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Sample records for carbon supported catalysts

  1. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  2. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  3. XPS studies of Pt catalysts supported on porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Deepak; Varma, Salil; Bharadwaj, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    Pt catalysts supported on porous carbon were prepared by hard templating route and used for HI decomposition reaction of Sulfur Iodine thermochemical cycle. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for oxidation state of platinum as well as nature of carbon present in the catalysts. It was found that platinum is present in metallic state and carbon is present in both sp2 and sp3 hybridization states. The catalysts were evaluated for their activity and stability for liquid phase HI decomposition reaction and it was observed that mesoporous carbon based catalysts were more active and stable under the reaction conditions.

  4. Carbon-supported and alumina-supported niobium sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Allali, N.; Marie, A.M.; Danot, M.

    1995-10-01

    Few studies deal with the properties of niobium sulfide as a hydrodesulfurization catalyst. In this paper, the preparation of carbon-supported niobium sulfide catalysts was optimized concerning (i) the nature of the soluble precursor, (ii) the drying process, and (iii) the sulfurizing treatment, which was always performed under atmospheric pressure but for different H{sub 2}S-based flows and reaction temperatures. The activities of the best samples prepared with niobium oxalate as the impregnation salt, drying at room temperature, and presulfurization with N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S at 400{degrees}C are superior to that of a supported MoS{sub 2} reference catalyst. Alumina-supported systems can be sulfurized only under more severe conditions (CS{sub 2} under pressure). After optimization of the sulfurization treatment (400{degrees}C, 10 h) the maximum activity obtained is significantly higher than that of a molybdenum sulfide reference catalyst. The catalytic activities of the various catalysts studied are related to their morphological and chemical characteristics using TPR and EXAFS measurements. The work illustrates the importance of the support and the sulfurization method on the genesis of a niobium sulfide active phase. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  6. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  7. Carbon nanotube synthesis with different support materials and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Fatih; Yuca, Neslihan; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Having remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of interest. Their mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical properties make CNTs suitable for several applications such as electronic devices, hydrogen storage, textile, drug delivery etc. CNTs have been synthesized by various methods, such as arc discharge, laser ablation and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). In comparison with the other techniques, CCVD is widely used as it offers a promising route for mass production. High capability of decomposing hydrocarbon formation is desired for the selected catalysts. Therefore, transition metals which are in the nanometer scale are the most effective catalysts. The common transition metals that are being used are Fe, Co, Ni and their binary alloys. The impregnation of the catalysts over the support material has a crucial importance for the CNT production. In this study, the influence of the support materials on the catalytic activity of metals was investigated. CNTs have been synthesized over alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2) and magnesium oxide (MgO) supported Fe, Co, Fe-Co catalysts. Catalyst - support material combinations have been investigated and optimum values for each were compared. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced at 800°C. The duration of synthesis was 30 minutes for all support materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  9. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  10. Optimization of carbon-supported platinum cathode catalysts for DMFC operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Brosha, E. L.; Zelenay, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe performance and optimization of carbon-supported cathode catalysts at low platinum loading. We find that at a loading below 0.6 mg cm-2 carbon-supported platinum outperforms platinum black as a DMFC cathode catalyst. A catalyst with a 1:1 volume ratio of the dry NafionTM to the electronically conducting phase (platinum plus carbon support) provides the best performance in oxygen reduction reaction. Thanks to improved catalyst utilization, carbon-supported catalysts with a platinum content varying from 40 wt% to 80 wt% deliver very good DMFC performance, even at relatively modest precious metal loadings investigated in this work.

  11. Function of titanium oxide coated on carbon nanotubes as support for platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qiling; Naidoo, Sivapregasen; Vaivars, Guntars

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the outcome of the synthesis of laboratory-made (HM) Pt monometallic, binary and ternary catalysts supported on TiO2/CNT (carbon nanotubes) and based on using the dry-mix method of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD). These multicomponent catalysts were investigated and compared with commercial Johnson Matthey (JM) catalysts for electrochemical applications.

  12. Laser Synthesis of Supported Catalysts for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Sherry, Leif J.; Hall, Lee J.; Schubert, Kathy (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Four methods of laser assisted catalyst generation for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis have been tested. These include pulsed laser transfer (PLT), photolytic deposition (PLD), photothermal deposition (PTD) and laser ablation deposition (LABD). Results from each method are compared based on CNT yield, morphology and structure. Under the conditions tested, the PLT was the easiest method to implement, required the least time and also yielded the best pattemation. The photolytic and photothermal methods required organometallics, extended processing time and partial vacuums. The latter two requirements also held for the ablation deposition approach. In addition to control of the substrate position, controlled deposition duration was necessary to achieve an active catalyst layer. Although all methods were tested on both metal and quartz substrates, only the quartz substrates proved to be inactive towards the deposited catalyst particles.

  13. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu / ZrO2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Israf Ud; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-01

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu - ZrO2/ CNF ) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO3). The CNF activated with 5% HNO3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m2/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  14. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  15. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  16. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  17. An investigation of the effect of carbon support on ruthenium/carbon catalysts for lactic acid and butanone hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel R; Iqbal, Sarwat; Kondrat, Simon A; Lari, Giacomo M; Miedziak, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-06-29

    A series of ruthenium catalysts supported on two different carbons were tested for the hydrogenation of lactic acid to 1,2-propanediol and butanone to 2-butanol. The properties of the carbon supports were investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and correlated with the properties of the ruthenium deposited onto the carbons by wet impregnation or sol-immobilisation. It was noted that the rate of butanone hydrogenation was highly dependent on the carbon support, while no noticeable difference in rates was observed between different catalysts for the hydrogenation of lactic acid. PMID:27079275

  18. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application. PMID:24658614

  19. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  20. Investigation of carbon supported Pd-Cu nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmenyar, Gamze; Akın, Ayşe Nilgün

    2014-03-01

    Carbon supported Pd and bimetallic Pd-Cu nanoparticles with different compositions are prepared by a modified polyol method and used as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and fuel cell experiments. The results show that the carbon supported Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts have much higher catalytic activity for the direct oxidation of BH4- than the carbon supported pure nanosized Pd catalyst, especially the Pd50Cu50/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all as-prepared catalysts, and the DBFC using Pd50Cu50/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst gives the best performance, and the maximum power density is 98 mW cm-2 at a current density of 223 mA cm-2 at 60 °C.

  1. Supporting PtRu catalysts on various types of carbon nanomaterials for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Masahiro; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Ue, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Kazuki; Muramoto, Hirokazu

    2013-04-01

    PtRu catalysts were supported on five types of carbon nanomaterials of various shapes, sizes, and graphitic properties and the catalyst supports evaluated. The carbon nanomaterial used included three types of nanoparticles: Arc Black (AcB), Vulcan XC-72 (Vulcan) and graphene oxide (GO), and two types of nanofibers: carbon nanocoil (CNC) and carbon nanotube (CNT). Pt and Ru were supported by the reduction method using sodium borohydride. The metal catalyst loading was confirmed by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and XRD revealed that the diameter of PtRu catalyst nanoparticles loaded on reduced GO (rGO) and AcB were ~2 nm and was the smallest among all the samples. Shifts in Pt (111) XRD peaks of CNC and CNT were larger than those of AcB, Vulcan, and rGO. These results suggest that the diameters of catalyst nanoparticles became smaller by loading on the carbon nanoparticles with a large surface area including rGO, AcB, and Vulcan. Loading onto the carbon nanofibers enhanced the degree of PtRu alloying.

