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Sample records for carbon stripper foil

  1. Producing carbon stripper foils containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, J. O. Jr.

    2012-12-19

    Parameters being actively tested by the accelerator community for the purpose of extending carbon stripper foil lifetimes in fast ion beams include methods of deposition, parting agents, mounting techniques, support (fork) materials, and inclusion of alloying elements, particularly boron. Specialized production apparatus is required for either sequential deposition or co-deposition of boron in carbon foils. A dual-use vacuum evaporator for arc evaporation of carbon and electron-beam evaporation of boron and other materials has been built for such development. Production of both carbon and boron foils has begun and improvements are in progress.

  2. Carbon stripper foils for heavy-ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon stripper foils have for many years been successfully used with accelerators because they yield higher average charge states than gas strippers. However, with the development of heavy ion accelerators and the resulting use of heavier ions, the carbon stripper foil lifetimes are greatly reduced. Even when using the new foils changer systems, which typically contain two hundred foils or more, it becomes necessary to have frequent accelerator shutdowns for foil reloading. The rate of experiment interruption makes it clear a new approach is necessary to increase foil lifetimes. Several techniques have been tried with varying degrees of success to strengthen these foils so that they will last longer; the most successful one reported a lifetime increase of the order of a factor of 30 over foils produced in the conventional manner. Methods of producing various types of foils will be presented, a discussion will be given on theories for foil breakage, and some new ideas will be introduced for further increasing foil lifetimes.

  3. Carbon stripper foils used in the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M.J.; Plum, M.A.; Sugai, I.

    1997-12-01

    Carbon stripper foils produced by the modified controlled ACDC arc discharge method (mCADAD) at the Institute for Nuclear Study have been tested and used for high current 800-MeV beam production in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) since 1993. Two foils approximately 110 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} each are sandwiched together to produce an equivalent 220 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} foil. The foil sandwitch is supported by 4-5 {mu}m diameter carbon filters attached to an aluminum frame. These foils have survived as long as five months during PSR normal beam production of near 70 {mu}A average current on target. Typical life-times of other foils vary from seven to fourteen days with lower on-target average current. Beam loss data also indicate that these foils have slower shrinkage rates than standard foils. Equipment has been assembled and used to produce foils by the mCADAD method at Los Alamos. These foils will be tested during 1997 operation.

  4. Development of the carbon foils as charge strippers for high-intensity uranium ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Hiroo; Kuboki, Hironori; Okuno, Hiroki; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Kamigaito, Osamu; Imao, Hiroshi; Goto, Akira; Kase, Masayuki

    2011-11-01

    carbon foil (C-foil) is commonly used as a charge stripper in the heavy-ion accelerators. Since 2005, the polymer-coated carbon foils (PCC-foils) have been fabricated at Nishina Center to prepare larger and thicker C-foils than those previously used as charge strippers. However, the multi-layer PCC-foils did not have sufficiently long life-time. Since August 2009, a new magnetron sputtering system is used to fabricate a thick C-foil. The foils coated with polymer are used as strippers. Life-times of the new single-layer PCC-foils under the uranium beam were measured in two configurations: at the first one a small piece of C-foil was attached to a fixed holder and in the second one a large C-foil was attached to a "rotating-cylinder stripper" device. The properties of the new single-layer PCC-foils and the results of the life-time measurements are reported in this contribution.

  5. Lifetime dependence of nitrided carbon stripper foils on sputter angle during N+ ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, I.; Oyaizu, M.; Takeda, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Hattori, T.; Kadono, T.

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated high-lifetime thin nitride carbon stripper (NCS) foils with high nitrogen contents using ion-beam sputtering with reactive nitrogen gas and investigated the dependence of their lifetimes on the sputter angle. The nitrogen in carbon foils plays a critical role in determining their lifetime. Therefore, in order to investigate the effects of the nitrogen level in NCS foils on foil lifetime, we measured the sputtering yield for different sputter angles at a sputtering voltage of 10 kV while using carbon-based targets. We also measured the nitrogen-to-carbon thickness ratios of the foils using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The foils made at a sputter angle of 15° using a glassy amorphous carbon target exhibited an average increase of 200-fold in lifetime when compared to commercially available foils.

  6. Mounting stripper foils on forks for maximum lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Stoner, John O.

    2008-06-01

    While research and development continue to produce forms of carbon for longer lasting stripper foils, relatively little attention has been paid to other factors that affect their survival in use. It becomes apparent that the form of carbon is only part of the issue. Specific mounting methods increase the lifetimes of carbon stripper foils. These methods are determined in part by the specific use and carbon type for a foil. With careful handling, appropriate adhesive, and slack mounting, premature breakage can be avoided. Foil lifetimes are then primarily affected by less easily controlled factors such as high-temperature expansion, shrinkage and evaporation.

  7. Measurement of 181 MeV H- ions stripping cross-sections by carbon stripper foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Yoshimoto, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Hotchi, H.; Harada, H.; Okabe, K.; Kinsho, M.; Irie, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The stripping cross-sections of 181 MeV H- (negative hydrogen) ions by the carbon stripper foil are measured with good accuracy. The present experiment was carried out at the 3-GeV RCS (Rapid Cycling Synchrotron) of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). The stripping cross-sections for different charge states, also known as electron loss cross-sections of H- ion, are denoted as σ-11, σ-10 and σ01, for both electrons stripping (H- →H+), one-electron stripping (H- →H0) and the 2nd-electron stripping (H0 →H+) proceeding σ-10, respectively. We have established very unique and precise techniques for such measurements so as also to determine a foil stripping efficiency very accurately. The cross-sections σ-11, σ-10 and σ01 are obtained to be (0.002 ± 0.001) ×10-18cm2, (1.580 ± 0.034) ×10-18cm2 and (0.648 ± 0.014) ×10-18cm2, respectively. The presently given cross-sections are newly available experimental results for an incident H- energy below 200 MeV and they are also shown to be consistent with recently proposed energy (1 /β2) scaled cross-sections calculated from the previously measured data at 200 and 800 MeV. The present results have a great importance not only at J-PARC for the upgraded H- beam energy of 400 MeV but also for many new and upgrading similar accelerators, where H- beam energies in most cases are considered to be lower than 200 MeV.

  8. Low-z gas stripper as an alternative to carbon foils for the acceleration of high-power uranium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, H.; Hershcovitch, A.; Fukunishi, N.; Goto, A.; Hasebe, H.; Imao, H.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Kuboki, H.; Yano, Y.; Yokouchi, S.

    2011-04-23

    The RIKEN accelerator complex started feeding the next-generation exotic beam facility radioisotope beam factory (RIBF) with heavy-ion beams from 2007 after the successful commissioning of RIBF at the end of 2006. Many improvements made from 2007 to 2010 were instrumental in increasing the intensity of various heavy-ion beams. However, the available beam intensity of very heavy ion beams, especially uranium beams, is far below our goal of 1 p{mu}A (6 x 10{sup 12} particles/s). In order to achieve this goal, upgrade programs are already in progress; the programs include the construction of a new 28-GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a new injector linac. However, the most serious problem, that of a charge stripper for high-power uranium beams, still remains unsolved, despite extensive research and development work using large foils mounted on a rotating cylinder and a N{sup 2} gas stripper. A gas stripper is free from problems related to lifetime, though the equilibrium charge state in this stripper is considerably lower than that in a carbon foil, owing to the absence of the density effect. Nevertheless, the merits of gas strippers motivated us to develop a low-Z gas stripper to achieve a higher equilibrium charge state even in gases. We measured the electron-loss and electron-capture cross sections of uranium ions in He gas as a function of their charge state at 11, 14, and 15 MeV/nucleon. The equilibrium charge states extracted from the intersection of the lines of the two cross sections were promisingly higher than those in N{sub 2} gas by more than 10. Simple simulations of charge development along the stripper thickness were performed by assuming the measured cross sections. The simulation results show that about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} of He gas should be accumulated to achieve a charge state higher than that of N{sub 2} gas, notwithstanding the difficulty in accumulation of this helium amount owing to its fast dispersion. However, we now

  9. Low-Z gas stripper as an alternative to carbon foils for the acceleration of high-power uranium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Goto, A.; Hasebe, H.; Imao, H.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Kuboki, H.; Yano, Y.; Yokouchi, S.; Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-03-01

    The RIKEN accelerator complex started feeding the next-generation exotic beam facility radioisotope beam factory (RIBF) with heavy-ion beams from 2007 after the successful commissioning of RIBF at the end of 2006. Many improvements made from 2007 to 2010 were instrumental in increasing the intensity of various heavy-ion beams. However, the available beam intensity of very heavy ion beams, especially uranium beams, is far below our goal of 1pμA (6×1012particles/s). In order to achieve this goal, upgrade programs are already in progress; the programs include the construction of a new 28-GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a new injector linac. However, the most serious problem, that of a charge stripper for high-power uranium beams, still remains unsolved, despite extensive research and development work using large foils mounted on a rotating cylinder and a N2 gas stripper. A gas stripper is free from problems related to lifetime, though the equilibrium charge state in this stripper is considerably lower than that in a carbon foil, owing to the absence of the density effect. Nevertheless, the merits of gas strippers motivated us to develop a low-Z gas stripper to achieve a higher equilibrium charge state even in gases. We measured the electron-loss and electron-capture cross sections of uranium ions in He gas as a function of their charge state at 11, 14, and 15MeV/nucleon. The equilibrium charge states extracted from the intersection of the lines of the two cross sections were promisingly higher than those in N2 gas by more than 10. Simple simulations of charge development along the stripper thickness were performed by assuming the measured cross sections. The simulation results show that about 1mg/cm2 of He gas should be accumulated to achieve a charge state higher than that of N2 gas, notwithstanding the difficulty in accumulation of this helium amount owing to its fast dispersion. However, we now believe that the following two

  10. Comparison of carbon stripper foils under operational conditions at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Spickerman, Thomas; Borden, Michael J; Macek, Robert J; Sugai, Isao

    2008-01-01

    At the 39{sup th} ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop HB 2006 and the 23{sup rd} INTDS World Conference we reported on first results of a test of nanocrystalline diamond foils developed at ORNL under operational conditions at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). We have continued these tests during the 2006 and 2007 run cycles and have been able to compare the diamond foils with the foils that are normally in use in PSR, which were originally developed by Sugai at KEK. We have gathered valuable information regarding foil lifetime, foil related beam losses and electron emission at the foil. Additional insight was gained under unusual beam conditions where the foiIs are subjected to higher temperatures. In the 2007 run cycle we also tested a Diamond-like-Carbon foil developed at TRIUMF. A Hybrid-Boron-Carbon foil, also developed by Sugai, is presently in use with the PSR production beam. We will summarize our experience with these different foil types.

  11. Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-19

    In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

  12. Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 μg/cm2 thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 μg/cm2 in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 μg/cm2 because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

  13. Performance characteristics of HBC stripper foils irradiated by 650 keV H- and high intensity DC ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, I.; Takagi, A.; Takeda, Y.; Irie, Y.; Oyaizu, M.; Kawakami, H.

    2014-06-01

    Newly developed Hybrid type Boron mixed Carbon (HBC) stripper foils are extensively used not only for the RCS of J-PARC and PSR of LANL, but also for other low energy, high intensity proton accelerators in medical applications. We had before tested HBC stripper foils with 3.2 MeV Ne+ and DC heavy ion beams. In order to further understand characteristics of HBC stripper foils, we measured the following parameters using the KEK-650 keV H- and light ion Cockcroft Walton DC accelerator: foil lifetime, thickness reduction, uniformity before and after beam irradiation, and foil deformation. Energy deposition in the present experiment was adjusted to a similar level to that of the HBC foil used in the RCS of J-PARC’. In addition, to understand the reason why the HBC stripper foils have high durability against high intensity beam irradiation, we investigated various physical properties, and compared them between the HBC foils and other tested carbon stripper foils. The sizes of the carbon particles in the HBC foil were found to play a vital role in the lifetime.

  14. SNS STRIPPER FOIL FAILURE MODES AND THEIR CURES

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Luck, Chris; Plum, Michael A; Shaw, Robert W; Ladd, Peter; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Kim, Sang-Ho; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom

    2010-01-01

    The diamond stripper foils in use at the Spallation Neutron Source worked successfully with no failures until May 3, 2009, when we started experiencing a rash of foil system failures after increasing the beam power to ~840 kW. The main contributors to the failures are thought to be 1) convoy electrons, stripped from the incoming H beam, that strike the foil bracket and may also reflect back from the electron catcher, and 2) vacuum breakdown from the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source SNS Diamond Stripper Foil Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Robert W; Plum, Michael A; Wilson, Leslie L; Feigerle, Charles S.; Borden, Michael J.; Irie, Y.; Sugai, I; Takagi, A

    2007-01-01

    Diamond stripping foils are under development for the SNS. Freestanding, flat 300 to 500 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} foils as large as 17 x 25 mm{sup 2} have been prepared. These nano-textured polycrystalline foils are grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition in a corrugated format to maintain their flatness. They are mechanically supported on a single edge by a residual portion of their silicon growth substrate; fine foil supporting wires are not required for diamond foils. Six foils were mounted on the SNS foil changer in early 2006 and have performed well in commissioning experiments at reduced operating power. A diamond foil was used during a recent experiment where 15 {micro}C of protons, approximately 64% of the design value, were stored in the ring. A few diamond foils have been tested at LANSCE/PSR, where one foil was in service for a period of five months (820 C of integrated injected charge) before it was replaced. Diamond foils have also been tested in Japan at KEK (640 keV H{sup -}) where their lifetimes slightly surpassed those of evaporated carbon foils, but fell short of those for Sugai's new hybrid boron carbon (HBC) foils.

  16. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  17. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  18. Development of carbon foils with a thickness of up to 600 μg/cm 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, Birgit; Hartmann, Willi; Hübner, Annett; Lommel, Bettina; Steiner, Jutta

    2010-02-01

    Carbon foils are applied as stripper for the heavy-ion accelerator as well as targets in different experiments at GSI. Carbon foils in a thickness range 5-100 μg/cm 2 are routinely produced with good homogeneity and excellent durability. Foils thicker than 100 μg/cm 2 used to be purchased. To overcome problems that emerged and intensified in some applications we started to advance our own carbon production towards higher thickness. We describe the production of carbon foils up to a thickness of 600 μg/cm 2, report on first tests as stripper foils and as targets, and discuss our future plans.

  19. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, M. A.; Cousineau, S. M.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S. H.; Ladd, P.; Luck, C. F.; Peters, C. C.; Polsky, Y.; Shaw, R. W.; Macek, R. J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.5 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H- charge-exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H- beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  20. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Oak Rdige Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Raparia, D.; Cousineau, S.M.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S.H.; Ladd, P.; Luck, C.F.; Peters, C.C.; Polsky, Y.; Shaw, R.W.; Macek, R.J.

    2011-03-28

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.5 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H{sup 0} excited states created during the H{sup -} charge-exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H{sup -} beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  1. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Plum, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the $H^0$ excited states created during the $H^-$ charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming $H^-$ beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  2. A new possibility of low-Z gas stripper for high power uranium beam acceleration alternative to C-foil

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, H.; Hershcovitch, A.; Fukunishi, N.; Goto, A.; Hasebe, H.; Imao, H.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Kuboki, H.; Yano, Y.

