between the polymeric matrix and carbon nanofibers. Wide angle X - Ray scattering investigations focused on the effect of carbon nanofibers on the crystalline phases of polypropylene and on the overall crystallinity degree of the polymeric matrix. This research aims at a better understanding of the nature and structure of the polymer -- carbon nanofibers interface.

  17. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  18. Functionally Graded Nanophase Beryllium/Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Beryllium, beryllium alloys, beryllium carbide, and carbon are the ingredients of a class of nanophase Be/Be2C/C composite materials that can be formulated and functionally graded to suit a variety of applications. In a typical case, such a composite consists of a first layer of either pure beryllium or a beryllium alloy, a second layer of B2C, and a third layer of nanophase sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. The three layers are interconnected through interpenetrating spongelike structures. These Be/Be2C/C composite materials are similar to Co/WC/diamond functionally graded composite materials, except that (1) W and Co are replaced by Be and alloys thereof and (2) diamond is replaced by sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. (Optionally, one could form a Be/Be2C/diamond composite.) Because Be is lighter than W and Co, the present Be/Be2C/C composites weigh less than do the corresponding Co/WC/diamond composites. The nanophase carbon is almost as hard as diamond. WC/Co is the toughest material. It is widely used for drilling, digging, and machining. However, the fact that W is a heavy element (that is, has high atomic mass and mass density) makes W unattractive for applications in which weight is a severe disadvantage. Be is the lightest tough element, but its toughness is less than that of WC/Co alloy. Be strengthened by nanophase carbon is much tougher than pure or alloy Be. The nanophase carbon has an unsurpassed strength-to-weight ratio. The Be/Be2C/C composite materials are especially attractive for terrestrial and aerospace applications in which there are requirements for light weight along with the high strength and toughness of the denser Co/WC/diamond materials. These materials could be incorporated into diverse components, including cutting tools, bearings, rocket nozzles, and shields. Moreover, because Be and C are effective as neutron moderators, Be/Be2C/C composites could be attractive for some nuclear applications.

  19. Complex Multifunctional Polymer/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Pritesh; Balasubramaniyam, Gobinath; Chen, Jian

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for developing complex multifunctional materials that consist of or contain polymer/carbon-nanotube composites has been conceived. As used here, "multifunctional" signifies having additional and/or enhanced physical properties that polymers or polymer-matrix composites would not ordinarily be expected to have. Such properties include useful amounts of electrical conductivity, increased thermal conductivity, and/or increased strength. In the present methodology, these properties are imparted to a given composite through the choice and processing of its polymeric and CNT constituents.

  20. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  1. Fabrication of nylon-6/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, D.; Han, Q.; Meek, T.

    2006-05-01

    A new technique to fabricate nylon-6/carbon nanotube (PA6/CNT) composites is presented. The method involves a pretreatment of carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and an improved in-situ process for mixing nanotubes with the nylon 6 matrix. A good bond between carbon nanotubes and the nylon-6 matrix is obtained. Mechanical property measurements indicate that the tensile strength of PA6/CNT composites is improved significantly while the toughness and elongation are somewhat compromised. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the fractured tensile specimens reveals cracking initiated at the wrapping of the CNTs PA6 layer/PA6 matrix interface rather than at the PA6/CNT interface.

  2. Elastomeric composites based on carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araby, Sherif; Meng, Qingshi; Zhang, Liqun; Zaman, Izzuddin; Majewski, Peter; Ma, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including carbon black (CB), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have attracted increasingly more interest in academia due to their fascinating properties. These nanomaterials can significantly improve the mechanical, electrical, thermal, barrier, and flame retardant properties of elastomers. The improvements are dependent on the molecular nature of the matrix, the intrinsic property, geometry and dispersion of the fillers, and the interface between the matrix and the fillers. In this article, we briefly described the fabrication processes of elastomer composites, illuminated the importance of keeping fillers at nanoscale in matrices, and critically reviewed the recent development of the elastomeric composites by incorporating CB, CNTs, and graphene and its derivatives. Attention has been paid to the mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivity. Challenges and further research are discussed at the end of the article.

  3. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  4. Carbon isotopic composition of Amazon shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Showers, W.J.; Angle, D.G.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of carbon isotopes in Amazon shelf sediment is controlled by the same processes that are forming the modern subaqueous delta. The terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) isotopic carbon signal observed in surficial sediments near the river mouth extends over 400 km northwest along the shelf. Terrestrial carbon is associated with areas of rapid sediment accumulation (topset and foreset regions). A sharp boundary between terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) and marine (-23 to -22 per thousand) isotopic carbon values in surficial sediments is associated with a change in depositional conditions (foreset to bottomset regions) and a decrease in sediment accumulation rate. POC water-column isotopic values (-27 per thousand) near the river mouth are similar to the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values, but POC water-column samples collected 20 km off the river mouth have marine carbon isotopic values (-22 to -19 per thousand) and differ from the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values. These water column observations are related to variations in turbidity and productivity. Down-core isotopic variation is only observed in cores taken in areas of lower sediment accumulation rates. These observations indicate that the organic carbon in Amazon shelf sediment is dominantly terrestrial in composition, and the location of deposition of this carbon is controlled by modern processes of sediment accumulation. The modern Amazon shelf is similar to large clinoform shale deposits of the Cretaceous in North America. Thus, the stratigraphic setting may help predict the isotopic variations of carbon in ancient deposits.

  5. Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ciminelli, D.L.; Kearns, K.M.; Ragland, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCF) offer a unique opportunity for carbon fiber composites to expand into a multitude of new markets due to their low cost of only $3 to 5 per pound. Additionally, VGCFs are extremely graphitic and have demonstrated the highest thermal conductivity of any graphite material. Pyrograf-III{reg_sign}, a VGCF produced by Applied Sciences, Inc (ASI), is a small diameter (0.1 {mu}m) fiber with a high aspect ratio (100- 1000). The primary interest of the work is for thermal management applications. The focus of the work has been developing novel process methodologies for these unusual fibers using phenolic and epoxy resin to produce low cost composites. The development of VGCF composites is being performed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) between ASI and the Materials Directorate (WL/ML), Wright Laboratory, United States Air Force.

  6. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of composite laminate.structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure that is filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477 deg K and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 KN/sq m pressure at 450 deg K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527 deg K to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  7. Spectroscopic Investigations on Polypropylene -- Carbon Nanofibers Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Mircea; Brian, Jones; Lozano, Karen; Villareal, John R.; Cristian Chipara, Alin; Hernandez, Anna; Dorina Chipara, Magdalena; Sellmyer, David J.

    2008-03-01

    Nanocomposites were obtained by high-shear mixing of isotactic polypropylene (Marlex HLN-120-01; Philips Sumika Polypropylene Company) with various amounts of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (PR-24AG; Pyrograf Products, Inc) by utilizing a HAAKE Rheomix at 65 rpm and 180 ^oC for 9 min followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 min. Composites loaded with various amounts of vapor grown carbon nanofibers have been prepared. Wide angle X-Ray scattering investigations focus on the effect of carbon nanofibers on the crystalline phases of polypropylene and on the overall crystallinity degree of the polymeric matrix. Raman spectroscopy analysis concentrates on D and G bands. X-band electron spin resonance investigations aim at a better understanding of the purity of carbon nanofibers and of the ratio between conducting and paramagnetic.

  8. Strength of modified carbon-graphite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, K.S.; Shchugorev, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Composite materials are being more and more widely used in the nontraditional power generation fields, particularly in powerplants using the ecologically clean energy sources (solar, wind, and tidal plants). The less expensive composites are preferred. Requirements of a functional nature are usually imposed on the composites: high (or low) thermal conductivity and high electroconductive (or electroinsulative) properties. At the same time, many powerplant components act as load-carrying structures and require analysis of their mechnical reliability and service life. Because of the considerable intrinsic mass (for large structures) and the wind, snow, and wave loads with long periods of operation, the mechnical analysis is a critical part of the design process. Various modification techniques are used to obtain materials with the required combination of mechanical, thermophysical, and electrical properties on the basis of the inexpensive composites. These techniques include modification of the properties of the binders by selecting the curing technique and introducing additives to the binder, and also the use of composites containing a quite high percentage of modifiers - metallic powders, ferromagnetics, ferroelectrics, and so on. The authors have studied the influence of the modifiers on the mechanical properties of the carbon-graphite composites that are created on the basis of powdered carbon-graphites and phenolformaldehyde resins. Such composites are already used in the heat engineering field. The carbon-graphite materials are obtained from a mixture of pulverized coke and coal tar with subsequent pressing into rod or blocks, which are sintered at 1200{degrees}C in air-free furnaces.

  9. Oxygen Reactivity of a Carbon Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron Devol; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2002-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are often suggested as armor material for the first wall of a fusion plasma chamber due to carbon's low atomic number, high thermal conductivity, and high melting point. However, carbon is chemically reactive in air and will react with ingress air during a Loss of Vacuum Accident and release tritium fuel that has been retained in the carbon. Tritium mobilization and carbon monoxide generation via CFC oxidation are both safety concerns. This paper discusses chemical reactivity experiments that were performed using the state-of-the-art 3-dimensional NB31 CFC produced by SNECMA and a laminar reaction gas of Ar–21 vol% O2. Oxidation reaction rates were measured for CFC temperatures of 525, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and a 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) Ar–O2 flow rate. Experiments were also performed at CFC temperatures of 700 and 1000 °C and a 1000 sccm Ar–O2 flow rate. Mass spectral analyses of the exhaust reaction gas suggested that carbon monoxide was the primary reaction at the CFC surface and carbon dioxide was readily produced in the exiting reaction gas. The measured reaction rates compare well with the literature and were used to produce a CFC oxidation curve that is recommended for use in fusion safety analyses.

  10. Thermal Cycling of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for space radiator applications owing to their light weight and high thermal conductivity. For those radiator applications where sunlight will impinge on the surface, it will be necessary to apply a white thermal control paint to minimize solar absorptance and enhance infrared emittance. Several currently available white thermal control paints were applied to candidate carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites and were subjected to vacuum thermal cycling in the range of -100 C to +277 C. The optical properties of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were evaluated before and after thermal cycling. In addition, adhesion of the paints was evaluated utilizing a tape test. The test matrix included three composites: resin-derived carbon-carbon and vapor infiltrated carbon-carbon, both reinforced with pitch-based P-120 graphite fibers, and a polyimide composite reinforced with T-650 carbon fibers, and three commercially available white thermal control paints: AZ-93, Z-93-C55, and YB-71P.

  11. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  12. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  13. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  14. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Yong, Zhenzhong; Li, Qingwen; Bradford, Philip D.; Liu, Wei; Tucker, Dennis S.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Zhu, Yuntian

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  15. Degradation Of Carbon/Phenolic Composites By NaOH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. M.; Semmel, M. L.; Goldberg, B. E.; Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of sodium hydroxide contamination level on physical and chemical properties of phenolic resin and carbon/phenolic composites described in report. NaOH degrades both carbon and phenolic components of carbon/phenolic laminates.

  16. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  17. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  18. Carbon isotope composition of Antarctic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, E. M.

    2000-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of Antarctic land plants are first reported. The most interesting feature is the isotope specificity of the species. For example Usnea antarctica from different locations shows relatively narrow range of the δ 13C-values from -22.44 to -21.29‰ (7 samples), Drepanocladus sp. from -24.86 to -23.49‰ (8 samples), and Andreaea depressincrvis from -23.87 to -23.23‰ (3 samples) etc. Usually, in inhabited lands and parts of the world with rich flora and developed soil, isotopic specificity of species is masked by variations of carbon isotope composition of CO 2. In Antarctic conditions influence of local sources of CO 2 on the isotope composition of CO 2 is appeared to be minimal. Therefore the δ 13C-variations inherent to individual plant physiology and biochemistry can be distinguished on the background of the stable level of the atmospheric CO 2 δ 13C-value. The latter is best to reflect the global state of the carbon cycle.

  19. On the test of carbon carbon composite turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, A.; Tanatsugu, N.; Naruo, Y.; Tachibana, M.; Yamashita, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Ueda, T.

    1993-12-31

    The research on C/C composites has reached the step of practical application of engineering materials in many countries in the world. C/C composites show high specific strength in comparison with other materials. It is important as structural materials for space vehicles and air craft. C/C composites have good thermal expansion, excellent heat impact resistance and high temperature strength, except that it has oxidation resistance. The authors have done research and development on an air turbo ramjet engine which is intended for space vehicles (ultra-high speed air craft). Carbon fiber reinforced yarn has been examined under the actual loading and rotor. The objective of this experiment is to obtain information on the environmental resistance (above 30.000 rpm, test atmosphere 70% H{sub 2}, 30% H{sub 2}O) of a ACC turbine blade. There is a difference in the fabrication method, as well as the fiber orientation and weaving method. Test results show that the fracture behavior of C/C composite turbine blade is strongly dependent on the weaving orientation of carbon fibers.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  1. Boron Nitride Nanotubes Reinforce Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds and Promote the Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Cijun; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Yu, Kun; Deng, Youwen; Peng, Shuping

    2016-05-01

    Incorporating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) into ceramic matrices is a promising strategy for obtaining multifunctional composites. In this study, the application of BNNTs in reinforcing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds manufactured using laser sintering is demonstrated. BNNTs contribute to the effective inhibition of both grain growth and phase transformation in β-TCP. Moreover, they can strengthen the grain boundaries and boost the fracture mode transition from intergranular to transgranular. BNNTs play an active role in reinforcing β-TCP in terms of load transfer and energy absorption by the synergistic mechanisms of pull-out, peel-off, crack bridging and deflection. With a BNNT content of 4 wt%, the elastic modulus, hardness, compressive strength and fracture toughness of β-TCP increase by 46%, 39%, 109% and 35%, respectively. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) were isolated with high purity, and surface molecule characterization revealed that they were CD90+, CD29+, CD73+, CD31-, CD34- and CD45-. UC-MSCs on BNNTs/β-TCP scaffolds were characterized by more positive Alizarin Red staining as well as up-regulated expression of osteoblast markers, as revealed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunofluorescence staining. These results are the first to demonstrate that BNNTs promote the osteogenic differentiation of UC-MSCs, indicating good osteoinductive properties for use in bone scaffolds. This study paves the way for the potential use of a BNNT/β-TCP scaffold in bone repair. PMID:27305816

  2. Amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang

    1998-12-01

    Much current work in analytical chemistry is devoted to design of biosensors. One particular area in this field is the development of enzyme-based amperometric biosensors for the quantitative determination of a series of substrates in clinical, environmental, industrial and agricultural significance. This dissertation focuses on the design of improved amperometric biosensors based on carbon composite transducers. The use of metallized carbons as transducer materials results in remarkably selective amperometric biosensors. Such enzyme-based transducers eliminate major electroactive interferences, and hence circumvent the need for mediators or membrane barriers. The remarkable selectivity of metal-dispersed carbons is attributed to their strong, preferential, electrocatalytic capacity towards the reductive detection of biologically-generated hydrogen peroxide. Such electrocatalytic activity allows metal-dispersed biosensors to be operated at the optimal potential region between +0.1 and -0.2 V, where the unwanted reactions are neglected resulting in the lowest noise level. Several new materials (e.g., ruthenium on carbon, rhodium on carbon, etc.) and constructions (e.g., carbon fiber, electrochemical co-deposition transducer, etc.) were applied in the development of novel enzyme-based transducers in order to improve the selectivity and applicability of amperometric biosensors. The susceptibility of first-generation oxidase amperometric biosensing to oxygen fluctuations can be improved by using oxygen-rich fluorocarbons as the pasting binders in carbon paste enzyme transducers. Such binders provide an internal supply of oxygen resulting in efficient detection in oxygen-deficit conditions. In particular, the use of poly-chlorotrifluorethylene (Kel-F) oil as carbon paste binder results in a well-defined response and an identical signal up to 40 mM glucose in both the presence and absence of oxygen. Comparing with mediated or wired enzyme-based transducers, such internal

  3. Mechanical and moisture barrier properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and halloysite nanotubes reinforced polylactic acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberton, J.; Martelli, S. M.; Fakhouri, F. M.; Soldi, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) has been larger used in biomedical field due to its low toxicity and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to produce PLLA nanocomposites, by melt extrusion, containing Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) and/or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Immediately after drying, PLLA was mechanically homogenized with the nanofillers and then melt blended using a single screw extruder (L/D = 30) at a speed of 110 rpm, with three heating zones in which the following temperatures were maintained: 150, 150 and 160°C (AX Plasticos model AX14 LD30). The film samples were obtained by compression molding in a press with a temperature profile of 235 ± 5°C for 2.5 min, after pressing, films were cooled up to room temperature. The mechanical tests were performed according to ASTM D882-09 and the water vapor permeability (WVP) was measured according to ASTM E-96, in triplicate. The tensile properties indicated that the modulus was improved with increased TiO2 content up to 1g/100g PLLA. The Young's modulus (YM) of the PLA was increased from 3047 MPa to 3222 MPa with the addition of 1g TiO2/100g PLLA. The tensile strength (TS) of films increases with the TiO2 content. In both cases, the YM and TS are achieved at the 1% content of TiO2 and is due to the reinforcing effect of nanoparticles. Pristine PLA showed a strain at break (SB) of 3.56%, while the SB of nanocomposites were significant lower, for instance the SB of composite containing 7.5 g HNT/100g PLLA was around 1.90 %. The WVP of samples was increased by increasing the nano filler content. It should be expected that an increase of nanofiller content would decrease the mass transfer of water molecules throughout the samples due to the increase in the way water molecules will have to cross to permeate the material. However, this was not observed. Therefore, this result can be explained considering the molecular structure of both fillers, which contain several hydroxyl groups in the surface, making the

  4. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite.

  5. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite. PMID:27185503

  6. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite. PMID:27185503

  7. Novel apparatus for joining of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeremiah D. E.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; La Forest, Mark L.; Simpson, Allen H.

    2007-01-01

    A novel apparatus for joining carbon-carbon (C-C) composites is presented. This device was designed and built based on the concept of self-sustained oxygen-free high-temperature reactions. A layer of reactive mixture is contained between two disks of C-C composite that are to be joined. The stack is held in place between two electrodes, which are connected to a dc power supply. dc current is used to uniformly initiate the reaction in the reactive layer. The electrodes are also part of the pneumatic system, which applies a load to the stack. The designed hydraulic system is effective, lending to low cost and simplified, rapid, accurate operation. It provides a very short response time (˜10ms), which is important for the considered applications. All operational parameters such as initial and final loads, applied current, delay time between ignition and final load application, duration of Joule heating, and safety interlocks are controlled by a programable logic controller system. These features make it an efficient, user-friendly and safe machine to join refractory materials. The entire joining process takes place on the order of seconds, rather than hours as required for solid-state joining methods. The mechanical properties of the obtained joints are higher than those for the C-C composites.

  8. Joining of carbon-carbon composites by graphite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dadras, P.; Mehrotra, G.M. . Mechanical and Materials Engineering Dept.)

    1994-06-01

    Joining of carbon-carbon (C-C) composites by graphite formation, using manganese, magnesium, and aluminum interlayers, has been investigated. The process involved the formation of a metal carbide by chemical reaction between the metal interlayer and the composite, followed by the decomposition of the carbide and evaporation of the metal at elevated temperatures. The maximum bonding temperature in these experiments was 2,200 C. Bonding of composite specimens occurred when manganese or a powder mixture of aluminum and graphite was used as interlayers. Attempts to join C-C pieces using a magnesium interlayer were unsuccessful. The double notch shear strengths of the joints produced using Mn interlayers were very low and ranged from 0.15 to 1.61 MPa at test temperatures of 1,200 and 1,400 C. The interlayer, after completion of the joining operation, consisted, in most cases, only of graphite. The joints produced with aluminum plus graphite interlayers were even weaker, with strength values of 0.11 MPa or less. The presence of aluminum could be detected in some of these joints, suggesting incomplete dissociation of Al[sub 4]C[sub 3] at the maximum bonding temperature of 2,150 C.

  9. Electron Beam Exposure of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for use as radiator face sheets or fins for space radiator applications. Several traditional white thermal control paints are being considered for the surface of the composite face sheets or fins. One threat to radiator performance is high energy electrons. The durability of the thermal control paints applied to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites was evaluated after extended exposure to 4.5 MeV electrons. Electron exposure was conducted under argon utilizing a Mylar(TradeMark) bag enclosure. Solar absorptance and infrared emittance was evaluated before and after exposure to identify optical properties degradation. Adhesion of the paints to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composite substrates was also of interest. Adhesion was evaluated on pristine and electron beam exposed coupons using a variation of the ASTM D-3359 tape test. Results of the optical properties evaluation and the adhesion tape tests are summarized.

  10. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  11. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  12. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  13. Processing, characterization and modeling of carbon nanofiber modified carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalot Rivera, Francis J.

    Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites are used in high temperature applications because they exhibit excellent thermomechanical properties. There are several challenges associated with the processing of C/C composites that include long cycle times, formation of closed porosity within fabric woven architecture and carbonization induced cracks that can lead to reduction of mechanical properties. This work addresses various innovative approaches to reduce processing uncertainties and thereby improve thermomechanical properties of C/C by using vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) in conjunction with carbon fabric and precursor phenolic matrix. The different aspects of the proposed research contribute to understanding of the translation of VGCNFs properties in a C/C composite. The specific objectives of the research are; (a) To understand the mechanical properties and microstructural features of phenolic resin precursor with and without modification with VGCNFs; (b) To develop innovative processing concepts that incorporate VGCNFs by spraying them on carbon fabric and/or adding VGCNFs to the phenolic resin precursor; and characterizing the process induced thermal and mechanical properties; and (c) To develop a finite element model to evaluate the thermal stresses developed in the carbonization of carbon/phenolic with and without VGCNFs. Addition of VGCNFs to phenolic resin enhanced the thermal and physical properties in terms of flexure and interlaminar properties, storage modulus and glass transition temperature and lowered the coefficient of thermal expansion. The approaches of spraying VGCNFs on the fabric surface and mixing VGCNFs with the phenolic resin was found to be effective in enhancing mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting C/C composites. Fiber bridging, improved carbon yield and minimization of carbonization-induced damage were the benefits of incorporating VGCNFs in C/C composites. Carbonization induced matrix cracking predicted by the finite

  14. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Huisheng; Zhu, Yuntian Theodore; Peterson, Dean E.; Jia, Quanxi

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  15. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  16. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  17. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  18. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  19. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  20. Application of Carbon Nanotubes to Nylon Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Nojima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchimoto, Akiharu; Chen, Beibei; Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have many interesting mechanical properties. Therefore, it is expected that an excellent characteristic can be demonstrated by small addition of CNTs in various composite materials. In this study, nylon-6 (N6) was used as the base material and CNTs were mixed to it as a reinforcing agent. Three kinds of CNT were used as filler. Single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) produced by arc plasma jet (APJ) method, SWNTs produced by ferrum-hydrogen arc (FHA) method, and multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Mechanical properties of the composites were measured by tension test, bending test and impact test. In general, when tensile or bending strength goes high, the value of impact energy falls. However, in the case of APJ-SWNT mixing in N6, the impact energy also increases together with the tensile and bending strengths. This study, thus, suggests that APJ-SWNT possesses a characteristic due to which the composite material is strengthened without losing its toughness.

  1. Dynamic damage in carbon-fibre composites.

    PubMed

    Bourne, N K; Parry, S; Townsend, D; Withers, P J; Soutis, C; Frias, C

    2016-07-13

    The Taylor test is used to determine damage evolution in carbon-fibre composites across a range of strain rates. The hierarchy of damage across the scales is key in determining the suite of operating mechanisms and high-speed diagnostics are used to determine states during dynamic loading. Experiments record the test response as a function of the orientation of the cylinder cut from the engineered multi-ply composite with high-speed photography and post-mortem target examination. The ensuing damage occurs during the shock compression phase but three other tensile loading modes operate during the test and these are explored. Experiment has shown that ply orientations respond to two components of release; longitudinal and radial as well as the hoop stresses generated in inelastic flow at the impact surface. The test is a discriminant not only of damage thresholds but of local failure modes and their kinetics. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242311

  2. Surface characterization of LDEF carbon fiber/polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammer, Holly L.; Wightman, James P.; Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1995-01-01

    XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analysis of both carbon fiber/epoxy matrix and carbon fiber/polysulfone matrix composites revealed significant changes in the surface composition as a result of exposure to low-earth orbit. The carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis in conjunction with the SEM photomicrographs revealed significant erosion of the polymer matrix resins by atomic oxygen to expose the carbon fibers of the composite samples. This erosion effect on the composites was seen after 10 months in orbit and was even more obvious after 69 months.

  3. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  4. Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Busch, Donald E.; Fenske, George R.; Lee, Sam; Shepherd, Gary; Pruett, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

  5. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  7. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites: Structure and property effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation tokamak reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites and other materials, such as beryllium, to protect their plasma facing components from the anticipated high heat fluxes. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce a large neutron flux. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HAIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORAL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (da) at an irradiation temperature of {approximately}600{degrees}C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated here included unidirectional, two- directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Irradiation induced dimensional changes are reported for the materials and related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, carbon-carbon composite material dimensional changes are discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. Neutron irradiation induced reductions in the thermal conductivity of two, three-directional carbon-carbon composites are reported, and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is demonstrated. Irradiation induced strength changes are reported for several carbon-carbon composite materials and are explained in terms of in-crystal and composite structural effects.

  8. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  9. Radiation curing of carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.; Dispenza, C.; Sabatino, M. A.; Pitarresi, G.; Tumino, D.; Przbytniak, G.

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy/carbon fibre reinforced composites were produced by means of e-beam irradiation through a pulsed 10 MeV electron beam accelerator. The matrix consisted of a difunctional epoxy monomer (DGEBA) and an initiator of cationic polymerisation, while the reinforcement was a unidirectional high modulus carbon fibre fabric. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was carried out in order to determine the cross-linking degree. The analysis pointed out a nonuniformity in the cross-linking degree of the e-beam cured panels, with the formation of clusters at low Tg (glass transition temperature) and clusters at high Tg. An out-of-mould post irradiation thermal treatment on e-beam cured samples provides a higher uniformity in the network although some slight degradation effects. Mode I delamination fracture toughness and Interlaminar Shear Strength (ISS) were also investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Short Beam Shear tests, respectively. Results from this mechanical characterisation allowed to correlate fracture toughness of the bulk matrix resin, cross-linking density and fibre/matrix interaction to the delamination fracture behaviour of the fibre reinforced material.

  10. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  11. Characterization and Damage Evaluation of Coal Tar Pitch Carbon Matrix Used in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Atul Ramesh; Mahajan, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    Flexure, compressive, and shear properties of the carbon matrix in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites made via a pitch impregnation method have been determined. The pitch carbon matrix was made using the same densification cycle used in making the C/C composite. Cyclic compression tests were performed on the matrix specimens. While unloading, a reduction in modulus was observed and residual strains were observed on complete unloading. These features were attributed to the presence of damage and plasticity in the densified matrix. A J 2 plasticity model with damage was used to simulate this behavior numerically. The parameters required for plasticity and damage model were evaluated iteratively by comparing the results in experiments with simulation.

  12. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process.

  13. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-07-28

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process. 4 figs.

  14. Fabrication of carbon film composites for high-strength structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preiswerk, P. R.; Lippman, M.

    1972-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of fiber composite materials consisting of carbon films are described. Application of carbon film structural composites for constructing microwave filters or optical instruments is proposed. Applications in aerospace and architectural structures for high strength and low density properties are discussed.

  15. Thermal and mechanical performance of a carbon-carbon composite spacecraft radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Benner, Steve M.; Butler, C. Dan; Silk, Eric A.

    1999-09-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall cost associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon- carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel.

  16. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  17. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  18. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  19. Research on ultra-high-temperature materials, monolithic ceramics, ceramic matrix composites and carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. J.; Grimes, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Research on three classes of materials that show potential for allowing significant increases in operating temperatures in gas turbine engines is discussed. Monolithic ceramics, ceramic matrix composites, and carbon-carbon composites are discussed. Sintering, hot pressing, and densification are discussed.

  20. Formation of carbon nanotubes from a silicon carbide/carbon composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Engstler, Jörg; Haridoss, Prathap; Schneider, Jörg J.

    2009-02-01

    The reaction of a SiC/C composite powder in an arcing plasma forms carbon nanotubes in good yield. Besides carbon nanotubes, a Si/C composite composed of β SiC covered with a shell of graphite is formed. The graphitic carbon surface layers of the carbon shell of this composite reacts further to form carbon nanotubes when heated to 600 °C. This process seems highly effective since only a small overall low weight loss, indicative for a complete carbon shell oxidation is observed by thermal analysis. The formation of the carbon nanotubes from SiC is unlikely since no SiO 2 has been found when heating the SiC/C core shell composite to its reaction temperature of 600 °C under O 2. The CNTs formed are of good quality with 3 to 6 concentric walls and high aspect ratio. Occasionally even single walled carbon naotubes have been observed.

  1. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  2. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Patterson, Joshua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Yaccato, Karin; Stagnaro, John; Devenney, Martin; Ries, Justin

    2012-03-20

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  3. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Patterson, Joshua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Yaccato, Karin; Stagnaro, John; Devenney, Martin; Ries, Justin

    2011-11-22

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  4. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Chen, Irvin

    2011-04-12

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  5. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-06-16

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  6. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Chen, Irvin; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Fernandez, Miguel

    2012-05-15

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  7. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Patterson, Joshua; Fernandez, Miguel; Yaccato, Karin; Thatcher, Ryan; Stagnaro, John; Chen, Irvin; Omelon, Sidney; Hodson, Keith; Clodic, Laurence; Geramita, Katharine; Holland, Terence C.; Ries, Justin

    2012-02-14

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  8. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-01-13

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  9. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  10. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  11. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  12. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  13. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinsong; Luo, Ruiying; Yan, Ying

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. {yields} The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. {yields} The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  14. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  15. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  16. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22103118

  18. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. ); Engle, G.B. ); Hollenberg, G.W. )

    1992-10-01

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible.

  19. Wear and Friction Behavior of Metal Impregnated Microporous Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goller, Gultekin; Koty, D. P.; Tewari, S. N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  20. Carbon fiber composites for cryogenic filament-wound vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. V.; Simon, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced unidirectional and bidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were evaluated for physical and mechanical properties over a cryogenic to room temperature range for potential application to cryogenic vessels. The results showed that Courtaulds HTS carbon fiber was the superior fiber in terms of cryogenic strength properties in epoxy composites. Of the resin systems tested in ring composites, CTBN/ERLB 4617 exhibited the highest composite strengths at cryogenic temperatures, but very low interlaminar shear strengths at room temperature. Tests of unidirectional and bidirectional composite bars showed that the Epon 828/Empol 1040 resin was better at all test temperatures. Neither fatigue cycling nor thermal shock had a significant effect on composite strengths or moduli. Thermal expansion measurements gave negative values in the fiber direction and positive values in the transverse direction of the composites.

  1. Isotope composition of carbon in amino acids of solid bitumens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, S. N.; Bushnev, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Primary data are presented on the isotope composition of carbon in individual amino acids from solid bitumens and several biological objects. The amino acids of biological objects are characterized by wide variations of the isotope composition of carbon. This fact occurs owing to the difference in biochemical paths of metabolism resulting in the synthesis of individual amino acids. The δ13C values are somewhat decreased for individual amino acids in asphaltenes, varying from -7.7 to -31.7‰. The carbon of amino acids is weighted in kerits from Bad'el' compared to asphaltenes. All the natural bitumens retain the characteristic trend for natural substances: the isotopically heavy and light amino acids by carbon are glycine and leucine, respectively. The isotope composition of amino-acid carbon is lightened compared to natural bitumens in the samples formed under a pronounced thermal impact (asphalt-like crust and kirishite).

  2. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  4. Differential Sputtering Behavior of Pyrolytic Graphite and Carbon-Carbon Composite Under Xenon Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Johnson, Mark L.; Williams, Desiree D.

    2003-01-01

    A differential sputter yield measurement technique is described, which consists of a quartz crystal monitor that is swept at constant radial distance from a small target region where a high current density xenon ion beam is aimed. This apparatus has been used to characterize the sputtering behavior of various forms of carbon including polycrystalline graphite, pyrolytic graphite, and PVD-infiltrated and pyrolized carbon-carbon composites. Sputter yield data are presented for pyrolytic graphite and carbon-carbon composite over a range of xenon ion energies from 200 eV to 1 keV and angles of incidence from 0 deg (normal incidence) to 60 deg .

  5. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  6. Revisit Carbon/Sulfur Composite for Li-S Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Zuo, Pengjian; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-07-23

    To correlate the carbon properties e.g. surface area and porous structure, with the electrochemical behaviors of carbon/sulfur (C/S) composite cathodes for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, four different carbon frameworks including Ketjen Black (KB, high surface area and porous), Graphene (high surface area and nonporous), Acetylene Black (AB, low surface area and nonporous) and Hollow Carbon Nano Sphere (HCNS, low surface area and porous) are employed to immobilize sulfur (80 wt.%). It has been revealed that high surface area of carbon improves the utilization rate of active sulfur and decreases the real current density during the electrochemical reactions. Accordingly, increased reversible capacities and reduced polarization are observed for high surface area carbon hosts such as KB/S and graphene/S composites. The porous structure of KB or HCNS matrix promotes the long-term cycling stability of C/S composites but only at relatively low rate (0.2 C). Once the current density increases, the pore effect completely disappears and all Li-S batteries show similar trend of capacity degradation regardless of the different carbon hosts used in the cathodes. The reason has been assigned to the formation of reduced amount of irreversible Li2S on the cathode as well as shortened time for polysulfides to transport towards lithium anode at elevated current densities. This work provides valuable information for predictive selection on carbon materials to construct C/S composite for practical applications from the electrochemical point of view.

  7. Anomalous swelling behavior of FM 5055 carbon phenolic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    The swelling response of a typical carbon phenolic composite was measured in the three primary material directions. The data obtained sugrest that at low and high relative humidities the incremental increase in moisture absorption can be attributed primarily to the resin. At intermediate relative humidities, the water is moving largely into the carbonized fibers.

  8. Low temperature specific heat measurement of a carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Migone, A. D.

    A.c. calorimetry was used to determine the value of the specific heat at low temperatures for a sample of Textron's fine weave pierced fabric (FWPF) composite, a three-directional carbon-carbon composite with orthogonal fibre orientation. The heat capacity measurements were performed from 30 to 100 K at nearly 1 K intervals. The specific heat values for the composite are similar to those reported in the literature for graphite in the same temperature range.

  9. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  10. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Marcinek, Marek; Kostecki, Robert

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  12. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2010-10-12

    A method for forming a reinforced rigid anode monolith and fuel and product of such method. The method includes providing a solution of organic aerogel or xerogel precursors including at least one of a phenolic resin, phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol(1,3-dihydroxybenzene), or catechol(1,2-dihydroxybenzene); at least one aldehyde compound selected from the group consisting of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and furfuraldehyde; and an alkali carbonate or phosphoric acid catalyst; adding internal reinforcement materials comprising carbon to said precursor solution to form a precursor mixture; gelling said precursor mixture to form a composite gel; drying said composite gel; and pyrolyzing said composite gel to form a wettable aerogel/carbon composite or a wettable xerogel/carbon composite, wherein said composites comprise chars and said internal reinforcement materials, and wherein said composite is suitable for use as an anode with the chars being fuel capable of being combusted in a molten salt electrochemical fuel cell in the range from 500 C to 800 C to produce electrical energy. Additional methods and systems/compositions are also provided.

  13. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, J. R.; Homer, M. L.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Shevade, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    At JPL we have investigated the effects of temperature on polymer-carbon black composite sensors. While the electrical properties of polymer composites have been studied, with mechanisms of conductivity described by connectivity and tunneling, it is not fully understood how these properties affect sensor characteristics and responses.

  14. Microstructure and properties of pitch-based carbon composites

    PubMed

    Blanco; Santamaria; Bermejo; Bonhomme; Menendez

    1999-11-01

    Pitches prepared in the laboratory by thermal treatment and air-blowing of a commercial coal-tar pitch were used as matrix precursors of carbon composites using granular petroleum coke, foundry coke, amorphous graphite and anthracite. Pitches were characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, softening point, solubility tests and carbon yield) and light microscopy (mesophase content). Pitch pyrolysis behaviour was monitored by thermogravimetric analysis and from the optical texture of cokes. Pitch wettability to the different carbons, at different temperatures, was also studied. Experimental conditions selected for the preparation of composites were based on pitch composition and properties. The main microstructural features of composites were determined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Composite properties were described in terms of their density, porosity and compressive strength, and related to composite microstructure and the characteristics of the precursors. Thermal treatment and air-blowing of pitch improved carbon composite structure and properties. The lowest porosities and best mechanical properties were observed in those composites obtained with the thermally treated pitches combined with foundry coke and anthracite. PMID:10540274

  15. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  16. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  17. Ionic Liquids as Versatile Precursors for Functionalized Porous Carbon and Carbon-Oxide Composite Materials by Confined Carbonization

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of an ionic liquid (IL) gives no char residue, whereas heating the same IL trapped within an oxide framework affords high carbonization yields (see picture). This confinement method allows incorporation of heteroatoms from the parent IL in the final products, for the development of functionalized porous carbon and carbon-oxide composite materials.

  18. Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. To accomplish this, the contractor will provide: (1) Comprehensive reports of on-going efforts to optimize carbonate composition. (2) A list of characteristics affected by electrolyte composition variations (e.g. ionic conductivity, vapor pressure, melting range, gas solubility, exchange current densities on NiO, corrosion and cathode dissolution effects). (3) Assessment of the overall effects that these characteristics have state-of-the-art cell voltage and lifetime.

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  20. Stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, O.; Taya, M.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo-mechanical properties of a composite of rubber embedded by carbon fill has been studied from the viewpoint of developing an electric device. The objective of the present study is to show stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber by using a mixed-type finite element method. Based on the condition o plane strain, the geometry of composite material is taken as the two types of orientation of carbon fiber, which are distributed regularly according the specified volume fraction along the horizontal and vertical directions in the base material of rubber. The loading condition is assumed to be the two types of axial and shearing deformations. Through the calculated results of equivalent and mean stress distributions and the load-deflection curve, effects of the geometry size, the carbon fiber orientation and the loading condition are clarified. The results for the typical axial deformation is compared with the experimental results.

  1. Interphase properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.J.; Weitzsacker, C.W.; Xie, M.; Corbin, S.; Drzal, L.T.

    1997-12-31

    The decline in price of carbon fibers gives an economic incentive to reconsider the use of these reinforcements in markets previously deemed too expensive, such as the automotive industry. Additionally, it would be advantageous if carbon fibers could be immediately used with polymers and manufacturing methods currently used for the production of fiberglass composites, and thus minimize development and startup costs. Of particular interest is the use of carbon fibers in vinyl esters manufactured by resin transfer molding, a leading manufacturing technology for the production of large and complex shaped composite parts. However, carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites have inferior mechanical properties as a result of poor bonding between fiber and matrix. The objective of this program was to evaluate the physical and chemical mechanisms currently thought responsible for adhesion in order to improve the performance of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites. The effect of carbon fiber surface treatment on fiber chemistry and topography was evaluated to uncover the fundamental mechanisms governing carbon fiber to vinyl ester adhesion.

  2. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  3. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  4. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  5. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  6. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  7. Creep of carbon-yarn and carbon-carbon composites at high temperatures and high stresses. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sines, G.; Yang, Z.; Vickers, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    To better understand the creep-behavior of carbon yarn and carbon-carbon composites, creep experiments were developed that permitted testing at high temperatures (up to 2500 C) and at high stresses (up to 850 MPa) on specially prepared, uniaxial specimens that had a known gage length. Using a Dorn-type power-law relation to model steady-state creep, the apparent activation energy for the carbon-yarn and carbon-composite specimens was determined to be 1082 kj/mol. This value represents a single thermally activated process, vacancy diffusion, that compares favorably with the various types of graphitizable carbon. The value determined for the stress exponent was 7.5. It too was found to be independent of the carbon-matrix's presence and independent of the specimens' loading history. Values of the pre-exponential constant for the carbon yarn and carbon composites were also calculated. The carbon matrix greatly improves the creep resistance of the carbon composite. This improvement was attributed to the matrix's microstructure. It distributes applied loads more evenly and it may also impose a triaxial stress state in the yarns's filaments. It is proposed that such a stress state may inhibit the flux of vacancies, thus accounting in part for this increase in creep resistance.

  8. Properties and applications of a pitch carbon microsphere composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Some properties and applications of a pitch carbon microsphere composite are described. The small hollow microspheres are made from the pitch which is usually a wasted by-product of petroleum refining. In contrast to high density composites or syntactic foams in which microspheres are inclusions within a continuous matrix, this composite is an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by a small amount of thermosetting polymer which does not form a continuous matrix. The result is a composite with low density and thermal expansion, modest strength and rigidity, and high porosity and carbon content. Mechanical, thermal, and sorption properties have been measured. Applications of the composite include honeycomb filler for high temperature or ionizing radiation fields and a wicking absorber for solar-powered stills.

  9. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  10. Comparison of carbon fiber/epoxy composites reinforced by short aramid and carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, L.; Hu, X.Z.

    1999-08-20

    This study is designed to examine and compare the toughening effects of short aramid and carbon fibers in carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The primary objective being to identify the toughening mechanisms associated with the two different short fibers. The detailed information on toughening mechanisms will provide a general guide on the relationship between composite interlaminar design and composite performance. Composite design and processing, delamination testing and SEM study of fracture surfaces are used in conjunction in the current study for a better understanding of the short fiber interlaminar reinforcement technique.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes - Polymer Composites with Enhanced Conductivity using Functionalized Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Chen, Jian; Gupta, Rishi

    2003-03-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes show superior electrical, mechanical and thermal properties [1]. Composite materials using carbon nanotubes as fillers are predicted to show similar superior properties. However, realization of such composites has been plagued by poor dispersion of carbon nanotubes in solvents and in polymer matrices. We have developed a method to homogenously disperse carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices using functionalized nanotubes [2]. Thin films of functionalized single walled nanotubes (SWNT) - polystyrene composites and functionalized SWNT - polycarbonate composites were prepared using solution evaporation and spin coating. Both of the composites show several orders of magnitude increase in conductivity for less than 1 wt thresholds of the composites are less than 0.2 wt nanotubes. We attribute the enhanced conduction to the superior dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in the polymer matrix and to the reduced nanotube waviness resulting from the rigid backbone of the conjugated polymer. References: [1]. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov and W. A. de Heer, Science v297, p787 (2002); [2]. J. Chen, H. Liu, W. A. Weimer, M. D. Halls, D. H. Waldeck and G. C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. v124, p9034 (2002).

  12. Carbon/ λ-MnO 2 composites for supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malak-Polaczyk, A.; Matei-Ghimbeu, C.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Frackowiak, E.

    2010-04-01

    In the present work a composite of carbon with λ-MnO 2 have been synthesized by a simple two-step route. In the first step, to obtain LiMn 2O 4/carbon material, mesoporous activated carbon was impregnated with the solution of precursor metal salts and heated subsequently. As-prepared materials were acid treated which resulted in the formation of λ-MnO 2/carbon. Physical properties, structure and specific surface area of electrode materials were studied by TEM, X-ray diffraction and nitrogen sorption measurements. Voltammetry cycling, galvanostatic charge/discharge and impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in two- and three-electrode cells have been applied in order to measure electrochemical parameters. TEM images confirmed well dispersed λ-MnO 2 particles on the surface of carbon material. The carbon in the composite plays an important role as the surface area enhancing component and a support of pseudocapacitive material. Furthermore, the through-connected porosity serves as a continuous pathway for electrolyte transport. A synergetic effect of the porous carbon framework and of the redox properties of the λ-MnO 2 is at the origin of improvement of specific capacitance values which has been observed for composites after delithiation.