  2. Platinum particle size and support effects in NO(x) mediated carbon oxidation over platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villani, Kenneth; Vermandel, Walter; Smets, Koen; Liang, Duoduo; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A

    2006-04-15

    Platinum metal was dispersed on microporous, mesoporous, and nonporous support materials including the zeolites Na-Y, Ba-Y, Ferrierite, ZSM-22, ETS-10, and AIPO-11, alumina, and titania. The oxidation of carbon black loosely mixed with catalyst powder was monitored gravimetrically in a gas stream containing nitric oxide, oxygen, and water. The carbon oxidation activity of the catalysts was found to be uniquely related to the Pt dispersion and little influenced by support type. The optimum dispersion is around 3-4% corresponding to relatively large Pt particle sizes of 20-40 nm. The carbon oxidation activity reflects the NO oxidation activity of the platinum catalyst, which reaches an optimum in the 20-40 nm Pt particle size range. The lowest carbon oxidation temperatures were achieved with platinum loaded ZSM-22 and AIPO-11 zeolite crystallites bearing platinum of optimum dispersion on their external surfaces. PMID:16683615

  3. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Israf Ud E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S. E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  4. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles.

  5. Carboxylic Group Embedded Carbon Balls as a New Supported Catalyst for Hydrogen Economic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Ankur

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic group functionalized carbon balls have been successfully synthesized by using a facile synthesis method and well characterized with different characterization techniques such as XPS, MAS NMR, SEM, ICP and N2 physi-sorption analysis. The synthesized material has been effectively utilized as novel support to immobilized ruthenium catalyst for hydrogen economic reactions. PMID:27455763

  6. Inkjet printing of carbon supported platinum 3-D catalyst layers for use in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, André D.; Kim, Edward Y.; Humes, Virgil P.; Kizuka, Jeremy; Thompson, Levi T.

    We present a method of using inkjet printing (IJP) to deposit catalyst materials onto gas diffusion layers (GDLs) that are made into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). Existing ink deposition methods such as spray painting or screen printing are not well suited for ultra low (<0.5 mg Pt cm -2) loadings. The IJP method can be used to deposit smaller volumes of water based catalyst ink solutions with picoliter precision provided the solution properties are compatible with the cartridge design. By optimizing the dispersion of the ink solution we have shown that this technique can be successfully used with catalysts supported on different carbon black (i.e. XC-72R, Monarch 700, Black Pearls 2000, etc.). Our ink jet printed MEAs with catalyst loadings of 0.020 mg Pt cm -2 have shown Pt utilizations in excess of 16,000 mW mg -1 Pt which is higher than our traditional screen printed MEAs (800 mW mg -1 Pt). As a further demonstration of IJP versatility, we present results of a graded distribution of Pt/C catalyst structure using standard Johnson Matthey (JM) catalyst. Compared to a continuous catalyst layer of JM Pt/C (20% Pt), the graded catalyst structure showed enhanced performance.

  7. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  8. Mesoporous Carbon Supported Rh Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Production of C2+ Alcohol from Syngas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Tae-Wan; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Kim, Jeong-Rang; Ha, Kyoung-Su

    2016-02-01

    Uniform rhodium nanoparticles (NP) with three different particle sizes (1.9, 2.4, and 3.6 nm) were prepared via a polyol method with rhodium (III) acetylacetonate, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with different concentrations of sodium citrate. The prepared Rh nanoparticles were impregnated into the ordered mesoporous carbon supports with two different pore structures (2D hexagonal and 3D cubic). The prepared Rh nanoparticle-supported ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) were introduced as catalysts for the CO hydrogenation of syngas to produce C2 higher alcohols. The characteristics of the Rh nanoparticle-supported ordered mesoporous carbons catalysts were analyzed through transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and N2 physisorption analysis. The catalytic tests of the catalyst were performed using a fixed-bed reactor. The results revealed that the catalysts exhibited the different catalytic activity and selectivity of higher alcohols, which could be attributed to the different OMC structures, the nanoparticle size of Rh, and aggregation of Rh nanoparticles during the reaction. PMID:27433718

  9. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction. PMID:26508075

  10. Production of biohydrogen by aqueous phase reforming of polyols over platinum catalysts supported on three-dimensionally bimodal mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Kim, Ho-Dong; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Chung, Young-Min; Park, Young-Kwon; Kim, Chul-Ung

    2012-04-01

    Now in 3D! Three-dimensionally bimodal carbons (3D-BMC) with mesopores of tunable size (controlled through the polymerization of the carbon precursor) are synthesized. After loading with platinum, the catalysts are used in aqueous phase reforming of polyols, and show superior performance in terms of carbon conversion, hydrogen yield, selectivity, and hydrogen production rate compared to platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon or two-dimensional CMK-3. PMID:22415941

  11. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells. PMID:26762466

  12. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells. PMID:26762466

  13. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-14

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizesmore » the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Here, owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells.« less

  14. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells.

  15. N-doped mesoporous carbons supported palladium catalysts prepared from chitosan/silica/palladium gel beads.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Minfeng; Wang, Yudong; Liu, Qi; Yuan, Xia; Feng, Ruokun; Yang, Zhen; Qi, Chenze

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a heterogeneous catalyst including palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (Pd@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts as palladium precursor, colloidal silica as template, and chitosan as carbon source. N2 sorption isotherm results show that the prepared Pd@N-C had a high BET surface area (640m(2)g(-1)) with large porosity. The prepared Pd@N-C is high nitrogen-rich as characterized with element analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization of the catalyst shows that the palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed on the nitrogen-containing mesoporous carbon. The Pd@N-C is high active and shows excellent stability as applied in Heck coupling reactions. This work supplies a successful method to prepare Pd heterogeneous catalysts with high performance from bulk biopolymer/Pd to high porous nitrogen-doped carbon supported palladium catalytic materials. PMID:27155234

  16. Effect of halide-modified model carbon supports on catalyst stability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kevin N; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Olson, Tim S; Dameron, Arrelaine A; O'Neill, Kevin; Christensen, Steven T; Dinh, Huyen N; Gennett, Thomas; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Modification of physiochemical and structural properties of carbon-based materials through targeted functionalization is a useful way to improve the properties and performance of such catalyst materials. This work explores the incorporation of dopants, including nitrogen, iodine, and fluorine, into the carbon structure of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its potential benefits on the stability of PtRu catalyst nanoparticles. Evaluation of the changes in the catalyst nanoparticle coverage and size as a function of implantation parameters reveals that carbon supports functionalized with a combination of nitrogen and fluorine provide the most beneficial interactions, resulting in suppressed particle coarsening and dissolution. Benefits of a carefully tuned support system modified with fluorine and nitrogen surpass those obtained with nitrogen (no fluorine) modification. Ion implantation of iodine into HOPG results in a consistent amount of structural damage to the carbon matrix, regardless of dose. For this modification, improvements in stability are similar to nitrogen modification; however, the benefit is only observed at higher dose conditions. This indicates that a mechanism different than the one associated with nitrogen may be responsible for the improved durability. PMID:23194033

  17. Soybean-derived mesoporous carbon as an effective catalyst support for electrooxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianbao; Wang, Hui; Ji, Shan; Linkov, Vladimir; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-02-01

    In this work, a low cost and nitrogen-containing carbon (CS) with mesoporous structure and high surface area is synthesized by carbonizing soybean. It is found that the prepared CS has excellent textural properties such as high specific surface areas and large pore diameters. TEM images show that the Pt nano-sized dendrites are well formed on the surface of CS. Compared to Pt supported on Vulcan carbon XC-72, electrochemical results show that Pt supported on CS possesses a higher electrocatalytic activity and better durability in methanol oxidation reaction, which are mainly attributed to the support effect of CS resulting in the unique morphology of Pt particles and high content of Pt(0). These results indicate that CS has great potential as a high-performance catalyst support for fuel cell electrocatalysis.