    2010-09-27

    The RIKEN accelerator complex started feeding the next-generation exotic beam facility RIBF (RadioIsotope Beam Factory) with heavy ion beams from 2007 after the successful commissioning at the end of 2006. Many elaborating improvements increased the intensity of the various heavy ion beams from 2007 to 2010. However, the available beam intensity especially of uranium beam is far below our goal of 1 p{micro}A (6 x 10{sup 12} particle/s). In order to achieve it, upgrade programs are well in progress, including constructions of a new 28 GHz superconducting ECR ion source and a new injector linac. However, the most serious problem of the charge stripper for uranium beam is still open although many elaborating R&D works for the problems. Equilibrium charge state in gas generally is much lower than that in carbon foil due to its density-effect. But gas stripper is free from the problems originated from its lifetime and uniformity in thickness. Such merits pushed us think about low-Z gas stripper to get higher equilibrium charge state even in gas. Electron loss and capture cross section of U ion beams in He gas were measured as a function of their charge state at 11, 14 and 15 MeV/u. The extracted equilibrium charge states from the cross point of the two lines of the cross sections were promisingly higher than those in N{sub 2} gas by more than 10. The plasma window is expected to be a key technology to solve the difficulty in accumulation of such thick as about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} of low-Z gas.

  3. Electric fields, electron production, and electron motion at the stripper foil in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1995-05-01

    The beam instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) most likely involves coupled oscillations between electrons and protons. For this instability to occur, there must be a strong source of electrons. Investigation of the various sources of electrons in the PSR had begun. Copious electron production is expected in the injection section because this section contains the stripper foil. This foil is mounted near the center of the beam pipe, and both circulating and injected protons pass through it, thus allowing ample opportunity for electron production. This paper discusses various mechanisms for electron production, beam-induced electric fields, and electron motion in the vicinity of the foil.

  4. Carbon foils for space plasma instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, F.; Ebert, R. W.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon foils have been successfully used for several decades in space plasma instruments to detect ions and neutral atoms. These instruments take advantage of two properties of the particle-foil interaction: charge conversion of neutral atoms and/or secondary electron emission. This interaction also creates several adverse effects for the projectile exiting the foil, such as angular scattering and energy straggling, which usually act to reduce the sensitivity and overall performance of an instrument. The magnitude of these effects mainly varies with the incident angle, energy, and mass of the incoming projectile and the foil thickness. In this paper, we describe these effects and the properties of the interaction. We also summarize results from recent studies with graphene foils, which can be made thinner than carbon foils due to their superior strength. Graphene foils may soon replace carbon foils in space plasma instruments and open new opportunities for space research in the future.

  5. Efficiency and lifetime of carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Kostin, M.; Tang, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Charge-exchange injection by means of carbon foils is a widely used method in accelerators. This paper discusses two critical issues concerning the use of carbon foils: efficiency and lifetime. An energy scaling of stripping efficiency was suggested and compared with measurements. Several factors that determine the foil lifetime--energy deposition, heating, stress and buckling--were studied by using the simulation codes MARS and ANSYS.

  6. Influence and efficiency of catalytic stripper in organic carbon removal from laboratory generated soot aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A catalytic stripper (CS) is a device used to remove the semi-volatile, typically organic carbon, fraction by passing raw or diluted exhaust over an oxidation catalyst heated to 300˚C. The oxidation catalyst used in this study is a commercially available diesel oxidation ca...

  7. Carbon nanotube foils for electron stripping in tandem accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reden, Karl; Zhang, Mei; Meigs, Martha; Sichel, Enid; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-08-01

    Carbon nanotube technology has rapidly advanced in recent years, making it possible to create meter-long, ∼4 cm wide films of multi-walled tubes of less than 3 μg/cm2 areal density in a bench top open-air procedure. The physical properties of individual carbon nanotubes have been well established, equaling or surpassing electrical and thermal conductivity and mechanical strength of most other materials, graphite in particular. The handling and transport of such nanotube films, dry-mounted self-supporting on metal frames with several cm2 of open area, is problem-free: the aerogel films having a volumetric density of about 1.5 mg/cm3 survived the trip by car and air from Dallas to Oak Ridge without blemish. In this paper we will present the results of first tests of these nanotube films as electron stripper media in a tandem accelerator. The tests were performed in the Model 25 URC tandem accelerator of the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We will discuss the performance of nanotube films in comparison with chemical vapor deposition and laser-ablated carbon foils.

  8. Relativistic Electron Transport Through Carbon Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, M.; Takasi, K.; Reinhold, C. O.; Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Komaki, K.; Azuma, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    We present a theoretical study of convoy electron emission resulting from transmission of relativistic 390 MeV/amu Ar17+ ions through carbon foils of various thicknesses. Our approach is based on a Langevin equation describing the random walk of the electron initially bound to the argon nucleus and later in the continuum. The calculated spectra of ejected electrons in the forward direction exhibit clear signatures of multiple scattering and are found to be in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  9. Three-dimensional thermal simulations of thin solid carbon foils for charge stripping of high current uranium ion beams at a proposed new heavy-ion linac at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Kim, V.; Schlitt, B.; Barth, W.; Groening, L.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Stöhlker, Th.; Vormann, H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an extensive numerical study of heating of thin solid carbon foils by 1.4 MeV/u uranium ion beams to explore the possibility of using such a target as a charge stripper at the proposed new Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy-ion linac. These simulations have been carried out using a sophisticated 3D computer code that accounts for physical phenomena that are important in this problem. A variety of beam and target parameters have been considered. The results suggest that within the considered parameter range, the target will be severely damaged by the beam. Thus, a carbon foil stripper does not seem to be a reliable option for the future Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy-ion linac, in particular, at FAIR design beam intensities.

  10. Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Tube Lined With Aluminum Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernet, Nelson J.; Kerr, Gregory K.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-fiber/epoxy composite tube lined with welded aluminum foil useful as part of lightweight heat pipe in which working fluid ammonia. Aluminum liner provides impermeability for vacuum seal, to contain ammonia in heat pipe, and to prevent flow of noncondensable gases into heat pipe. Similar composite-material tubes lined with foils also incorporated into radiators, single- and two-phase thermal buses, tanks for storage of cryogenic materials, and other plumbing required to be lightweight.

  11. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  12. Charge stripping of U238 ion beam by helium gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imao, H.; Okuno, H.; Kuboki, H.; Yokouchi, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Kamigaito, O.; Hasebe, H.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kase, M.; Yano, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a nondestructive, efficient electric-charge-stripping method is a key requirement for next-generation high-intensity heavy-ion accelerators such as the RIKEN Radioactive-Isotope Beam Factory. A charge stripper employing a low-Z gas is an important candidate applicable to high-intensity uranium beams for replacing carbon-foil strippers. In this study, a high-beam-transmission charge-stripping system employing helium gas for U238 beams injected at 10.8MeV/u was developed and demonstrated for the first time. The charge-state evolution measured using helium in a thickness range of 0.24-1.83mg/cm2 is compared with theoretical predictions. Energy attenuation and energy spread due to the helium stripper are also investigated.

  13. Electron Strippers for Compact Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Terai, K.; Tanaka, N.; Kisaki, M.; Tsugawa, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Takeno, T.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Wada, M.

    2011-09-26

    The next generation of compact tandem-type DD or DT neutron generators requires a robust electron stripper with high charge exchange efficiency. In this study, stripping foils of various types were tested, and the H{sup -} to H{sup +} conversion efficiency, endurance to the heat load, and durability were investigated in terms of suitability in the tandem-type neutron generator. In the experiments, a H{sup -} beam was accelerated to about 180 keV, passes through a stripping foil, and produces a mixed beam of H{sup -}, H{sup 0}, and H{sup +}. These ions were separated by an electric field, and detected by a movable Faraday cup to determine the conversion efficiency. The experimental results using thin foils of diamond-like carbon, gold, and carbon nano-tubes revealed issues on the robustness. As a new concept, a H{sup -} beam was injected onto a metal surface with an oblique angle, and reflected H{sup +} ions are detected. It was found that the conversion efficiency, H{sup +} fraction in the reflected particles, depends on the surface condition, with the maximum value of about 90%.

  14. Characterization and anticorrosion properties of carbon nanotubes directly synthesized on Ni foil using ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Namjo; Jwa, Eunjin; Kim, Chansoo; Hwang, Kyo Sik; Park, Soon-cheol; Jang, Moon Suk

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe the direct growth of carbon nanofilaments by the catalytic decomposition of ethanol on untreated polycrystalline Ni foil. Our work focuses on the effects of synthesis conditions on the growth of the carbon nanofilaments and their growth mechanism. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is more favorable on lower-purity Ni foil. The highest yield was obtained at approximately 750 °C. The average diameter of the CNTs was approximately 20-30 nm. Raman spectra revealed that the increase of H2 concentration in the carrier gas and synthesis temperature induced the growth of better-graphitized CNTs. Additionally, we investigated the anticorrosion properties of as-prepared products under simulated seawater conditions. The corrosion rate of the CNT/Ni foil system was maximally 50-60 times slower than that of the as-received Ni foil, indicating that the CNT coating may be a good candidate for corrosion inhibition.

  15. Mechanical design and vibro-acoustic testing of ultrathin carbon foils for a spacecraft instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, John D; Baca, Allen G

    2009-01-01

    IBEX-Hi is an electrostatic analyzer spacecraft instrument designed to measure the energy and flux distribution of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) emanating from the interaction zone between the Earth's solar system and the Milky Way galaxy. A key element to this electro-optic instrument is an array of fourteen carbon foils that are used to ionize the ENAs. The foils are comprised of an ultrathin (50-100 {angstrom} thick) layer of carbon suspended across the surface of an electroformed Nickel wire screen, which in turn is held taught by a metal frame holder. The electro formed orthogonal screen has square wire elements, 12.7 {micro}m thick, with a pitch of 131.1 wires/cm. Each foil holder has an open aperture approximately 5 cm by 2.5 cm. Designing and implementing foil holders with such a large surface area has not been attempted for spaceflight in the past and has proven to be extremely challenging. The delicate carbon foils are subject to fatigue failure from the large acoustic and vibration loads that they will be exposed to during launch of the spacecraft. This paper describes the evolution of the foil holder design from previous space instrument applications to a flight-like IBEX-Hi prototype. Vibro-acoustic qualification tests of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument and the resulting failure of several foils are summarized. This is followed by a discussion of iterative foil holder design modifications and laser vibrometer modal testing to support future fatigue failure analyses, along with additional acoustic testing of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument. The results of these design and testing activities are merged and the resulting flight-like foil holder assembly is proposed.

  16. Carbon/graphene foils: a critical subsystem for plasma instruments in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, F.; Ebert, R. W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bedworth, P.; Sinton, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thin carbon foils play a critical role in the time-of-flight (TOF) and charge conversion subsystems used in many of the plasma sensors developed for space. These instruments take advantage of properties of the particle-foil interaction: charge conversion of neutral atoms and/or secondary electron emission. This interaction also creates several adverse effects for the projectile exiting the foil, such as angular scattering and energy straggling, that usually act to reduce the sensitivity and overall performance of an instrument. The magnitude of these effects varies with the incident angle, energy, and mass of the incoming projectile and the foil thickness. The thinnest foils flown typically have a nominal thickness (as specified by the manufacturer) of ~0.5 - 1 µg cm-2. In this presentation, we will summarize several studies that have quantified the properties of ions exiting the thin carbon foil and discuss recent work on graphene foils, a promising new technology that may be capable of mitigating the undesirable effects associated with these interactions.

  17. Eutectic bonding of a Ti sputter coated, carbon aerogel wafer to a Ni foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Kanna, R.L.

    1994-06-01

    The formation of high energy density, storage devices is achievable using composite material systems. Alternate layering of carbon aerogel wafers and Ni foils with rnicroporous separators is a prospective composite for capacitor applications. An inherent problem exists to form a physical bond between Ni and the porous carbon wafer. The bonding process must be limited to temperatures less than 1000{degrees}C, at which point the aerogel begins to degrade. The advantage of a low temperature eutectic in the Ni-Ti alloy system solves this problem. Ti, a carbide former, is readily adherent as a sputter deposited thin film onto the carbon wafer. A vacuum bonding process is then used to join the Ni foil and Ti coating through eutectic phase formation. The parameters required for successfld bonding are described along with a structural characterization of the Ni foil-carbon aerogel wafer interface.

  18. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied. PMID:24245201

  19. Evaluating cotton stripper field performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton strippers are used primarily in the Southern High Plains due to the specific cotton varieties grown. Typically, cotton strippers cost about two-thirds the price of a cotton picker and range from one-half to one-fourth the horsepower. A cotton stripper also has a higher field and harvesting ef...

  20. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  1. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  2. Influence of oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber growth directly on nichrome foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Shinde, Sachin M.; Saufi Rosmi, Mohamad; Takahashi, Chisato; Papon, Remi; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D.; Ishii, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of various nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanostructures has been significantly explored as an alternative material for energy storage and metal-free catalytic applications. Here, we reveal a direct growth technique of N-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on flexible nichrome (NiCr) foil using melamine as a solid precursor. Highly reactive Cr plays a critical role in the nanofiber growth process on the metal alloy foil in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Oxidation of Cr occurs in the presence of oxygen impurities, where Ni nanoparticles are formed on the surface and assist the growth of nanofibers. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly show the transformation process of the NiCr foil surface with annealing in the presence of oxygen impurities. The structural change of NiCr foil assists one-dimensional (1D) CNF growth, rather than the lateral two-dimensional (2D) growth. The incorporation of distinctive graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen in the graphene lattice are observed in the synthesized nanofiber, owing to better nitrogen solubility. Our finding shows an effective approach for the synthesis of highly N-doped carbon nanostructures directly on Cr-based metal alloys for various applications.

  3. Influence of oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber growth directly on nichrome foil.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Shinde, Sachin M; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Takahashi, Chisato; Papon, Remi; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D; Ishii, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of various nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon nanostructures has been significantly explored as an alternative material for energy storage and metal-free catalytic applications. Here, we reveal a direct growth technique of N-doped carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on flexible nichrome (NiCr) foil using melamine as a solid precursor. Highly reactive Cr plays a critical role in the nanofiber growth process on the metal alloy foil in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process. Oxidation of Cr occurs in the presence of oxygen impurities, where Ni nanoparticles are formed on the surface and assist the growth of nanofibers. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly show the transformation process of the NiCr foil surface with annealing in the presence of oxygen impurities. The structural change of NiCr foil assists one-dimensional (1D) CNF growth, rather than the lateral two-dimensional (2D) growth. The incorporation of distinctive graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen in the graphene lattice are observed in the synthesized nanofiber, owing to better nitrogen solubility. Our finding shows an effective approach for the synthesis of highly N-doped carbon nanostructures directly on Cr-based metal alloys for various applications. PMID:27479000

  4. Charge-state resolved energy spectra of swift 22Ne ions passing through thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevic, A.; Bohlen, H. G.; von Oertzen, W.; Balashov, V. V.; Stysin, A. V.

    2006-04-01

    The method of coupled kinetic equations for a unified description of charge exchange and excitation of ions passing through matter is applied to calculate energy-loss spectra of swift 22Ne ions in carbon foils in the non-equilibrium regime. Good agreement is obtained for these calculations with the results of recent measurements, performed at the ISL-facility at the Hahn-Meitner Institute.

  5. The survivability of phyllosilicates and carbonates impacting Stardust Al foils: Facilitating the search for cometary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniakiewicz, Penelope J.; Ishii, Hope A.; Kearsley, Anton T.; Bradley, John P.; Price, Mark. C.; Burchell, Mark J.; Teslich, Nick; Cole, Mike J.