  13. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  14. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  15. Effectiveness of Electromagnetic-Wave Shielding by Composites of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Microcoils in Polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2015-11-01

    Carbon microcoils (CMCs) were deposited on Al2O3 substrates using C2H2 and H2 as source gases and SF6 as an additive gas in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Composites of carbon nanotubes in polyurethane (CNT@PU), carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CMC@PU), and carbon nanotubes plus carbon microcoils in polyurethane (CNT + CMC@PU) were fabricated. The electromagnetic-wave-shielding properties of the CNT + CMC@PU composites were examined and compared with those of CNT@PU and CMC@PU in the measurement-frequency range of 0.25-3.5 GHz. By the incorporation of CNTs, the CNT + CMC@PU composite had the reduced volume resistivity compared with that of CMC@PU composite. Consequently it gives rise to the enhanced shielding effectiveness through the reflection-based EMI-shielding mechanism. Meanwhile, the CNT + CMC@PU composite showed increasing shielding effectiveness with increasing measuring frequency in the range of 2.0-3.5 GHz. In addition, the CNT+CMC@PU composite's SE increased with increasing coated-layer thickness. These results indicate the role of the absorption as an EMI-shielding mechanism in CNT + CMC@PU composite. Based on these results, we suggest that the CNT + CMC@PU composite is a promising EMI-shielding material that can be applicable in a wide frequency range through the reflection and absorption shielding mechanism. PMID:26726656

  16. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Christopher H.; Schopf, J. William; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Coath, Christopher D.; Harrison, T. Mark; Stetter, Karl O.

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the ˜850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the ˜2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The δ13CPDB values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 ± 1.7‰ to -31.9 ± 1.2‰, and the δ13CPDB values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 ± 0.7‰ to -45.4 ± 1.2‰. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  17. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  18. Preparation and structure analysis of carbon/carbon composite made from phenolic resin impregnation into exfoliated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Zheng, Y. P.; Kang, F.; Shen, W. C.

    2006-05-01

    Exfoliated graphite-based carbon/carbon composites were prepared using sequence processes of phenolic resin alcohol solution impregnation, carbonization and carbon dioxide (or steam) activation. The textural/structural characteristics of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The results indicated that the composites were composed of graphite and amorphous carbon. On the surface, the worm-like particles were covered by pyrolytic carbon, which also penetrated into parts of the interior pores of the particles. Macropores still remained in the composite, whereas micropores which were formed by the activation of pyrolytic carbon contributed to most of the pore volume.

  19. Modeling Composites of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Prashant; Goyal, Meenakshi; Kumar, Navin

    2013-10-01

    High strain rate experiments performed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, polycarbonate composites (MWCNT-PC) have exhibited enhanced impact resistance under a dynamic strain rate of nearly 2500/s with composition of only 0.5 to 2.0% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in pure polycarbonate (PC). Similarly, hardness and elastic modulus under static loads resulted in a significant increase, depending upon the composition of MWCNTs in PC. The present work aims to analyze these results by correlating the data to fit expressions in generalizing the behavior of MWCNTs composition for MWCNT-PC composites under both static and impact loads. As a result, we found that an optimum composition of 2.1 weight % of MWCNTs exhibits maximum stress resistance within elastic range under strain rates of nearly 2500/s for MWCNT-PC composites. The composition of MWCNTs plays a crucial role in maximizing modification of static and dynamic impact-based mechanical properties of polycarbonates. Further, a simple model based on Lennard-Jones 6-12 atom-atom based potential is formulated and used to compute preliminary estimates of static properties of pure as well as composite PC with the aim to modify this in subsequent approaches.

  20. Improved fire retardancy of thermoset composites modified with carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongfu; Gou, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Multifunctional thermoset composites were made from polyester resin, glass fiber mats and carbon nanofiber sheets (CNS). Their flaming behavior was investigated with cone calorimeter under well-controlled combustion conditions. The heat release rate was lowered by pre-planting carbon nanofiber sheets on the sample surface with the total fiber content of only 0.38 wt.%. Electron microscopy showed that carbon nanofiber sheet was partly burned and charred materials were formed on the combusting surface. Both the nanofibers and charred materials acted as an excellent insulator and/or mass transport barrier, improving the fire retardancy of the composite. This behavior agrees well with the general mechanism of fire retardancy in various nanoparticle-thermoplastic composites.

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  3. Functionalized carbon nanotube-polymer composites and interactions with radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  4. Carbon fiber reinforced composites: their structural and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingquan; Yang, Dehua

    2010-07-01

    More and more astronomical telescopes use carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRP). CFRP has high stiffness, high strength, and low thermal expansion. However, they are not isotropic in performance. Their properties are direction dependent. This paper discusses, in detail, the structural and thermal properties of carbon fiber structure members, such as tubes, plates, and honeycomb sandwich structures. Comparisons are provided both from the structural point of view and from the thermal point of view.

  5. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  6. Stress Rupture Behavior of Silicon Carbide Coated, Low Modulus Carbon/Carbon Composites. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, Gary A.; Wallace, John F.

    1988-01-01

    The disadvantages of carbon-carbon composites, in addition to the oxidation problem, are low thermal expansion, expensive fabrication procedures, and poor off axis properties. The background of carbon-carbon composites, their fabrication, oxidation, oxidation protection and mechanical testing in flexure are discussed.

  7. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  8. Autoclave processing of thick carbon-phenolic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.S.; Kim, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Aerospace applications of carbon-phenolics are primarily structures and preforms for carbon-carbon composites. Phenolic composites are usually compression molded under high pressure to achieve good consolidation, high density, and enhanced mechanical properties; but for the applications where continuous fiber reinforcement is necessary, vacuum bagging and cure in the autoclave or hydroclave is preferrable. The resols used for ablative applications generate condensation by-products, either water or methanol, which may volatilize inside a curing composite and expand to form bubbles. The resulting pores in cured composites may act as weak points in the matrix and trapped volatiles may also expand explosively under the intensive heating typical of ablative applications. With phenolic, however, it is impossible to remove all volatiles prior to cure because water and methanol are reaction products. Therefore, it is very important to control process parameters in order to suppress the volatiles during processing for a void free matrix. In this paper, a reliable autoclave process has been developed for large and thick carbon-phenolic. Foam sandwich structural composites for the application to a blast deflector have been identified through the various nondestructive and destructive tests.

  9. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime. PMID:24224845

  10. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  11. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  12. The carbon components in SNC meteorites of feldspathic harzburgite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Two meteorites collected in Antarctica, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516, have characteristics which link them to the shergottite group of SNC meteorites. Essentially, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 are feldspathic harzburgites, being comprised of roughly equal quantities of olivine and pyroxene, with an additional few percent of feldspar which has subsequently been converted to maskelynite by shock. The meteorites represent samples of a cumulate rock which is itself composed of two different lithologies: in one, large pyroxenes poikilitically enclose olivine crystals, while the other consists of interstitial areas made up of pyroxene, olivine, maskelynite, whitlockite, troilite, ilmenite and chlorapatite. It has been proposed that meteorites such as ALH A77005 (and LEW 88516) are relict samples of the source peridotite from which the other shergottites formed. As such it should be informative to study in detail the carbon components present within these samples, in order to make comparisons with data from other shergottites. Although not plutonic in origin, and therefore not sampling a truly deep source, analyses of ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 should assist with attempts to define the bulk carbon isotopic composition of Mars. This has been assessed previously through analyses of carbon of presumed magmatic origin in other SNC meteorites, but the carbon isotopic compositions obtained seem to be at variance with what might be expected. It is important to constrain the carbon isotopic composition of Mars as well as possible so that models of atmospheric evolution, based on carbon isotopic data, can yield the most reliable results.

  13. Reactive Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah; Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory; Asthana, Rajiv

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading.

  14. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  15. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers: Reinforcement efficiency and carbonization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Han Gi

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers were made using various processing methods such as conventional solution spinning, gel spinning, and bi-component gel spinning. The detailed characterization exhibited that the smaller and longer CNT will reinforce polymer matrix mostly in tensile strength and modulus, respectively. Gel spinning combined with CNT also showed the promising potential of PAN/CNT composite fiber as precursor fiber of the next generation carbon fiber. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the highly ordered PAN crystal layer on the CNT, which attributed to the enhanced physical properties. The subsequent carbonization study revealed that carbonized PAN/CNT fibers have at least 50% higher tensile strength and modulus as compared to those of carbonized PAN fibers. Electrical conductivity of CNT containing carbon fiber was also 50% higher than that of carbonized PAN fiber. In order to have carbon fiber with high tensile strength, the smaller diameter precursor fiber is preferable. Bi-component gel spinning produced 1-2 mum precursor fiber, resulting in ˜1 mum carbon fiber. The tensile strength of the carbonized bi-component fiber (islands fibers) is as high as 6 GPa with tensile modulus of ˜500 GPa. Further processing optimization may lead to the next generation carbon fiber.

  16. Void morphology in polyethylene/carbon black composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, D.W.M.; Wartenberg, M.; Schwartz, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and contrast matching techniques is used to determine the size and quantity of voids incorporated during fabrication of polyethylene/carbon black composites. The analysis used to extract void morphology from SANS data is based on the three-phase model of microcrack determination via small angle x-rayscattering (SAXS) developed by W.Wu{sup 12} and applied to particulate reinforced composites.

  17. Failure mechanisms of woven carbon and glass composites

    SciTech Connect

    Alif, N.; Carlsson, L.A.

    1997-12-31

    Stress-strain responses in tension, compression, and shear of a five-harness satin-weave carbon/epoxy composite and a four-harness satin-weave glass/epoxy composite have been examined. Damage progression under tension was examined by optical microscopic inspection of the polished edges of the specimens. Models for elastic property and failure predictions of woven-fabric composites were examined and correlated with the experimental data. Damage inspection of the carbon/epoxy composite under tension revealed that the initial failure was cracking of pure matrix regions followed by transverse bundle cracking. Fill/weft debonding and longitudinal splits of the fill bundles occurred close to ultimate failure of the composite. The glass/epoxy composite displayed damage in the form of fill/weft debonding and longitudinal splits, but no transverse yarn cracking. The damage observed in both composites was confined to the region where ultimate failure occurred. Elastic properties of the composites were overall in good agreement with micromechanical predictions based on uniform strain, but failure stress predictions were less accurate.

  18. Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a lightweight, small sensor for inert gases that consumes a relatively small amount of power and provides measurements that are as accurate as conventional approaches. The sensing approach is based on generating an electrical discharge and measuring the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas present in a sample. An array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a substrate is connected to a variable-pulse voltage source. The CNT tips are spaced appropriately from the second electrode maintained at a constant voltage. A sequence of voltage pulses is applied and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas. The CNTs in the gas sensor have a sharp (low radius of curvature) tip; they are preferably multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbon nanofibers (CNFs), to generate high-strength electrical fields adjacent to the tips for breakdown of the gas components with lower voltage application and generation of high current. The sensor system can provide a high-sensitivity, low-power-consumption tool that is very specific for identification of one or more gas components. The sensor can be multiplexed to measure current from multiple CNT arrays for simultaneous detection of several gas components.

  19. Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Future space nuclear power systems will require radiator technology to dissipate excess heat created by a nuclear reactor. Large radiator fins with circulating coolant are in development for this purpose and an investigation of how to make them most efficient is underway. Maximizing the surface area while minimizing the mass of such radiator fins is critical for obtaining the highest efficiency in dissipating heat. Processes to develop surface roughness are under investigation to maximize the effective surface area of a radiator fin. Surface roughness is created through several methods including oxidation and texturing. The effects of atomic oxygen impingement on carbon-carbon surfaces are currently being investigated for texturing a radiator surface. Early studies of atomic oxygen impingement in low Earth orbit indicate significant texturing due to ram atomic oxygen. The surface morphology of the affected surfaces shows many microscopic cones and valleys which have been experimentally shown to increase radiation emittance. Further study of this morphology proceeded in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Atomic oxygen experiments on the LDEF successfully duplicated the results obtained from materials in spaceflight by subjecting samples to 4.5 eV atomic oxygen from a fixed ram angle. These experiments replicated the conical valley morphology that was seen on samples subjected to low Earth orbit.

  20. Conductivity of carbon nanotube polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, J T; Kung, P; Maiti, A

    2006-11-20

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations were used to investigate methods of controlling the assembly of percolating networks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in thin films of block copolymer melts. For suitably chosen polymers the CNTs were found to spontaneously self-assemble into topologically interesting patterns. The mesoscale morphology was projected onto a finite-element grid and the electrical conductivity of the films computed. The conductivity displayed non-monotonic behavior as a function of relative polymer fractions in the melt. Results are compared and contrasted with CNT dispersion in small-molecule fluids and mixtures.

  1. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  2. Carbon nanotube/felt composite electrodes without polymer binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolen, J. Mauricio; Matsubara, E. Y.; Marchesin, Marcel S.; Lala, Stella M.; Montoro, L. A.; Tronto, S.

    In this work we have investigated the suitability of composite electrodes consisting of cup-stacked and bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNT) synthesized directly onto a carbon felt for both lithium storage and double-layer capacitance applications. The CNT/felt composite electrode was prepared using catalytic chemical vapor decomposition on the carbon felt. The microstructure of the electrodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical characterization of the CNT/felt, either submitted or not to acid treatment for extraction of the catalytic particles used during the CNT growth, was carried out using 1 mol L -1 LiPF 6 in mixtures of ethylene carbonate, dimethyl carbonate, diethyl carbonate, and propylene carbonate. The carbon nanotubes loading and the type of CNT, whether open or closed, on the felt were the most significant factors regarding the electrochemical properties of the composite. With respect to the application of the composite to lithium storage, an anomalous behavior in the reversible specific capacity as a function of the current was detected. The capacity was found to be large at higher current values. The best reversible specific capacity was found for the open-CNT/felt (275 mAh g -1 at 0.16 A g -1, and 200 mAh g -1 at 0.82 A g -1), on an area of 0.634 mm 2. The double-layer capacitance of the CNT decreased with increasing current. In the case of the open-CNT with a CNT loading of 13.93 mg, the composite provided 40.3 μF cm 2 or about 12 F g -1 at 10 mA of polarization current using 1 mol L -1 LiPF 6 in mixtures of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate. For the closed-CNT with a CNT loading of 9.3 mg, the double-layer capacitance was 30 F g -1 at 20 mA in 1 M H 2SO 4.

  3. Influence of carbon fillers on the thermal conductivity of Poly (methyl methacrylate)/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Komal; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2016-04-01

    In the present research on carbon polymer composites, the effects of variation of the concentration of conductive fillers on the thermal conductivity of the resultant composite were studied. Carbon powders in the form of Carbon Fibers (CF) (200µm), Carbon Black (CB) (30-100 nm) and Graphite (75-100µm) were being considered as conductive fillers in the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix. Nielsen model was found to be the best proposed model that incorporated geometric configuration comprising of both the orientation and shape of fillers. It was established that the calculated values of thermal conductivity of PMMA composites with single fillers of CF were higher than those of CB followed by Graphite. Furthermore, a visible synergy was observed between the combinations of these fillers such as Graphite and CF, Graphite and CB, CF and CB, as well as CB and CF.

  4. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P; Baker, C

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  5. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/PMMA Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangming; Fisher, John; Winey, Karen

    2003-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have demonstrated unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Similar properties are expected for polymer/SWNT nanocomposites. A new processing method has been used to produce PMMA/SWNT composites, which provides better dispersion of SWNT in the polymer matrix. Optical microscopy of the samples show improved dispersion of SWNT in the PMMA matrix, which is the key factor of the composite performance. Aligned and unaligned composite samples have been made for both purified SWNT and functionalized SWNT with different SWNT loadings. The tensile, thermal conductivity, and electroconductivity measurements of these samples will be performed.

  6. Electrical conductivity and rheology of carbon black composites under elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Electrical properties of conductive polymer composites are governed by filler particle structures which are formed in the material during the mixing. Therefore, knowledge of the behavior of conductive particle structures under defined conditions of deformation is necessary to produce materials with balanced electrical and rheological properties. Whereas the electrical conductivity evolution under shear can be nowadays studied even with the commercial rheometers, the investigations under elongation were not performed up to now. In this work simultaneous electrical and rheological measurements in elongation on polystyrene/carbon black composites are introduced. Such kind of experiment can help in understanding the relationships between processing conditions and properties of conductive polymer composites.

  7. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  8. High toughness carbon cloth composites for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Sara; Forte, Giuseppe; Mascia, Leno; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers based on a thermoplastic, high performance matrix such as Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene have been produced using two different routes and it was found that in-situ polymerization of the matrix is a possible way forward to achieve a combination of high strength and high toughness in composites.

  9. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limi...

  10. Thermal Conductivity Database of Various Structural Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Ransone, Philip O.; Tsou, Hwa-Tsu

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thermal protection materials envisioned for use on future hypersonic vehicles will likely be subjected to temperatures in excess of 1811 K (2800 F) and, therefore, will require the rapid conduction of heat away from the stagnation regions of wing leading edges, the nose cap area, and from engine inlet and exhaust areas. Carbon-carbon composite materials are candidates for use in advanced thermal protection systems. For design purposes, high temperature thermophysical property data are required, but a search of the literature found little thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon materials above 1255 K (1800 F). Because a need was recognized for in-plane and through-the-thickness thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon composite materials over a wide temperature range, Langley Research Center (LaRC) embarked on an effort to compile a consistent set of thermal conductivity values from room temperature to 1922 K (3000 F) for carbon-carbon composite materials on hand at LaRC for which the precursor materials and thermal processing history were known. This report documents the thermal conductivity data generated for these materials. In-plane thermal conductivity values range from 10 to 233 W/m-K, whereas through-the-thickness values range from 2 to 21 W/m-K.

  11. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  12. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon-copper composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng'ao; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Hongbo; Xiong, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Using 2.5-dimensional carbon fiber fabrics as the reinforcement, porous carbon/carbon(C/C) substrates were firstly fabricated by impregnation/carbonization (I/C) technique with furan resin and then treated at 2000, 2300 and 3000 °C, respectively. Finally, carbon fiber reinforced carbon and copper(C/C-Cu) composites were prepared by infiltrating melt copper alloy into C/C substrates under pressure. The effects of treating temperatures on microstructures and thermal conductivities of the composites were investigated. The results show that heat treatment plays an important role in the microstructure and thermal conductivity of C/C-Cu composites. It is conducive not only to rearrange the carbon crystallite of resin-based carbon in oriented layer structure, but also to improve the content and connectivity of copper alloy. The thermal conductivity increases with the increase in heat treatment temperature in both parallel and perpendicular direction; the thermal conductivity in parallel direction is evidently superior to that in perpendicular direction.

  13. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  14. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  15. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of a Carbon/Carbon Composite Spacecraft Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Benner, Steve; Butler, Dan; Silk, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall costs associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon Spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon-carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator (CCR) with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel. While carbon-carbon is an ideal thermal candidate for spacecraft radiators, in practice there are technical challenges that may compromise performance. In this work, the thermal and mechanical performance of the EO-1 CCR is assessed by analysis and testing. Both then-nal and mechanical analyses were conducted to predict the radiator response to anticipated launch and on-orbit loads. The thermal model developed was based on thermal balance test conditions. The thermal analysis was performed using SINDA version 4.0. Structural finite element modeling and analysis were performed using SDRC/1-DEAS and UAI/NASTRAN, respectively. In addition, the CCR was subjected to flight qualification thermal/vacuum and vibration tests. The panel meets or exceeds the requirements for space flight and demonstrates promise for future satellite missions.

  16. A comparative study of EMI shielding properties of carbon nanofiber and multi-walled carbon nanotube filled polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonglai; Gupta, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanofiber- and multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of composites was frequency independent, and increased with the increase of carbon nanofiber or nanotube loading. At the same filler loading, multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites exhibited higher shielding effectiveness compared to those filled with carbon nanofibers. In particular, carbon nanotubes were more effective than nanofibers in providing high EMI shielding at low filler loadings. The experimental data showed that the shielding effectiveness of the composite containing 7 wt% carbon nanotubes could reach more than 26 dB, implying that such a composite can be used as a potential electromagnetic interference shielding material. The dominant shielding mechanism of carbon nanotube-filled polystyrene composites was also discussed. PMID:16060155

  17. Microwave attenuation of multiwalled carbon nanotube-fused silica composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Changshu; Pan Yubai; Liu Xuejian; Sun Xingwei; Shi Xiaomei; Guo Jingkun

    2005-09-19

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used to convert radome materials to microwave absorbing materials. Dense MWCNT-fused silica composites were prepared by hot-pressing technique. The composites exhibit high complex permittivities at X-band frequencies, depending on the content of MWCNTs. The value of the loss tangent increases three orders over pure fused silica only by incorporating 2.5 vol % MWCNTs into the composites. The average magnitude of microwave transmission reaches -33 dB at 11-12 GHz in the 10 vol % MWCNT-fused silica composites, which indicates the composites have excellent microwave attenuation properties. The attenuation properties mainly originate from the electric loss of MWCNTs by the motion of conducting electrons.