  18. Carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite-supported Pt catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingwei; Wei, Jiadi; Chai, Yuzheng; Zhang, Shuo

    2015-07-15

    Carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite (MWCNTs-SnO2) was obtained via the hydrolysis of SnCl4 in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent calcinations. And carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite-supported Pt catalysts (Pt/MWCNTs-SnO2) were prepared by in-situ liquid phase reduction using H2PtCl6 as a metal precursor. As-prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their catalytic performances were evaluated by chronoamperometry (CA) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Desirable catalytic performance for methanol electro-oxidation was observed with a reduced size and an improved dispersion of Pt catalysts on the MWCNTs-SnO2 nanocomposite. The calcination temperature of MWCNTs-SnO2 nanocomposite was a key factor for controlling the catalytic performance of Pt/MWCNTs-SnO2 catalysts. PMID:25801135

  19. A packed bed membrane reactor for production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed K; Raman, Abdul Aziz A; Sulaiman, Nik M N

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel continuous reactor has been developed to produce high quality methyl esters (biodiesel) from palm oil. A microporous TiO2/Al2O3 membrane was packed with potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon. The central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst amount and cross flow circulation velocity on the production of biodiesel in the packed bed membrane reactor. The highest conversion of palm oil to biodiesel in the reactor was obtained at 70 °C employing 157.04 g catalyst per unit volume of the reactor and 0.21 cm/s cross flow circulation velocity. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel were determined and compared with the standard specifications. High quality palm oil biodiesel was produced by combination of heterogeneous alkali transesterification and separation processes in the packed bed membrane reactor. PMID:20888219

  20. Vapor Phase Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene to Aniline Over Carbon Supported Ruthenium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Chakravartula S; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    A series of Ru/Carbon catalysts (0.5-6.0 wt%) were prepared by impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), CO-chemisorption, surface area and pore-size distribution measurements. The catalytic activities were evaluated for the vapor phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. The dispersion measured by CO-uptake values suggests that a decrease of dispersion is observed with increasing Ru loading on carbon support. These findings are well supported by the crystallite size measured from XRD measurements. XPS study reveals the formation of Ru0 after reduction at 573 K for 3 h. The catalysts exhibit high conversion/selectivity at 4.5 wt% Ru loading during hydrogenation reaction. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are related to the TOF during the hydrogenation reaction. Ru/C catalysts are found to show higher conversion/selectivities during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline. PMID:26373150

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported carbides catalysts for hydrous hydrazine decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnatsakanyan, Raman; Zhurnachyan, Alina R.; Matyshak, Valery A.; Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported Mo2C and WC nanomaterials was studied. Two different routes were utilized to prepare MoO3 (WO3) - C precursors that were then subjected to microwave irradiation in an inert atmosphere. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as irradiation time and gas environment, was investigated. The structure and formation mechanism of the carbide phases were explored. As-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited catalytic activity for hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) decomposition at 30-70 °C. It was shown that the catalyst activity significantly increases if microwave irradiation is applied during the decomposition process. Such conditions permit complete conversion of hydrazine to ammonia and nitrogen within minutes. This effect can be attributed to the unique nanostructure of the catalysts that includes microwave absorbing carbon and active carbide constituents.

  2. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong S.; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

  3. Enhanced activity of urea electrooxidation on nickel catalysts supported on tungsten carbides/carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Du, Tingting; Cheng, Jin; Xie, Xing; Yang, Bolun; Li, Mingtao

    2015-04-01

    Nickel nanoparticles with tungsten carbides supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, noted as Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst, is prepared through an impregnation method and used for the electrooxidation of urea in alkaline conditions. The micro-morphology and composition of the Ni-WC/MWCNT particles are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The electrooxidation activity and conductivity of the catalyst are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Characterization results indicate that the Ni nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the WC/MWCNT framework, and the Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst shows an improved activity for the urea electrooxidation. The current densities of Ni-WC/MWCNT are over 3 times and 15 times higher than those of the Ni-WC/C and Ni/C catalysts, respectively, and the electrochemical impedance also decreases markedly. The higher activity on Ni-WC/MWCNT is attributed to the support effect of MWCNT as well as the synergistic effect between Ni and WC.

  4. Environmentally Friendly Carbon-Preserving Recovery of Noble Metals From Supported Fuel Cell Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Latsuzbaia, R; Negro, E; Koper, G J M

    2015-06-01

    The dissolution of noble-metal catalysts under mild and carbon-preserving conditions offers the possibility of in situ regeneration of the catalyst nanoparticles in fuel cells or other applications. Here, we report on the complete dissolution of the fuel cell catalyst, platinum nanoparticles, under very mild conditions at room temperature in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M HCl by electrochemical potential cycling between 0.5-1.1 V at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1) . Dissolution rates as high as 22.5 μg cm(-2) per cycle were achieved, which ensured a relatively short dissolution timescale of 3-5 h for a Pt loading of 0.35 mg cm(-2) on carbon. The influence of chloride ions and oxygen in the electrolyte on the dissolution was investigated, and a dissolution mechanism is proposed on the basis of the experimental observations and available literature results. During the dissolution process, the corrosion of the carbon support was minimal, as observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). PMID:25959077

  5. Hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol over rhenium catalyst supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ung Gi; Park, Hai Woong; Lee, Joongwon; Hwang, Sunhwan; Kwak, Jimin; Yi, Jongheop; Song, In Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Copper-containing mesoporous carbon (Cu-MC) was prepared by a single-step surfactant-templating method. For comparison, copper-impregnated mesoporous carbon (Cu/MC) was also prepared by a surfactant-templating method and a subsequent impregnation method. Rhenium catalysts supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon and copper-impregnated mesoporous carbon (Re/Cu-MC and Re/Cu/MC, respectively) were then prepared by an incipient wetness method, and they were applied to the liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol (BDO). It was observed that copper in the Re/Cu-MC catalyst was well incorporated into carbon framework, resulting in higher surface area and larger pore volume than those of Re/Cu/MC catalyst. Therefore, Re/Cu-MC catalyst showed higher copper dispersion than Re/Cu/MC catalyst, although both catalysts retained the same amounts of copper and rhenium. In the liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO, Re/Cu-MC catalyst showed a better catalytic activity than Re/Cu/MC catalyst. Fine dispersion of copper in the Re/Cu-MC catalyst was responsible for its enhanced catalytic activity. PMID:24245272

  6. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunyu; Luo Zhiquan; Li Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao Zhen; Shi Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-06-15

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO{sub 2} and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO{sub 2}. CNT growth on SiO{sub 2} exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100 nm/min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1 {mu}m/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO{sub 2} and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2 {mu}m/min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process.

  7. Growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by using ceria as catalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojun; Peng, Fei; Yang, Feng; He, Xiaohui; Huang, Huixin; Luo, Da; Yang, Juan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Haichao; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Yan

    2014-02-12

    The growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) on flat substrates is essential for the application of SWNTs in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We developed a flexible strategy to selectively grow s-SWNTs on silicon substrates using a ceria-supported iron or cobalt catalysts. Ceria, which stores active oxygen, plays a crucial role in the selective growth process by inhibiting the formation of metallic SWNTs via oxidation. The so-produced ultralong s-SWNT arrays are immediately ready for building field effect transistors. PMID:24392872

  8. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1). PMID:20362394

  9. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  10. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst. PMID:27454194

  11. The influence of carbon support porosity on the activity of PtRu/Sibunit anode catalysts for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V.; Simonov, P. A.; Savinova, E. R.; Plaksin, G. V.; Cherepanova, S. V.; Kryukova, G. N.; Stimming, U.