    2015-11-01

    Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples returned by NASA's Stardust mission provide an unequalled opportunity to study the contents of, and hence conditions and processes operating on, comets. They can potentially validate contentious interpretations of cometary infrared spectra and in situ mass spectrometry data: specifically the identification of phyllosilicates and carbonates. However, Wild 2 dust was collected via impact into capture media at ~6 km s-1, leading to uncertainty as to whether these minerals were captured intact, and, if subjected to alteration, whether they remain recognizable. We simulated Stardust Al foil capture conditions using a two-stage light-gas gun, and directly compared transmission electron microscope analyses of pre- and postimpact samples to investigate survivability of lizardite and cronstedtite (phyllosilicates) and calcite (carbonate). We find the phyllosilicates do not survive impact as intact crystalline materials but as moderately to highly vesiculated amorphous residues lining resultant impact craters, whose bulk cation to Si ratios remain close to that of the impacting grain. Closer inspection reveals variation in these elements on a submicron scale, where impact-induced melting accompanied by reducing conditions (due to the production of oxygen scavenging molten Al from the target foils) has resulted in the production of native silicon and Fe- and Fe-Si-rich phases. In contrast, large areas of crystalline calcite are preserved within the calcite residue, with smaller regions of vesiculated, Al-bearing calcic glass. Unambiguous identification of calcite impactors on Stardust Al foil is therefore possible, while phyllosilicate impactors may be inferred from vesiculated residues with appropriate bulk cation to Si ratios. Finally, we demonstrate that the characteristic textures and elemental distributions identifying phyllosilicates and carbonates by transmission electron microscopy can also be observed by state-of-the-art scanning electron

  6. X-ray Thomson scattering diagnostics of impact ionization in laser-driven carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, P.; Zastrau, U.; Toleikis, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the light-matter interaction of ultra-short, intense optical laser fields with thin carbon foils via particle-in-cell simulations. Especially, the influence of additional impact ionization on the density and temperature of the generated plasma and on the corresponding Thomson scattering spectra was investigated. We predict a pump-probe experiment at the free electron laser FLASH in order to verify the importance of this effect in the laser-matter interaction on ultra-short time scales and to check our predictions quantitatively.

  7. Dynamics of formation of K-hole fractions of sulfur projectiles inside a carbon foil

    SciTech Connect

    Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Chojnacki, S.; Kretschmer, W.

    2004-06-01

    The K{alpha} and K{beta} satellite and hypersatellite x-ray lines emitted by highly ionized sulfur projectiles passing with energies from 65 MeV up to 122 MeV through carbon foils of thickness of 15-210 {mu}g cm{sup -2} have been recorded using a Si(Li) detector. The additional hypersatellite Ky{sup h} peak proves that for such high energies of the sulfur ions very high subshells (4p and 5p) could be occupied. In order to study the dynamics of formation of K-shell vacancy fractions of sulfur projectiles passing through a carbon foil the dependence of sulfur K x-ray production cross sections on foil thickness has been examined separately for each recorded line using the three component model. For each projectile energy the values of K-shell hole production cross sections and K-shell electron capture cross sections (both common for all recorded x-ray lines in the case of each projectile energy) have been fitted, as well as the specific values (for each recorded x-ray line) of K-shell hole filling cross sections, which are directly connected with average lifetimes of appropriate states of sulfur ions. The obtained ''experimental'' values of K-shell vacancy production cross sections are much higher than the theoretical predictions. This suggests that apart from the ionization process the excitation from K shell into higher shells is responsible for a production of K-shell vacancies, which has been confirmed by recent classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations.

  8. From graphene to carbon nanotube: The oxygen effect on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials on nickel foil during CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Ching; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an oxygen-assisted ultralow-pressure (20 mTorr) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including multilayer graphene (MLG), double-layer graphene (DLG), single-layer graphene (SLG), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a Ni foil substrate. Oxygen is typically considered undesirable to synthesize carbon nanomaterials during the CVD process. However, our study provided evidence demonstrating that the growth of MLG, DLG, SLG, and CNTs can be maintained by adjusting the oxygen concentration during the CVD process; it also provided an easy way in controlling the layer of graphene. It was observed that oxygen played an important role in controlling the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials.

  9. Application of aluminum foil for ``strain sensing'' at fatigue damage evaluation of carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Sergey; Burkov, Mikhail; Lyubutin, Pavel; Altukhov, Yurii

    2014-01-01

    Surface layer of a loaded solid is an individual structural level of deformation that was shown numerously within concept of physical mesomechanics. This gives rise to advance in its deformation development under loading as well as allows using this phenomenon to sense the strain induced structure changes. It is of specific importance for composite materials since they are highly heterogeneous while estimating their mechanical state is a topical applied problem. Fatigue tests of carbon fiber composite specimens were carried out for cyclic deformation estimation with the use of strain sensors made of thin (80 μm) aluminum foil glued to the specimen's surface. The surface images were captured by DSLR camera mounted onto an optical microscope. Strain relief to form during cyclic loading was numerically estimated using different parameters: dispersion, mean square error, universal image quality index, fractal dimension and energy of Fourier spectrum. The results are discussed in view of deformation mismatch in thin foil and bulk specimen and are offered to be applied for the development of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach.

  10. Denser and taller carbon nanotube arrays on Cu foils useable as thermal interface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Nuri; Hasegawa, Kei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Noda, Suguru

    2015-09-01

    To achieve denser and taller carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on Cu foils, catalyst and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions were carefully engineered. CNTs were grown to ˜50 µm using Fe/TiN/Ta catalysts in which Ta and TiN acted as diffusion barriers for Cu and Ta, respectively. A tradeoff was found between the mass density and height of the CNT arrays, and CNT arrays with a mass density of 0.30 g cm-3 and height of 45 µm were achieved under optimized conditions. Thermal interface materials (TIMs) with CNT array/Cu foil/CNT array structures showed decreasing thermal resistance from 86 to 24 mm2 K W-1 with increasing CNT array mass densities from 0.07-0.08 to 0.19-0.26 g cm-3 for Cu and Al blocks with surfaces as rough as 20-30 µm. The best CNT/Cu/CNT TIMs showed thermal resistance values comparable to that of a typical indium sheet TIM.

  11. RTF glovebox stripper regeneration development

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, A.K.

    1992-10-31

    Currently, the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) glovebox stripper system consists of a catalytic oxidation front end where trace tritium which may escape from the primary tritium process into the glovebox nitrogen system is oxidized to tritiated water. The tritiated water, along with normal water which may leak into the glovebox from the surrounding atmosphere, is then captured on a zeolite bed. Eventually, the zeolite bed becomes saturated with water and must be regenerated to remain effective as a stripper. This is accomplished by heating the zeolite and evolving the trapped water which is then passed over an elevated temperature uranium bed. A waste minimization program was instituted to address this issue. The program has two parallel paths. One path investigates replacing the entire glovebox stripper system with a system of getters to scavenge trace tritium. This report concentrates on the second path, retaining the catalytic oxidation front end but replacing the uranium bed water cracking with alternative technologies.

  12. Charge state evolution of 2 MeV/u sulfur ion passing through thin carbon foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Sugai, H.; Nishio, K.

    2007-03-01

    Charge state distribution and its evolution for 2.0 MeV/u sulfur ions after passing through 0.9, 1.1, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.7, 6.9 and 10 μg/cm2 carbon foils have been extensively studied following our previous paper [M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 230 (2005) 63] to derive data for all the initial charge states between 6+ and 14+. Measured charge state distributions, their mean charge states and distribution widths do not flat off to establish equilibrium within the measured target thickness, and an overshooting feature of the distribution width for S6+ projectile is observed around 1 μg/cm2 in the target thickness. Two kinds of calculations, one based on rate equations accounting only for single charge transfer and the other applying ETACHA code, show good agreements with the experimental evolutions of mean charge and distribution width.

  13. Foil Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    Foil can be shaped into almost anything--it is the all-purpose material for children's art. Foil is a unique drawing surface. It reflects, distorts and plays with light and imagery as young artists draw over it. Foil permits quick impressions of a model or object to be sketched. Foil allows artists to track their drawing moves, seeing the action…

  14. Angular scattering of 1–50 keV ions through graphene and thin carbon foils: Potential applications for space plasma instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Robert W.; Allegrini, Frédéric; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Nicolaou, Georgios; Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 ; Bedworth, Peter; Sinton, Steve; Trattner, Karlheinz J.; Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303

    2014-03-15

    We present experimental results for the angular scattering of ∼1–50 keV H, He, C, O, N, Ne, and Ar ions transiting through graphene foils and compare them with scattering through nominal ∼0.5 μg cm{sup −2} carbon foils. Thin carbon foils play a critical role in time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers and energetic neutral atom sensors in space. These instruments take advantage of the charge exchange and secondary electron emission produced as ions or neutral atoms transit these foils. This interaction also produces angular scattering and energy straggling for the incident ion or neutral atom that acts to decrease the performance of a given instrument. Our results show that the angular scattering of ions through graphene is less pronounced than through the state-of-the-art 0.5 μg cm{sup −2} carbon foils used in space-based particle detectors. At energies less than 50 keV, the scattering angle half width at half maximum, ψ{sub 1/2}, for ∼3–5 atoms thick graphene is up to a factor of 3.5 smaller than for 0.5 μg cm{sup −2} (∼20 atoms thick) carbon foils. Thus, graphene foils have the potential to improve the performance of space-based plasma instruments for energies below ∼50 keV.

  15. High power cladding light strippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Alexandre; Faucher, Mathieu; Sévigny, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The ability to strip cladding light from double clad fiber (DCF) fibers is required for many different reasons, one example is to strip unwanted cladding light in fiber lasers and amplifiers. When removing residual pump light for example, this light is characterized by a large numerical aperture distribution and can reach power levels into the hundreds of watts. By locally changing the numerical aperture (N.A.) of the light to be stripped, it is possible to achieve significant attenuation even for the low N.A. rays such as escaped core modes in the same device. In order to test the power-handling capability of this device, one hundred watts of pump and signal light is launched from a tapered fusedbundle (TFB) 6+1x1 combiner into a high power-cladding stripper. In this case, the fiber used in the cladding stripper and the output fiber of the TFB was a 20/400 0.06/0.46 N.A. double clad fiber. Attenuation of over 20dB in the cladding was measured without signal loss. By spreading out the heat load generated by the unwanted light that is stripped, the package remained safely below the maximum operating temperature internally and externally. This is achieved by uniformly stripping the energy along the length of the fiber within the stripper. Different adhesive and heat sinking techniques are used to achieve this uniform removal of the light. This suggests that these cladding strippers can be used to strip hundreds of watts of light in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  16. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ray W. Sheldon, P.E.

    2001-11-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  17. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-10-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  18. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ray W. Sheldon

    2001-09-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (stripper gas water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  19. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-04-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  20. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-01-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  1. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2002-07-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  2. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-11-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program was intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research was to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by

  3. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominately water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  4. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-08-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research is to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately

  5. Electrochemical Stability of Carbon Fibers Compared to Metal Foils as Current Collectors for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Martha, Surendra K; Dudney, Nancy J; Kiggans, Jim; Nanda, Jagjit

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of highly conductive, fully-graphitic, semi-graphitic and non-graphitic carbon fibers were studied as the cathode current collectors of lithium batteries in standard electrolyte (alkyl carbonate/LiPF6) solutions and compared to bare aluminum (Al). All of these current collectors demonstrate a stable electrochemical behavior within the potential range of 2.5 to 5 V, due to passivation by surface films. Carbon fibers have comparable electrochemical stability of Al and may be used in place Al foil. While the carbon fibers do not contribute any irreversible or extra capacity when they are cycled below 4.5 V, for fully-graphitic and semi-graphitic fibers PF6 intercalation and deintercalation into the carbon fiber may occur when they are cycled at high potentials >4.5 V.

  6. Modified titanium foil's surface by high temperature carbon sintering method as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Dianlong; Zhu, Junsheng

    2014-12-01

    Titanium foil can be a type of ideal material as the substrate for bipolar lead-acid battery. However, it can't be directly used because it can be oxidized in the high voltage and strong oxidizing conditions. In this paper, we coat the titanium suboxide on the titanium foil surface by means of the high temperature carbon sintering method for the improvement of corrosion resistance of titanium metal and use it as the substrate to bipolar lead-acid battery to study its effect on the battery performances. Modified titanium foils are characterized by SEM, XRD, corrosion resistance test and electronic conductivity test. The electrochemical properties of the bipolar lead-acid battery are investigated by constant current charge/discharge method. The results demonstrate that the titanium foil carbon-sintered at 800 °C for 2 h has the most excellent chemical stability and electronic conductivity. Initial specific capacities of positive active material of bipolar lead-acid battery with modified titanium as the substrate at 0.25C, 0.5C, 1C and 2C discharge rate are 99.29 mAh g-1, 88.93 mAh g-1, 77.54 mAh g-1, and 65.41 mAh g-1. After 50 cycles, the specific capacity of positive active material at 0.5C is 81.36 mAh g-1 and after 100 cycles, the specific capacity at 1C is 61.92 mAh g-1.

  7. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  8. Liquid-film electron stripper

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Basil F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved liquid-film electron stripper particularly for high intensity heavy ion beams which produces constant regenerated, stable, free-standing liquid films having an adjustable thickness between 0.3 to 0.05 microns. The improved electron stripper is basically composed of at least one high speed, rotating disc with a very sharp, precision-like, ground edge on one said of the disc's periphery and with a highly polished, flat, radial surface adjacent the sharp edge. A fine stream of liquid, such as oil, impinges at a 90.degree. angle adjacent the disc's sharp outer edge. Film terminators, located at a selected distance from the disc perimeter are positioned approximately perpendicular to the film. The terminators support, shape, and stretch the film and are arranged to assist in the prevention of liquid droplet formation by directing the collected film to a reservoir below without breaking or interfering with the film. One embodiment utilizes two rotating discs and associated terminators, with the discs rotating so as to form films in opposite directions, and with the second disc being located down beam-line relative to the first disc.

  9. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  10. Investigation of the influence of surface composition on the charge state distribution of ∼keV hydrogen exiting thin carbon foils for space plasma instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, Frédéric; Coulter, Kent; Ebert, Robert W.; Nicolaou, Georgios; Poenitzsch, Vasiliki Zorbas

    2016-06-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging techniques have become a powerful tool for remotely probing plasma environments in space. ENA imagers cover energies from 0.01 keV up to a few MeV, and they use different techniques to cover such a broad energy range. Most of them convert the ENA into a charged particle to remove the converted ENA from the initial neutral direction. In the >∼0.2 keV/nuc to 10's of keV/nuc range, the conversion subsystem is usually an ultra-thin carbon foil. The sensitivity of ENA imagers based on charge conversion by carbon foils is driven by the ability of these foils to convert a neutral atom into an ion. The charge state distribution after the carbon foils is a strong function of the chemical and physical properties of the exit surface. In this study, we analyze the composition and structure of the surface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface is roughly 88% carbon and 12% oxygen, forming strong Csbnd O bonds. Annealing the foil lowers the oxygen content to about 9%. We coat the surface of the foils with Au, Al2O3, or MgO. We compare the exit charge state distributions of hydrogen prior to and post coatings. While no significant difference is observed in the exit charge state for the Au and Al2O3 coatings, there is a slight decrease of the positive fraction after MgO. The annealing of the foil has the benefit of reducing the angular scattering of hydrogen by a factor of ∼1.2. This is a significant improvement that has the potential to increase sensitivity of ENA imagers.

  11. Classroom Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pafford, William N.

    1970-01-01

    Aluminum foil, because of its characteristics, can be used for many elementary science activities: demonstrating Archimedes Principle, how to reduce cohesion, reflection and mirror effect, fuse action, condensation, friction, and as containers and barriers. (BR)

  12. 21 CFR 870.4875 - Intraluminal artery stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraluminal artery stripper. 870.4875 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4875 Intraluminal artery stripper. (a) Identification. An intraluminal artery stripper is a device used to perform an...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4875 - Intraluminal artery stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraluminal artery stripper. 870.4875 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4875 Intraluminal artery stripper. (a) Identification. An intraluminal artery stripper is a device used to perform an...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4875 - Intraluminal artery stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraluminal artery stripper. 870.4875 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4875 Intraluminal artery stripper. (a) Identification. An intraluminal artery stripper is a device used to perform an...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4875 - Intraluminal artery stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraluminal artery stripper. 870.4875 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4875 Intraluminal artery stripper. (a) Identification. An intraluminal artery stripper is a device used to perform an...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4875 - Intraluminal artery stripper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraluminal artery stripper. 870.4875 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4875 Intraluminal artery stripper. (a) Identification. An intraluminal artery stripper is a device used to perform an...