  18. Recent advances in research on carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michele T; Gun'ko, Yurii K

    2010-04-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate remarkable electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, which allow a number of exciting potential applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in research on the development of CNT-polymer composites, with particular attention to their mechanical and electrical (conductive) properties. Various functionalization and fabrication approaches and their role in the preparation of CNT-polymer composites with improved mechanical and electrical properties are discussed. We tabulate the most recent values of Young's modulus and electrical conductivities for various CNT-polymer composites and compare the effectiveness of different processing techniques. Finally, we give a future outlook for the development of CNT-polymer composites as potential alternative materials for various applications, including flexible electrodes in displays, electronic paper, antistatic coatings, bullet-proof vests, protective clothing, and high-performance composites for aircraft and automotive industries. PMID:20496401

  19. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes in Modified Plant Oil Composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAninch, Ian M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their impressive mechanical properties are ideal reinforcement material. Acrylated epoxidized soy oil (AESO) has been previously shown to have favorable interactions with carbon nanotubes; however a mixture of aggregates and dispersed tubes were found even at low CNT concentrations. In order to prevent re-aggregation, the CNTs were functionalized with a 10 carbon long aliphatic chain. These aliphatic chains are similar to the fatty acids that make up soy oil. Functionalization was verified using XPS and IR spectroscopy. These functionalized CNTs were dispersed by mechanical shear mixing into AESO both with and without styrene as a comonomer. No large aggregates were observed in the liquid, uncured, samples or in the final cured composites. Dispersion in the solid composites was verified using optical and electron microscopy. Better dispersion also resulted in improved mechanical properties.

  20. Reduction mechanisms of pyrite cinder-carbon composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-jian; Xing, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Jian-liang; Cao, Ming-ming; Jiao, Ke-xin; Ren, Shan

    2012-11-01

    The non-isothermal reduction mechanisms of pyrite cinder-carbon composite pellets were studied at laboratory scale under argon (Ar) atmosphere. The composite pellets as well as the specimens of separate layers containing pyrite cinder and coal were tested. The degree of reduction was measured by mass loss. The microstructures of the reduced composite pellets were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that the reduction processes of the composite pellets may be divided into four stages: reduction via CO and H2 from volatiles in coal at 673-973 K, reduction via H2 and C produced by cracking of hydrocarbon at 973-1123 K, direct reduction by carbon via gaseous intermediates at 1123-1323 K, and direct reduction by carbon at above 1323 K. Corresponding to the four stages, the apparent activation energies ( E) for the reduction of the composite pellets are 86.26, 78.54, 72.01, and 203.65 kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  1. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  2. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  3. Supercapacitors based on carbon nanotube fuzzy fabric structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alresheedi, Bakheet Awad

    Supercapacitors used in conjunction with batteries offer a solution to energy storage and delivery problems in systems where high power output is required, such as in fully electric cars. This project aimed to enhance current supercapacitor technology by fabricating activated carbon on a substrate consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon fiber fabric (fuzzy fabric). The fuzzy surface of CNTs lowers electrical resistance and increases porosity, resulting in a flexible fabric with high specific capacitance. Experimental results confirm that the capacitance of activated carbon fabricated on the fuzzy fiber composite is significantly higher than when activated carbon is formed simply on a bare carbon fiber substrate, indicating the usefulness of CNTs in supercapacitor technology. The fabrication of the fuzzy fiber based carbon electrode was fairly complex. The processing steps included composite curing, stabilization, carbonization and activation. Ratios of the three basic ingredients for the supercapacitor (fiber, CNT and polymer matrix) were investigated through experimentation and Grey relational analysis. The aim of Grey relational analysis was to examine factors that affect the overall performance of the supercapacitor. It is based on finding relationships in both independent and interrelated data series (parameters). Using this approach, it was determined that the amount of CNTs on the fiber surface plays a major role in the capacitor properties. An increased amount of CNTs increases the surface area and electrical conductivity of the substrate, while also reducing the required time of activation. Technical advances in the field of Materials and Structures are usually focused on attaining superior performance while reducing weight and cost. To achieve such combinations, multi-functionality has become essential; namely, to reduce weight by imparting additional functions simultaneously to a single material. In this study, a structural composite with

  4. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  5. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., <10%) in shells from aquatic organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions

  6. Gas composition sensing using carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and system for estimating one, two or more unknown components in a gas. A first array of spaced apart carbon nanotubes (''CNTs'') is connected to a variable pulse voltage source at a first end of at least one of the CNTs. A second end of the at least one CNT is provided with a relatively sharp tip and is located at a distance within a selected range of a constant voltage plate. A sequence of voltage pulses {V(t.sub.n)}.sub.n at times t=t.sub.n (n=1, . . . , N1; N1.gtoreq.3) is applied to the at least one CNT, and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of a curve I(t.sub.n) for current or a curve e(t.sub.n) for electric charge transported from the at least one CNT to the constant voltage plate. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas.

  7. Permeability Measurements in Carbon-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdenek, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the permeability of the composite feedline, that is proposed to be used in the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), three 8 x 8-in. coupons were constructed. Two of the coupons were layed-up with 4 plies of plain weave prepreg [0/90, plus or minus 45, plus or minus 45, 0/90] and the other one layed-up with 4 plies of unidirectional prepreg [0, 90, 90, 0]. The coupons were vacuumed bagged and cured to manufactures specifications. The coupons were then placed in an apparatus to test for permeability. Nitrogen gas was used to permeate through the coupons at a pressure of 5 psig. A manometer was placed on the opposite side of the coupons and was used to measure the height of the fluid with respect to time. From this data the mass flow rate of the gas could be calculated since the area of the manometer and the density of the gas is known. The results of the test are given. The permeability constant was calculated using Darcy's law, which related the pressure drop, flow rate of the permeating gas and resistance to flow through the coupon created. To put the results into prospective the permeability of sand stone and granite is 1E-15 and 1E-20 respectively.

  8. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  9. BASIC PROPERTIES OF REFERENCE CROSSPLY CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides basic in-air property data and correlations-tensile, compressive, shear, tensile fatigue, and tensile creep-for a reference carbon-fiber composite being characterized as a part of the Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Materials and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-based design guidance for polymeric composites for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed here is a {+-}45{degree} crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. Basic tensile, compressive, and shear properties are tabulated for the temperature range from {minus}40 to 120 C. Fatigue response at room-temperature and 120 C are presented, and creep and creep rupture at room temperature only are reported. In all cases, two fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}--relative to the specimen axes are addressed. The properties and correlations presented are interim in nature. They are intended as a baseline for planning a full durability test program on this reference composite.

  10. Iron-carbon composites for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Bhanu Kiran

    This research is focused on engineering submicron spherical carbon particles as effective carriers/supports for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to address the in situ remediation of soil and groundwater chlorinated contaminants. Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) form a class of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) toxic contaminants in soil and groundwater. The in situ injection of NZVI particles to reduce DNAPLs is a potentially simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign technology that has become a preferred method in the remediation of these compounds. However, unsupported NZVI particles exhibit ferromagnetism leading to particle aggregation and loss in mobility through the subsurface. This work demonstrates two approaches to prepare carbon supported NZVI (iron-carbon composites) particles. The objective is to establish these iron-carbon composites as extremely useful materials for the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and suitable materials for the in situ injection technology. This research also demonstrates that it is possible to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles either on the external surface or within the interior of carbon microspheres using a one-step aerosol-based process. The simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis as both the iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports. Furthermore, the aerosol-based process is applied to prepare new class of supported catalytic materials such as carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles for ex situ remediation of contaminated water. The iron-carbon composites developed in this research have multiple functionalities (a) they are reactive and function effectively in reductive dehalogenation (b) they are highly adsorptive thereby bringing the chlorinated compound to the proximity of the reactive sites and also serving as adsorption

  11. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Sun, Jianwei; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Reeves, Mark; Keidar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90 K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100 F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  12. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Sun, Jianwei; Reeves, Mark

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90 K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100 F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  13. Thermal Expansion of Carbon Nanofiber-Reinforced Multiscale Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald L.; Achar, Sriniket; Gupta, Nikhil

    2012-10-01

    Improved dimensional stability of composites is desired in applications where they are exposed to varying temperature conditions. The current study aims at analyzing the effect of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix composites and hollow particle-filled composites (syntactic foams). CNFs have a lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) than epoxy resin, which results in composites with increased dimensional stability as the CNF content is increased. The experimental measurements show that with 10 wt.% CNF, the composite has about 11.6% lower CTE than the matrix resin. In CNF-reinforced syntactic foams, the CTE of the composite decreases with increasing wall thickness and volume fraction of hollow particle inclusions. With respect to neat epoxy resin, a maximum decrease of 38.4% is also observed in the CNF/syntactic foams with microballoon inclusions that range from 15 vol.% to 50 vol.% in all composite mixtures. The experimental results for CNF/syntactic foam are in agreement with a modified version of Kerner's model. A combination of hollow microparticles and nanofibers has resulted in the ability to tailor the thermal expansion of the composite over a wide range.

  14. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p < 0.05) among all composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications. PMID:23629922

  15. A Nanoporous Carbon/Exfoliated Graphite Composite For Supercapacitor Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, Memoria; Ekaputra, Muhamad P.; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal

    2010-12-01

    Nanoporous carbon was prepared from coconut shells using a simple heating method. The nanoporous carbon is subjected to different treatments: without activation, activation with polyethylene glycol (PEG), and activation with sodium hydroxide (NaOH)-PEG. The exfoliated graphite was synthesized from graphite powder oxidized with zinc acetate (ZnAc) and intercalated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and NaOH. A composite was made by mixing the nanoporous carbon with NaOH-PEG activation, the exfoliated graphite and a binder of PVA solution, grinding the mixture, and annealing it using ultrasonic bath for 1 hour. All of as-synthesized materials were characterized by employing a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a MATLAB's image processing toolbox, and an x-ray diffractometer (XRD). It was confirmed that the composite is crystalline with (002) and (004) orientations. In addition, it was also found that the composite has a high surface area, a high distribution of pore sizes less than 40 nm, and a high porosity (67%). Noting that the pore sizes less than 20 nm are significant for ionic species storage and those in the range of 20 to 40 nm are very accessible for ionic clusters mobility across the pores, the composite is a promising material for the application as supercapacitor electrodes.

  16. Special Polymer/Carbon Composite Films for Detecting SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Jewell, April; Shevade, Abhijit; Manatt, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William

    2008-01-01

    A family of polymer/carbon films has been developed for use as sensory films in electronic noses for detecting SO2 gas at concentrations as low as 1 part per million (ppm). Most previously reported SO2 sensors cannot detect SO2 at concentrations below tens of ppm; only a few can detect SO2 at 1 ppm. Most of the sensory materials used in those sensors (especially inorganic ones that include solid oxide electrolytes, metal oxides, and cadmium sulfide) must be used under relatively harsh conditions that include operation and regeneration at temperatures greater than 100 C. In contrast, the present films can be used to detect 1 ppm of SO2 at typical opening temperatures between 28 and 32 C and can be regenerated at temperatures between 36 and 40 C. The basic concept of making sensing films from polymer/carbon composites is not new. The novelty of the present family of polymer/carbon composites lies in formulating the polymer components of these composites specifically to optimize their properties for detecting SO2. First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations of the energies of binding of SO2 molecules to various polymer functionalities are used as a guide for selecting polymers and understanding the role of polymer functionalities in sensing. The polymer used in the polymer-carbon composite is a copolymer of styrene derivative units with vinyl pyridine or substituted vinyl pyridine derivative units. To make a substituted vinyl pyridine for use in synthesizing such a polymer, poly(2-vinyl pyridine) that has been dissolved in methanol is reacted with 3-chloropropylamine that has been dissolved in a solution of methanol. The methanol is then removed to obtain the copolymer. Later, the copolymer can be dissolved in an appropriate solvent with a suspension of carbon black to obtain a mixture that can be cast and then dried to obtain a sensory film.

  17. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  18. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  19. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on hierarchically structured cobalt nanoparticle/carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composites.

    PubMed

    Zarubova, Sarka; Rane, Shreyas; Yang, Jia; Yu, Yingda; Zhu, Ye; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2011-07-18

    The hierarchically structured carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/carbon felt composites, in which CNFs were directly grown on the surface of microfibers in carbon felt, forming a CNF layer on a micrometer range that completely covers the microfiber surfaces, were tested as a novel support material for cobalt nanoparticles in the highly exothermic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A compact, fixed-bed reactor, made of disks of such composite materials, offered the advantages of improved heat and mass transfer, relatively low pressure drop, and safe handling of immobilized CNFs. An efficient 3-D thermal conductive network in the composite provided a relatively uniform temperature profile, whereas the open structure of the CNF layer afforded an almost 100 % effectiveness of Co nanoparticles in the F-T synthesis in the fixed bed. The greatly improved mass and heat transport makes the compact reactor attractive for applications in the conversion of biomass, coal, and natural gas to liquids. PMID:21563315

  20. Structural Analysis of Novel Lignin-derived Carbon Composite Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Nicholas W; Rios, Orlando; Feygenson, Mikhail; Proffen, Thomas E; Keffer, David J

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel lignin-based carbon composite anodes consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains motivates the understanding of a relationship of the structural properties characterizing these materials, such as crystallite size, intracrystallite dspacing, crystalline volume fraction and composite density, with their pair distribution functions (PDF), obtained from both molecular dynamics simulation and neutron scattering. A model for these composite materials is developed as a function of experimentally measurable parameters and realized in fifteen composite systems, three of which directly match all parameters of their experimental counterparts. The accurate reproduction of the experimental PDFs using the model systems validates the model. The decomposition of the simulated PDFs provides an understanding of each feature in the PDF and allows for the development of a mapping between the defining characteristics of the PDF and the material properties of interest.

  1. Study of the mechanical behavior of a 2-D carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, W. B.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    The out-of-plane fracture of a 2-D carbon-carbon composite was observed and characterized to gain an understanding of the factors influencing the stress distribution in such a laminate. Finite element analyses of a two-ply carbon-carbon composite under in-plane, out-of-plane, and thermal loading were performed. Under in-plane loading all components of stress were strong functions of geometry. Additionally, large thermal stresses were predicted. Out-of-plane tensile tests revealed that failure was interlaminar, and that cracks propagated along the fiber-matrix interface. An elasticity solution was utilized to analyze an orthotropic fiber in an isotropic matrix under uniform thermal load. The analysis reveals that the stress distributions in a transversely orthotropic fiber are radically different than those predicted assuming the fiber to be transversely isotropic.

  2. Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Abbatiello, L.A.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1987-06-17

    The invention is directed to the fabrication of ultralight carbon- bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0. 04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter. The composites are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0. 03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of a mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

  3. Nonlinear forced vibration response of smart two-phase nano-composite beams to external harmonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareishi, Soraya; Kalhori, Hamed; Rafiee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Seyedeh Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for nonlinear free and forced vibration response of smart laminated nano-composite beams resting on nonlinear elastic foundation and under external harmonic excitation. The structure is under a temperature change and an electric excitation through the piezoelectric layers. Different distribution patterns of the single walled aligned and straight carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the thickness of the beam are considered. The beam complies with Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and von Kármán geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinearity is due to the mid-plane stretching of the beam and the nonlinear stiffness of the elastic foundation. The Multiple Time Scales perturbation scheme is used to perform the nonlinear dynamical analysis of functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced beams. Analytical expressions of the nonlinear natural frequencies, nonlinear dynamic response and frequency response of the system in the case of primary resonance have been presented. The effects of different parameters including applied voltage, temperature change, beam geometry, the volume fraction and distribution pattern of the carbon nanotubes on the nonlinear natural frequencies and frequency-response curves are presented. It is found that the volume fractions of SWCNTs as well as their distribution pattern significantly change the behavior of the system.

  4. Electromagnetic Shielding of Oriented Carbon Fiber Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Laurenzi, S.; Mariani Primiani, V.; Moglie, F.; Gradoni, G.; Marchetti, M.

    2012-05-01

    The paper analyses the electromagnetic shielding measurements of carbon fiber composite structure. In particular the shielding effectiveness is measured applying the nested reverberation chamber method in the frequency range of 3.5 GHz - 8.5 GHz. This method ensure a realistic electromagnetic excitation of the sample under test characterized by a random polarization and incoming direction. The paper also describes the material manufacturing procedure and gives important details about the sample mounting technique. Three material samples are considered which differ in carbon fiber orientation and stratification. Obtained results highlight the capability of such materials to behave as high-performance shields in the microwave region.

  5. Carbon black and carbon black-conducting polymer composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeshwar, K.; Wampler, W.A.; Goeringer, S.; Gerspacher, M.

    1996-12-31

    A large fraction of the carbon black commercially produced in the U. S. and other parts of the world goes into the automobile tire industry and other rubber applications. However, specialty applications of this material are expected to grow in the future. The present study explores the applicability of composites of carbon black and an electronically conductive polymer, polypyrrole, in environmental pollution abatement scenarios. Chromium was used as a model environmental pollutant for demonstration of our approach.

  6. Processing, structure and properties of pitch-based carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Appleyard, S.P.; Rand, B.; Ahearn, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The potential of carbon-carbon (CC) composites as materials for high temperature applications was recognized at a very early stage, leading to their development in the 1960`s as materials for thermal protection during space vehicle re-entry. By the early 1970`s, two basic approaches to the formation of the carbon matrix were established, namely through chemical vapor deposition from a hydrocarbon gas (CVD) and through carbonization of a carbon-bearing resin or pitch. Fundamentally, little has changed since those early years with respect to these basic methods of CC composite fabrication. Further developments have, however, involved the introduction of multidirectional fibre architectures in order to reduce the mechanical anisotropy present in unidirectionally and bidirectionally reinforced composites caused by poor mechanical properties in the unreinforced directions. The strategic importance of several aerospace applications of CC composites, including military rocket nozzles and nose cones, the NASA space shuttle nose cone and leading edge protection surfaces, aircraft brake discs and gas diverter fins, ensured their continued development during the 1970`s and 1980`s.

  7. Radio-frequency and microwave load comprising a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Everleigh, C.A.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-04-21

    A billet of low-density carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) composite is machined into a desired attenuator or load element shape (usually tapering). The CBCF composite is used as a free-standing load element or, preferably, brazed to the copper, brass or aluminum components of coaxial transmission lines or microwave waveguides. A novel braze method was developed for the brazing step. The resulting attenuator and/or load devices are robust, relatively inexpensive, more easily fabricated, and have improved performance over conventional graded-coating loads. 9 figs.

  8. Radio-frequency and microwave load comprising a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Everleigh, Carl A.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A billet of low-density carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) composite is machined into a desired attenuator or load element shape (usually tapering). The CBCF composite is used as a free-standing load element or, preferably, brazed to the copper, brass or aluminum components of coaxial transmission lines or microwave waveguides. A novel braze method was developed for the brazing step. The resulting attenuator and/or load devices are robust, relatively inexpensive, more easily fabricated, and have improved performance over conventional graded-coating loads.

  9. Superior piezoelectric composite films: taking advantage of carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Saber, Nasser; Araby, Sherif; Meng, Qingshi; Hsu, Hung-Yao; Yan, Cheng; Azari, Sara; Lee, Sang-Heon; Xu, Yanan; Ma, Jun; Yu, Sirong

    2014-01-31

    Piezoelectric composites comprising an active phase of ferroelectric ceramic and a polymer matrix have recently found numerous sensory applications. However, it remains a major challenge to further improve their electromechanical response for advanced applications such as precision control and monitoring systems. We here investigated the incorporation of graphene platelets (GnPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), each with various weight fractions, into PZT (lead zirconate titanate)/epoxy composites to produce three-phase nanocomposites. The nanocomposite films show markedly improved piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical responses (50%) besides an enhancement of ~200% in stiffness. The carbon nanomaterials strengthened the impact of electric field on the PZT particles by appropriately raising the electrical conductivity of the epoxy. GnPs have been proved to be far more promising in improving the poling behavior and dynamic response than MWNTs. The superior dynamic sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite may be caused by the GnPs' high load transfer efficiency arising from their two-dimensional geometry and good compatibility with the matrix. The reduced acoustic impedance mismatch resulting from the improved thermal conductance may also contribute to the higher sensitivity of GnP-reinforced composite. This research pointed out the potential of employing GnPs to develop highly sensitive piezoelectric composites for sensing applications. PMID:24398819

  10. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Drilling of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbilir, Ozden; Ghassemieh, Elaheh

    2012-06-01

    Despite the increased applications of the composite materials in aerospace due to their exceptional physical and mechanical properties, the machining of composites remains a challenge. Fibre reinforced laminated composites are prone to different damages during machining process such as delamination, fibre pull-out, microcracks, thermal damages. Optimization of the drilling process parameters can reduces the probability of these damages. In the current research, a 3D finite element (FE) model is developed of the process of drilling in the carbon fibre reinforced composite (CFC). The FE model is used to investigate the effects of cutting speed and feed rate on thrust force, torque and delamination in the drilling of carbon fiber reinforced laminated composite. A mesoscale FE model taking into account of the different oriented plies and interfaces has been proposed to predict different damage modes in the plies and delamination. For validation purposes, experimental drilling tests have been performed and compared to the results of the finite element analysis. Using Matlab a digital image analysis code has been developed to assess the delamination factor produced in CFC as a result of drilling.

  12. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  13. Joining and Integration of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites to Metallic Systems for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research and development activities in joining and integration of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals such as Ti and Cu-clad-Mo for thermal management applications are presented with focus on advanced brazing techniques. A wide variety of carbon-carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices were joined to Ti and Cu-clad Mo using a number of active braze alloys. The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of active elements (e.g., Ti) at the composite/braze interface. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The chemical and thermomechanical compatibility between C/C and metals at elevated temperatures is assessed. The role of residual stresses and thermal conduction in brazed C/C joints is discussed. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that composite-to-metal brazed joints may be promising for lightweight thermal management applications.

  14. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, M.; Safdari, M.; Boroujeni, A. Y.; Razavi, Z.; Case, S. W.; Dahmen, K.; Garmestani, H.; Al-Haik, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface.

  15. [Study on the preparation and application of individual artificial bone with carbon/carbon composites].