    In this paper we analyse the promises of homemade carbon materials of Sibunit family prepared through pyrolysis of natural gases on carbon black surfaces as supports for the anode catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells. Specific surface area ( SBET) of the support is varied in the wide range from 6 to 415 m 2 g -1 and the implications on the electrocatalytic activity are scrutinized. Sibunit supported PtRu (1:1) catalysts are prepared via chemical route and the preparation conditions are adjusted in such a way that the particle size is constant within ±1 nm in order to separate the influence of support on the (i) catalyst preparation and (ii) fuel cell performance. Comparison of the metal surface area measured by gas phase CO chemisorption and electrochemical CO stripping indicates close to 100% utilisation of nanoparticle surfaces for catalysts supported on low (22-72 m 2 g -1) surface area Sibunit carbons. Mass activity and specific activity of PtRu anode catalysts change dramatically with SBET of the support, increasing with the decrease of the latter. 10%PtRu catalyst supported on Sibunit with specific surface area of 72 m 2 g -1 shows mass specific activity exceeding that of commercial 20%PtRu/Vulcan XC-72 by nearly a factor of 3.

  12. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media. PMID:27389659

  13. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  14. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2–C4 olefins, which are important building blocks for the chemical industry. Bulk iron catalysts (with promoters) were conventionally used, but these deactivate due to either phase transformation or carbon deposition resulting in disintegration of the catalyst particles. For supported iron catalysts, iron particle growth may result in loss of catalytic activity over time. In this work, the effects of promoters and particle size on the stability of supported iron nanoparticles (initial sizes of 3–9 nm) were investigated at industrially relevant conditions (340 °C, 20 bar, H2/CO = 1). Upon addition of sodium and sulfur promoters to iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers, initial catalytic activities were high, but substantial deactivation was observed over a period of 100 h. In situ Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that after 20 h time-on-stream, promoted catalysts attained 100% carbidization, whereas for unpromoted catalysts, this was around 25%. In situ carbon deposition studies were carried out using a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). No carbon laydown was detected for the unpromoted catalysts, whereas for promoted catalysts, carbon deposition occurred mainly over the first 4 h and thus did not play a pivotal role in deactivation over 100 h. Instead, the loss of catalytic activity coincided with the increase in Fe particle size to 20–50 nm, thereby supporting the proposal that the loss of active Fe surface area was the main cause of deactivation. PMID:27330847

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  16. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Branko N.; Subramanian, Nalini; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  17. Sol-gel synthesis of titanium oxide supported nickel catalysts for hydrogen and carbon production by methane decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Lua, Aik Chong

    2015-04-01

    TiO2-supported NiO hybrids have been synthesized by the sol-gel method and further processed into catalysts for hydrogen production by methane decomposition. The structures of the metal oxides and catalysts are characterized using field emission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption test. The catalytic performance of the catalysts is evaluated in terms of hydrogen yield rate, methane conversion and carbon yield. It is found that the TiO2-supported catalysts show better catalytic performance when compared with the unsupported catalyst, which is attributed to the uniform dispersion of ultrafine nickel particles as well as the appropriate metal-support interaction. The catalyst performance is dependent on the ratio of NiO and TiO2. The 1NiO-2TiO2 exhibits the highest carbon yield of 321.1 g C g-1 Ni at 500 °C. The structures of the produced carbons are characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It is found that the resulting filamentous carbon materials exhibit uniform diameters and various morphologies including hollow tube, platelet, bow-like and herringbone structures.

  18. Continuous preparation of carbon-nanotube-supported platinum catalysts in a flow reactor directly heated by electric current

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antonio Rodolfo; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Summary In this contribution we present for the first time a continuous process for the production of highly active Pt catalysts supported by carbon nanotubes by use of an electrically heated tubular reactor. The synthesized catalysts show a high degree of dispersion and narrow distributions of cluster sizes. In comparison to catalysts synthesized by the conventional oil-bath method a significantly higher electrocatalytic activity was reached, which can be attributed to the higher metal loading and smaller and more uniformly distributed Pt particles on the carbon support. Our approach introduces a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for fuel cell catalyst preparation in a flow reactor which could be used at a large scale. PMID:22043252

  19. Tip-growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on cobalt catalyst supported by alumina using alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistamam, Mohd Shahril Amin; Azam, Mohd Asyadi

    Metal oxide layer helps to support carbon nanotubes (CNTs) aligned perpendicular as well as preventing the tip-growth which takes place due to the strong adhesion force between the catalyst and metal oxide. However, in this work we discovered tip-growth of aligned CNTs with Co as catalyst on thermally oxidized Al/SiO2/Si substrate system using simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique.

  20. Effect of Pretreatment on Carbon-Supported Au/TiO2 Catalysts for Preferential Oxidation of CO

    SciTech Connect

    N Hammer; K Mathisen; T Zscherpe; D Chen; M Ronning

    2011-12-31

    The impact of thermal treatment at various preparation stages of carbon supported Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts prior to oxidation of CO in the presence and absence of hydrogen was studied. An increase in catalytic activity for thermally treated samples due to a more ordered structure of TiO{sub 2} was observed. A reversible deactivation of the catalysts occurred in the absence of hydrogen. However, the activity was restored at preferential CO oxidation conditions in presence of hydrogen.

  1. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  2. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  3. Graphitic Mesoporous Carbon as a Support of Promoted Rh Catalysts for Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Songhai; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Xiqing; Kidder, Michelle; Schwartz, Viviane; Golden, Melissa L; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, Deen

    2012-01-01

    Graphitic mesoporous carbon (GMC), prepared through high-temperature graphitization of soft-templated amorphous mesoporous carbon (AMC), was used as the support for Mn, Li, and Fe triple-promoted Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation to ethanol. The use of GMC results in C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH selectivity and formation rate comparable to nonporous SiO{sub 2} support along with a significant inhibition on the formation of undesired CH{sub 4} and light hydrocarbons at the expense of appreciable amounts of CO{sub 2} produced. The better catalytic performance of promoted-Rh/GMC than those supported on other carbon allotropes (AMC and non-porous graphitic carbon black) seems to be associated with the specific graphitic structure and mesoporosity of GMC. The surface modification of GMC by wet oxidation leads to considerable increases in C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH selectivity and formation rate. The modified GMC as a support shows substantially greater CO{sub 2}-free selectivity for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH than the SiO{sub 2}.

  4. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior for Pt catalysts supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Vulcan XC-72 in proton exchange membrane fuel cells under accelerated stress test was examined by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization technique. Pt catalyst supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes exhibited highly stable electrochemical surface area, oxygen reduction kinetics, and fuel cell performance at a highly oxidizing condition, indicating multiwalled carbon nanotubes show high corrosion resistance and strong interaction with Pt nanoparticles. The Tafel slope, ohmic resistances, and limiting current density determined were used to differentiate kinetic, ohmic, mass-transfer polarization losses from the actual polarization curve. Kinetic contribution to the total overpotential was larger throughout the stress test. However, the fraction of kinetic overpotential decreased and mass-transfer overpotential portion remained quite constant during accelerated stress test, whereas the fraction of ohmic overpotential primarily originating from severe proton transport limitation in the catalyst layer increased under the anodic potential hold.