  17. Nonadditivity of convoy- and secondary-electron yields in the forward-electron emission from thin carbon foils under irradiation of fast carbon-cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, S.; Yoda, S.; Uchiyama, R.; Ishii, S.; Sasa, K.; Kaneko, T.; Kudo, H.

    2006-06-01

    We have measured energy spectra of secondary electrons produced by fast-carbon-cluster Cn+ (n=1-4) bombardment of thin carbon foils (3.2, 7.3, 11.9, and 20.3μg/cm2 ). For clusters of identical velocity, the convoy-electron yield is enhanced with increasing cluster size n , while the yield of secondary electrons is reduced. The yield of convoy electrons normalized to the number of injected atoms increases proportionally with cluster size n . This proportionality suggests that there is only a weak vicinage effect on the number of primary electrons scattered by the projectile. The vicinage effect observed in low-energy secondary electrons must therefore arise from either transport or transmission through the surface.

  18. Composite heat pipe development status: Development of lightweight prototype carbon-carbon heat pipe with integral fins and metal foil liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rovang, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    This report discusses development and proof-of-concept testing of a new lightweight carbon-carbon (C-C) space radiator heat pipe, carried out under the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Program. The prototype heat pipe, equipped with a niobium-zirconium foil liner, was filled with potassium working fluid and tested for 11 hours, including startup from ambient temperature with the working fluid initially in the frozen state to near 700 K condenser temperature. Steady-state heat pipe input power during testing was facility limited to about 300 watts. Post test inspection showed the heat pipe to be in excellent condition after eight thermal cycles from ambient to steady-state operating temperature. Utilization of other liner materials and working fluids would greatly extend the spectrum of service temperatures for this technology, with potential applications ranging from small spacecraft heat rejection to aircraft and terrestrial uses.

  19. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Boyer II; N.R. Fairchild, Jr.

    2000-04-01

    As part of Task 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Holditch-Reservoir Technologies has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden & Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. The industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwest Pennsylvania. The Task 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently working with the well data supplied by the industry partners to develop and validate these methodologies.

  20. Charge Strippers of Heavy Ions for High Intensity Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry A.; Marti, Felix

    2014-02-01

    Charge strippers play a critical role in many high intensity heavy ion accelerators. Here we present some history of recent stripper technology development and indicate the capabilities and limitations of the various approaches. The properties of solid, gaseous, and liquid strippers are covered. In particular, the limitations of solid strippers for high intensity, high atomic number heavy ions and the unique features of helium gas and liquid lithium for high intensity applications are covered. The need for high quality simulation of stripper performance as important input for system optimization is explained and examples of the current simulation codes are given.

  1. Evaluation of a cotton stripper yield monitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of a microwave sensor based yield monitor for measuring yield on a cotton stripper harvester and determine if the yield monitor can discriminate differences in yield to the same level as a reference scale system. A new yield monitor was instal...

  2. Sulphur hexafluoride as a stripper gas for tandem accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Child, D.; Fink, D.; Garton, D.; Levchenko, V.; Wilcken, K.

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated sulphur hexafluoride as a stripper gas in tandem accelerators by using the ANTARES accelerator system at ANSTO to measure charge state distributions for this gas. Results are reported at 4 MV terminal voltage for injected negative ions ranging from carbon to uranium oxide. For iodine and thorium the distributions are extended across a range of energies of practical use for accelerator mass spectrometry, ion beam analysis and other accelerator applications. Charge state distributions using sulphur hexafluoride are found to have mean charge states up to 1 charge unit higher than, and to be broader than, corresponding distributions for argon gas, except in the case of carbon beams. As a result, SF6 is shown to provide significantly higher yields for charge states of heavy ions above the mean charge state. We now perform actinide AMS measurements with 9% yield to the 5+ charge state, compared to 4-5% achieved previously with argon gas.

  3. Hydrogen in carbon foils made by DC glow discharge in ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, P.; Armour, D. G.; England, J. B. A.; Tait, N. R. S.; Tolfree, D. W. L.

    1983-08-01

    Thermal desorption has been studied from thin films of carbon prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene. The only gases released in significant quantities are hydrogen and methane. Both releases can be characterised by a continuum of activation energies but the methane release peaks at a lower temperature than that from hydrogen. The estimated total hydrogen release is compared with the hydrogen content determined by nuclear scattering experiments. Infra red studies suggest that the majority of CH 2 and CH 3 bonds can be ruptured by annealing at 300°C, a temperature well below the hydrogen and methane release rate maxima. Possible hydrogen bonding modes and desorption mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2 MeV/u sulfur ions passing through carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Sugai, H.; Nishio, K.

    2009-08-01

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions for 2.0 MeV/u sulfur ions after passing through carbon foils were studied experimentally. For the equilibrium charge-state distribution, incident ions of S 7+, S 12+, S 14+ and S 16+ were injected into carbon foils 54, 98, 150 and 200 μg/cm 2 in thickness, whereas for the non-equilibrium distributions, new measurements for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences were made through carbon foils of 0.9-10 μg/cm 2 to supplement our previous experiments regarding S 6+-S 14+ incidences [M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 230 (2005) 63; M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 256 (2007) 11]. Mean charge states for S 6+-S 14+ incidences as functions of the penetration thickness merged at 6.9 μg/cm 2 and changed together until reaching equilibrium at around 100 μg/cm 2, while those for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences took different paths to equilibrium, which was also the case for distribution widths for S 6+-S 14+, S 15+ and S 16+ incidences. An equilibrium mean charge state of 12.68 and distribution width of 1.11 were attained with equilibrium charge distributions between 6+ and 16+.

  5. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  6. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Boyer II; N.R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

    2001-01-01

    As part of Task 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden and Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Access/Excel based software and processing this well data to generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies. Preparation of the Final Technical report has begun.

  7. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Boyer II; N.R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

    2000-10-01

    As part of Task 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden and Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Access/Excel based software and processing this well data to generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies.

  8. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Boyer II; N.,R. Fairchild, Jr.; R.J. MacDonald P.G.

    2000-10-01

    As part of Phase 1 in the Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has partnered with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy (formerly Range Resources) and Belden & Blake Corporation, to develop methodologies for the identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided data for over 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently processing the production and well data and developing our new Access/Excel based software that incorporates our identification methodologies. Upon completion we will generate a list of potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies.

  9. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald

    2002-07-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are using the final version of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have processed all well information and identified potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, the final technical report is almost finished and a draft version has been reviewed by DOE.

  10. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions passing through carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Matsuda, M.; Okayasu, S.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Nishio, K.

    2015-07-01

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions were studied experimentally for 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions after passing through carbon foils. Measured charge-state distribution established the equilibrium at a target thickness of 10 μg/cm2 and this remained unchanged until a maximum target thickness of 98 μg/cm2. The equilibrium charge-state distribution, the equilibrium mean charge-state, and the width and skewness of the equilibrium distribution were compared with predictions using existing semi-empirical formulae as well as simulation results, including the ETACHA code. It was found that charge-state distributions, mean charge states, and distribution widths for C2+, C3+, and C4+ incident ions merged into quasi-equilibrium values at a target thickness of 5.7 μg/cm2 in the pre-equilibrium region and evolved simultaneously to the 'real equilibrium' values for all of the initial charge states, including C5+ and C6+ ions, as previously demonstrated for sulfur projectile ions at the same velocity (Imai et al., 2009). Two kinds of simulation, ETACHA and solution of rate equations taking only single electron transfers into account, were used, and both of them reproduced the measured charge evolution qualitatively. The quasi-equilibrium behavior could be reproduced with the ETACHA code, but not with solution of elementary rate equations.

  11. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  12. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  13. Proof of concept for a novel, binder-free and conducting carbon-free sulfur battery cathode: Composite electroformation of copper foil with incorporated polythiophene wrapped sulfur particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhardt, Claudia; Sörgel, Şeniz; Meinhard, Sandra; Sörgel, Timo

    2015-11-01

    This work, for the first time, presents sulfur electrodes for lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries produced by a newly developed single-step electroforming process, which allows simultaneous sulfur incorporation during electroformation of an electrically conducting electrode. This metal is used as binding matrix for the sulfur particles and thereby makes any binder and conducting carbon additives redundant. Furthermore, it serves by itself as the current collector, so that all functionalities (current collector, binder and electrical conductor towards sulfur) are fulfilled by the electroformed metal, while modified sulfur particles are directly incorporated (composite electroformation). In this way, the sulfur cathode can be produced in a single continuous step in form of a metal foil with adjustable thickness and sulfur loading. The process requires functionalization of sulfur to improve its wettability, incorporation homogeneity and volume which is provided by wrapping sulfur particles with polythiophene. Electroformed copper-sulfur composite foils are chosen as a first proof of the new concept. The achieved battery capacity, cycling stability and coulombic efficiency are presented. It is shown that the electroformed copper-sulfur composite foil operates very well as a battery cathode and a discharge capacity of over 400 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.5 C over 100 cycles is preserved.

  14. Lithium ion batteries made of electrodes with 99 wt% active materials and 1 wt% carbon nanotubes without binder or metal foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kei; Noda, Suguru

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we propose lithium ion batteries (LIBs) without binder or metal foils, based on a three-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT) current collector. Because metal foils occupy 20-30 wt% of conventional LIBs and the polymer binder has no electrical conductivity, replacing such non-capacitive materials is a valid approach for improving the energy and power density of LIBs. Adding only 1 wt% of few-wall CNTs to the active material enables flexible freestanding sheets to be fabricated by simple dispersion and filtration processes. Coin cell tests are conducted on full cells fabricated from a 99 wt% LiCoO2-1 wt% CNT cathode and 99 wt% graphite-1 wt% CNT anode. Discharge capacities of 353 and 306 mAh ggraphite-1 are obtained at charge-discharge rates of 37.2 and 372 mA ggraphite-1, respectively, with a capacity retention of 65% at the 500th cycle. The suitability of the 1 wt% CNT-based composite electrodes for practical scale devices is demonstrated with laminate cells containing 50 × 50 mm2 electrodes. Use of metal combs instead of metal foils enables charge-discharge operation of the laminate cell without considerable IR drop. Such electrodes will minimize the amount of metal and maximize the amount of active materials contained in LIBs.

  15. Foil Electron Multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Baldonado, Juan R.; Dors, Eric E.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2006-03-28

    An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident particles and a back side for transmitting secondary electrons that are produced from the incident particles transiting through the foil. The foil thickness enables the incident particles to travel through the foil and continue on to an anode or to a next foil in series with the first foil. The foil, or foils, and anode are contained within a supporting structure that is attached within an evacuated enclosure. An electrical power supply is connected to the foil, or foils, and the anode to provide an electrical field gradient effective to accelerate negatively charged incident particles and the generated secondary electrons through the foil, or foils, to the anode for collection.

  16. 43 CFR 3103.4-2 - Stripper well royalty reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stripper well royalty reductions. 3103.4-2 Section 3103.4-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING Fees, Rentals and Royalty § 3103.4-2 Stripper well...

  17. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2002-01-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process the information and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway. During this quarter, we have presented our project and discussed the software to numerous Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) workshops located in various regions of the United States.

  18. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  19. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: {lg_bullet} 2004 SWC Final Project Reports distribution; {lg_bullet} Exhibit and present at the Midcontinent Oil and Gas Prospect Fair, Great Bend, KS, September 12, 2006; {lg_bullet} Participate and showcase current and past projects at the 2006 Oklahoma Oil and Gas Trade Expo, Oklahoma City, OK, October 26, 2006; {lg_bullet} Finalize agenda and identify exhibitors for the northeastern US, Fall SWC Technical Transfer Workshop, Pittsburghhh, PA, November 9, 2006; {lg_bullet} Continue distribution of the public broadcast documentary, ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; {lg_bullet} Communications/outreach; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  20. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2003-04-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are using the final version of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel programs. During the last quarter of 2002, we received additional data for approximately 2,200 wells from Great Lakes. This information pertains to their Cooperstown field located in northwestern Pennsylvania. We recognized approximately 130 potential remediation candidates, and Great Lakes' personnel are currently reviewing this list for viable remediation. This field has provided a rigorous test of our software and analytical methods. We have processed all the information provided to us including the Cooperstown data. Great Lakes also provided supplemental data listing the original operator of the wells. We are also determining whether a statistically significant number of underperformers correlate to specific operators and/or their associated completion/stimulation methods. In addition, the DOE has reviewed a draft version of a final report.

  1. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2003-01-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are using the final version of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have received additional data from Great Lakes pertaining to a Cooperstown field that is expected to have numerous remediation candidates. This field will provide a rigorous test of out software and analytical methods. We have processed all the information provided to us before receiving the Cooperstown data and are currently analyzing the new data. Great Lakes will be providing supplemental data in the near future that will identify the original operator of the wells. This will prove valuable in determining whether a statistically significant number of underperformers are a result of specific operators and their associated completion/stimulation methods. We have identified potential candidate wells for Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, a draft version of a final report has been reviewed by DOE.

  2. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2005-04-27

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project were to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify underperforming wells with remediation potential. We enhanced and streamlined our software and are using it with Microsoft's{trademark} Access and Excel programs. During the last quarter of 2002, Great Lakes provided us with additional data for approximately 2,200 wells located in their Cooperstown field situated in northwestern Pennsylvania. We identified approximately 220 potential remediation candidates and Great Lakes personnel reviewed this list for viability and selected more than twenty five wells to be reworked. Approximately fifteen wells have been successfully reworked as of year-end 2004. This field provided a rigorous test of our software and analytical methods. We processed all the information provided to us including the Cooperstown data. Great Lakes also provided supplemental data listing the original operator of the wells.

  3. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2004-07-14

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify underperforming wells with remediation potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software and are using it with the latest versions of Microsoft's{trademark} Access and Excel programs. During the last quarter of 2002, Great Lakes provided us with additional data for approximately 2,200 wells located in their Cooperstown field situated in northwestern Pennsylvania. We identified approximately 130 potential remediation candidates, and Great Lakes personnel are currently reviewing this list for viable remediation. Within the last few weeks, a list of five candidates have been chosen for refract, in addition to two alternate wells. This field has provided a rigorous test of our software and analytical methods. We have processed all the information provided to us including the Cooperstown data. Great Lakes also provided supplemental data listing the original operator of the wells. We have determined whether a statistically significant number of underperformers correlate to specific operators and/or their associated completion/stimulation methods. In addition, the DOE has reviewed a draft version of a final report.

  4. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2003-04-04

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are using the final version of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel programs. During the last quarter of 2002, we received additional data for approximately 2,200 wells from Great Lakes. This information pertains to their Cooperstown field located in northwestern Pennsylvania. We recognized approximately 130 potential remediation candidates, and Great Lakes' personnel are currently reviewing this list for viable remediation. This field has provided a rigorous test of our software and analytical methods. We have processed all the information provided to us including the Cooperstown data. Great Lakes also provided supplemental data listing the original operator of the wells. We have determined whether a statistically significant number of underperformers correlate to specific operators and/or their associated completion/stimulation methods. In addition, the DOE has reviewed a draft version of a final report.