    PubMed

    Ni, Xinye; Qian, Nong; Zhou, Dong; Miao, Yunliang; Xiong, Xinbo; Lin, Tao; Chen, Da; Zhao, Gongyin; Zhong, Ping

    2013-12-01

    The present paper is aimed to study the preparation and application of individual artificial bone of carbon/carbon composites. Using computer tomography images (CT), we acquired a three-dimensional image. Firstly, we described bone contour line outlined with manual and automatic method by the binary volume data. Secondly, we created 3D object surface information by marching cubes. Finally, we converted this information to non-uniform rational B-spine (NURBS) by using geomagic software. Individual artificial bone with carbon/carbon composite was prepared through the CNC Machining Center. We replaced the humeral head of the tested rabbit, and then observed the effects of implantation in neuroimaging and pathological section. Using this method, we found that the bone shape processed and bone shape replaced was consistent. After implantation, the implant and the surrounding bone tissue bound closely, and bone tissue grew well on the surface of the implant. It has laid a sound foundation of the preparation using this method for individual artificial bone of carbon/carbon composite material. PMID:24645609

  16. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  17. Tin oxide-carbon nanotube composite for NOx sensing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Mi; Jung, Hyuck; Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Soon-Ku; Kim, Hyojin

    2012-02-01

    Tin oxide-single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nano composites are synthesized for gas sensor application. The fabrication includes deposition of porous SWCNTs on thermally oxidized SiO2 substrates followed by rheotaxial growth of Sn and thermal oxidation at 300, 400, 500, and 600 degrees C in air. The effects of oxidation temperature on morphology, microstructure, and gas sensing properties are investigated for process optimization. The tin monoxide oxidized at 400 degrees C showed the highest response at the operating temperature of 200 degrees C. Under the optimized test condition, the composite structure showed better response than both structures of SWCNTs and thin film SnO. PMID:22629971

  18. Damage-Tolerant Composites Made By Stitching Carbon Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Work conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate stitching combined with resin transfer molding to make composites more tolerant of damage and potentially cost competitive with metals. Composite materials tailored for damage tolerance by stitching layers of dry carbon fabric with closely spaced threads to provide reinforcement through thickness. Epoxy resin then infused into stitched preforms, and epoxy was cured. Various stitching patterns and thread materials evaluated by use of flat plate specimens. Also, blade-stiffened structural elements fabricated and tested. Stitched flat laminates showed outstanding damage tolerance, excellent compression strength in notched specimens, and acceptable fatigue behavior. Development of particular interest to aircraft and automotive industries.

  19. Carbon fibre-reinforced silicon nitride composites by slurry infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Grenet, C.; Plunkett, L.; Veyret, J.B.; Bullock, E.

    1995-12-01

    The present paper reports on the fabrication of long-carbon fibre reinforced silicon nitride matrix composites by liquid infiltration of an aqueous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurry followed by hot-pressing. A methodology for the maximum volume and uniform infiltration of preforms has been developed by optimising slurry rheology and fibre wetting conditions. Fully infiltrated green forms of 55% theoretical density are achieved with some 40% volume fraction of fibres. The quality of the composites has been assessed by microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization.

  20. Anisotropic thermal property of magnetically oriented carbon nanotube polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Dong, Shuai; Wang, Caiping; Wang, Xiaojie; Fang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for preparing multi-walled carbon nanotubea/polydimethylsiloxane (MWCNTs/PDMS) composites with enhanced thermal properties by using a high magnetic field (up to 10T). The MWCNT are oriented magnetically inside a silicone by in-situ polymerization method. The anisotropic structure would be expected to produce directional thermal conductivity. This study will provide a new approach to the development of anisotropic thermal-conductive polymer composites. Systematic studies with the preparation of silicone/graphene composites corresponding to their thermal and mechanical properties are carried out under various conditions: intensity of magnetic field, time, temperature, fillings. The effect of MWCNT/graphene content and preparation procedures on thermal conductivity of composites is investigated. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is used to reveal the mechanical properties of the composites in terms of the filling contents and magnetic field strength. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the micro-structure of the MWCNT composites. The alignment of MWCNTs in PDMS matrix is also studied by Raman spectroscopy. The thermal conductivity measurements show that the magnetically aligned CNT-composites feature high anisotropy in thermal conductivity.

  1. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  2. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  3. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  4. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-03-19

    A method and composition are disclosed for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, copper, cobalt, manganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  5. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  6. Isotope composition of carbon in the carbonates of the Gumbeykan scheelite deposits in the southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.; Yarynych, O.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through investigations of the isotope composition of carbon of various generations and carbonates from marbles, skarns, and nested and vein scheelite orebodies, the probable source of carbon of these carbonates has been established as a mixture of sedimentary carbonates, carbon dioxide with carbonic acid that was formed by oxidation of the organic matter from sedimentary terrane (..delta..C/sup 13/ - 0.05 to -0.62%). In the calcite and dolomite phenocrysts of marble and the coarse-grained dolostone, containing scheelite, the carbon was lighter (..delta..C/sup 13/ from -0.60 to -0.87%). For the dolomite and ankerite from scheelite pockets of the Balkan deposit and quartz veins of the Buranovo, ..delta..C/sup 13/ varied from -0.44 to -0.87%. The lightest carbon found in strontianite (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.32%), located near the coating of the organic matter (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.26%) in fractures of the quartz vein of the Buranovo deposit. In the section through the orebodies and near-ore diffusion-metasomatic zones of the Balkan deposit, the lessening of carbon in the carbonates was observed, with increasing distance away from the fracture. ..delta..C/sup 13/ in the altered granitoids ranged from -0.44 to -1.03%; while in the diopside-wollastonite hornfels, from -0.89 to 1.13%. The lessening in weight of the carbon is explained by diffusional fractionation of the isotopes caused apparently by the differential movement of volatile mixtures of carbon during ore-forming processes and the formation of their diffusion-metasomatic zones.

  7. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Kirk A.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Judkins, Roddie R.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply airstream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium.

  8. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, K.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1998-10-27

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply air stream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium. 3 figs.

  9. Virtual Prototyping for Carbon Nanotubes and Their Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakobson, Boris I.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are of interest as constituents-reinforcements for composites, probes for scanning microscopy, quantum wires for electronics, and building blocks for nanomachinery. Their small size makes direct experimental measurements difficult. Therefore, the critical answers about their properties should be obtained based on adequate modeling, virtual prototyping, using the methods of classical molecular dynamic (MD), in combination with the analytical methods and continuum mechanics.

  10. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  11. Current research in oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites at NASA. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Barrett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The significant potential of carbon-carbon composites for high-temperature structural applications is well established. For hypersonic vehicle applications, desirable properties include low density, high specific strength and stiffness, low coefficients of thermal expansion, and retention of mechanical properties above 3000 F. A significant problem associated with carbon materials, however, is that they oxidize rapidly in air at temperatures above about 800 F, and therefore must be protected from oxidation. Successful development of effective methods of oxidation protection is key to the eventual utilization of carbon-carbon composites on hypersonic vehicles such as NASP. In this presentation, the basic elements of an oxidation-protection system are described. Results from oxidation-performance evaluations of state-of-the-art ACC-4 type material in simulated airframe vehicle environments (temperature, pressure, and time) conducted at NASA Langley are also presented. NASA Langley has an active research effort to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon materials for airframe structural and vehicle thermal protection applications. Conversion coating and sealant development research is highlighted.

  12. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  13. and Carbon Fiber Reinforced 2024 Aluminum Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmar, Jacek W.; Naplocha, Krzysztof; Morgiel, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy composite materials strengthened with Al2O3 Saffil fibers or together with addition of carbon fibers were investigated. The fibers were stabilized in the preform with silica binder strengthened by further heat treatment. The preforms with 80-90% porosity were infiltrated by direct squeeze casting method. The microstructure of the as-cast specimens consisted mainly of α-dendrites with intermetallic compounds precipitated at their boundaries. The homogenization treatment of the composite materials substituted silica binder with a mixture of the Θ phase and silicon precipitates distributed in the remnants of SiO2 amorphous phase. Outside of this area at the binder/matrix interface, fine MgO precipitates were also present. At surface of C fibers, a small amount of fine Al3C4 carbides were formed. During pressure infiltration of preforms containing carbon fibers under oxygen carrying atmosphere, C fibers can burn releasing gasses and causing cracks initiated by thermal stress. The examination of tensile and bending strength showed that reinforcing of aluminum matrix with 10-20% fibers improved investigated properties in the entire temperature range. The largest increase in relation to unreinforced alloy was observed for composite materials examined at the temperature of 300 °C. Substituting Al2O3 Saffil fibers with carbon fibers leads to better wear resistance at dry condition with no relevant effect on strength properties.

  14. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  15. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications. PMID:20665629

  16. Potential release of fibers from burning carbon composites. [aircraft fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental carbon fiber source program was conducted to determine the potential for the release of conductive carbon fibers from burning composites. Laboratory testing determined the relative importance of several parameters influencing the amounts of single fibers released, while large-scale aviation jet fuel pool fires provided realistic confirmation of the laboratory data. The dimensions and size distributions of fire-released carbon fibers were determined, not only for those of concern in an electrical sense, but also for those of potential interest from a health and environmental standpoint. Fire plume and chemistry studies were performed with large pool fires to provide an experimental input into an analytical modelling of simulated aircraft crash fires. A study of a high voltage spark system resulted in a promising device for the detection, counting, and sizing of electrically conductive fibers, for both active and passive modes of operation.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lars R.; Pyrz, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The tensile modulus of individual nanotubes and nanotube-polypropylene composites has been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes showed that their tensile modulus was dependent on the tube structure and the diameter if the diameter was below 1,6 nm. The tensile modulus was determined for an infinite single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in an amorphous polypropylene matrix and for a finite and capped single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a polypropylene matrix. For the infinite nanotube-polypropylene system the modulus was found to correspond to the one given by the Voigt approximation. For the finite nanotube-polypropylene system the reinforcing effect of the nanotube was not very pronounced. A pull out simulation showed that the length of the nanotube in the simulation was much smaller than the critical length and hence no load transfer between the nanotube and the matrix existed.

  18. Processing of carbon composite paper as electrode for fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R. B.; Maheshwari, Priyanka H.; Dhami, T. L.; Sharma, R. K.; Sharma, C. P.

    The porous carbon electrode in a fuel cell not only acts as an electrolyte and a catalyst support, but also allows the diffusion of hydrogen fuel through its fine porosity and serves as a current-carrying conductor. A suitable carbon paper electrode is developed and possesses the characteristics of high porosity, permeability and strength along with low electrical resistivity so that it can be effectively used in proton-exchange membrane and phosphoric acid fuel cells. The electrode is prepared through a combination of two important techniques, viz., paper-making technology by first forming a porous chopped carbon fibre preform, and composite technology using a thermosetting resin matrix. The study reveals an interdependence of one parameter on another and how judicious choice of the processing conditions are necessary to achieve the desired characteristics. The current-voltage performance of the electrode in a unit fuel cell matches that of a commercially-available material.

  19. Electrically conductive LCP-carbon composite with low carbon content for bipolar plate application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, H.; Willert-Porada, M.

    Lightweight polymer-carbon composites with high specific electrical conductivity at a carbon content below 40 vol.% were developed. The electrical and mechanical properties and the hydrogen permeability of carbon fiber and particle reinforced liquid crystalline polymers were examined. Vectra ® A 950, SIGRAFIL ® carbon fibers and Vulcan ® XC 72 R carbon black were employed. The composites are found to have sufficient mechanical properties and a hydrogen permeability low enough to be utilised as bipolar plate material in fuel cell applications. The density of the new composite is 20% lower than the density of commercial bipolar plates made from carbon reinforced polymeric composite materials, due to the lower carbon content. The current density at 0.5 V in an operating fuel cell is only 20% lower compared to commercial materials with more than 80 vol.% carbon content and meets the requirements for bipolar plate application.

  20. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors: evaluating the role of polymer molecular weight and carbon loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, M. L.; Lim, J. R.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Yen, S. -P. S.; Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the effect of environmental condtions coupled with varying polymer properties and carbon loadings on the performance of polymer-carbon black composite film, used as sensing medium in the JPL Electronic Nose.

  1. Bulk and surface polymer composites prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Edward

    This dissertation describes the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) as an aid in fabricating polymer/polymer composites. Monomers and initiators were infused into solid polymer substrates using SC CO 2. The monomers were subsequently polymerized within the substrates to form composites. CO2 swells the polymer substrate and increases the diffusively of reactants within the substrate. The solvent strength of SC CO2 is tunable allowing control over the degree of swelling and over the partitioning behavior of the reactants. CO2 can be easily removed from the final products. First, polystyrene/polyethylene bulk composites were investigated. Styrene and a radical initiator were infused into and reacted throughout the bulk of polyethylene substrates. The composite composition was controlled by controlling infusion time, reaction time and partitioning conditions. Characterization of the composites showed that the crystalline domains of the polyethylene were unaffected. Styrene infused into and polymerized within only the amorphous domains of polyethylene. Polyethylene and polystyrene are immiscible; the semicrystalline nature of polyethylene frustrated gross phase separation of the polystyrene. The resulting "kinetically trapped" phase morphology gave the composites interesting mechanical properties. The phase morphology was characterized, and the polystyrene was found to reside within the interlamellar regions and the centers of the polyethylene spherulites. The polystyrene formed a continuous "scaffold" that reinforced the polyethylene. The reinforcement provided efficient and dramatic improvement in the composite modulus and strength. However, the composites fracture toughness decreased with increasing polystyrene content. The fracture behavior was correlated to the microstructural damage mechanisms in the composites. Second, surface composites were investigated. Using a two-stage process, ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate (ECA) monomer was anionically polymerized in the

  2. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  3. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  4. Template-free synthesis of porous graphitic carbon nitride/carbon composite spheres for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaorui; Hu, Xiaofei; Yan, Zhenhua; Lei, Kaixiang; Li, Fujun; Cheng, Fangyi; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-28

    Porous graphitic carbon nitride/carbon composite spheres were synthesized using melamine and cyanuric acid, and glucose as the carbon nitride and carbon precursor, respectively. The 3D hierarchical composites efficiently catalyzed the oxygen reduction reaction with an onset potential of 0.90 V and a kinetic current density of 23.92 mA cm(-2). These merit their promising applications in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26666314

  5. The composites based on plasticized starch and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhao, Feng; Ma, Xiaofei

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the nanocomposite films based on plasticized starch and modified-carbon nanotubes were prepared using a simple casting method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were oxidized to prepare CNT oxide (OCNT) by Hummer's method, and OCNTs were reduced by glucose to obtain reduced CNT (RCNT). The thermogravimetric (TG) curves revealed that OCNTs and RCNTs contained about 15 and 8wt% oxygen-containing groups, respectively. The UV-vis spectra proved that CNTs with the aid of the dispersant TNWDIS, OCNTs and RCNTs possessed the good stability in water. As the fillers, CNTs, OCNTs and RCNTs were introduced into plasticized-starch (PS) matrix to obtain the composites. They had the obvious reinforcing effect on PS matrix. The composites containing 4wt% RCNT had the maximum tensile strength of 19.5MPa, in contrast to 3.89MPa of PS. Among of them, PS/CNT composites showed the best moisture resistance. And the PS-based CNT, OCNT and RCNT composites exhibited approximate electrical conductivities. PMID:23587994

  6. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  7. Identification and Selection of Major Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

    2011-06-30

    A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of CO2 is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs due to rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents selected for co-sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g. density, viscosity, interfacial tension) behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface. These impurities and concentrations are a function of both the industrial source(s) of the CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for geologic sequestration. This report summarizes the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon-capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, we selected four test fluid compositions for use in geochemical experiments. These included: 1) a pure CO2 stream representative of food grade CO2 used in most enhanced oil recovery projects: 2) a test fluid composition containing low concentrations (0.5 mole %) SO2 and NOx (representative of that generated from cement production), 3) a test fluid composition with higher concentrations (2.5 mole %) of SO2, and 4) and test fluid composition containing 3 mole % H2S.

  8. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulikkathara, Merlyn X.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Peralta, Ivana R. G.; Wei, Xin; Khabashesku, Valery N.

    2009-05-01

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C11H23 derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy. The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C11FxHy, yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives.

  9. Medium density polyethylene composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Peralta, Ivana R G; Wei, Xin; Khabashesku, Valery N

    2009-05-13

    A strong interface between the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polymer matrix is necessary to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of composites. In this work a series of sidewall-functionalized SWNTs have been investigated in order to evaluate the effect of functionalization on SWNT aspect ratio and composite interfacial chemistry and their role on mechanical properties of a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) matrix. Fluorinated nanotubes (F-SWNTs) were used as precursors for subsequent sidewall functionalization with long chain alkyl groups to produce an F-SWNT- C(11)H(23) derivative. The latter was refluorinated to yield a new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C(11)F(x)H(y). The functionalized SWNTs as well as the pristine SWNTs were integrated into an MDPE matrix at a 1 wt% loading. The nanotubes and composite materials were characterized with FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, XPS, AFM, SEM, TGA, DSC and tensile tests. When incorporated into polyethylene, the new perfluorinated derivative, F-SWNT- C(11)F(x)H(y), yielded the highest tensile strength value among all nanotube/MDPE composite samples, showing a 52% enhancement in comparison with the neat MDPE. The 1 wt% SWNT/MDPE composite contained nanotubes with a larger aspect ratio but, due to a lack of interfacial chemistry, it resulted in less improvement in mechanical properties compared to the composites made with the fluorinated SWNT derivatives. PMID:19420641

  10. Giant electrorheological fluid comprising nanoparticles: Carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaxing; Gong, Xiuqing; Chen, Shuyu; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2010-05-01

    We have fabricated suspensions exhibiting the giant electrorheological (GER) effect comprising nanoparticles—multiwall carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) composite particles dispersed in silicone oil. This type of GER fluids display dramatically enhanced antisedimentation characteristic without sacrificing the yield stress. The nanoparticles-nanotubes composites were fabricated by modifying the coprecipitation method with MCNTs and urea-coated barium titanyl-oxylate (BTRU) nanoparticles as the components. The composite solid particles are denoted MCNT-BTRU. In the best cases, stabilized suspensions with MCNT-BTRU particles dispersed in silicone oil have been maintained for several months without any appreciable sedimentation being observed. Both the sedimentary and rheological properties of the MCNT-BTRU suspension were systematically studied and compared with their BTRU counterparts. Yield stress as high as 194 kPa was obtained in the MCNT-BTRU suspensions. The MCNT-BTRU based GER fluids, with their antisedimentation characteristic, may have broad engineering applications.

  11. Electrical properties of foamed polypropylene/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, M.; Kotzev, G.; Vulchev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Polypropylene composites containing carbon black fillers were produced by vibration assisted extrusion process. Solid (unfoamed) composite samples were molded by conventional injection molding method, while structural foams were molded by a low pressure process. The foamed samples were evidenced to have a solid skin-foamed core structure which main parameters were found to depend on the quantity of material injected in the mold. The average bubbles' sizes and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It is established that the conductivity of the foamed samples gradually decreases when reducing the sample density. Nevertheless, the conductivity is found to be lower than the conductivity of the unfoamed samples both being of the same order. The flexural properties of the composites were studied and the results were discussed in the context of the structure parameters of the foamed samples.

  12. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  13. Dense and homogenous silicon nitride composites containing carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Osendi, M I; Gautheron, F; Miranzo, P; Belmonte, M

    2009-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) materials with 1.8 and 5.3 vol.% of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were densified using 7 wt% of sintering additives (Y2O3 +Al2O3). The mixing and sintering procedures produced quite homogenous and dense MWCNT/Si3N4 composites. The nanotubes condition was followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy and no alteration was observed in spite of the relatively high sintering temperatures (approximately 1600 degrees C). Mechanical parameters (hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness) of the composites and comparative blank specimens were measured by instrumented indentation and discussed in parallel. Thermal conductivity was also estimated for these specimens. The nanotube orientation effect inherent to pressure assisted sintering methods and the weak interfacial bond between nanotubes and Si3N4 are important factors to explain the mechanical and thermal behaviours of these composites. PMID:19908514

  14. Multifunctional Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Yarn Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Corey D.; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Gates, Thomas S.; Kahng, Seun K.

    2006-01-01

    By forming composite structures with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) yarns we achieve materials capable of measuring strain and composite structures with increased mechanical strength. The CNT yarns used are of the 2-ply and 4-ply variety with the yarns having diameters of about 15-30 micrometers. The strain sensing characteristics of the yarns are investigated on test beams with the yarns arranged in a bridge configuration. Additionally, the strain sensing properties are also investigated on yarns embedded on the surface of a flexible membrane. Initial mechanical strength tests also show an increase in the modulus of elasticity of the composite materials while incurring a weight penalty of less than one-percent. Also presented are initial temperature characterizations of the yarns.

  15. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  16. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes in vinyl ester polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Paras, Laura

    This work focused on a parametric study of dispersions of different types of carbon nanotubes in a polymer resin. Single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), multi-walled (MWNTs) and XD-grade carbon nanotubes (XD-CNTs) were dispersed in vinyl ester (VE) using an ultra-sonic probe at a fixed frequency. The power, amplitude, and mixing time parameters of sonication were correlated to the electrical and mechanical properties of the composite materials in order to optimize dispersion. The quality of dispersion was quantified by Raman spectroscopy and verified through optical and scanning electron microscopy. By Raman, the CNT distribution, unroping, and damage was monitored and correlated with the composite properties for dispersion optimization. Increasing the ultrasonication energy was found to improve the distribution of all CNT materials and to decrease the size of nanotube ropes, enhancing the electrical conductivity and storage modulus. However, excessive amounts of energy were found to damage CNTs, which negatively affected the properties of the composite. Based on these results the optimum dispersion energy inputs were determined for the different composite materials. The electrical resistivity was lowered by as much as 14, 13, 13, and 11 orders of magnitude for SWNT/VE, DWNT/VE, MWNT/VE, and XD-CNT/VE respectively, compared to the neat resin. The storage modulus was also increased compared to the neat resin by 77%, 82%, 45%, 40% and 85% in SWNT, SAP-f-SWNT, DWNT, MWNT and XD-CNT/VE composites, respectively. This study provides a detailed understanding of how the properties of, nanocomposites are determined by the composite mixing parameters and the distribution, concentration, shape and size of the CNTs. Importantly, it indicates the importance of the need for dispersion metrics to correlate and understand these properties.