  5. Electrochemical performance and durability of carbon supported Pt catalyst in contact with aqueous and polymeric proton conductors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Skou, Eivind

    2014-10-01

    Significant differences in catalyst performance and durability are often observed between the use of a liquid electrolyte (e.g., sulfuric acid), and a solid polymer electrolyte (e.g., Nafion). To understand this phenomenon, we studied the electrochemical behavior of a commercially available carbon supported platinum catalyst in four different electrode structures: catalyst powder (CP), catalyst ionomer electrode (CIE), half membrane electrode assembly (HMEA), and full membrane electrode assembly (FMEA) in both ex situ and in situ experiments under a simulated start/stop cycle. We found that the catalyst performance and stability are very much influenced by the presence of the Nafion ionomers. The proton conducting phase provided by the ionomer and the self-assembled electrode structure render the catalysts a higher utilization and better stability. This is probably due to an enhanced dispersion, an improved proton-catalyst interface, the restriction of catalyst particle aggregation, and the improved stability of the ionomer phase especially after the lamination. Therefore, an innovative electrode HMEA design for ex-situ catalyst characterization is proposed. The electrode structure is identical to the one used in a real fuel cell, where the protons transport takes place solely through solid state proton conducting phase. PMID:25216270

  6. Tungsten Carbide Modified High Surface Area Carbon as Fuel Cell Catalyst Support

    SciTech Connect

    M Shao; B Merzougui; K Shoemaker; L Stolar; L Protsailo; Z Mellinger; I Hsu; J Chen

    2011-12-31

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  7. Characterization of platinum catalyst supported on carbon nanoballs prepared by solution plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ichin, Yoshimichi; Mitamura, Koji; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2009-07-15

    In order to improve the energy-conversion efficiency in fuel cells, the authors loaded Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanoballs (CNBs) by using solution plasma processing (SPP) involving CNB and Pt ion with a protection group. In this study, we employed poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to prepare Pt nanoparticles supported on CNB (Pt/CNB) by the SPP, and the electrochemical properties as a catalyst was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The carbon nanoballs were prepared by thermal decomposition process of ethylene and hydrogen gases. Color of the solution changed from yellow to dark brown as synthesis time. This change indicates the improvement of dispersibility of CNB. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy images and elemental mapping images showed the Pt nanoparticles supported on CNB. A catalytic activity of the Pt/CNB in use of SDS was shown to be higher than the Pt/CNB prepared with PVP system. The SDS-containing Pt/CNB also showed the higher activity than that obtained by the conventional method.

  8. Potassium effects on activated-carbon-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2007-08-15

    The effect of potassium on the activity, selectivity, and distribution of products (hydrocarbons and oxygenates) was studied over iron catalysts supported on activated carbon (AC) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). This is part of a wider study on the incremental effects of components (including the support) of a multicomponent (Fe-Cu-Mo-K/AC) FTS catalyst. The range of potassium loading used was 0-2 wt%. A fixed-bed reactor was used under the conditions of 260-300{sup o}C, 300 psig, and 3 Nl/g cat/h, using syngas with a H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.9. Both FTS and water-gas shift activities increase after the addition of 0.9 wt % potassium, whereas an opposite trend is observed with the addition of 2 wt % potassium. This is shown to be the result of interaction between the decrease of both the activation energy (E{sub a}) and the pre-exponental factor (k{sub 0}) with the amount of potassium promoter added. Detectable hydrocarbons up to C{sub 34} and oxygenates up to C{sub 5} are formed on the Fe/AC catalysts with or without potassium. The potassium promoter significantly suppresses formation of methane and methanol and shifts selectivities to higher-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C{sub 5+}) and alcohols (C{sub 2}-C{sub 5}). Meanwhile, the potassium promoter changes paraffin and olefin distributions. At least for carbon numbers of 25 or less, increasing the K level to 0.9 wt % greatly decreases the amount of n-paraffins and internal olefins (i.e., those with the double bond in other than the terminal positions) and dramatically increases branched paraffins and 1-olefins, but a further increase in the K level shows little additional improvement. The addition of potassium changes the effect of temperature on the selectivity to oxygenates. In the absence of K, oxygenate selectivity decreases with temperature. However, when K is present, the selectivity is almost independent of the temperature. 71 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  10. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  11. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  12. What is below the support layer affects carbon nanotube growth: an iron catalyst reservoir yields taller nanotube carpets.

    PubMed

    Shawat, E; Mor, V; Oakes, L; Fleger, Y; Pint, C L; Nessim, G D

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate an approach to enhance the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by including a catalyst reservoir underneath the thin-film alumina catalyst underlayer. This reservoir led to enhanced CNT growth due to the migration of catalytic material from below the underlayer up to the surface through alumina pinholes during processing. This led to the formation of large Fe particles, which in turn influenced the morphology evolution of the catalytic iron surface layer through Ostwald ripening. With inclusion of this catalyst reservoir, we observed CNT growth up to 100% taller than that observed without the catalyst reservoir consistently across a wide range of annealing and growth durations. Imaging studies of catalyst layers both for different annealing times and for different alumina support layer thicknesses demonstrate that the surface exposure of metal from the reservoir leads to an active population of smaller catalyst particles upon annealing as opposed to a bimodal catalyst size distribution that appears without inclusion of a reservoir. Overall, the mechanism for growth enhancement we present here demonstrates a new route to engineering efficient catalyst structures to overcome the limitations of CNT growth processes. PMID:24323364

  13. A palladium-doped ceria@carbon core-sheath nanowire network: a promising catalyst support for alcohol electrooxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2015-08-01

    A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique interconnected one-dimensional core-sheath structure is revealed to facilitate immobilization of the metal catalysts, leading to the improved durability. This core-sheath nanowire network opens up a new strategy for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells.A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique

  14. One-step preparation of highly dispersed metal-supported catalysts by fluidized-bed MOCVD for carbon nanotube synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunbao; Zhu, Jesse

    2004-11-01

    A new technique of fluidized-bed metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (FB-MOCVD) is developed as a one-step method to prepare highly dispersed metal-supported catalysts for carbon nanotube synthesis. By using ultrafine powder of gamma-alumina (70 nm Sauter mean in size) as the support with Fe(CO)5 and Mo(CO)6 as the metal precursors, Fe/Al2O3, Mo/Al2O3 and Fe-Mo/Al2O3 catalysts have been prepared in an FB-MOCVD reactor. Compared with the conventional catalyst-preparation methods such as impregnation, ion exchange, co-precipitation and co-crystallization, the one-step FB-MOCVD technique is advantageous in many aspects. These include eliminating the solid-liquid separation and the subsequent operations of drying and high-temperature calcination/reduction, thus minimizing the aggregation or the crystalline size-growing problem for the supported metal particles caused by these operations. The metal-supported catalysts obtained by FB-MOCVD are characterized with various techniques including ICP-AES, SEM-EDX, XRD and nitrogen isothermal adsorption. Some catalysts are selected and used for carbon nanotube synthesis by CVD from acetylene (C2H2) in a fluidized bed at 650 or 850 °C. The formation of the entangled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), around 50 nm in outer diameter and 10 nm in inner diameter, and several to tens of microns in length, has been confirmed by the TEM and SEM analyses. High CNT selectivity ({\\ge }95{%} ) with the carbon yield ranging widely from about 10% to over 60%, depending on the type of catalyst used and the CNT deposition temperature, has been demonstrated with TGA tests.

  15. TiN@nitrogen-doped carbon supported Pt nanoparticles as high-performance anode catalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Fu, Shenna; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, TiN@nitrogen-doped carbons (NDC) composed of a core-shell structure are successfully prepared through self-assembly and pyrolysis treatment using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as coupling agent, polyaniline as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Subsequently, TiN@NDC supporting Pt nanoparticles (Pt/TiN@NDC) are obtained by a microwave-assisted polyol process. The nitrogen-containing functional groups and TiN nanoparticles play a critical role in decreasing the average particle size of Pt and improving the electrocatalytic activity of Pt/TiN@NDC. Transmission electron microscope results reveal that Pt nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the TiN@NDC surface with a narrow particle size ranging from 1 to 3 nm in diameter. Moreover, the Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst shows significantly improved catalytic activity and high durability for methanol electrooxidation in comparison with Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, revealed by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Strikingly, this novel Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst reveals a better CO tolerance related to Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, which due to the bifunctional mechanism and strong metal-support interaction between Pt and TiN@NDC. In addition, the probable reaction steps for the electrooxidation of CO adspecies on Pt NPs on the basis of the bifunctional mechanism are also proposed. These results indicate that the TiN@NDC is a promising catalyst support for methanol electrooxidation.