  5. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald

    2002-11-01

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger Data & Consulting Services (DCS) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are using the final version of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have received additional data from Great Lakes pertaining to a Cooperstown field that is expected to have numerous remediation candidates. This field will provide a rigorous test of out software and analytical methods. We have processed all the information available to us before the Cooperstown data was provided. We have identified potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, a draft version of a final report has been reviewed by DOE.

  6. Improved liquid-film electron stripper

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, B.F.

    1984-11-01

    An improved liquid-film electron stripper particularly for high intensity heavy ion beams which produces constant regenerated, stable, free-standing liquid films having an adjustable thickness between 0.3 to 0.05 microns. The improved electron stripper is basically composed of at least one high speed, rotating disc with a very sharp, precision-like, ground edge on one side of the disc's periphery and with highly polished, flat, radial surface adjacent the sharp edge. A fine stream of liquid, such as oil, impinges at a 90/sup 0/ angle adjacent the disc's sharp outer edge. Film terminators, located at a selected distance from the disc perimeter are positioned approximately perpendicular to the film. The terminators support, shape, and stretch the film and are arranged to assist in the prevention of liquid droplet formation by directing the collected film to a reservoir below without breaking or interfering with the film. One embodiment utilizes two rotating discs and associated terminators, with the discs rotating so as to form films in opposite directions, and with the second disc being located down beam-line relative to the first disc.

  7. U2 8 + -intensity record applying a H2 -gas stripper cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Heilmann, Manuel; Hollinger, Ralph; Jäger, Egon; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Krier, Joerg; Scharrer, Paul; Vormann, Hartmut; Yakushev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    To meet the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research science requirements higher beam intensity has to be achieved in the present GSI-accelerator complex. For this an advanced upgrade program for the UNILAC is ongoing. Stripping is a key technology for all heavy ion accelerators. For this an extensive research and development program was carried out to optimize for high brilliance heavy ion operation. After upgrade of the supersonic N2 -gas jet (2007), implementation of high current foil stripping (2011) and preliminary investigation of H2 -gas jet operation (2012), recently (2014) a new H2 -gas cell using a pulsed gas regime synchronized with arrival of the beam pulse has been developed. An obviously enhanced stripper gas density as well as a simultaneously reduced gas load for the pumping system result in an increased stripping efficiency, while the beam emittance remains the same. A new record intensity (7.8 emA) for 238U2 8 + beams at 1.4 MeV /u has been achieved applying the pulsed high density H2 stripper target to a high intensity 238U4 + beam from the VARIS ion source with a newly developed extraction system. The experimental results are presented in detail.

  8. Foil changing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Crist, Charles E.; Ives, Harry C.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Miller, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    A self-contained hermetically sealed foil changer for advancing a portion of foil web into a position normal to the path of a high energy particle beam. The path of the beam is defined generally by an aperture plate and cooperating axially movable barrel such that the barrel can be advanced toward the plate thereby positioning a portion of the foil across the beam path and sealing the foil between the barrel and the plate to form a membrane across said beam path. A spooling apparatus contained in the foil changer permits selectively advancing a fresh supply of foil across the beam path without breaking the foil changer seal.

  9. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. [Volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  10. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grinnell, J. J.; Klein, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  11. Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

    2005-04-01

    Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current

  12. What You Should Know about Using Paint Strippers

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaporate quickly, such as methylene chloride. However, electrical sparks from fans may increase the chance of flammable ... use flammable paint strippers near any source of sparks, flame, or high heat . Do not work near ...

  13. Hot-blade stripper for polyester insulation on FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.; Chambers, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Stripper incorporates a blade which is electrically heated to a controlled temperature. Heated blade softens and strips insulation from cable while paper ribbon removes insulation material and keeps blade clean for next operation.

  14. Absolute cross sections for binary-encounter electron ejection by 95-MeV/u {sup 36}Ar{sup 18+} penetrating carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, E.; Lanzano, G.; Aiello, S.; Arena, N.; Geraci, M.; Pagano, A.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.; Anzalone, A.; Giustolisi, F.

    2003-08-01

    Doubly differential electron velocity spectra induced by 95-MeV/u {sup 36}Ar{sup 18+} from thin carbon foils were measured at GANIL (Caen, France) by means of the ARGOS multidetector and the time-of-flight technique. The spectra allow us to determine absolute singly differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for binary encounter electron ejection from C targets are compared to a transport theory, which is based on the relativistic electron impact approximation for electron production and which accounts for angular deflection, energy loss, and also energy straggling of the transmitted electrons. For the thinnest targets, the measured peak width is in good agreement with experimental data obtained with a different detection technique. The theory underestimates the peak width but provides (within a factor of 2) the correct peak intensity. For the thickest target, even the peak shape is well reproduced by theory.

  15. Effects of pulse voltage and deposition time on the adhesion strength of graded metal/carbon films deposited on bendable stainless steel foils by hybrid cathodic arc - glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamesh, Mohammed Ibrahim; Boxman, R. L.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Kocer, Cenk; Hu, Tingwei; Zhang, Xuming; McKenzie, David R.; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-03-01

    Graded Ti/C composite films with carbon topcoats are prepared on bendable stainless steel foils by hybrid cathodic arc / glow discharge plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition to simulate cardiovascular stents. Strong adhesion between the stainless steel substrate and carbon topcoat is achieved due to the graded Ti/C interface and it is further improved by increasing the pulse voltage. Moreover, the graded coating is more hydrophilic than the stainless steel substrate.

  16. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  17. Glovebox stripper system tritium capture efficiency-literature review

    SciTech Connect

    James, D. W.; Poore, A. S.

    2015-09-28

    Glovebox Stripper Systems (GBSS) are intended to minimize tritium emissions from glovebox confinement systems in Tritium facilities. A question was raised to determine if an assumed 99% stripping (decontamination) efficiency in the design of a GBBS was appropriate. A literature review showed the stated 99% tritium capture efficiency used for design of the GBSS is reasonable. Four scenarios were indicated for GBSSs. These include release with a single or dual stage setup which utilizes either single-pass or recirculation for stripping purposes. Examples of single-pass as well as recirculation stripper systems are presented and reviewed in this document.

  18. Effect of stripper conditions on the yield and structure of coke derived from n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, A.A.H.; McGhee, B.J.; Snape, C.E.

    1996-10-01

    In FCC units, coked catalyst first passes to a steam stripper to remove residual volatiles before being transferred to the regenerator. Entrained products which are symptomatic of incomplete stripping can contribute to the overall level of coke and increase its hydrogen content considerably. To determine how the yields and composition coke varies in FCC as a function of stripper conditions, tests have been conducted ill fluidised-bed reactor using n-hexadecane at 500{degrees}C, a commercial FCC catalyst with stripping times up to 120 min. Coke concentrates have been prepared by demineralisation with hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids. The inherently quantitative single pulse excitation {sup 13}C NMR technique has been used to derive the total, protonated and non-protonated aromatic carbon concentrations for the coke concentrates. Mass spectrometry las also used to characterise the cokes. The initial coke possesses considerable aliphatic character (carbon aromaticity of 0.80), but the removal of volatiles by stripping gives rise to increases in both aromaticity and aromatic ring size.

  19. Compliant Foil Seal Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret; Delgado, Irebert

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi) to develop a Compliant Foil Seal for use in gas turbine engines. MiTi was awarded phase I and phase II SBIR contracts to analyze, develop, and test foil seals. As part of the Phase II contract, MiTi delivered an 8.5 inch diameter foil seal to NASA GRC for testing. Today I will be presenting some results of testing the 8.5 inch foil seal at NASA.

  20. Vapor-phase polymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on commercial carbon coated aluminum foil as enhanced electrodes for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Linyue; Skorenko, Kenneth H.; Faucett, Austin C.; Boyer, Steven M.; Liu, Jian; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M.; Bernier, William E.; Jones, Wayne E.

    2015-11-01

    Laminar composite electrodes are prepared for application in supercapacitors using a catalyzed vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) on the surface of commercial carbon coated aluminum foil. These highly electrically conducting polymer films provide for rapid and stable power storage per gram at room temperature. The chemical composition, surface morphology and electrical properties are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). A series of electrical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge (CD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are also used to evaluate electrical performance. The processing temperature of VPP shows a significant effect on PEDOT morphology, the degree of orientation and its electrical properties. The relatively high temperature leads to high specific area and large conductive domains of PEDOT layer which benefits the capacitive behavior greatly according to the data presented. Since the substrate is already highly conductive, the PEDOT based composite can be used as electrode materials directly without adding current collector. By this simple and efficient process, PEDOT based composites exhibit specific capacitance up to 134 F g-1 with the polymerization temperature of 110 °C.

  1. What Do You Really Know About Floor Finishes & Strippers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    An independent testing laboratory reveals the results of comparative studies done on vinyl flooring and the question of to wax or not to wax'' and which waxes work best with what flooring; and provides six evaluation tips on floor strippers. (EA)

  2. Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripper building for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east inside of the ingot mold stripper building for the 44" slab mill at a row of ingots. A row of ingot molds are pictured east on the left. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, 44" Slab Mill, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 43 CFR 3103.4-2 - Stripper well royalty reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... seven years after production on which the operator claims a royalty rate reduction for stripper well... assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102. The BLM may terminate a royalty rate reduction if it is... charges will be assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102....

  4. 43 CFR 3103.4-2 - Stripper well royalty reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... seven years after production on which the operator claims a royalty rate reduction for stripper well... assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102. The BLM may terminate a royalty rate reduction if it is... charges will be assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102....

  5. 43 CFR 3103.4-2 - Stripper well royalty reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... seven years after production on which the operator claims a royalty rate reduction for stripper well... assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102. The BLM may terminate a royalty rate reduction if it is... charges will be assessed in accordance with 30 CFR 218.102....

  6. Modeling of RTF Glove-Box and Stripper System

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-28

    The glove box-stripper system for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) has been modeled to determine its steady-state performance. To permit comparison, simulations of modified cases were compared with a standard or base case. This paper discusses tests conducted, results obtained and makes recommendations.

  7. 7 CFR 2902.39 - Floor strippers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... biobased content of at least 78 percent, which shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished...

  8. Foil Face Seal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  9. Surface treatment using metal foil liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, Ray

    1989-01-01

    A metal foil liner can be used to seal large area surfaces. Characteristics of the two-layer foil liner are discussed. Micrographs for foil-to-foil, foil-to-composite, visible seams, and hidden seams are examined.

  10. Beam-foil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Hass, M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of some applications of beam-foil spectroscopy is presented. Among the topics covered are lifetime and magnetic moment measurements, nuclear alignment, and polarized light production. (AIP)

  11. Foil changer for the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, C.R.; Kilborn, R.I.; Mouris, J.E.; Proulx, D.R.; Weaver, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    Capture of an injected beam in the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron requires that a carbon stripping foil be accurately placed in a dee to intercept the incoming beam. Foil radial position must be precisely adjustable and foils must be easily replaced. A foil changing apparatus has been designed, built and tested to meet these requirements. The main components are a supply magazine, a transport system, and unloading and loading mechanisms. The magazine is on top of the cyclotron. It holds 300 foils and can be isolated from machine vacuum for refilling. Each foil is mounted on a stainless steel frame. A stainless steel roller chain fitted with 33 copper sleeves (shrouds) carries foils, one per shroud, down a dee stem to the midplane. A 12-bit absolute optical shaft encoder senses foil position. To replace a foil a shroud is positioned at the top of the cyclotron, a foil is removed, and another is transferred from the magazine to the empty shroud. Three stepping motors and associated electronics provide mechanical drive and are interfaced with a CAMAC control system.

  12. Stripper system performance in the replacement tritium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site in the United States was designed and built to handle kilogram levels of tritium. The RTF was started up in January 1994. All the design objectives were achieved. To minimize tritium release to the environment, the tritium handling process is installed inside nitrogen-atmosphere gloveboxes. Any tritium that might leak from the process to the gloveboxes is recovered by stripper systems. The tritium concentration in the gloveboxes is normally maintained at below 0.1 Ci/m{sup 3}. During a large tritium leak from the process to the glovebox, the stripper system lowered the tritium concentration in the glovebox from about 8,000 Ci/m{sup 3} to about 100 Ci/m{sup 3} in one hour. After that the tritium concentration decreased very slowly. It required 5 days of stripping before the concentration was down to about 10 Ci/m{sup 3}.

  13. Stripper property evaluation through the use of value maps

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, S.

    1995-12-31

    Low-production stripper wells constitute a substantial fraction of total oil and gas wells in the US. Stripper properties are often sold by major companies to independent producers or by one independent to another. Many such properties can be evaluated by using the property decline rates, along with cost and price estimates, and the purchasers` targeted rates of return. Computer program programs can do the basic analyses, as well as assess the sensitivity of the property value to alternate assumptions. However, value maps can be constructed that provide almost instantaneous evaluation; these value maps also provide sensitivity assessments very quickly, and provide insights about property values that may not be apparent from computer runs. The paper explains the math behind a value map, its use, and insights gained from its use.

  14. Investigation of Nanodiamond and Silicon Carbide Foils Product for H-Stripping to Support Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gary; Griffin, James; Vispute, Rd; CIQM Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Diamond and silicon carbide (SiC) is an ideal material as an H- stripper foil for spallation neutron source (SNS) applications due to their high thermal conductivity, low molecular weight, and strength. Cubic silicon carbide grown on silicon is a material tension stress and the foil does not curl. Polycrystalline diamond is characterized by a high degree of internal stress, which causes the foil to curl when not supported by the substrate. the sic is grown using a RF CVD system. Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) was used to grow diamond on a silicon substrate. In both cases a 1.2 cm diameter window was etched in the silicon using a 1:1:3 solution of hydrofluoric, nitric, and acetic acids so that the diamond of SiC foil would be suspended while being supported on all sides by the silicon. Wax and or photoresist were used as masks to protect the outer silicon from etching. Raman spectroscopy verified the quality of the grown material. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the diamond foil originally against the substrate had an average roughness of <6.7 nm while the foil away from the substrate had an average roughness of 13.2 nm. The SiC foils had roughness less than 3 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed no cracks in the suspended foil. NSF-STC CIQM.

  15. Foil implosion studies on PEGASUS

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Begay, F.; Kruse, H.W.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Turchi, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    PEGASUS is a 1.5 MJ capacitor bank facility used in the Los Alamos Trailmaster foil implosion program. The experiments on this facility are to serve as a diagnostic testbed and foil physics benchmark for foil implosions with explosive generators as drivers. During the first year of operation, foil implosions have been driven by discharging the bank directly into a very thin Aluminum 2500 /angstrom/ thick free-standing foil without any pulse sharpening techniques; so-called ''direct drive.''These direct drive experiments have served as initial tests to optimize bank performance and foil implosion experimental techniques. The results to date are presented below. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  16. 30 CFR 210.155 - What reports must I submit for Federal onshore stripper oil properties?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Gas, and Geothermal Resources § 210.155 What reports must I submit for Federal onshore stripper oil... Management (BLM) under 43 CFR 3103.4-2 must submit Form MMS-4377, Stripper Royalty Rate Reduction Notification, under 43 CFR 3103.4-2(b)(3). (b) Reporting options. You may find Form MMS-4377 on our...

  17. Proso Millet Harvest: A Comparison of Conventional Harvest and Direct Harvest with a Stripper Header

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was conducted to determine if proso millet can be harvested with a stripper header. Stripper headers use extremely fast rotating metal teeth to rip the seed off the plant and leave the majority of residue standing in the field as opposed to cutting off the entire plant and running tha...