  17. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  18. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2015-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  19. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  20. Ionic polymer metal composites with nanoporous carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmre, Viljar; Brandell, Daniel; Mäeorg, Uno; Torop, Janno; Volobujeva, Olga; Punning, Andres; Johanson, Urmas; Aabloo, Alvo

    2010-04-01

    Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs) are soft electroactive polymer materials that bend in response to the voltage stimulus (1 - 4 V). They can be used as actuators or sensors. In this paper, we introduce two new highly-porous carbon materials for assembling high specific area electrodes for IPMC actuators and compare their electromechanical performance with recently reported IPMCs based on RuO2 electrodes. We synthesize ionic liquid (Emi-Tf) actuators with either Carbide-Derived Carbon (CDC) (derived from TiC) or coconut shell based activated carbon electrodes. The carbon electrodes are applied onto ionic liquid-swollen Nafion membranes using the direct assembly process. Our results show that actuators assembled with CDC electrodes have the greatest peak-to-peak strain output, reaching up to 20.4 mɛ (equivalent to >2%) at a 2 V actuation signal, exceeding that of the RuO2 electrodes by more than 100%. The electrodes synthesized from TiC-derived carbon also revealed significantly higher maximum strain rate. The differences between the materials are discussed in terms of molecular interactions and mechanisms upon actuation in the different electrodes.

  1. Characterization of carbon fiber composite materials for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) materials have been used for decades in the aerospace, automotive, and naval industries. They have often been used because of their mechanical advantages. These advantageous characteristics have typically included low weight and high strength. It is also a benefit that CFC materials can be made into nearly any shape or size. With the abundant use of CFC materials, it seems desirable to better under- stand the electromagnetic applications of these materials. CFC materials consist of a non-conductive resin or epoxy in addition to conductive carbon fibers. The carbon fibers can be oriented and layered in many different configurations. The specific orientation and layering of the carbon fibers has a direct impact on its electrical characteristics. One specific characteristic of interest is the conductivity of CFC materials. The work in this paper deals with probing the conductivity characteristics of CFC materials for applications in antenna and radar design. Multiple layouts of carbon fiber are investigated. The DC conductivity was measured by applying a conductive epoxy to sample edges and using a milliohm meter. Shielding effectiveness was then predicted based on fundamental electromagnetics for conducting media. Finally, prototype dipole antennas made from CFC materials were investigated.

  2. Installation of adhesively bonded composites to repair carbon steel structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Dunn, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the viability and durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, efforts are underway to adapt bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. This paper presents a study in the application of composite patches on large trucks and hydraulic shovels typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. It is believed that the use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, will help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel structure and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This paper will focus on the first phase of this study which evaluated the performance of different mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments will be discussed along with related laminate design and installation issues.

  3. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E; Eric Skidmore, E

    2008-12-12

    The Department of Energy Savannah River Site vitrifies nuclear waste incident to defense programs through its Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The piping in the DWPF seal pot jumper configuration must withstand the stresses during an unlikely but potential deflagration event, and maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites (CFR) were proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event. The proposed CFR materials have been ASME-approved (Section XI, Code Case N-589-1) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. The proposed carbon fiber/epoxy composite reinforcement system was originally developed for pipeline rehabilitation and post-construction maintenance in petrochemical, refineries, DOT applications and other industries. The effects of ionizing radiation on polymers and organic materials have been studied for many years. The majority of available data are based on traditional exposures to gamma irradiation at high dose rates ({approx}10,000 Gy/hr) allowing high total dose within reasonable test periods and general comparison of different materials exposed at such conditions. However, studies in recent years have shown that degradation of many polymers are sensitive to dose rate, with more severe degradation often observed at similar or even lower total doses when exposed to lower dose rates. This behavior has been primarily attributed to diffusion-limited oxidation which is minimized during very high dose rate exposures. Most test standards for accelerated aging and nuclear qualification of components acknowledge these limitations. The results of testing to determine the radiation resistance and microstructural effects of gamma irradiation exposure on a bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix composite reinforced with carbon fibers are presented. This work provides a foundation for a more extensive evaluation of dose rate effects on advanced epoxy

  4. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  5. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Burchell, Timothy D

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues, measurements were

  6. Functionally gradient hard carbon composites for improved adhesion and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Roger Jagdish

    A new approach is proposed for fabricating biomedical devices that last longer and are more biocompatible than those presently available. In this approach, a bulk material is chosen that has desirable mechanical properties (low modulus, high strength, high ductility and high fatigue strength). This material is coated with corrosion-resistant, wear-resistant, hard, and biocompatible hard carbon films. One of the many forms of carbon, tetrahedral amorphous carbon, consists mainly of sp3-bonded atoms. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon possesses properties close to diamond in terms of hardness, atomic smoothness, and inertness. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond films usually contain large amounts of compressive and sometimes tensile stresses; adhesive failure from these stresses has limited widespread use of these materials. This research involves processing, characterization and modeling of functionally gradient tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond composite films on metals (cobalt-chromium and titanium alloys) and polymers (polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene) used in biomedical applications. Multilayer discontinuous thin films of titanium carbide, titanium nitride, aluminum nitride, and tungsten carbide have been developed to control stresses and graphitization in diamond films. A morphology of randomly interconnected micron sized diamond crystallites provides increased toughness and stress reduction. Internal stresses in tetrahedral amorphous carbon were reduced via incorporation of carbide forming elements (silicon and titanium) and noncarbide forming elements (copper, platinum, and silver). These materials were produced using a novel target design during pulsed laser deposition. These alloying atoms reduce hardness and sp3-bonded carbon content, but increase adhesion and wear resistance. Silver and platinum provide the films with antimicrobial properties, and silicon provides bioactivity and aids bone formation. Bilayer coatings were created that couple

  7. Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Lewis, Jr., John

    1989-01-01

    Ultralight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0.04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0.03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

  8. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  9. The use of carboranes as oxidation inhibitors for carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have many beneficial properties for use in aerospace applications, including their high specific strength and modulus at elevated temperatures. However, they share with all carbon based substances a strong tendency to burn when heated in air. In order to exploit their good qualities, it is necessary to slow or prevent their oxidation during use. Molecular inhibiters offer protection with the advantage of being able to form a homogeneous solution with the resin. Since boron oxides are known to provide the desired kind of protection, molecular compounds based on boron seem reasonable candidates to test as inhibitors. Performance tests indicated that carboranes are excellent materials for obtaining high uniform loadings of boron inhibitors in glassy carbon materials and thus reducing their rates of oxidation. Further, there is evidence that the use of substituted derivatives could provide more complete and thorough forms of protection.

  10. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    SciTech Connect

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  11. Influence of carbon nanotube extending length on pyrocarbon microstructure and mechanical behavior of carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Li, Kezhi; Sun, Jiajia; Jia, Yujun; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-11-01

    We present an in-depth study of the effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) extending length on microstructural and mechanical behavior of carbon/carbon (C/C) composite. High-purity CNTs with controlled extending length were in situ grown on the surface of carbon cloths using injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) by varying the reaction time. Microstructure analysis shows that compared with the CNTs of short extending length which only change the pyrocarbon (PyC) close to fiber surface, CNTs with long extending length can strongly affect the deposition behavior of PyC during chemical vapor infiltration and modify the whole matrix PyC. Mechanical tests reveal that CNTs with long extending length are more beneficial to enhance the interlaminar shear strength and in-plane compressive strength of the composites, while the reactive conditions during ICVD degrade the carbon fibers and lead to the decrease of flexural strength. Our work demonstrates that it is necessary to make CNTs long enough as well as to prevent strength degradation of fibers, if we want to largely increase delamination resistance and through-thickness properties without compromising in-plane performance of C/C composites.

  12. Enhanced capacitive deionization of graphene/mesoporous carbon composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dengsong; Wen, Xiaoru; Shi, Liyi; Yan, Tingting; Zhang, Jianping

    2012-09-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) with low-energy consumption and no secondary waste is emerging as a novel desalination technology. Graphene/mesoporous carbon (GE/MC) composites have been prepared via a direct triblock-copolymer-templating method and used as CDI electrodes for the first time. The influences of GE content on the textural properties and electrochemical performance were studied. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis indicate that mesoporous structures are well retained and the composites display improved specific surface area and pore size distribution, as well as pore volume. Well dispersed GE nanosheets are deduced to be beneficial for enhanced electrical conductivity. The electrochemical performance of electrodes in an NaCl aqueous solution was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The composite electrodes perform better on the capacitance values, conductive behaviour, rate performance and cyclic stability. The desalination capacity of the electrodes was evaluated by a batch mode electrosorptive experiment and the amount of adsorbed ions can reach 731 μg g⁻¹ for the GE/MC composite electrode with a GE content of 5 wt%, which is much higher than that of MC alone (590 μg g⁻¹). The enhanced CDI performance of the composite electrodes can be attributed to the better conductive behaviour and higher specific surface area. PMID:22836788

  13. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  14. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods. PMID:26880518

  15. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods.

  16. Electromagnetic interference shielding properties of carbon nanotube buckypaper composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Gyu; Louis, Jeffrey; Cheng, Qunfeng; Bao, Jianwen; Smithyman, Jesse; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck; Brooks, James S; Kramer, Leslie; Fanchasis, Percy; Dorough, David

    2009-10-14

    Preformed carbon nanotube thin films (10-20 microm), or buckypapers (BPs), consist of dense and entangled nanotube networks, which demonstrate high electrical conductivity and provide potential lightweight electromagnetic interference (EMI) solutions for composite structures. Nanocomposite laminates consisting of various proportions of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, having different conductivity, and with different stacking structures, were studied. Single-layer BP composites showed shielding effectiveness (SE) of 20-60 dB, depending on the BP conductivity within a 2-18 GHz frequency range. The effects on EMI SE performance of composite laminate structures made with BPs of different conductivity values and epoxy or polyethylene insulating layer stacking sequences were studied. The results were also compared against the predictions from a modified EMI SE model. The predicted trends of SE value and frequency dependence were consistent with the experimental results, revealing that adjusting the number of BP layers and appropriate arrangement of the BP conducting layers and insulators can increase the EMI SE from 45 dB to close to 100 dB owing to the utilization of the double-shielding effect. PMID:19755727

  17. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes Upon Emissions From Cutting and Sanding Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Composites

    PubMed Central

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20% to 80% compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9×108 and 2.8×106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC. PMID:26478716

  18. Elemental composition, biochemical composition and caloric value of Antarctic krill.: Implications in Energetics and carbon balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färber-Lorda, Jaime; Gaudy, Raymond; Mayzaud, P.

    2009-11-01

    Samples of Antarctic krill were analyzed for elemental composition, biochemical composition, weight and caloric content. Sexes and maturity stages were separated. Mature females showed the highest caloric values (Joules) and juveniles the lowest in a per animal basis. On unit of wet weight per animal basis, spent females showed the lowest caloric values. For the caloric values by animal, a significant difference was found between males, mature females, spent females and juveniles, either on a per animal basis or in the basis of 1 g of wet weight, showing a real difference between the groups, regardless of their individual size. Significant differences were found for carbon, nitrogen and lipids, but not for proteins, analyzed in % of dry weight. Carbon was lowest for spent females and highest for mature females. On the contrary, nitrogen values were lowest for mature females and highest for males. Mature females had the highest lipid content and males the lowest. All variables were significantly correlated. For the linear regression analysis, the best correlation found was between Joules and carbon, followed by carbon vs. dry weight and Joules vs. dry weight. In an analysis with two independent variables, the best correlation was found for Joules vs. lipids and dry weight, followed by Joules vs. carbon and nitrogen, and Joules vs. lipids and proteins. The results obtained were used to make an analysis of the energy and carbon fluxes through the food chain in the sampled area, showing higher energetic and carbon "densities" in frontal areas, the POM calorific values showed an opposite pattern than that of krill.

  19. Hybrid carbon fiber/carbon nanotube composites for structural damping applications.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, M; Safdari, M; Boroujeni, A Y; Razavi, Z; Case, S W; Dahmen, K; Garmestani, H; Al-Haik, M S

    2013-04-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on the surface of carbon fibers utilizing a relatively low temperature synthesis technique; graphitic structures by design (GSD). To probe the effects of the synthesis protocols on the mechanical properties, other samples with surface grown CNTs were prepared using catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The woven graphite fabrics were thermally shielded with a thin film of SiO2 and CNTs were grown on top of this film. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy revealed the grown species to be multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The damping performance of the hybrid CNT-carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite was examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Mechanical testing confirmed that the degradations in the strength and stiffness as a result of the GSD process are far less than those encountered through using the CCVD technique and yet are negligible compared to the reference samples. The DMA results indicated that, despite the minimal degradation in the storage modulus, the loss tangent (damping) for the hybrid composites utilizing GSD-grown MWCNTs improved by 56% compared to the reference samples (based on raw carbon fibers with no surface treatment or surface grown carbon nanotubes) over the frequency range 1-60 Hz. These results indicated that the energy dissipation in the GSD-grown MWCNTs composite can be primarily attributed to the frictional sliding at the nanotube/epoxy interface and to a lesser extent to the stiff thermal shielding SiO2 film on the fiber/matrix interface. PMID:23518871

  20. Electron transport mechanisms in polymer-carbon sphere composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    A set of uniform carbon microspheres (CSs) whose diameters have the order of 0.125 μm to 10 μm was prepared from aqueous sucrose solution by means of hydrothermal carbonization of sugar molecules. A pressed pellet was composed by mixing CSs with polyethylene oxide (PEO). Electrical characterization of the pellet was carried out showing Ohmic current-voltage characteristics and temperature-dependent conductivity in the range of 80 K composites.

  1. Hot melt joints for carbon fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netze, C.; Michaeli, W.

    The electric conductivity of carbon fibers and EVA thermoplastic adhesives in composite materials are exploited in a method for melting and/or hardening joint bonds. The joining method is based on the simultaneous use of electrical energy and mechanical pressure in joining sections of CFRP materials by means of hot melts. The EVA hot melt is used as a model adhesive to join 1:1 bidirectional CFRP sheets with a 12.5 mm overlap. Heating power is shown to affect the temperature development in the joining areas, and no relationship is noted between heating behavior and joining pressure. The strength of the bonds is comparable to the values yielded by other methods, although the carbon black in the EVA films leads to some microscopic cracks. The joining technique outlined is shown to provide effective structural bonds that could be of use in the fabrication of aircraft and other structures.

  2. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerny, Jennifer; Morscher, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon-carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.

  3. Effects of Graphene Oxide Modified Sizing Agents on Interfacial Properties of Carbon Fibers/Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingbo; Jiang, Dawei; Liu, Li; Huang, Yudong; Long, Jun; Wu, Guangshun; Wu, Zijian; Umar, Ahmad; Guo, Jiang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Zhanhu

    2015-12-01

    A kind of graphene oxide (GO) modified sizing agent was used to improve the interfacial properties of carbon fibers/epoxy composites. The surface topography of carbon fibers was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface compositions of carbon fibers were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the interfacial properties of composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results show that the existence of GO increases the content of reactive functional groups on carbon fiber surface. Thus it enhances the interfacial properties of carbon fibers/epoxy composites. When GO loading in sizing agents is 1 wt%, the ILSS value of composite reaches to 96.2 MPa, which is increased by 27.2% while comparing with unsized carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, the ILSS of composites after aging is also increased significantly with GO modified sizing agents. PMID:26682416

  4. Elemental composition of extant microbialites: mineral and microbial carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdespino-Castillo, P. M.; Falcón, L. I.; Holman, H. Y. N.; Merino-Ibarra, M.; García-Guzmán, M.; López-Gómez, L. M. D. R.; Martínez, J.; Alcantara-Hernandez, R. J.; Beltran, Y.; Centeno, C.; Cerqueda-Garcia, D.; Pi-Puig, T.; Castillo, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    Microbialites are the modern analogues of ancient microbial consortia. Their existence extends from the Archaean (~3500 mya) until present and their lithified structure evidences the capacity of microbial communities to mediate mineral precipitation. Living microbialites are a useful study model to test the mechanisms involved in carbonates and other minerals precipitation. Here, we studied the chemical composition, the biomass and the microbial structure of extant microbialites. All of these were found in Mexico, in water systems of different and characteristic ionic firms. An elemental analysis (C:N) of microbial biomass was performed and total P was determined. To explore the chemical composition of microbialites as a whole, X-ray diffraction analyses were performed over dry microbialites. While overall inorganic carbon content (carbonates) represented >70% of the living layer, a protocol of inorganic carbon elimination was performed for each sample resulting in organic matter contents between 8 and 16% among microbialites. Stoichiometric ratios of C:N:P in microbialite biomass were different among samples, and the possibility of P limitation was suggested mainly for karstic microbialites, N limitation was suggested for all samples and, more intensively, for soda system microbialites. A differential capacity for biomass allocation among microbialites was observed. Microbialites showed, along the biogeographic gradient, a diverse arrangement of microbial assemblages within the mineral matrix. While environmental factors such as pH and nitrate concentration were the factors that defined the general structure and diversity of these assemblages, we intend to test if the abundance of major ions and trace metals are also defining microbialite characteristics (such as microbial structure and biomass). This work contributes to define a baseline of the chemical nature of extant microbial consortia actively participating in mineral precipitation processes.

  5. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanofiber-polymide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobing

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are potentially excellent reinforcements in polymer-based composites due to very good mechanical properties, thermal and electrical conductivity, and low cost to manufacture. The dispersion of fibers and the interfacial interaction with the polymer matrix need to be improved for CNF composites to achieve this potential. Treatment of the nanofiber surface with groups that are compatible with the polymer is key to addressing these issues. Attached functional groups may enhance the adhesion between reinforcement phase and matrix phase and reduce the slip of polymer chains on the surfaces of fibers. As a result, load can be transferred to fibers efficiently. In this investigation, CNFs were used as reinforcements in a polyimide (PI) matrix to produce a composite. To improve dispersion of fibers as well as interfacial adhesion, oxidized carbon nanofibers (OCNFs) were functionalized by covalently attaching 1,4-phenylenediamine (1,4-PDA) or polyimide oligomer to the surfaces. The functionalization with diamine was carried out either through direct reaction with OCNFs in dimethylacetimide (DMAc) solvent or through a two-step approach in which oxidized fibers were reacted with thionyl chloride (SOCl2) to improve surface reactivity followed by reaction with PDA in DMAc. The PDA was successfully bonded to the surfaces of fibers using both strategies. The further attachment of oligomer proceeded as expected in DMAc. The functionalized CNFs were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the functionalization reaction. Raman spectra and XPS spectra qualitatively indicated target chemical bonds were formed in each reaction step. Quantifications of TGA and XPS consistently supported that desired chemical moieties were present on the surfaces of fibers. In short, the interfaces of fibers were tailored with groups that would mimic the structure of polyimide and can

  6. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  7. Estimation of carbon fibre composites as ITER divertor armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.; Landman, I.

    2004-08-01

    Exposure of the carbon fibre composites (CFC) NB31 and NS31 by multiple plasma pulses has been performed at the plasma guns MK-200UG and QSPA. Numerical simulation for the same CFCs under ITER type I ELM typical heat load has been carried out using the code PEGASUS-3D. Comparative analysis of the numerical and experimental results allowed understanding the erosion mechanism of CFC based on the simulation results. A modification of CFC structure has been proposed in order to decrease the armour erosion rate.

  8. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  9. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-01-11

    Piping in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) must withstand the stresses involved during an unlikely but potential deflagration event. One method proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event is the use of a carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite (Diamond-Wrap{reg_sign}). In the DWPF, this reinforcement composite product would be required to maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. This product has been ASME-approved (nuclear code case 589) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. However, its radiation resistance properties have not been evaluated. This report documents initial radiation resistance testing of the product and microstructural effects. Additional testing is recommended to evaluate radiation effects on specific properties such as burst strength, chemical resistance/weeping and for service life prediction in critical applications.

  10. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites. PMID:20355578

  11. Rheological properties of polyolefin composites highly filled with calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Jakubowska, Paulina; Sterzynski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological properties of highly filled polyolefin composites (HFPCs) have been investigated. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3), with stearic acid modified surface, was used as filler. Ternary compounds have been obtained by the inclusion of a CaCO3/polypropylene master batch into the high density polyethylene matrix. The highly filled polyolefin composites with CaCO3 content in the range between 40 and 64 wt% have been prepared in the molten state using a single-screw extruder, the temperature of the extrusion die was set at 230°C. The melt rheological properties of the HFPCs have been extensively investigated both in oscillatory and steady shear flow.