  16. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  17. Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate from Ethylene Carbonate and Methanol Over Nano-Catalysts Supported on CeO2-MgO.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin Oh; Lee, Joongwon; Kang, Ki Hyuk; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    A series of CeO2(X)-MgO(1-X) (X = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0) nano-catalysts were prepared by a co-precipitation method for use in the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from ethylene carbonate and methanol. Among the CeO2(X)-MgO(1-X) catalysts, CeO2(0.25)-MgO(0.75) nano-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance. Alkali and alkaline earth metal oxides (MO = Li2O, K2O, Cs2O, SrO, and BaO) were then supported on CeO2(0.25)-MgO(0.75) by an incipient wetness impregnation method with an aim of improving the catalytic performance of CeO2(0.25)-MgO(0.75). Basicity of the catalysts was determined by CO2-TPD experiments in order to elucidate the effect of basicity on the catalytic performance. The correlation between catalytic performance and basicity showed that basicity played an important role in the reaction. Yield for dimethyl carbonate increased with increasing basicity of the catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, Li2O/CeO2(0.25)-MgO(0.75) nano-catalyst with the largest basicity showed the best catalytic performance in the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate. PMID:26726512

  18. Effect of surface oxidation of the support on the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts supported on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Calafat, A. |; Lopez-Agudo, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide a better understanding of the influence of the nature of the carbon support on the HDS activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts. For this purpose a high purity activated carbon was subjected to oxidative treatments with HNO{sub 3} to modify its surface properties. NiMo catalysts supported on the resulting activated carbons were prepared and characterized by TPR, XRD, and SEM-EDX, and their activity for HDS of thiophene at 30 bars and 375{degrees}C was evaluated. The results obtained showed that oxidation of the carbon surface does not affect the HDS activity and other characteristics of the supported Mo phase. In contrast, the HDS activity of the Ni catalysts is enhanced by acid treatments of the carbon support. In this case, introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups (O{sub (s)}) leads to a strong interaction of O{sub (s)}-Ni during impregnation, which becomes essential to achieving and preserving high nickel dispersion. This effect on NiMo/C catalysts. The synergistic effect of the bimetallic catalysts is observed only when oxygen functional groups are present on the carbon surface, which are necessary for a good HDS activity, mainly because they enhance Ni-Mo interactions that produce the highly active Ni-Mo-S phase. A NiMoO{sub 4}-like phase formed during impregnation seems to be the precursor for the active sulfide phase over the present NiMo/C catalysts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times.

  20. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times. PMID:26578426

  1. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times. PMID:26578426

  2. Glycerol electro-oxidation on a carbon-supported platinum catalyst at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Keisuke; Kosaka, Fumihiko; Shimada, Iori; Oshima, Yoshito; Otomo, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    The electro-oxidation of glycerol on a carbon-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/C) in combination with a reaction products analysis was investigated at intermediate temperatures (235-260 °C) using a single cell with a CsH2PO4 proton conducting solid electrolyte. A high current density was achieved. The main products were H2, CO2 and CO but the formation of C2 compounds, such as glycolic acid and ethane, was also observed. In addition, several C3 compounds were detected as minor products. A reaction products analysis revealed that the C-C bond dissociation ratio of glycerol was 70-80% at both low and high potentials (>200 mV vs. reversible hydrogen electrode) at 250 °C, suggesting that rapid dissociation occurs on Pt/C. The reaction products analysis also suggested that hydrogen production via thermal decomposition and/or steam reforming of glycerol (indirect path) and direct electro-oxidation of glycerol (direct path) proceed in parallel. More detailed reaction paths involving C1, C2 and C3 reaction products are discussed as well as the possible rate-determining step in glycerol electro-oxidation at intermediate temperatures.

  3. Carbon nitride nanosheet-supported porphyrin: a new biomimetic catalyst for highly efficient bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shengyuan; Yuan, Peixin; Ji, Xubo; Shan, Dan; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-14

    A highly efficient biomimetic catalyst was fabricated based on ultrathin carbon nitride nanosheets (C3N4)-supported cobalt(II) proto-porphyrin IX (CoPPIX). The periodical pyridinic nitrogen units in C3N4 backbone could serve as electron donors for great affinity with Co(2+) in PPIX, which resembled the local electronic structure as vitamin B12 and heme cofactor of hemoglobin. UV-vis kinetics and electrochemistry revealed its competitive (electro)catalysis with conventional peroxidase, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations suggest that the rehybridization of Co 3d with N orbitals from the backside can result in significant changes in enthalpy and charge density, which greatly promoted the activity of CoPPIX. The prepared nanocatalyst was further conjugated with streptavidin via multiple amines on the edge plane of C3N4 for facile tagging. Using biotinylated molecular beacon as the capture probe, a sensitive electrochemiluminescence-based DNA assay was developed via the electroreduction of H2O2 as the coreactant after the hairpin unfolded by the target, exhibiting linearity from 1.0 fM to 0.1 nM and a detection limit of 0.37 fM. Our results demonstrate a new paradigm to rationally design inexpensive and durable biomimics for electrochemiluminescence quenching strategy, showing great promise in bioanalytical applications. PMID:25495667

  4. Graphene nanoribbons hybridized carbon nanofibers: remarkably enhanced graphitization and conductivity, and excellent performance as support material for fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaonan; Gao, Hongrong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yiren; Huang, Bowen; Zhao, Junhong; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Wang Zhang; Zhang, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for electrocatalysis. Through electrospinning and carbonization processes, GNR embedded carbon nanofibers (G-CNFs) with greatly enhanced graphitization and electronic conductivity were synthesized. Chemical deposition of Pt NPs onto G-CNFs generated a new Pt-G-CNF hybrid catalyst, with homogeneously distributed Pt NPs of ~3 nm. Compared to Pt-CNF (Pt on pristine CNFs) and Pt-M-CNF (Pt on MWCNT embedded CNFs), Pt-G-CNF hybrids exhibit significantly improved electrochemically active surface area (ECSA), better CO tolerance for electro-oxidation of methanol and higher electrochemical stability, testifying G-CNFs are promising support materials for high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells.High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for

  5. Ligand-Free Noble Metal Nanocluster Catalysts on Carbon Supports via "Soft" Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ben; Yao, Huiqin; Song, Wenqiao; Jin, Lei; Mosa, Islam M; Rusling, James F; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We report a robust, universal "soft" nitriding method to grow in situ ligand-free ultrasmall noble metal nanocatalysts (UNMN; e.g., Au, Pd, and Pt) onto carbon. Using low-temperature urea pretreatment at 300 °C, soft nitriding enriches nitrogen-containing species on the surface of carbon supports and enhances the affinity of noble metal precursors onto these supports. We demonstrated sub-2-nm, ligand-free UNMNs grown in situ on seven different types of nitrided carbons with no organic ligands via chemical reduction or thermolysis. Ligand-free UNMNs supported on carbon showed superior electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation compared to counterparts with surface capping agents or larger nanocrystals on the same carbon supports. Our method is expected to provide guidelines for the preparation of ligand-free UNMNs on a variety of supports and, additionally, to broaden their applications in energy conversion and electrochemical catalysis. PMID:27014928

  6. Evaluation studies on carbon supported catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Vakula S.; Singer, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes tests designed to predict the performance of fuel cell electrodes, as applied to an alkaline oxygen-fuel cell having specially fabricated porous-carbon electrodes with various amounts of dispersed platinum or gold as active catalysts. The tests are based on information obtained from the techniques of cyclic voltammetry and polarization. The parameters obtained from cyclic voltammetry were of limited use in predicting fuel cell performance of the cathode. On the other hand, half-cell polarization measurements offered close simulation of the oxygen electrode, although a predictor of the electrode life is still lacking. The very low polarization of the Au-10 percent Pt catalytic electrode suggests that single-phase catalysts should be considered.