  18. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    DOEpatents

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  19. On a thermal analysis of a second stripper for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nolen, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-08-04

    This memo summarizes simple calculations and results of the thermal analysis on the second stripper to be used in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Both liquid (Sodium) and solid (Titanium and Vanadium) stripper concepts were considered. These calculations were intended to provide basic information to evaluate the feasibility of liquid (thick film) and solid (rotating wheel) second strippers. Nuclear physics calculations to estimate the volumetric heat generation in the stripper material were performed by 'LISE for Excel'. In the thermal calculations, the strippers were modeled as a thin 2D plate with uniform heat generation within the beam spot. Then, temperature distributions were computed by assuming that the heat spreads conductively in the plate in radial direction without radiative heat losses to surroundings.

  20. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  1. Compliant Foil Seal Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret; Delgado, Irebert

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature testing of an 8.5 inch diameter foil seal was conducted in the High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The seal was operated at speeds up to 30,000 rpm and pressure differentials up to 75 psid. Seal leakage and power loss data will be presented and compared to brush seal performance. The failure of the seal and rotor coating at 30,000 rpm and 15 psid will be presented and future development needs discussed.

  2. Submicron, unbacked, shaped metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    A method was developed to produce unbacked, shaped metal foils in sub-micron thicknesses. This process utilizes a temporary substrate consisting of a water-soluble polymer film as a base for the electron-beam deposition of the metal layer. After formation of the metal foil, the polymer is removed by immersion of the assembly in water. Unbacked metal-foil cylinders as thin as 0.17 ..mu..m with extremely smooth, wrinkle-free surfaces have been produced by this technique. Polyvinyl alcohol was an excellent substrate. Aluminum foils were produced.

  3. 40 CFR 435.60 - Applicability; description of the stripper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Stripper... in the oil and gas extraction industry. ... of crude oil and which are operating at the maximum feasible rate of production and in...

  4. 40 CFR 435.60 - Applicability; description of the stripper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of crude oil and which are operating at the maximum feasible rate of production and in accordance... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Stripper... in the oil and gas extraction industry....

  5. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) The contract was signed on August 20, 2000. Little work has been performed other than preliminary planning to get the project underway.

  6. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-04-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: Continued coordinating the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok. Oneok plans on performing the operations early in 2003.

  7. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Continued coordinating the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok. Oneok plans on performing the operations early in 2003.

  8. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Began preparing final project report, less the field implementation component. (2) Coordinated the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok.

  9. Rhenium-Foil Witness Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical portion of wall of combustion chamber replaced with rhenium foil mounted on holder. Rhenium oxidizes without melting, indicating regions of excess oxidizer in combustion-chamber flow. Rhenium witness foils also useful in detecting excess oxygen and other oxidizers at temperatures between 2,000 and 3,600 degrees F in burner cores of advanced gas-turbine engines.

  10. Consequences of FOIL for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koban, Lori; Sisneros-Thiry, Simone

    2015-01-01

    FOIL is a well-known mnemonic that is used to find the product of two binomials. We conduct a large sample (n = 252) observational study of first-year college students and show that while the FOIL procedure leads to the accurate expansion of the product of two binomials for most students who apply it, only half of these students exhibit conceptual…

  11. Alternative stripper configurations for CO{sub 2} capture by aqueous amines

    SciTech Connect

    Oyenekan, B.A.; Rochelle, G.T.

    2007-12-15

    Aqueous absorption/stripping is a promising technology for the capture of CO{sub 2} from existing or new coal-fired power plants. Four new stripper configurations (matrix, internal exchange, flashing feed, and multipressure with split feed) have been evaluated with seven model solvents that approximate the thermodynamic and rate properties of 7m (30 wt %) monoethanolamine (MEA), potassium carbonate promoted bypiperazine (PZ), promoted MEA, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) promoted by PZ, and hindered amines. The results show that solvents with high heats of absorption (MEA, MEA/PZ) favor operation at normal pressure. The relative performance of the alternative configurations is matrix > internal exchange > multipressure with split feed > flashing feed. MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ are attractive alternatives to 7m MEA. The best solvent and process configuration, matrix with MDEA/PZ, offers 22 and 15% energy savings over the baseline and improved baseline, respectively,with stripping and compression to 10 MPa. The energy requirement for stripping and compression to 10 MPa is about 20% of the power output from a 500 MW power plant with 90% CO{sub 2} removal.

  12. Consequences of FOIL for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koban, Lori; Sisneros-Thiry, Simone

    2015-02-01

    FOIL is a well-known mnemonic that is used to find the product of two binomials. We conduct a large sample (n = 252) observational study of first-year college students and show that while the FOIL procedure leads to the accurate expansion of the product of two binomials for most students who apply it, only half of these students exhibit conceptual understanding of the procedure. We generalize this FOIL dichotomy and show that the ability to transfer a mathematical property from one context to a less familiar context is related to both procedural success and attitude towards math.

  13. Induction Bonding of Prepreg Tape and Titanium Foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Bernadette C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid structural laminates made of titanium foil and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite offer a potential for improved performance in aircraft structural applications. To obtain information needed for the automated fabrication of hybrid laminates, a series of bench scale tests were conducted of the magnetic induction bonding of titanium foil and thermoplastic prepreg tape. Foil and prepreg specimens were placed in the gap of a toroid magnet mounted in a bench press. Several magnet power supplies were used to study power at levels from 0.5 to 1.75 kW and frequencies from 50 to 120 kHz. Sol-gel surface-treated titanium foil, 0.0125 cm thick, and PIXA/IM7 prepreg tape were used in several lay-up configurations. Data were obtained on wedge peel bond strength, heating rate, and temperature ramp over a range of magnet power levels and frequencies at different "power-on" times for several magnet gap dimensions. These data will be utilized in assessing the potential for automated processing. Peel strengths of foil-tape bonds depended on the maximum temperature reached during heating and on the applied pressure. Maximum peel strengths were achieved at 1.25kW and 8OkHz. Induction heating of the foil appears to be capable of good bonding up to 10 plies of tape. Heat transfer calculations indicate that a 20-40 C temperature difference exists across the tape thickness during heat-up.

  14. Laser surface texturization for high power cladding light stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisset, Michael; Lebrun, Léo.; Faucon, Marc; Kling, Rainer; Boullet, Johan; Aguergaray, Claude

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated herein a new type of cladding light strippers suitable for high power systems. By precisely micro-machining the surface of the fiber we create CLS with efficiencies as high as 97 % for large NA, multi-mode, cladding light (NA = 0.3), and 70 % for single-mode, low NA, light. The NA of the cladding light is reduced from 0.3 down to 0.08. The CLS exhibit a 1°C/stripped-Watt temperature elevation making them very suitable for high power applications. This fabrication method is simple and reliable. We have tested different texturization geometries on several different fibers: 20/400 from Nufern, KAGOME, and LMA 10 and LMA 15 fibers (results not shown herein) and we observed good efficiencies and temperature elevation behavior for all of them. Finally, large scale production of CLS with this method is possible since the time necessary to prepare on CLS is very small, in the order of few seconds.

  15. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Type curve matching continued during the reporting period. (2) A second data collection trip to Tulsa was performed to gather information on the additional reservoirs to be included in the analysis. Created updated database

  16. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) The search for another field site was abandoned after discussion with DOE. There is a clear absence of willing industry partners to participate in this project. The greatest obstacle is having the necessary data to perform the

  17. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-08-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Compiled information and results of field activities that Oneok has conducted in relation to the project. Field activities have included performing six pressure transient tests, and implementing six workovers, four of which were

  18. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Finished preparing the final project report, less the field implementation component. Sent to DOE for review. (2) Continued coordinating the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok. Oneok postponed field

  19. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Continued to solicit industry research partners to provide test sites, including Patina Oil and Gas and EOG Resources, each of whom have previously worked with ARI on a similar projects funded by the Gas Technology Institute. Both

  20. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Completed both type curve and artificial neural network analysis of the field. Developed list of production enhancement candidates. (2) Made final presentation of results to Oneok in Tulsa (February 26). (3) Made presentations on

  1. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOEpatents

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Knighton, Gaven C.; Clark, Curtis R.

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  2. Lithium-6 foil neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.A.

    1982-12-21

    A neutron detection apparatus is provided which includes a selected number of flat surfaces of lithium-6 foil, and which further includes a gas mixture in contact with each of the flat surfaces for selectively reacting to charged particles emitted by or radiated from the lithium foil. A container is provided to seal the lithium foil and the gas mixture in a volume from which water vapor and atmospheric gases are excluded, the container having one or more walls which are transmissive to neutrons. Monitoring equipment in contact with the gas mixture detects reactions taking place in the gas mixture, and, in response to such reactions, provides notice of the flux of neutrons passing through the volume of the detector.

  3. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1980-04-01

    Solar absorber metal foils are discussed in terms of materials and basic processing science. Also included is the use of finished heavy sheet stock for direct fabrication of solar collector panels. Both the adhesives and bonding methods for foils and sheet are surveyed. Developmental and representative commercial foils are used as illustrative examples. As a result it was found that foils can compete economically with batch plating but are limited by adhesive temperature stability. Also absorber foils are very versatile and direct collector fabrication from heavy foils appears very promising.

  4. Foil dissociation of fast molecular ions into atomic excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Gay, T.J.; Brooks, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The intensity and polarizations of light emitted from atomic excited states of dissociated molecular ions were measured. The dissociations are induced when fast molecular ions (50 to 500 keV/amu) are transmitted through thin carbon foils. A calculation of multiple scattering and the Coulomb explosion gives the average internuclear separation of the projectile at the foil surface. Experimentally, the foil thickness is varied to give varying internuclear separations at the foil surface and observe the consequent variation in light yield and optical polarization. Using HeH/sup +/ projectiles, factors of 1 to 5 enhancements of the light yields from n = 3, /sup 1/ /sup 3/P,D states of He I and some He II and H I emissions were observed. The results can be explained in terms of molecular level crossings which provide mixings of the various final states during dissociation of the molecular ions at the exit surface. They suggest a short range surface interaction of the electron pick-up followed by a slow molecular dissociation. Alignment measurements confirm the essential features of the model. Observations of Lyman ..cap alpha.. emission after dissociation of H/sub 2//sup +/ amd H/sub 3//sup +/ show rapid variations in light yield for small internuclear separations at the foil surface.

  5. Picker vs. stripper harvesting in the Texas High Plains: Agronomic implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many changes have occurred during the last decade in the Texas High Plains which have resulted in increased cotton yields and improved fiber quality. The main factors associated with both higher lint yield and quality include a shift in varieties planted, with virtually no "storm-proof stripper type...

  6. Yields in stripper header vs conventional header in dryland cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in crop residue quality can impact the amount of soil water storage in semi-arid no-till systems of the West Central Great Plains. Using a stripper header as opposed to a conventional-reel type header to harvest small grains impacts the quality of the crop residue left in the field. Pr...

  7. NONPROCESS SOLVENT USE IN THE FURNITURE REFINISHING AND REPAIR INDUSTRY: EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRIPPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the feasibility of using alternatives to high volatile organic compound/hazardous air pollutant (VOC/HAP) solvent-based, chemical strippers that are currently used in the furniture repair and refinishing industry to remove both traditi...

  8. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2000-10-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. According to the original proposal, this fourth quarterly technical report was to deliver a procedure guide, a summary report, and a Society of Petroleum Engineers technical paper. However, James Engineering, Inc. was granted a six month, no cost extension to allow the required time to thoroughly investigate and prepare these portions of the study, therefore completion of the current deliverables has been re-scheduled. James Engineering, Inc. did present preliminary results of the study during a panel discussion on Stripper Gas Wells at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Eastern Regional Meeting held in Morgantown, West Virginia October 19, 2000. No cost to the study was incurred for the preliminary presentation.

  9. NONPROCESS SOLVENT USE IN THE FURNITURE REFINISHING AND REPAIR INDUSTRY: EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE CHEMICAL STRIPPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the feasibility of using alternatives to high volatile organic compound/hazardous air pollutant (VOC/HAP) solvent-based, chemical strippers that are currently used in the furniture repair and refinishing industry to remove both traditi...

  10. 30 CFR 1210.155 - What reports must I submit for Federal onshore stripper oil properties?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rate by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) under 43 CFR 3103.4-2 must submit Form MMS-4377, Stripper Royalty Rate Reduction Notification, under 43 CFR 3103.4-2(b)(3). (b) Reporting options. You may find Form... mail addressed to Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), P.O. Box 25165, MS 392B2,...

  11. Development of a high-capacity extractor cleaner for cotton strippers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton strippers have used extractor type cleaners for many years to remove large foreign material from harvested seed cotton. These machines are commonly referred to as "field cleaners" and are similar in design and operation to stick machines used in gins. The field cleaners used on modern cotton ...

  12. Proso Millet Yield and Residue Mass Following Direct Harvest with a Stripper-header

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) (PM) is an important crop for dryland agricultural rotations in the central Great Plains. The crop is traditionally swathed prior to combining to promote uniform drying of the panicle and to minimize seed shattering losses. Direct harvesting of PM with a stripper ...

  13. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  14. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building.

  15. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  16. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  17. Extended foil capacitor with radially spoked electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Foster, James C.

    1990-01-01

    An extended foil capacitor has a conductive disk electrically connected in oncrushing contact to the extended foil. A conductive paste is placed through spaces between radial spokes on the disk to electrically and mechanically connect the extended foil to the disk.

  18. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  19. Novel single stripper with side-draw to remove ammonia and sour gas simultaneously for coal-gasification wastewater treatment and the industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, D.C.; Yu, Z.J.; Chen, Y.; Qian, Y.

    2009-06-15

    A large amount of wastewater is produced in the Lurgi coal-gasification process with the complex compounds carbon dioxide, ammonia, phenol, etc., which cause a serious environmental problem. In this paper, a novel stripper operated at elevated pressure is designed to improve the pretreatment process. In this technology, two noticeable improvements were established. First, the carbon dioxide and ammonia were removed simultaneously in a single stripper where sour gas (mainly carbon dioxide) is removed from the tower top and the ammonia vapor is drawn from the side and recovered by partial condensation. Second, the ammonia is removed before the phenol recovery to reduce the pH value of the subsequent extraction units, so as the phenol removal performance of the extraction is greatly improved. To ensure the operational efficiency, some key operational parameters are analyzed and optimized though simulation. It is shown that when the top temperature is kept at 40 C and the weight ratio of the side draw to the feed is above 9%, the elevated pressures can ensure the removal efficiency of NH{sub 3} and carbon dioxide and the desired purified water as the bottom product of the unit is obtained. A real industrial application demonstrates the attractiveness of the new technique: it removes 99.9% CO{sub 2} and 99.6% ammonia, compared to known techniques which remove 66.5% and 94.4%, respectively. As a result, the pH value of the wastewater is reduced from above 9 to below 7. This ensures that the phenol removal ratio is above 93% in the following extraction units. The operating cost is lower than that of known techniques, and the operation is simplified.

  20. Development of thin foils for use in generating neutral particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, W.S.; Zevenbergen, L.A.; Adair, H.L.; Culpepper, C.A.; McCulla, W.H.; Nolan, T.A.; Hughes, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) was requested to prepare large-area, ultrathin aluminum and carbon foils for use in beam neutralization experiments. There were two major parts to this request. The first was to immediately provide a number of 5-cm-dia foils 5 to 20 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ thick for use in experiments at the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility and at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The second, longer-term request was to develop methods to prepare 25-cm x 25-cm, 10-..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ aluminum neutralizer foils. Both parts of the request have been successfully met.