  12. Dry-processable carbon nanotubes for functional devices and composites.

    PubMed

    Di, Jiangtao; Wang, Xin; Xing, Yajuan; Zhang, Yongyi; Zhang, Xiaohua; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhu, Yuntian T

    2014-11-01

    Assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in effective and productive ways is of vital importance to their application. Recent progress in synthesis of CNTs has inspired new strategies for utilizing the unique physiochemical properties of CNTs in macroscale materials and devices. Assembling CNTs by dry processes (e.g., directly collecting CNTs in the form of freestanding films followed by pressing, stretching, and multilayer stacking instead of dispersing them in solution) not only considerably simplifies the processes but also avoids structural damage to the CNTs. Various dry-processable CNTs are reviewed, focusing on their synthesis, properties, and applications. The synthesis techniques are organized in terms of aggregative morphologies and microstructure control of CNTs. Important applications such as functional thin-film devices, strong CNT films, and composites are included. The opportunities and challenges in the synthesis techniques and fabrication of advanced composites and devices are discussed. PMID:25123967

  13. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  14. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  15. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  16. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  18. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-01

    A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H2O2 solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  19. Na-doped hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites: Preparation, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hejun; Zhao, Xueni; Cao, Sheng; Li, Kezhi; Chen, Mengdi; Xu, Zhanwei; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2012-12-01

    Na-doped hydroxyapatite (Na-HA) coating was directly prepared onto carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the mean thickness of the coating is approximately 10 ± 2 μm. The formed Na-HA crystals which are Ca-deficient, are rod-like with a hexagonal cross section. The Na/P molar ratios of the coating formed on C/C substrate is 0.097. During the deposition, the Na-HA crystals grow in both radial and longitudinal directions, and faster along the longitudinal direction. The pattern formation of crystal growth leads to dense coating which would help to increase the bonding strength of the coating. The average shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. The in vitro bioactivity of the Na-HA coated C/C composites were investigated by soaking the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. The results indicate that the Na-HA coated C/C composites can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. The in vitro cellular biocompatibility tests reveal that the Na-HA coating was better to improve the in vitro biocompatibility of C/C composites compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. It was suggested that the Na-HA coating might be an effective method to improve the surface bioactivity and biocompatibility of C/C composites.

  20. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  1. The friction and wear of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Toby

    Many carbon-carbon composite aircraft brakes encounter high wear rates during low energy braking operations. The work presented in this thesis addresses this issue, but it also elucidates the microstructural changes and wear mechanisms that take place in these materials during all braking conditions encountered by aircraft brakes. A variety of investigations were conducted using friction and wear testing, as well as examination of wear surfaces and wear debris using OM, SEM, X-RD, TGA and Density Gradient Separation (DOS). Friction and wear tests were conducted on a PAN fibre/CVI matrix carbon-carbon composite (Dunlop) and a pitch fibre/Resin-CVI matrix carbon-carbon composite (Bendix). Extensive testing was undertaken on the Dunlop composites to asses the effects of composite architecture, fibre orientation and heat treatment temperatures on friction and wear. Other friction and wear tests, conducted on the base Dunlop composite, were used to investigate the relative influences of temperature and sliding speed. It was found that the effect of temperature was dominant over composite architecture, fibre orientation and sliding speed in governing the friction and wear performance of the Dunlop composites. The development of bulk temperatures in excess of 110 C by frictional heating resulted in smooth friction and a low wear rate. Reducing heat treatment temperature also reduced the thermal conductivity producing high interface temperatures, low smooth friction coefficients and low wear rates under low energy braking conditions. However, this was at the expense of high oxidative wear rates under higher energy braking conditions. The Bendix composites had lower thermal conductivities than the fully heat treated Dunlop composite and exhibited similar friction and wear behaviour to Dunlop composites heat treated to lower temperatures. Examination of the wear surfaces using OM and SEM revealed particulate or Type I surface debris on wear surfaces tested under low energy

  2. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  3. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  4. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part III. Shrinkage of Composite Pellets during Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-based carbon/carbon composites with three-dimensional network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuguang; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Rufan; Li, Peng; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei

    2013-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-based carbon/carbon composites were fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration of pyrolytic carbon into pre-compressed MWCNT blocks. The pyrolytic carbon was deposited on the surface of the MWCNTs and filled the gaps between the MWCNTs, which improved the connection between the MWCNTs and formed a three-dimensional network structure. The mechanical and electrical properties were improved significantly. The values of the maximum compressed deformation, maximum breaking strength, Young's modulus and energy absorption are measured as 10.9%, 148.6 MPa, 1588.6 MPa and 13.8 kJ kg-1, respectively. The conductivity reached about 204.4 S cm-1, more than 10 times larger than that of pre-compressed MWCNT blocks. After annealing at 1800 °C in vacuum, the graphitization improved remarkably. The pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of the MWCNTs was rearranged along the walls, and resulted in an increase of the number of walls of the MWCNTs.Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-based carbon/carbon composites were fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration of pyrolytic carbon into pre-compressed MWCNT blocks. The pyrolytic carbon was deposited on the surface of the MWCNTs and filled the gaps between the MWCNTs, which improved the connection between the MWCNTs and formed a three-dimensional network structure. The mechanical and electrical properties were improved significantly. The values of the maximum compressed deformation, maximum breaking strength, Young's modulus and energy absorption are measured as 10.9%, 148.6 MPa, 1588.6 MPa and 13.8 kJ kg-1, respectively. The conductivity reached about 204.4 S cm-1, more than 10 times larger than that of pre-compressed MWCNT blocks. After annealing at 1800 °C in vacuum, the graphitization improved remarkably. The pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of the MWCNTs was rearranged along the walls, and resulted in an increase of the number of walls of the MWCNTs. Electronic supplementary

  6. Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

    2012-06-01

    Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed

  7. Investigation of transient heat transfer in composite walls using carbon/epoxy composites as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpiłowski, Janusz; Gawron, Bartosz; Woroniak, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the application of similarity theory to investigations of transient heat transfer in materials with complex structure. It describes the theoretical-experimental method for identification and design of the structure of two-component composite walls based on the research of the thermal diffusivity for the composite and its matrix separately. The thermal diffusivity was measured by means of the modified flash method. The method was tested on two samples of double-layer `epoxy resin - polyamide'. All the investigated samples had the same diameter of 12 mm and thickness ranging from 1.39-2.60 mm and their equivalent value of thermal diffusivity ranging from (1.21-1.98)×10-7 m2/s. Testing the method and research on carbon/epoxy composites was carried out at temperatures close to room temperature.

  8. Raman spectroscopic investigation of carbon-based materials and their composites. Comparison between carbon nanotubes and carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokobza, Liliane; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Couzi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy experiments on multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNTs), carbon black (CB) and on a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) filled either with MWCNTs or CB and also with a mixture of both particles (MWCNTs + CB) are reported. Emphasis is given on the dispersive effects of the Raman D band with laser energy that are shown for the first time to differ in each type of composites revealing a different polymer-filler interface. In addition, an upshift of the G band is observed when CB particles are incorporated into the polymer matrix.

  9. Facile Instep Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticle/Carbon@Carbon Nanotube Composites for Electrooxidation of Xylitol.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Ramanujam; Kim, Ae Rhan; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoo, Dong Jin

    2016-03-01

    The development of a facile, instep, and eco-friendly synthesis method of mono-dispersed low quantity palladium nanoparticle/carbon@functionllized carbon nanotube composite (Pd@C-f-CNT)electrocatalytic material was developed for use in the electrooxidation of xylitol. The prepared nanocatalyst was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electrocatalytic studies were performed using voltammetric methods. Formation of Pd NPs was observed within 2 min. The microscopic analysis showed 5- to 10-nm-sized Pd NPs that uniformly covered the CNT. The instep-formed carbon helped to improve the electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. Our proposed method provides new insight for the development of highly efficient metal NPs/CNT nanocatalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. PMID:27455674

  10. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1). PMID:27561502

  11. Carbon Nanotube/Magnesium Composite as a Hydrogen Source.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min Kyu; Se, Kwon Oh; Kim, Min Joong; Hwang, Jae Won; Yoon, Byoung Young; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen produced using the steam reforming process contains sulfur and carbon monoxide that are harmful to the Pt catalyst in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, CO-free hydrogen can be generated from the hydrolysis of either Al in strongly alkaline water or Mg in neutral water with chlorides such as sea water. The hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of Mg is extremely slow and linearly proportional to the corrosion rate of Mg in chloride water. In this work, we fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)--reinforced Mg--matrix composite by Spark Plasma Sintering as a fast hydrogen generation source for a PEMFC. The CNTs distributed in the Mg matrix act as numerous local cathodes, and hence cause severe galvanic corrosion between the Mg-matrix anode and CNT-cathode in NaCl solution. It was found that the hydrogen generation rate from the hydrolysis of the 5 vol.% CNT/Mg composite is 3300 times faster than that of the Mg without CNTs due primarily to the galvanic corrosion effect. PMID:26726603

  12. A filament wound carbon-carbon composite for impact shell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, Ralph; Romanoski, Glenn

    2000-01-01

    The performance and safety of the radioisotope power source depend in part on the thermal and impact properties of the materials used in the general purpose heat source (GPHS) through the use of an impact shell, thermal insulation and an aeroshell. Within the aeroshell are two graphite impact shells, made of fine-weave pierced-fabric (FWPF) that encapsulate four iridium alloy clad isotopic fuel pellets and provides impact protection for the clad. Impact studies conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory showed that impact shells typically fractured parallel to their longitudinal axis. The objective of this effort is to develop new impact shell concepts with improved performance. An effort to develop alternative carbon-carbon composites for the graphite impact shell was conducted. Eight braided architectures were examined in this study. The effects of the number of graphitization cycles on both the density and circumferential strength of these braided structures were determined. Results show that a filament wound carbon-carbon composite possesses the desired density and circumferential strength important to GPHS. .

  13. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2008-01-01

    OXIMAP is a numerical (FEA-based) solution tool capable of calculating the carbon fiber and fiber coating oxidation patterns within any arbitrarily shaped carbon silicon carbide composite structure as a function of time, temperature, and the environmental oxygen partial pressure. The mathematical formulation is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a chemically reacting, porous solid. The result of the formulation is a set of two coupled, non-linear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined at each time step using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The non-linear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual finite element method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

  15. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  16. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; James, R. H.; Parkinson, I. J.; Connelly, D. P.; Fairchild, I. J.

    2013-11-01

    Chromium isotopes are fractionated during redox reactions and have the potential to provide a record of changes in the oxygenation levels of the oceans in the geological past. However, Cr is a trace metal in seawater and its low concentrations make isotopic measurements challenging. Here we report the first determinations of δCr53 for seawater from open ocean (Argentine Basin) and coastal (Southampton Water) settings, using a double-spike technique. The total chromium concentration in seawater from Southampton Water is 1.85 nM, whereas the Cr content of Argentine Basin samples is 5.8-6.6 nM. The δCr53 value of seawater from the Argentine Basin is 0.491-0.556‰ in intermediate and deep waters, and varies between 0.412 and 0.664‰ in surface waters (<150 m). The δCr53 value of Southampton Water seawater is 1.505‰, which may reflect in situ reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). All of our seawater samples have higher δCr53 than crustal and mantle silicates, and mass balance modelling demonstrates that river water must also be enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, indicating that Cr isotopes are fractionated during weathering and/or during transport to the oceans. We also show that the Cr isotopic composition of modern non-skeletal marine carbonates (0.640- 0.745‰) encompasses the range that we measure for Argentine Basin seawater. Thus, fractionation of Cr isotopes during precipitation of these marine carbonates is likely to be small (<0.2‰), and they have the potential to provide a record of the Cr isotopic composition of ancient seawater. Phanerozoic carbonates are also characterised by heavy δCr53 and a correlation between δCr53 and Ce/Ce* suggests that the Cr and Ce cycles in the ocean are linked.

  17. Influence of carbon nanotube dimensions on the percolation characteristics of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehzad, Khurram; Ahmad, Mirza Nadeem; Hussain, Tajamal; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Shah, Asma Tufail; Mujahid, Adnan; Wang, Chao; Ellingsen, Josef; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2014-08-01

    The effect of carbon nanotube aspect ratio (AR) on the percolation characteristics of their polymer composites was investigated by melt blending the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different AR with a thermoplastic elastomer. Previously, most studies reported the effect of aspect ratio of MWCNTs only in the context of achieving the maximum electrical conductivity at lower percolation thresholds in the polymer composites. In this study, our results indicate that aspect ratio can also influence other percolation properties such as the pre-percolation conductivity, percolation conductivity and post-percolation conductivity, shape of the percolation curve, and the width of the insulator-conductor transition. We have established that AR can be used to tailor the percolation curves from sharp to quasi-linear ones, which can help us fabricate the percolative composites with stable electrical properties. Experimental results suggested that the mathematically calculated nominal AR of the MWCNTs was an unclear parameter to correlate with the percolation characteristics of the composites. Instead, an approach taking into consideration the nominal length (l) and the diameter (d) of the MWCNTs individually rather than as a combined AR (l/d) parameter gave a better explanation of the relation between MWCNT dimensions and percolation characteristics.

  18. Spatial variability in plant species composition and peatland carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, E.; Moore, T. R.; Roulet, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    Plant species shifts in response to global change will have significant impacts on ecosystem carbon (C) exchange and storage arising from changes in hydrology. Spatial variation in peatland C fluxes have largely been attributed to the spatial distribution of microhabitats that arise from variation in surface topography and water table depth, but little is known about how plant species composition impacts peatland C cycling or how these impacts will be influenced by changing environmental conditions. We quantified the effect of species composition and environmental variables on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes over 2 years in a temperate peatland for four plant communities situated along a water table gradient from ombrotrophic bog to beaver pond. We hypothesized that (i) spatial heterogeneity in species composition would drive predictable spatial heterogeneity in C fluxes due to variation in plant traits and ecological tolerances, and (ii) increases in peat temperature would increase C fluxes. Species had different effects on C fluxes primarily due to differences in leaf traits. Differences in ecological tolerances among communities resulted in different rates of CO2 exchange in response to changes in water table depth. There was an overall reduction in ecosystem respiration (ER), gross primary productivity (GPP) and CH4 flux in response to colder peat temperatures in the second year, and the additive effects of a deeper water table in the bog margin and pond sites further reduced flux rates in these areas. These results demonstrate that different plant species can increase or decrease the flux of C into and out of peatlands based on differences in leaf traits and ecological tolerances, and that CO2 and CH4 fluxes are sensitive to changes in soil temperature, especially when coupled with changes in moisture availability.

  19. The importance of bendability in the percolation behavior of carbon nanotube and graphene-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, I.

    2012-09-01

    The very low percolation thresholds in carbon nanotube and graphene polymer composites are of great recent interest. The values of these thresholds are basically determined by the extreme aspect ratios of the carbon particles. However, examining the many data in the literature we found that, surprisingly, for the corresponding composites the exclusion of the particles positions, due to their "hard cores," is very small. We propose that this is associated primarily with the bending of these carbon particles within the actual composites.

  20. Innovative Manufacturing of Carbon Nanotube-Loaded Fibrillar Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. J. T.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fakirov, S.

    The concept of microfibrillar composite (MFC) has been used to create a new type of polymer composites, in which the reinforcing microfibrils are loaded with carbon nanotubes (CNT). Polyamide 66 (PA66) has been melt blended with polypropylene in a twin screw extruder with and without CNT, and thereafter cold drawn to create a fibrillar state as well as to align the CNT in the PA66 microfibrils. The drawn bristles were compression moulded at 180°C to prepare MFC plates. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicate near perfect distribution of CNT in the reinforcing PA66 microfibrils. Although the fibrillated PA66 is able to improve the tensile stiffness and strength as expected from the MFC structure, the incorporation of CNT does not exhibit any further enhancing effect. It rather adversely affects the mechanical properties due to poor interface adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing microfibrils with the presence of CNT, as demonstrated by SEM. However, the resulting highly aligned CNT within the MFC are expected to affect the physical and functional properties of these composites.

  1. Carbon Materials Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Composite and Battery Anode Composed of the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of forming a composite material for use as an anode for a lithium-ion battery is disclosed. The steps include selecting a carbon material as a constituent part of the composite, chemically treating the selected carbon material to receive nanoparticles, incorporating nanoparticles into the chemically treated carbon material and removing surface nanoparticles from an outside surface of the carbon material with incorporated nanoparticles. A material making up the nanoparticles alloys with lithium.

  2. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  3. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    PubMed

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  5. Carbon Chemistry: Effects on Planetesimal Composition in Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence; Lunine, Jonathan; Mousis, Olivier; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2012-07-01

    Stellar abundances of exoplanet host stars exhibit significant variations from solar in solid forming elements, both refractory and volatile (e.g [1]). The C/O ratio is particularly important in determining the refractory (silicate and metal) to volatile ice ratio in material condensed beyond the snow line [2, 3]. Given the observed range in stellar C/O in exoplanet host stars, condensates might range from more water and volatile rich than solar system objects to volatile poor and silicate/metal rich [4]. In addition, for more carbon-rich stars (C/O > ˜0.8) refractory material in the inner part of the systems might be dominated by carbides rather than silicates [2, 5]. We have estimated the composition of volatile and refractory material in extrasolar planetesimals using a set of stars with a wide range of measured C/O abundances [6-9] and compare them with early solar system materials [10]. The volatile ice content of planetesimals in these systems varies significantly with C/O, controlled primarily by the availability of O for H_2O ice condensation. Systems with C/O less than the solar value (C/O = 0.55; [C/O] = 0 dex) should have very water ice rich planetesimals, while water ice mass fraction decreases rapidly with increasing C/O until only ices of CO and CO_2 are left in significant proportions. For larger C/O ratios, the system would become more reducing, with CH_4 becoming the major carbon-bearing gas and possibly including C as solid hydrocarbons in the condensates. If the refractory carbon phase is similar to CHON particles in comets, both carbon and oxygen are removed from the gas phase and the condensates will be water-poor mixtures of silicates and metal, carbon, and carbon-bearing volatile ices, depending on temperature. For the carbon-rich system HD4203 with (C/O > ˜1.5), condensates should range from ˜86 % mass fraction of silicate and metal for reducing conditions and no solid carbon phase to ˜70% mass fraction silicate and 30% mass fraction

  6. Photoactivity of g-C3 N4 /S-Doped Porous Carbon Composite: Synergistic Effect of Composite Formation.

    PubMed

    Seredych, Mykola; Łoś, Szymon; Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2016-04-21

    A composite of g-C3 N4 with visible-light photoactive S-doped carbon was synthesized. Synergistic effects in surface chemistry and electrical conductivity, and a decrease in the band gap (Eg , estimated from optical measurements) from 2.91 eV for g-C3 N4 to 2.79 eV for the composite were found. Both the carbon and the composite showed photosensitivity but only the composite revealed a visible-light-driven reduction activity. PMID:26990914

  7. Electrically Conductive Multiphase Polymer Blend Carbon-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigandi, Paul James

    The use of multiphase polymer blends provides unique morphologies and properties to reduce the percolation concentration and increase conductivity of carbon-based polymer composites. These systems offer improved conductivity, temperature stability and selective distribution of the conductive filler through unique morphologies at significantly lower conductive filler concentration. In this work, the kinetic and thermodynamic effects on a series of multiphase conductive polymer composites were investigated. The polymer blend phase morphology, filler distribution, electrical conductivity, and rheological properties of CB-filled PP/PMMA/EAA conductive polymer composites were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were found to influence the morphology development and final composite properties. The morphology and CB distribution were found to be kinetically driven when annealed for a short period of time following the shear-intensive mixing process, whereas the three-phase polymer blend morphology is driven by thermodynamics when given sufficient time under high temperature annealing conditions in the melt state. At short annealing times, the CB distribution was influenced by the compounding sequence where the CB was added after being premixed with one of the polymer phases or directly added to the three phase polymer melt, but again was thermodynamically driven at longer annealing times with the CB migrating to the EAA phase. The resistivity was found to decrease by a statistically significant amount to similar levels for all of the composite systems with increasing annealing time, providing evidence of gradual phase coalescence to a tri-continuous morphology and CB migration. The addition of CB via the PP and EAA masterbatch results in significantly faster percolation and lower resistivity compared to when added direct to the system during compounding after 30 minutes annealing by a statistically significant amount. Dynamic oscillatory shear rheology using

  8. Biological properties of carbon/carbon implant composites with unique manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Hui; Yu, Shu; Zhu, Shai-Hong; Gao, Chang-Qing; Liu, Yong; Miu, Yun-Liang; Huang, Bo-Yun

    2009-12-01

    The goal was to manufacture carbon/carbon (C/C) composites through a unique procedure with improved biocompatibility and reduced debris release. C/C composites were prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and their biological properties were analyzed. With regard to mechanical properties, compressive strength/modulus was 219.1 MPa/9.72 GPa, flexural strength/modulus was 121.63 MPa/21.9 GPa, and interlaminar sheer was 15.13 GPa. Biocompatibility testing revealed: (1) the extract liquid from the C/C composites had no effect on cell proliferation; (2) the extract had no impact on micronucleus frequency as compared with the control groups (P > 0.05); (3) in vivo, there was mild tissue inflammation after implantation within the first 2 weeks, but there was no significant difference compared with the control group (P > 0.05); (4) the implants were well integrated into the host tissue, and debris was limited. The tested samples have excellent biocompatibilities and reduced release of debris. The demonstrated changes in manufacturing procedures are promising. PMID:19593650

  9. Effect of carbon nanotubes and processing methods on the properties of carbon nanotube/polypropylene composites.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Thet, Naing Tun; Tan, Qing Hao; Li, Lin; Chan, Siew Hwa; Zhao, Jianhong; Yu, Suzhu

    2009-10-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and processing methods on the morphological, crystalline, dynamic mechanical, mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT/polypropylene (PP) composites has been investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and electric conductivity tests. The MWCNTs have been functionalized covalently and noncovalently for better dispersion in the PP matrix. A homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs was achieved in the PP matrix as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) results confirmed that the incorporation of the MWCNTs effectively enhanced the crystallization of the PP matrix through heterogeneous nucleation. The glass transition temperature increased from 8 degrees C for the pure PP to 26 degrees C for the composite with 10 wt% MWCNT-COOH. The present investigation revealed that the mechanical, thermal as well as electrical properties of carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites were strongly dependent on the state of dispersion, mixing and processing methods. PMID:19908474

  10. Image analysis of degradation processes of carbon/carbon composites in a high temperature chemical flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Masao; Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Arai; Norio; Ushigome, Nobutaka; Kato, Yoshinari

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a measurement technique for in-situ monitoring of the degradation processes of thermal-resistance materials, such as C/C (carbon fiber reinforced carbon) composites, in high temperature fields. Spatially, spectrally and temporally resolved images of emission from diatomic molecules in an acetylene-air were observed flame by a spectrovideo camera, assembled by combining a conochromator and a high speed UV video camera. Two dimensional atomic adsorption spectrometry (AAS) using the spectrovideo camera was applied to investigate the degradation process. The test samples employed in this study were Mg-doped three different C/C composites with oxidation-resistive double layer coatings of SiC and glass materials. The results indicated that the time changes in the spatial distribution of Mg adsorption observed by the spectrovideo camera proved to be a powerful tool to in-situ monitor the degradation/oxidation processes of the oxidation-resistive C/C composites in high temperature fields.