  7. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  8. Sn-doped TiO2 modified carbon to support Pt anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yabei; Liu, Chuntao; Liu, Yanying; Feng, Bo; Li, Li; Pan, Hengyu; Kellogg, Williams; Higgins, Drew; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Catalyst supports are known to play important role in governing overall catalyst activity and durability. Here, a new type of SnO2-TiO2 solid solution (TixSn1-xO2) support was prepared via a solvothermal method with substitution of Ti4+ by Sn4+ in the TiO2 lattice. Furthermore, the TixSn1-xO2 was combined with conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) to prepare a hybrid support (TixSn1-xO2-C) for depositing Pt nanoparticles. The ratios of Sn vs. Ti in the solid-solution and TixSn1-xO2vs. XC-72 were systematically optimized in terms of their performance as supports for methanol oxidation. Compared to Pt/TiO2-C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, the best performing Pt/Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C catalyst exhibited the highest activity, evidenced by methanol oxidation and CO stripping experiments. The well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles (2-3 nm) are mostly deposited on the boundaries of Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 and carbon blacks. Formation of the special triple junction structure can play an important role in improving Pt utilization with increased electrochemical active surface areas (ESA) of Pt. In addition, the enhanced activity for Pt supported on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C is due to high content of OH group on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 along with the strengthened metal-supports interactions. Both promote the oxidation of poisoning CO absorbed on Pt active sites.

  9. Ni-SiO₂ catalysts for the carbon dioxide reforming of methane: varying support properties by flame spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Emma C; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Silica particles were prepared by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) as a support for nickel catalysts. The impact of precursor feed rate (3, 5 and 7 mL/min) during FSP on the silica characteristics and the ensuing effect on catalytic performance for the carbon dioxide, or dry, reforming of methane (DRM) was probed. Increasing the precursor feed rate: (i) progressively lowered the silica surface area from ≈340 m2/g to ≈240 m2/g; (ii) altered the silanol groups on the silica surface; and (iii) introduced residual carbon-based surface species to the sample at the highest feed rate. The variations in silica properties altered the (5 wt %) nickel deposit characteristics which in turn impacted on the DRM reaction. As the silica surface area increased, the nickel dispersion increased which improved catalyst performance. The residual carbon-based species also appeared to improve nickel dispersion, and in turn catalyst activity, although not to the same extent as the change in silica surface area. The findings illustrate both the importance of silica support characteristics on the catalytic performance of nickel for the DRM reaction and the capacity for using FSP to control these characteristics. PMID:25774491

  10. Electrocatalytic properties of carbon-supported Pt-Ru catalysts with the high alloying degree for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    A series of carbon-supported bimetallic Pt-Ru catalysts with high alloying degree and different Pt/Ru atomic ratio have been prepared by a chemical reduction method in the H 2O/ethanol/tetrahydrofuran (THF) mixture solvent. The structural and electronic properties of catalysts are characterized using X-ray reflection (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrooxidation of formic acid on these Pt-Ru nanoparticles are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and CO-stripping measurements. The results of electrochemical measurements illustrate that the alloying degree and Pt/Ru atomic ratio of Pt-Ru catalyst play an important role in the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Ru/C catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation due to the bifunctional mechanism and the electronic effect. Since formic acid is an intermediate in the methanol electrooxidation on Pt electrode in acidic electrolyte, the observation provides an additional fundamental understanding of the structure-activity relationship of Pt-Ru catalyst for methanol electrooxidation.

  11. Effects of catalyst support and chemical vapor deposition condition on synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanocoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Tetsuo; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Harigai, Toru; Ue, Hitoshi; Umeda, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanocoil (MWCNC) is a carbon nanotube (CNT) with helical shape. We have synthesized MWCNCs and MWCNTs hybrid by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). MWCNCs are considered to be a potential material in nanodevices, such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. It is very important to take into account the purity of MWCNCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs by changing catalyst preparation and CVD conditions. As a catalyst, Fe2O3/zeolite was prepared by dissolving Fe2O3 fine powder and Y-type zeolite (catalyst support material) in ethanol with an Fe density of 0.5wt.% and with a zeolite density of 3.5wt.%. The catalyst-coated Si substrate was transferred immediately onto a hotplate and was heated at 80°C for 5 min. Similarly, Fe2O3/Al2O3, Co/zeolite/Al2O3, Co/zeolite, and Co/Al2O3 were prepared. The effect of the difference of the composite catalysts on synthesis of MWCNCs was considered. The CVD reactor was heated in a tubular furnace to 660-790°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 1000 ml/min. Subsequently, acetylene was mixed with nitrogen at a flow rate ratio of C2H2/N2 = 0.02-0.1. The reaction was kept under these conditions for 10 min. MWCNTs and MWCNCs were well grown by the catalysts of Co/zeolite and Co/Al2O3. The composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was increased by using a combination of zeolite and Al2O3. The highest composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was 12%.

  12. Process of making supported catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  13. Continuous flow hydroformylation using supported ionic liquid phase catalysts with carbon dioxide as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Hintermair, Ulrich; Gong, Zenxing; Serbanovic, Ana; Muldoon, Mark J; Santini, Catherine C; Cole-Hamilton, David J

    2010-09-28

    A supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalyst prepared from [PrMIM][Ph(2)P(3-C(6)H(4)SO(3))] (PrMIM = 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium), [Rh(CO)(2)(acac)] (acacH = 2,4-pentanedione) [OctMIM]NTf(2) (OctMIM = 1-n-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, Tf = CF(3)SO(2)) and microporous silica has been used for the continuous flow hydroformylation of 1-octene in the presence of compressed CO(2). Statistical experimental design was used to show that the reaction rate is neither much affected by the film thickness (IL loading) nor by the syngas:substrate ratio. However, a factor-dependent interaction between the syngas:substrate ratio and film thickness on the reaction rate was revealed. Increasing the substrate flow led to increased reaction rates but lower overall yields. One of the most important parameters proved to be the phase behaviour of the mobile phase, which was studied by varying the reaction pressure. At low CO(2) pressures or when N(2) was used instead of CO(2) rates were low because of poor gas diffusion to the catalytic sites in the SILP. Furthermore, leaching of IL and Rh was high because the substrate is liquid and the IL had been designed to dissolve in it. As the CO(2) pressure was increased, the reaction rate increased and the IL and Rh leaching were reduced, because an expanded liquid phase developed. Due to its lower viscosity the expanded liquid allows better transport of gases to the catalyst and is a poorer solvent for the IL and the catalyst because of its reduced polarity. Above 100 bar (close to the transition to a single phase at 106 bar), the rate of reaction dropped again with increasing pressure because the flowing phase becomes a better and better solvent for the alkene, reducing its partitioning into the IL film. Under optimised conditions, the catalyst was shown to be stable over at least 40 h of continuous catalysis with a steady state turnover frequency (TOF, mol product (mol Rh)(-1)) of 500 h(-1) at low Rh leaching (0.2 ppm). The selectivity of the

  14. Carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticles-iron phthalocyanine as alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jalal; Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Lihua; Kim, Sunghyun

    2012-06-01

    The high cost and limited resources of precious metals as oxygen reduction catalysts (ORR) hindered the widespread use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in practice. Here, the feasibility of metal oxide assisted metal macrocyclic complex was investigated as a catalyst for ORR in an air-cathode MFC. Electrochemical results revealed that cobalt oxide (CoOx) incorporation increased the ORR activity of iron phthalocyanine (FePc). In MFCs, the maximum power density of 654 ± 32 mW m-2 was achieved from the C-CoOx-FePc cathode, which was 37% higher than the power density of carbon supported FePc (C-FePc). The voltage output of the MFC only decreased to 85% of its initial voltage after 50 cycles, suggesting that the synthesized catalyst showed acceptable long-term stability. The voltage drop partially resulted from the covering of biofilm on the catalyst layer. This work provided a potential alternative to Pt in MFCs for sustainable energy generation.