  1. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Continued to solicit industry research partners to provide test sites. A Cooperative Research Agreement has been signed with Oneok, for a test site in the Mocane-Laverne field in the Anadarko basin (Oklahoma). The site consists of

  2. A Unique Method of Retention for Gum Stripper- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    T.S., Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    Successful restoration of partially edentulous situations, especially kennedy’s class-I, II &IV requires lot of contemporary and conventional treatment approaches. Semi precision attachments play a major role in retention of clinically challenging partially edentulous situation. Attachment retained partial dentures can be one of the successful treatment option in prosthdontics. This article presents a unique technique of retaining gum stripper using semi precision attachments. PMID:25654046

  3. Hydrodynamic and shock heating instabilities of liquid metal strippers for RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Ahmed

    2013-05-24

    Stripping of accelerated ions is a key problem for the design of RIA to obtain high efficiency. Thin liquid Lithium film flow is currently considered as stripper for RIA ion beams to obtain higher Z for following acceleration: in extreme case of Uranium from Z=29 to Z=60-70 (first stripper) and from Z=70 till full stripping Z=92 (second stripper). Ionization of ion occurs due to the interaction of the ion with electrons of target material (Lithium) with the loss of parts of the energy due to ionization, Q{sub U}, which is also accompanied with ionization energy losses, Q{sub Li} of the lithium. The resulting heat is so high that can be removed not by heat conduction but mainly by convection, i.e., flowing of liquid metal across beam spot area. The interaction of the beam with the liquid metal generates shock wave propagating along direction perpendicular to the beam as well as excites oscillations along beam direction. We studied the dynamics of these excited waves to determine conditions for film stability at the required velocities for heat removal. It will allow optimizing jet nozzle shapes and flow parameters to prevent film fragmentation and to ensure stable device operation.

  4. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the cases of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be research and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This fifth quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms developed during this quarter.

  5. Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

    2000-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This second quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop data collection forms of pertinent information to assist in analysis of problem wells. The report also describes the procedures to categorize individual well problems. Finally, the report summarizes the frequency of individual well problems.

  6. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This sixth quarter technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also further describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms further developed during this quarter.

  7. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-10-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This eight quarterly technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two to three additional wells will be selected for remediation for inclusion into the study. The results of the additional remediations will be included in the final report.

  8. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-12-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This final technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two additional wells were selected for remediation and included into the study. Furthermore, the remediation results of wells that were a part of the study group of wells are also described.

  9. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  10. Technical Development Path for Foil Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  11. Free Surface and Flapping Foil Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, Palaniswamy

    2014-11-01

    Flapping foils for station-keeping of a near-surface body in a current is analyzed using a finite-difference method based on boundary-fitted coordinates. The foils are hinge-connected to the aft of the body and subject to pitch oscillation. Results are obtained for a range of Strouhal number, Froude number, unsteady frequency parameter τ, Reynolds number and the depth of foil submergence. Results show that at low Strouhal number (St < 0 . 1) and sub-critical unsteady parameter τ < 0 . 25 , the flapping generates drag instead of thrust. At high Strouhal number and super-critical value of the unsteady parameter (τ > 0 . 25) flapping generates high thrust with low efficiency. Thrust and efficiency are found to decrease with decreasing submergence depth of the foil. At the critical τ = 0 . 25 and shallow submergence of the foil, the standing wave generated above the foil continues to grow until breaking; both the thrust and efficiency of the foil are reduced at the critical τ. The necessary conditions for optimal thrust generation by a flapping foil underneath the free surface are found to be (i) Strouhal number in the range from 0.25 to 0.35, (ii) unsteady parameter τ > 0 . 25 and (iii) the maximum angle of attack less than 15° for the flat-plate foil. Supported by the US Office of Naval Research through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC) Consortium of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  12. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  13. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  14. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Prepared various materials to describe the project for promotional purposes and to attract potential industry partners. Materials included slides for DOE's displays at the SPE Eastern Regional and Annual Technical Conference, and

  15. Foil bearing lubrication theory including compressibility effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Catalano, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented to determine the film thickness in a foil bearing. Using the Reynolds equation and including the compressibility effects of the gas, an equation was developed applicable to the film thickness in a foil bearing. The bearing was divided into three regions, namely, the entrance region, middle region and exit region. Solutions are obtained for the film thickness in each region.

  16. Chromic acid anodizing of aluminum foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H.

    1988-01-01

    The success of the Space Station graphite/epoxy truss structure depends on its ability to endure long-term exposure to the LEO environment, primarily the effects of atomic oxygen and the temperture cycling resulting from the 94 minute orbit. This report describes the development and evaluation of chromic acid anodized (CAA) aluminum foil as protective coatings for these composite tubes. Included are: development of solar absorptance and thermal emittance properties required of Al foil and development of CAA parameters to achieve these optical properties; developing techniques to CAA 25 ft lengths of Al foil; developing bonding processes for wrapping the Al foil to graphite/epoxy tubes; and atomic oxygen testing of the CAA Al foil. Two specifications were developed and are included in the report: Chromic Acid Anodizing of Aluminum Foil Process Specification and Bonding of Anodized Aluminum Foil to Graphite/Epoxy Tubes. Results show that CAA Al foil provides and excellent protective and thermal control coating for the Space Station truss structure.

  17. Nuclear Propulsion using Thin Foiled Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.

    1998-11-01

    A new way to produce plasma for nuclear propulsion is proposed. A thin foiled fuel can be used for converting fission energy to propulsion energy efficiently. The fission products coming out of the thin foil directly ionize the hydrogen molecules which are used for propulsion. Thus very small portion of fission energy deposited in the thin foil, and integrity of the thin foiled fuel can be maintained even in high nuclear power. Fuel material with large thermal fission cross-section is preferable to make thin foiled fuel and the heat deposition in the foil can be reduced. To get high power from the foiled fuel assembly, thermal neutrons which are created out from the assembly can be supplied, or the assembly itself can create the high intensity thermal neutrons by self-multiplication. A flexible design of a highly efficient nuclear propulsion system can be made. The thickness of the foil and the maintenance of the thermo-mechanical integrity can be determined from the fission cross-section and the slowing down power for fission products. The talk discusses the issues related to heat removal from the assembly.

  18. Barrier Foil Heating Simulations Using LASNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D

    2002-03-12

    It is necessary to place a barrier foil in front of the X-ray converter target to prevent the backstreaming ions. This research note presents the simulations of foil heating using the latest EOS tables. LASNEX simulations are carried out using both DARHT-II and ETA-II beam parameters. Results for all the foils studied here, using the DARHT-II beam parameters, show that the integrated line density along the axis at the end of the 4th pulse remains essentially unchanged even if the foils are heated by beams with relatively small beam spot sizes. The temperature can reach up to 3000 C on graphite foil but can only reach several hundred degree Celsius on Mylar foil. Simulations also show that ETA-II beam can create a ''burn-through'' hole on all the foils except graphite and diamond foils, which may require pre-heat. The threshold beam spot size required for hole formation will be compared with LASNEX simulation for the purpose of code verification.

  19. Hot foil transducer skin friction sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranas, T. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The device utilizes foil transducers with only one edge exposed to the fluid flow. The surfaces are polished producing a foil transducer that does not generate turbulence while sufficiently thick to carry the required electrical current for high temperature fluid flow. The assembly utilizes a precut layered metal sandwich with attached electrodes eliminating a need for welding and individual sensor calibration.

  20. A Preliminary Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2006-01-01

    Recent breakthrough improvements in foil gas bearing load capacity, high temperature tribological coatings and computer based modeling have enabled the development of increasingly larger and more advanced Oil-Free Turbomachinery systems. Successful integration of foil gas bearings into turbomachinery requires a step wise approach that includes conceptual design and feasibility studies, bearing testing, and rotor testing prior to full scale system level demonstrations. Unfortunately, the current level of understanding of foil gas bearings and especially their tribological behavior is often insufficient to avoid developmental problems thereby hampering commercialization of new applications. In this paper, a new approach loosely based upon accepted hydrodynamic theory, is developed which results in a "Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map" to guide the integration process. This performance map, which resembles a Stribeck curve for bearing friction, is useful in describing bearing operating regimes, performance safety margins, the effects of load on performance and limiting factors for foil gas bearings.

  1. S.1919: Federal Oil and Gas Stripper Well Preservation Act of 1998, introduced in the US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this bill is to provide for the energy security of the Nation through encouraging the production of domestic oil and gas resources from stripper wells on Federal lands, and for other purposes. The law would authorize reduction of royalty rates for stripper wells on federal lands and suspend minimum royalty and per acre rental fees.

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  3. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  4. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This seventh quarterly technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the methodology to analyze the group of wells where recent problems have occurred utilizing the data gathering forms. This report also describes the methodology to select the two wells with the greatest potential for increase and also having the most frequently occurring problem. Finally, this report describes the preliminary results of the remediation applied to the two wells selected. Two wells selected and analyzed from a twenty-four well study group indicated that their current abnormal production decline was attributable to fluid build-up in the wellbore. Subsequent remediation work of putting both wells on pump to reduce fluid build-up in the well bore decreased the flowing bottom hole pressure and increased gas production dramatically.

  5. Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

    2000-07-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This third quarterly technical report was to describe the data reduction and methodologies to develop decision trees, identify cost effective techniques to solve the most frequently experienced problems and then apply the methodology to a group of wells where recent problems have developed. Further, this third quarterly technical report was to describe the data reduction and methodologies to select the two wells with the greatest potential for increase and also having the most frequently occurring problem, and evaluate the results of the methodology and the implemented procedure. However, preparation and analysis of the decision trees is more complex than initially anticipated due to the combination of problems rather than identifiable individual problems. Therefore, this portion of the study is still in progress. We have requested and been granted verbal approval for a six month no cost extension to allow more time to thoroughly investigate this portion of the study. The delivery of the decision trees will be included in future technical reports. Work on the other tasks to be

  6. Assembly Methods for Etched Foil Regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Matthew P.

    2004-06-01

    Etched foil appears to offer substantial advantages over other regenerator materials, especially for annular regenerators. However, assembly of etched foil regenerators has been difficult because etching regenerator patterns in foil is most satisfactorily accomplished using pieces too small for a complete, spiral-wrapped regenerator. Two techniques have been developed to deal with that problem: For spiral-wrapped regenerators, a new technique for joining pieces of foil using tabs has been successfully employed. The joints are no thicker than the parent material. The tabs substantially fill the holes into which they are locked, virtually eliminating any undesired leak path through the regenerator. The holes constitute breaks in the conductive path through the regenerator. A patent is pending. An alternate method is to insert pieces of foil in a cylindrical housing one at a time. An inflatable bladder presses each newly-inserted piece of foil against the previous layer until both edges slip past each other and contact the previously-installed piece. When the bladder is deflated, the natural springiness of the foil causes the cut edges to seek the wall and meet each other in a butt joint. A patent on the method has been issued; a patent on the resulting regenerator is pending.

  7. Beam-single and beam-two-foil experimental facility to study physics of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A.A.; Ram, R.; Abhilash, S.R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Patnaik, J.K.; De, Sankar; Karn, R.K.; Nandi, T.

    2006-03-15

    A facility for lifetime measurement of metastable states in highly charged ions using the beam-foil technique with a single-foil and a two-foil target has been developed. In the two-foil technique, one foil moves with respect to the other and the option of varying the thickness of the fixed foil online has been implemented. A holder with multiple foils is used as a fixed target, and moved along x, y, and {theta}, the angle of rotation with respect to beam direction along the z axis. Using this facility, the He-like 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o} and Li-like 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5l/2}{sup o} titanium lifetimes have been measured and compared with earlier values. In addition to this, the processes which occur when excited states collide with carbon foils of different thicknesses have also been investigated. Preliminary results suggest the scope of studying intrashell transitions during ion-solid collision using this setup. In this article, the setup is described in detail and representative results are briefly discussed.

  8. Synthetic Graphene Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Copper Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting Fung; Shen, Tian; Cao, Helin; Jauregui, Luis A.; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Newell, David; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of graphene, a single layer of covalently bonded carbon atoms, has attracted intense interest. Initial studies using mechanically exfoliated graphene unveiled its remarkable electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. There has been a growing need and rapid development in large-area deposition of graphene film and its applications. Chemical vapor deposition on copper has emerged as one of the most promising methods in obtaining large-scale graphene films with quality comparable to exfoliated graphene. In this paper, we review the synthesis and characterizations of graphene grown on copper foil substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. We also discuss potential applications of such large-scale synthetic graphene.

  9. Reactive multilayer synthesis of hard ceramic foils and films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Holt, J.B.

    1996-02-13

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing hard ceramic materials such as carbides, borides and aluminides, particularly in the form of coatings provided on another material so as to improve the wear and abrasion performance of machine tools, for example. The method involves the sputter deposition of alternating layers of reactive metals with layers of carbon, boron, or aluminum and the subsequent reaction of the multilayered structure to produce a dense crystalline ceramic. The material can be coated on a substrate or formed as a foil which can be coiled as a tape for later use.

  10. Reactive multilayer synthesis of hard ceramic foils and films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Holt, Joseph B.

    1996-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hard ceramic materials such as carbides, borides nd aluminides, particularly in the form of coatings provided on another material so as to improve the wear and abrasion performance of machine tools, for example. The method involves the sputter deposition of alternating layers of reactive metals with layers of carbon, boron, or aluminum and the subsequent reaction of the multilayered structure to produce a dense crystalline ceramic. The material can be coated on a substrate or formed as a foil which can be coild as a tape for later use.

  11. Reactive multilayer synthesis of hard ceramic foils and films

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Holt, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Disclosed is method for synthesizing hard ceramic materials such as carbides, borides and aluminides, particularly in the form of coatings provided on another material so as to improve the wear and abrasion performance of machine tools, for example. Method involves the sputter deposition of alternating layers of reactive metals with layers of carbon, boron, or aluminum and the subsequent reaction of the multilayered structure to produce a dense crystalline ceramic. The material can be coated on a substrate or formed as a foil which can be coiled as a tape for later use.

  12. An overview of the Noncyanide Metal Stripper program conducted at Kelly Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, M.D.; Cowan, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Noncyanide Metal Stripper Program was a waste minimization effort aimed at identifying and testing suitable noncyanide stripping solutions that could replace the cyanide stripping solutions found in the United States Air Force (USAF) Air Logistics Centers (ALC). The program started with laboratory testing of commercial stripping solutions. The performance of these solutions was compared with the cyanide process solutions C-101 and C-106 targeted for replacement. Plate metal stripping rate, basis metal corrosion, and compatibility with masking materials and biodegradability were all used to determine the performance of each product. Those products that passed the acceptance criteria were field tested using 25 to 50-gallon solutions to determine optimum operating conditions, stripper maintenance requirements, and maximum solution loading and longevity. The program included investigating any adverse effects these new products might have on existing chemical and biological waste treatment processes. All cyanide stripping solutions at the San Antonio Air Logistics Command Center have been successfully replaced with commercial noncyanide products. Generally, these replacements were less toxic and generated less waste and had longer lifetimes than their cyanide counterparts.

  13. Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water

    SciTech Connect

    Pico, T., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

  14. Bonded Invar Clip Removal Using Foil Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T.; Tuttle, James G.

    2009-01-01

    A new process uses local heating and temperature monitoring to soften the adhesive under Invar clips enough that they can be removed without damaging the composite underneath or other nearby bonds. Two 1x1 in. (approx.2.5x2.5 cm), 10-W/sq in. (approx.1.6-W/sq cm), 80-ohm resistive foil Kapton foil heaters, with pressure-sensitive acrylic adhesive backing, are wired in parallel to a 50-V, 1-A limited power supply. At 1 A, 40 W are applied to the heater pair. The temperature is monitored in the clip radius and inside the tube, using a dual thermocouple readout. Several layers of aluminum foil are used to speed the heat up, allowing clips to be removed in less than five minutes. The very local heating via the foil heaters allows good access for clip removal and protects all underlying and adjacent materials.