  11. Study of Composite Interface Fracture and Crack Growth Monitoring Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-08-01

    Interface fracture of woven fabric composite layers was studied using Mode II fracture testing. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were used with a vinyl ester resin. First, the single-step cured (i.e., co-cured) composite interface strength was compared to that of the two-step cured interface as used in the scarf joint technique. The results showed that the two-step cured interface was as strong as the co-cured interface. Carbon nanotubes were then applied to the composite interface using two-step curing, and then followed by Mode II fracture testing. The results indicated a significant improvement of the interface fracture toughness due to the dispersed carbon nanotube layer for both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites. The carbon nanotube layer was then evaluated as a means to monitor crack growth along the interface. Because carbon nanotubes have very high electrical conductivity, the electrical resistance was measured through the interface as a crack grew, thus disrupting the carbon nanotube network and increasing the resistance. The results showed a linear relationship between crack length and interface resistance for the carbon fiber composites, and allowed initial detection of failure in the E-glass fiber composites. This study demonstrated that the application of carbon nanotubes along a critical composite interface not only improves fracture properties but can also be used to detect and monitor interfacial damage.

  12. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites.

    PubMed

    Massey, M K; Kotsialos, A; Volpati, D; Vissol-Gaudin, E; Pearson, C; Bowen, L; Obara, B; Zeze, D A; Groves, C; Petty, M C

    2016-01-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task. PMID:27558444

  13. Characterization of radar cross section of carbon fiber composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite (CFC) materials have been used for many structural applications for decades. Their electromagnetic properties are also of great interest and are being quantified by recent research. This research explores shielding effectiveness, antenna design, conductivity, reflection, and absorption properties. The work in this paper specifically characterizes the radar cross section (RCS) of CFC structures. Various CFC planar samples were created using a wet layup method and vacuum bagging techniques. These samples were then placed in an anechoic chamber and their RCS values were measured at normal incidence. These measured values were compared to those of aluminum samples made into the same shape as the CFC samples. All of the measurements were made over 7 - 12 GHz frequency range. The RCS of the CFC samples show some interesting results. The fiber direction in the CFC samples had great influence on the RCS. Theories and reasoning for the results are presented and discussed.

  14. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  15. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  16. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Dangelo, Carlos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  17. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  18. Evolution of Electronic Circuits using Carbon Nanotube Composites

    PubMed Central

    Massey, M. K.; Kotsialos, A.; Volpati, D.; Vissol-Gaudin, E.; Pearson, C.; Bowen, L.; Obara, B.; Zeze, D. A.; Groves, C.; Petty, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution-in-materio concerns the computer controlled manipulation of material systems using external stimuli to train or evolve the material to perform a useful function. In this paper we demonstrate the evolution of a disordered composite material, using voltages as the external stimuli, into a form where a simple computational problem can be solved. The material consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in liquid crystal; the nanotubes act as a conductive network, with the liquid crystal providing a host medium to allow the conductive network to reorganise when voltages are applied. We show that the application of electric fields under computer control results in a significant change in the material morphology, favouring the solution to a classification task. PMID:27558444

  19. Surface modified carbon nanoparticle papers and applications on polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xilian

    Free-standing paper like materials are usually employed as protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, and electronic or optoelectric components. Free-standing papers made from carbon nanoparticles have drawn increased interest because they have a variety of superior chemical and physical characteristics, such as light weight, high intrinsic mechanical properties, and extraordinary high electrical conductivity. Nanopapers fabricated from 1- D shape carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising reinforcing materials for polymer composites, because the highly porous CNF and CNT nanopapers (porosity ˜80% and ˜70% respectively) can be impregnated with matrix polymers. In the first part of this work, polyaniline (PANI) was used to functionalize the surface of CNFs, and the resultant carbon nanopapers presented impressive mechanical strength and electrical conductivity that it could be used in the in-mold coating (IMC)/ injection molding process to achieve high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness. Aniline modified (AF) CNT nanopapers were used as a 3D network in gas separation membranes. The resultant composite membranes demonstrated better and stable CO2 permeance and CO 2/H2 selectivity in a high temperature (107°C) and high pressure (15-30 atm) gas separation process, not achievable by conventional polymer membranes. In the second part, we demonstrated that 2-D graphene (GP) or graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could be tightly packed into a film which was impermeable to most gases and liquids. GP or GO nanopapers could be coated on polymer composites. In order to achieve well-dispersed single-layer graphene in aqueous medium, we developed a facile approach to synthesize functional GP bearing benzenesulfonic acid groups which allow the preparation of nanopapers by water based assembly. With the optimized processing conditions, our best GP nanopapers could reach

  20. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Branko N.; Subramanian, Nalini; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  1. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  2. High Temperature Permeability of Carbon Cloth Phenolic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, O. Y.; Lawrence, T. W.

    2003-01-01

    The carbon fiber phenolic resin composite material used for the RSRM nozzle insulator occasionally experiences problems during operation from pocketing or spalling-like erosion and lifting of plies into the char layer. This phenomenon can be better understood if the permeability of the material at elevated temperatures is well defined. This paper describes an experimental approach to determining high temperature permeability of the carbon phenolic material used as the RSRM nozzle liner material. Two different approaches were conducted independently using disk and bar type specimens with the designed permeability apparatus. The principle of the apparatus was to subject a test specimen to a high pressure differential and a heat supply and to monitor both the pressure and temperature variations resulting from gas penetration through the permeable wall between the two chambers. The bar types, especially designed to eliminate sealing difficulties at a high temperature environment, were directly exposed to real time temperature elevation from 22 C to 260 C during the test period. The disk types were pre-heat treated up to 300 C for 8 hours and cooled to room temperature before testing. Nonlinear variation of downstream pressure at a certain temperature range implied moisture release and matrix pyrolysis. Permeability was calculated using a semi-numerical model of quasi-steady state. The test results and the numerical model are discussed in the paper.

  3. Carbon-Carbon Composite Radiator Development for the EO-1 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace; Shinn, Elizabeth; Rawal, Suraj; Wright, Joe

    2004-01-01

    The Carbon-Carbon Space Radiator Partnership (CSRP), an informal partnership of Government and industrial personnel, was formed to promote the use of Carbon-carbon composites (C-C) as engineering materials for spacecraft thermal management applications . As a part of this effort the partnership has built a structural radiator for the Earth Orbiter - 1 (EO-1) spacecraft. This radiator, using C-C face-sheets with an aluminum honeycomb core, will demonstrate both the thermal and structural properties of C-C under actual service conditions as well as provide performance data from space flight. This paper will present results from the design of the radiator, the thermal/mechanical tests of the facesheet materials, and sub-component test results on the C-C/Al honeycomb sandwich material. The 29- by 28-inch radiator was designed to support two electronics boxes with a combined heat output of 60 watts maximum and a weight of 58 lbs. The analysis of the radiator design shows that the radiator constructed with 20-mil-thick facesheets of a P30-fiber-reinforced C-C from BFGoodrich is able to meet or exceed all the required thermal and mechanical requirements.

  4. Fatigue and flexural response of advanced carbon-carbon composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Das, Partha S.; Jeelani, Shaik; Baker, Dean M.; Johnson, Sigurd A.

    1992-01-01

    The flexural response of SiC-coated carbon-carbon composites (ACC-4) at room and elevated temperatures is presented. Three-point bending tests were performed on virgin and mission-cycled specimens, and the variation in flexural strength is examined. The load-deflection behavior of the material at various temperatures is investigated, and the Weibull (1939) analysis of the strength data is performed. Micrographs of various cross sections in the damaged zone were taken, and the failure mechanisms are discussed. Fatigue tests were conducted under flexural loads, and the S-N diagram with the corresponding Weibull analysis are presented. Untested as well as fractured specimens under static and dynamic loading were C-scanned to identify the damaged zone and visualize the extent of the damage. Failure analyses are presented for both static and cyclic loading on the basis of NDE, the micrographs, and the experimental data.

  5. Brazing of Carbon Carbon Composites to Cu-clad Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.; Shpargel, T> P.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced carbon carbon composites were joined to copper-clad molybdenum (Cu/Mo) using four active metal brazes containing Ti (Cu ABA, Cusin-1 ABA, Ticuni, and Ticusil) for potential use in thermal management applications. The brazed joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Knoop microhardness measurements across the joint region. Metallurgically sound C-C/Cu/Mo joints, devoid of interfacial cracks formed in all cases. The joint interfaces were preferentially enriched in Ti, with Cu ABA joints exhibiting the largest interfacial Ti concentrations. The microhardness measurements revealed hardness gradients across the joint region, with a peak hardness of 300-350 KHN in Cusin-1 ABA and Ticusil joints and 200-250 KHN in Cu ABA and Ticuni joints, respectively.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of PETI-330/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Working, Dennis C.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Criss, Jim M.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Connell, John W.

    2005-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to incorporate multi-functionality into advanced composites, blends of PETI-330 and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared, characterized and fabricated into moldings. The PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight percent by dry mixing the components in a ball mill. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing, thermal and rheological properties. Based on the characterization results, PETI-330/MWCNT samples were scaled up to approx. 300 g and used to fabricate moldings 10.2 cm x 15.2 cm x 0.32 cm thick. The moldings were fabricated by injecting the mixtures at 260-280 C into a stainless steel tool followed by curing for 1 h at 371 C. The tool was designed to impart high shear during the injection process in an attempt to achieve some alignment of the MWCNTs in the flow direction. Good quality moldings were obtained that were subsequently characterized for thermal, mechanical and electrical properties. The degree of dispersion and alignment of the MWCNTs were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The preparation and preliminary characterization of PETI-330/MWCNT composites will be discussed. Keywords: phenylethynyl terminated imides, high temperature polymers, nanocomposites,

  7. Enrichment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2014-05-20

    Treatment of ventilation air methane (VAM) with cost-effective technologies has been an ongoing challenge due to its high volumetric flow rate with low and variable methane concentrations. In this work, honeycomb monolithic carbon fiber composites were developed and employed to capture VAM with a large-scale test unit at various conditions such as VAM concentration, ventilation air (VA) flow rate, temperature, and purging fluids. Regardless of inlet VAM concentrations, methane was captured at almost 100%. To regenerate the composites, the initial vacuum swing followed by combined temperature and vacuum swing adsorption (TVSA) was applied. It was found that initial vacuum swing is a control step for the final methane concentration having 5 or 11 times the VAM enrichment by one-step adsorption, which is, to our knowledge, the best performance achieved in VAM enrichment technologies worldwide. Five-time enriched VAM can be utilized as a principle fuel for lean burn turbine. Also, it can be further enriched by second step adsorption to more than 25% which then can be used for commercially available gas engines. In this way, the final product can be out of the methane explosive range (5-15%). PMID:24787090

  8. High Temperature Resin/Carbon Nanotube Composite Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Sun, Keun J.; Criss, Jim M.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Connell, John W.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of incorporating multifunctionality into advanced composites, blends of phenylethynyl terminated imides-330 (PETI-330) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared, characterized and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight percent by dry mixing the components in a ball mill. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing, thermal and rheological properties. Based on the characterization results, PETI-330/MWCNT samples were scaled up to approximately 300 g and used to fabricate moldings by injecting the mixtures at 260-280 deg C into a stainless steel tool followed by curing for 1 h at 371 deg C. The tool was designed to impart a degree of shear during the injection process in an attempt to achieve some alignment of the MWCNTs in the flow direction. Obtained moldings were subsequently characterized for thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. The degree of dispersion and alignment of MWCNTs were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The preparation and preliminary characterization of PETI-330/MWCNT composites will be discussed.

  9. Carbon nanotube-MoS2 composites as solid lubricants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Luster, Brandon; Church, Amelia; Muratore, Christopher; Voevodin, Andrey A; Kohli, Punit; Aouadi, Samir; Talapatra, Saikat

    2009-03-01

    Solid lubricants (SLs) characterized by low coefficients of friction (mu) and wear rates (w) drastically improve the life span of instruments that undergo extreme frictional wear. However, the performance of SLs such as sputtered or nanoparticulate molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)), tungsten disulfide (WS(2)), or graphite deteriorates heavily under extreme operational conditions such as elevated temperatures and high humidity. Here, we present our preliminary results, which demonstrate that composites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and MoS(2) produced by electrodeposition of MoS(2) on vertically aligned CNT films have low mu ( approximately 0.03) and w (approximately 10(-13) mm(3)/N.mm) even at 300 degrees C, which are about 2 orders of magnitude better than those of nanoparticulate MoS(2)-based coatings. The high load-bearing capacity of CNTs provides a strong enduring support to MoS(2) nanoclusters and is responsible for their ultralow w. The incorporation of these composites in liquid lubricants reduces the friction coefficient of the liquid lubricants by approximately 15%. The technique described here to produce SL coatings with extremely appealing frictional properties will provide valuable solutions for a variety of tribological applications where the coatings encounter high temperature, reduced pressure, and/or low- and high-humidity conditions. PMID:20355996

  10. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Kovach, Louis; Taylor, Albert J.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400.degree. K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10-30 vol. % carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing bases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  11. Lanthanum-hexaboride carbon composition for use in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.; Taylor, A.J.

    1980-01-22

    The present invention relates to a structural composition useful in corrosive hydrogen-fluorine environments at temperatures in excess of 1400/sup 0/K. The composition is formed of a isostatically pressed and sintered or a hot-pressed mixture of lanthanum hexaboride particles and about 10 to 30 vol% carbon. The lanthanum-hexaboride reacts with the high-temperature fluorine-containing gases to form an adherent layer of corrosion-inhibiting lanthanum trifluoride on exposed surfaces of the composition. The carbon in the composite significantly strengthens the composite, enhances thermal shock resistance, and significantly facilitates the machining of the composition.

  12. Rapid processing of carbon-carbon composites by forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyaraman, S.; Lackey, W.J.; Agrawal, P.K.; Freeman, G.B.; Langman, M.D.

    1995-10-01

    Carbon fiber-carbon matrix composites were fabricated using the forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Preforms were prepared by stacking 40 layers of plain weave carbon cloth in a graphite holder. The preforms were infiltrated using propylene, propane, and methane. The present work showed that the FCVI process is well suited for fabricating carbon-carbon composites; without optimization of the process, the authors have achieved uniform and thorough densification. Composites with porosities as low as 7% were fabricated in 8--12 h. The highest deposition rate obtained in the present study was {approximately}3 {micro}m/h which is more than an order of magnitude faster than the typical value of 0.1--0.25 {micro}m/h for the isothermal process. It was also found that the use of propylene and propane as reagents resulted in faster infiltration compared to methane.

  13. Novel molecular sources for dispersing boron in carbon-carbon composites. Final report, 1 Jun-30 Nov 91

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1991-12-31

    Improving the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites is key to expanding the use of this material system into higher temperature applications. While boron particles have been added to these materials to seal cracks in protective coatings, oxidation of the carbon matrix neighboring the boron particles seriously affects composite strength. This problem is exacerbate by a natural segregation of the boron particles to fiber rich areas of the composites. Carborane, a robust molecular source of boron, was used as the precursor for atomically dispersed boron in a phenolic derived carbon matrix. Modifications of the chemical structure of carborane were used to improve the solubility in phenolic. Additions of carboranes into the phenolic resins dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of the carbonized char. The char yield of the phenolic resin was also increased significantly.

  14. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  15. Tribological properties of polypropylene composites with carbon nanotubes and sepiolite.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Victor H; Vargas, Andres F; Brostow, Witold; Datashvili, Tea; López, Betty L; Mei, Kevin; Su, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and sepiolite (SEP) were modified in order to improve their compatibility with the polypropylene (PP) matrix. Carboxylic groups were introduced into the CNTs through an oxidative treatment and aliphatic chains were incorporated on SEP by ion exchange of a cationic surfactant. Maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PPgMA) was mixed with neat PP to introduce polar groups into the polymer matrix. Composites including modified and non-modified fillers were prepared by melt extrusion. Dispersion and interaction of the CNTs with the PP and PPgMA matrices were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy while a focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) was used for SEP containing composites. Scratch resistance, microhardness, dynamic friction and wear were determined. Raman spectroscopy shows that the introduction of polar groups into PP matrices has a positive effect on the dispersion of modified CNTs. FIB/SEM results show that the modification of SEP improves its dispersion in the polypropylene matrix; filler clusters found in the PPgMA matrix are much times smaller than those in the neat PP. Despite of SEP agglomerates in the composites, a good interaction between both phases is seen; SEP particles are fully coated and embedded inside the PP matrix. The 'lack of cooperation' between unmodified PP and its fillers results in nanocomposites with larger residual depths; by contrast, PPgMA does 'cooperate' with its fillers so that the nanocomposites in scratch resistance testing have smaller residual depths R(h) than the neat PPgMA. Addition of the fillers to PPgMA also increases the hardness. As for wear rates, some our fillers provide higher and some lower wear rates than PP. PMID:24757963

  16. Processable Conducting Polyaniline, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and Their Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan

    Good processability is often required for applications of conducting materials like polyaniline (PANI), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. This can be achieved by either physical stabilization or chemical functionalization. Functionalization usually expands the possible applications for the conducting materials depending on the properties of the functional groups. Processable conducting materials can also be combined with other co-dissolving materials to prepare composites with desired chemical and physical properties. Polyanilines (PANI) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) are soluble in many organic solvents such as chloroform and toluene. Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be dispersed into PANI/DBSA to form homogeneous solutions. PANI/DBSA functions as a conducting surfactant for SWCNTs. The mixture can be combined with two-parts polyurethanes that co-dissolve in the organic solvent to produce conducting polymer composites. The composite mixtures can be applied onto various substrates by simple spray-on methods to obtain transparent and conducting coatings. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, has drawn intense interest for its unique properties. Processable graphene has been produced in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) by a one-step solvothermal reduction of graphite oxide without the aid of any reducing reagent and/or surfactant. The as-synthesized graphene disperses well in a variety of organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol and tetrahydrogenfuran (THF). The conductivity of solvothermal reduced graphite oxide is comparable to hydrazine reduced graphite oxide. Attempts were made to create intrinsically conducting glue comparable to mussel adhesive protiens using polyaniline and graphene. Mussels can attach to a variety of substrates under water. Catechol residue in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the key to the wet adhesion. Tyrosine and phosphoserine with primary alkyl amine groups also participate in adhesion. A

  17. Modeling Environmental Controls on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Ecosystem Respired Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, T.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2006-12-01

    Our main objective was to test whether the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2 varied in response to environmental conditions in a manner consistent with well-known leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination. We developed an ecosystem-scale model that calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance and chloroplast CO2 concentration separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers. The stomatal conductance model was linked to differences in water potential and resistances in the hydraulic pathway between the soil and the tree foliage. This part of the ecosystem model was validated by comparison to leaf-level gas exchange measurements and estimates of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis (GEP). The estimates of GEP were based on eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network standard protocol for partitioning NEE into GEP and total ecosystem respiration (TER). The carbon isotope composition of carbohydrate formed during photosynthesis was calculated based on the Farquhar model of isotope effects. Total ecosystem respiration was modeled, based on measured temperature and soil moisture, as the sum of four components (1) above-ground plant, (2) root, (3) litter, and (4) mineral soil. We applied a variety of techniques to allocate the contribution of these different components so that modeled TER was consistent with TER calculated from NEE measurements. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 released during above-ground plant and root respiration was calculated based on an assimilated-weighted average of carbohydrate fixed during a variable number of days previous to the day of respiration. The isotope composition of CO2 released by litter and mineral soil respiration was based on measurements of the δ13C values of these components (we assumed no isotope fractionation during respiration) and held constant in all calculations. The model was compared to

  18. Micromechanical simulation of damage progression in carbon phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon/phenolic composites are used extensively as ablative insulating materials in the nozzle region of solid rocket motors. The current solid rocket motor (RSRM) on the space shuttle is fabricated from woven rayon cloth which is carbonized and then impregnated with the phenolic resin. These plies are layed up in the desired configuration and cured to form the finished part. During firing, the surface of the carbon/phenolic insulation is exposed to 5000 F gases from the rocket exhaust. The resin pyrolizes and the material chars to a depth which progresses with time. The rate of charring and erosion are generally predictable, and the insulation depth is designed to allow adequate safety margins over the firing time of the motor. However, anomalies in the properties and response of the carbon/phenolic materials can lead to severe material damage which may decrease safety margins to unacceptable levels. Three macro damage modes which were observed in fired nozzles are: ply lift, 'wedge out', and pocketing erosion. Ply lift occurs in materials with plies oriented nearly parallel to the surface. The damage occurs in a region below the charred material where material temperatures are relatively low - about 500 F. Wedge out occurs at the intersection of nozzle components whose plies are oriented at about 45 deg. The corner of the block of material breaks off along a ply interface. Pocketing erosion occurs in material with plies oriented normal to the surface. Thermal expansion is restrained in two directions resulting in large tensile strains and material failure normal to the surface. When a large section of material is removed as a result of damage, the insulation thickness is reduced which may lead to failure of the nozzle due to excessive heating of critical components. If these damage events cannot be prevented with certainty, the designer must increase the thickness of the insulator thus adding to both weight and cost. One of the difficulties in developing a full

  19. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Mathur, R. B.

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from -29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to -51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  20. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei Xue Tao; Jin Zhihao; Qiao Guanjun

    2008-04-01

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products.