  15. Application of foil bearings to helium turbocompressor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.Ming; Howarth, R.; Bernard, Geren; Theilacker, Jay C.; Soyars, William M.; /Fermilab

    2001-01-01

    Hydrodynamic gas-lubricated foil bearings are ideal for machinery that operates at high speed or in extreme-temperature environments. As motors and generators run at higher speeds with more torque capacity, the need for commonly available, robust, high-speed, low-loss foil bearings is clear. This paper presents an application example of the successful replacement of a tape-type bearing for a bump-type bearing in a helium turbocompressor. Both bearing types are described, as are the steps involved in design and fabrication of the bump bearing, and results of comparison tests between the original and replacement bearings. Methods to analyze bump-type foil bearings with commercially available software are reviewed to further emphasize the inherent simplicity of these bearings. By providing the engineering community with the understanding needed to successfully apply foil bearings, the authors hope that the benefits and true potential of this technology will finally be realized.

  16. 75 FR 61624 - Promotion of Development, Reduction of Royalty Rates for Stripper Well and Heavy Oil Properties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... CFR 3103.4-3). The BLM promulgated the latter two provisions in 1992 and 1996, respectively (57 FR 35973 (Aug. 11, 1992); 61 FR 4750 (Feb. 8, 1996)). A stripper well property, within the meaning of... properties (70 FR 42093 (July 21, 2005)). The BLM suspended and subsequently terminated the program for...

  17. Experimental evaluation of foil-supported resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1977-01-01

    A new type of resilient-pad gas thrust bearing was tested to determine the feasibility of the design. The bearing consists of carbon graphite pads mounted asymmetrically on foil beams. Two bearing configurations were tested at thrust loads from 27 to 80 newtons at speeds to 9000 rpm. The outside diameter of the bearing was 8.9 centimeters.

  18. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

    2003-08-01

    In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was

  19. Cryostat with Foil and MLI

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Peter K.F.; Gung, Chen-yu

    2005-10-06

    Induction cores are used to accelerate heavy ion beam array, which are built around the outer diameter of the cryostat housing the superconducting quadruple array. Compact cryostat is highly desirable to reduce the cost of the induction cores. Recent experiences in fabrication of a cryostat for single beam transport revealed that it is possible to reduce the spacing in the cryostat vacuum jacket by using low-emissivity thermal insulation material instead of conventional MLI. However, it is labor-intensive to install the new type of insulation as compared with using MLI. It is promising to build a cost-effective compact cryostat for quadruple magnet array for heavy ion beam array transport by using low-emissivity material combined with conventional MLI as radiation insulation. A matrix of insulation designs and tests will be performed as the feasibility study and for the selection of the optimal thermal insulation as the Phase I work. The selected mixed insulation will be used to build prototype compact cryostats in the Phase II project, which are aiming for housing quadruple doublet array. In this STTR phase I study, a small cryostat has been designed and built to perform calorimetric characterization of the heat load in a liquid helium vessel insulated with a vacuum layer with a nominal clearance of 3.5 mm. The vacuum clearance resembled that used in the warm-bore beam tube region in a prototype cryostat previously built for the heavy ion beam transport experiment. The vacuum clearance was geometrically restricted with a heater shell with the temperature controlled at near 300 K. Various combinations of radiation and thermal shields were installed in the tight vacuum clearance for heat load measurements. The measured heat loads are reported and compared with previous test result using a compact vacuum layer. Further developments of the thermal insulations used in the present study are discussed. The compact cryostat with foil and MLI insulation may be used in the

  20. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Gary T. Rochelle; Eric Chen; Babatunde Oyenekan; Andrew Sexton; Jason Davis; Marcus Hilliard; Amornvadee Veawab

    2006-09-30

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Ethylenediamine was detected in a degraded solution of MEA/PZ solution, suggesting that piperazine is subject to oxidation. Stripper modeling has demonstrated that vacuum strippers will be more energy efficient if constructed short and fat rather than tall and skinny. The matrix stripper has been identified as a configuration that will significantly reduce energy use. Extensive measurements of CO{sub 2} solubility in 7 m MEA at 40 and 60 C have confirmed the work by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 to 181 mpy in lean solutions of 6.2 m MEA/PZ as piperazine increases from 0 to 3.1 m.

  1. Air strippers and their emissions control at Superfund sites. Technical report, February-April 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Blaney, B.L.; Branscome, M.

    1988-08-01

    Air stripping, a traditional means of making slightly contaminated ground water potable, is being applied increasingly to more-severe groundwater pollution at remedial action sites. Concentrations of volatile and semivolatile compounds at such sites may reach hundreds of parts per million. As a result, several changes have resulted in air-stripping technology. New air stripping technologies are being employed to achieve very high (>99% removal of volatile compounds and to increase the removal of semivolatiles. New stripper designs are being investigated for compactness and mobility. In addition, emissions controls are being added because air-pollution impacts are larger. The paper discusses these trends and provides examples from ground-water cleanup at remedial-action sites in the United States.

  2. Status of Genesis Mo-Pt Foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.; Butterworth, A. L.; Caffee, M. W.; Clark, B.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Komura, K.; Westphal, A. J.; Welten, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 8,000 sq cm of Mo-coated Pt foils were exposed to solar wind for 884 days by the Genesis mission. Solar wind ions were captured in the surface of the Mo. Our objective is the measurement of long-lived radionuclides, such as Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and Mn-53, and short-lived radionuclides, such as Na-22 and Mn-54, in the captured sample of solar wind. The expected flux of these nuclides in the solar wind is 100 atom/sq cm yr or less. The hard landing of the SRC (Sample Return Capsule) at UTTR (Utah Test and Training Range) has resulted in contaminated and crumpled foils. Here we present a status report and revised plan for processing the foils.

  3. Two High-Temperature Foil Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    An enlarged, high-temperature-compliant foil bearing has been built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of such bearings for use in aircraft gas turbine engines. Foil bearings are attractive for use in some machines in which (1) speeds of rotation, temperatures, or both exceed maximum allowable values for rolling-element bearings; (2) conventional lubricants decompose at high operating temperatures; and/or (3) it is necessary or desirable not to rely on conventional lubrication systems. In a foil bearing, the lubricant is the working fluid (e.g., air or a mixture of combustion gases) in the space between the journal and the shaft in the machine in which the bearing is installed.

  4. Method of high-density foil fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Blue, Craig A.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Ohriner, Evan K.

    2003-12-16

    A method for preparing flat foils having a high density includes the steps of mixing a powdered material with a binder to form a green sheet. The green sheet is exposed to a high intensity radiative source adapted to emit radiation of wavelengths corresponding to an absorption spectrum of the powdered material. The surface of the green sheet is heated while a lower sub-surface temperature is maintained. An apparatus for preparing a foil from a green sheet using a radiation source is also disclosed.

  5. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    DOEpatents

    Elpern, David G.; McCabe, Niall; Gee, Mark

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  6. Diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium foil

    SciTech Connect

    Schur, D.V.; Pishuk, V.K.; Adejev, V.M.; Zaginaichenko, S.Y.

    1998-12-31

    The authors of present research have used in experiments the atomic hydrogen and metallic foil 25--30 {micro}m thick. It has been supposed that these technical operations will permit excluding the influence of surface and diffusional processes on the rate of Me-H interaction. The series of experiments have been carried out and they confirm this assumption. It has been shown that hydrogenation reaction of zirconium foil in atomic hydrogen conforms to the topochemical model of volume segregation of interaction product, and the rate of its flow is independent of the surface processes and hydrogen diffusion in volume.

  7. Steel Foil Improves Performance Of Blasting Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Perry, Ronnie; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1990-01-01

    Blasting caps, which commonly include deep-drawn aluminum cups, give significantly higher initiation performance by application of steel foils on output faces. Steel closures 0.005 in. (0.13 mm) thick more effective than aluminum. Caps with directly bonded steel foil produce fragment velocities of 9,300 ft/s (2.8 km/s) with large craters and unpredictable patterns to such degree that no attempts made to initiate explosions. Useful in military and aerospace applications and in specialized industries as mining and exploration for oil.

  8. Thrust augmentation in tandem flapping foils by foil-wake interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Erik; Lauder, George

    2006-11-01

    Propulsion by pitching and heaving airfoils and hydrofoils has been a focus of much research in the field of biologically inspired propulsion. Organisms that use this sort of propulsion are self-propelled, so it is difficult to use standard experimental metrics such as thrust and drag to characterize performance. We have constructed a flapping foil robot mounted in a flume on air-bearings that allows for the determination of self-propelled speed as a metric of performance. We have used a pair of these robots to examine the impact of an upstream flapping foil on a downstream flapping foil as might apply to tandem fins of a swimming organism or in-line swimming of schooling organisms. Self-propelled speed and a force transducer confirmed significant thrust augmentation for particular foil-to-foil spacings, phase differences, and flapping frequencies. Flow visualization shows the mechanism to be related to the effective angle of attack of the downstream foil due to the structure of the wake of the upstream foil. This confirms recent computational work and the hypotheses by early investigators of fish fluid dynamics.

  9. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  10. Tight, Flat, Smooth, Ultrathin Metal Foils for Locating Synchrotron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Connie S.; Stoner, John O.

    2007-01-01

    It is often desired to locate a synchrotron x-ray beam precisely in space with minimal disturbance of its spatial profile and spectral content. This can be done by passing the beam through an ultrathin, flat, smooth metal foil having well-defined composition, preferably a single chemical element such as chromium, titanium or aluminum. Localized fluorescence of the foil at characteristic x-ray lines where the x-ray beam passes through the foil serves to locate the beam in two dimensions. Use of two such foils along the beam direction locates the x-ray beam spatially and identifies precisely its direction. The accuracy of determining these parameters depends in part upon high uniformity in the thickness of the foil(s), good planarity, and smoothness of the foil(s). In practice, several manufacturing steps to produce a foil must be carried out with precision. The foil must be produced on a smooth removable substrate in such a way that its thickness (or areal density) is as uniform as possible. The foil must be fastened to a support ring that maintains the foil's surface quality, and it must be then stretched onto a frame that produces the desired mirror flatness. These steps are illustrated and some of the parameters specifying the quality of the resulting foils are identified.

  11. Research proposal for development of an electron stripper using a thin liquid lithium film for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-06

    Hydrodynamic instability phenomena in a thin liquid lithium film, which has been proposed for the first stripper in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), were discussed. Since it was considered that film instability could significantly impair the feasibility of the liquid lithium film stripper concept, potential issues and research tasks in the RIA project due to these instability phenomena were raised. In order to investigate these instability phenomena, a research proposal plan was developed. In the theoretical part of this research proposal, a use of the linear stability theory was suggested. In the experimental part, it was pointed out that the concept of Reynolds number and Weber number scaling may allow conducting a preliminary experiment using inert simulants, hence reducing technical difficulty, complexity, and cost of the experiments. After confirming the thin film formation in the preliminary experiment using simulants, demonstration experiments using liquid lithium were proposed.

  12. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  13. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-18

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the fourteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC fall technology transfer meetings, and (3) recruit the SWC base membership.

  14. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-08-26

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) prepare presentation for the 16th Annual Oil Recovery Conference in Wichita, Kansas, (2) continued working on the SWC technical bulletin ''Keeping the Home Wells Flowing: Helping Small Independent Oil and Gas Producers Develop New Technology Solutions'', (3) continue efforts on the Public Broadcast of Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells, and (4) continue efforts to recruit SWC members.

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-01-04

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the SWC fall technology transfer meetings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and State College, Pennsylvania, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC spring proposal meeting, (3) release of the SWC Request-for-proposals (RFP), (4) revision of the SWC By-Laws, and (5) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members.

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-12-28

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) exhibit and participate in the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Regional Meeting in Charleston West Virginia, (2) finalize the organization of the two fall Technology Transfer meetings and (3) initiate the revision of the SWC By-laws.

  17. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-01-03

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) exhibit and participate in the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Regional Meeting in Charleston WV, (2) host the SWC fall technology transfer meeting in Oklahoma City, OK and finalize the organization of the State College, PA fall Technology Transfer meeting, and (3) initiate the revision of the SWC By-laws.

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-17

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period focused on organizing and hosting three fall technology transfer meetings that will be held in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania. In addition, work has started on developing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposals which will be released during the next reporting period. During this reporting period, the efforts were focused primarily on the organizing the SWC fall technology transfer meetings.

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-12-23

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the fifteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) hosting the SWC spring proposal meeting in Golden Colorado, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC fall technology transfer meetings, and (3) recruiting the SWC base membership.

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-02-17

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) host the State College, PA fall Technology Transfer meeting, (2) revision of the SWC By-laws, (3) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members, and (4) finalizing the plans for the Spring Proposal Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

  1. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-12-28

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the first quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) hosting the SWC spring proposal meeting in Golden Colorado, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC fall technology transfer meetings, and (3) recruiting the SWC base membership.

  2. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in State College, PA to review and select projects for SWC co-funding; (2) Participation in the 2006 PA CleanEnergy Expo Energy Theater to air the DVD on ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''; (3) New member additions; (4) Improving communications; and (5) Planning of the fall technology meetings.

  3. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-04-21

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Nomination and election of the Executive Council members for the 2006-07 term, (2) Finalize and release the 2006 Request for Proposals (RFP), (3) Invoice and recruit members, (4) Plan for the spring meeting, (5) Improving communication efforts, and (6) Continue distribution of the DVD entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''.

  4. Foil Panel Mirrors for Nonimaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuyper, D. J.; Castillo, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Large durable, lightweight mirrors made by bonding thick aluminum foil to honeycomb panels or other rigid, flat backings. Mirrors suitable for use as infrared shields, telescope doors, solar-furnance doors, advertising displays, or other reflectors that require low thermal emissivity and high specularity but do not require precise surface figure necessary for imaging.

  5. Thermal Sensitive Foils in Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek; Konecný, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a set of physics demonstration experiments where thermal sensitive foils are used for the detection of the two dimensional distribution of temperature. The method is used for the demonstration of thermal conductivity, temperature change in adiabatic processes, distribution of electromagnetic radiation in a microwave oven and…

  6. Hydrogen and Palladium Foil: Two Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In these two classroom demonstrations, students observe the reaction between H[subscript 2] gas and Pd foil. In the first demonstration, hydrogen and palladium combine within one minute at 1 atm and room temperature to yield the non-stoichiometric, interstitial hydride with formula close to the maximum known value, PdH[subscript 0.7]. In the…

  7. 6Li foil thermal neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Favalli, Andrea; Chung, Kiwhan; Macarthur, Duncan W

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design of a multilayer thermal neutron detector based on {sup 6}Li reactive foil and thin film plastic scintillators. The {sup 6}Li foils have about twice the intrinsic efficiency of {sup 10}B films and about four times higher light output due to a unique combination of high energy of reaction particles, low self absorption, and low ionization density of tritons. The design configuration provides for double sided readout of the lithium foil resulting in a doubling of the efficiency relative to a classical reactive film detector and generating a pulse height distribution with a valley between neutron and gamma signals similar to {sup 3}He tubes. The tens of microns thickness of plastic scintillator limits the energy deposited by gamma rays, which provides the necessary neutron/gamma discrimination. We used MCNPX to model a multilayer Li foil detector design and compared it with the standard HLNCC-II (18 {sup 3}He tubes operated at 4 atm). The preliminary results of the {sup 6}Li configuration show higher efficiency and one third of the die-away time. These properties, combined with the very short dead time of the plastic scintillator, offer the potential of a very high performance detector.

  8. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  9. Strong field electrodynamics of a thin foil

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Rykovanov, Sergey G.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2013-12-15

    Exact solutions describing the nonlinear electrodynamics of a thin double layer foil are presented. These solutions correspond to a broad range of problems of interest for the interaction of high intensity laser pulses with overdense plasmas, such as frequency upshifting, high order harmonic generation, and high energy ion acceleration.

  10. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…