  15. Tuning the acid/metal balance of carbon nanofiber-supported nickel catalysts for hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Geboers, Jan; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Eloy, Pierre; Dornez, Emmie; Seo, Jin Won; Courtin, Christophe M; Gaigneaux, Eric M; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2012-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are a class of graphitic support materials with considerable potential for catalytic conversion of biomass. Earlier, we demonstrated the hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose over reshaped nickel particles attached at the tip of CNFs. The aim of this follow-up study was to find a relationship between the acid/metal balance of the Ni/CNFs and their performance in the catalytic conversion of cellulose. After oxidation and incipient wetness impregnation with Ni, the Ni/CNFs were characterized by various analytical methods. To prepare a selective Ni/CNF catalyst, the influences of the nature of oxidation agent, Ni activation, and Ni loading were investigated. Under the applied reaction conditions, the best result, that is, 76 % yield in hexitols with 69 % sorbitol selectivity at 93 % conversion of cellulose, was obtained on a 7.5 wt % Ni/CNF catalyst prepared by chemical vapor deposition of CH(4) on a Ni/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst, followed by oxidation in HNO(3) (twice for 1 h at 383 K), incipient wetness impregnation, and reduction at 773 K under H(2). This preparation method leads to a properly balanced Ni/CNF catalyst in terms of Ni dispersion and hydrogenation capacity on the one hand, and the number of acidic surface-oxygen groups responsible for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis on the other. PMID:22730195

  16. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee-Young; Jang, Injoon; Jung, Namgee; Chung, Young-Hoon; Ryu, Jae Yoon; Cha, In Young; Kim, Hyung Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyung; Yoo, Sung Jong

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to stabilize the NPs, but weak enough to not significantly block the metal surfaces. As only the target materials and Glu are required in our procedure, it can be considered environmentally friendly, with the NPs being devoid of hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, the resulting NP/Cs exhibited an improvement in activity for various electrochemical reactions, mainly attributed to their high surface area.

  17. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Young; Jang, Injoon; Jung, Namgee; Chung, Young-Hoon; Ryu, Jae Yoon; Cha, In Young; Kim, Hyung Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyung; Yoo, Sung Jong

    2015-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to stabilize the NPs, but weak enough to not significantly block the metal surfaces. As only the target materials and Glu are required in our procedure, it can be considered environmentally friendly, with the NPs being devoid of hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, the resulting NP/Cs exhibited an improvement in activity for various electrochemical reactions, mainly attributed to their high surface area. PMID:26380962

  18. Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotube as highly active catalyst for hydrogen generation from ammonia-borane.

    PubMed

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Ozkar, Saim

    2012-11-01

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ru(0)@MWCNT) were in situ formed during the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (AB) and could be isolated from the reaction solution by filtration and characterized by ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, and XPS techniques. The results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles of size in the range 1.4-3.0 nm are well-dispersed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They were found to be highly active catalyst in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of AB with a turnover frequency value of 329 min⁻¹. The reusability experiments show that Ru(0)@MWCNTs are isolable and redispersible in aqueous solution; when redispersed they are still active catalyst in the hydrolysis of AB exhibiting a release of 3.0 equivalents of H₂ per mole of NH₃BH₃ and preserving 41% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fourth run of hydrolysis. The lifetime of Ru(0)@MWCNTs was measured as 26400 turnovers over 29 h in the hydrolysis of AB at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here also includes the kinetic studies depending on the temperature to determine the activation energy of the reaction (E(a) = 33 ± 2 kJ/mol) and the effect of catalyst concentration on the rate of the catalytic hydrolysis of AB, respectively. PMID:23113804

  19. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt−1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt−1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support. PMID:27302135

  20. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt‑1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt‑1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support.

  1. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-01-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt(-1) as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt(-1) under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support. PMID:27302135

  2. Phosphorus-doped carbon nanotubes supported low Pt loading catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziwu; Shi, Qianqian; Zhang, Rufan; Wang, Quande; Kang, Guojun; Peng, Feng

    2014-12-01

    To develop low-cost and efficient cathode electrocatalysts for fuel cells in acidic media, phosphorus-doped carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) supported low Pt loading catalyst (0.85% Pt) is designed. The as-prepared Pt/P-CNTs exhibit significantly enhanced electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and long-term stability due to the stronger interaction between Pt and P-CNTs, which is proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the as-prepared Pt/P-CNTs also display much better tolerance to methanol crossover effects, showing a good potential application for future proton exchange membrane fuel cell devices.

  3. Effects of microstructure on carbon support in the catalyst layer on the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Fukuoka, Yuko; Sugawara, Yasushi

    1996-12-31

    In the case of the Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), the reaction sites exist on the platinum (Pt) surface covered with PFSI. Though PFSI membrane is used as an electrolyte of the PEFC, the membrane does not soak deeply into the electrodes as a liquid electrolyte does. Therefore, PFSI solution was impregnated into the catalyst layers to increase the contact areas between Pt and PFSI. In our previous work we proposed a new preparation method of the M&E assembly which emphasized the colloid formation of the PFSI to optimize the network of PFSIs in the catalyst layer and also to simplify the fabrication process of the M&E assembly. Following this work, we focused on the microstructure of the catalyst layer. The importance of the morphological properties of the gas-diffusion electrodes on performance has been reported in several papers. The catalyst layer was claimed to have had two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.1 {mu}m. The smaller pore (primary pore) was identified with the space in and between the primary particles in the agglomerate of the carbon support and the larger one (secondary pore) was that between the agglomerates. In our recent work, we reported that the PFSI was distributed only in the secondary pores, and the reaction sites were therefore limited to that location. The results indicated that the PEFC system required a particular design rather than a conventional one for the fuel cells with liquid electrolytes. We proposed that novel structure and/or preparation methods of the catalyst layer were keys to higher utilization of Pt.

  4. Effective synthesis of carbon nanotubes via catalytic decomposition of methane: Influence of calcination temperature on metal-support interaction of Co-Mo/MgO catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, Wei-Ming; Lee, Kim-Yang; Chai, Siang-Piao; Lee, Keat-Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-11-01

    The present work investigated the influence of calcination temperature for bimetallic Co-Mo/MgO catalyst on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of methane. The experimental results showed that variation in the catalyst calcination temperature affected carbon yield, diameter distribution and quality of the CNTs. Increasing the catalyst calcination temperature enabled Co-Mo/MgO catalysts in growing CNTs at higher yield, narrower diameter distribution and better degree of graphitization, credited to the strong metal-support interaction (MSI) formed between CoO species and MgO support. We also discovered that the catalysts of weak MSI were beneficial to the nucleation and growth of CNTs, meanwhile the catalysts with strong MSI provoked the growth of CNTs with narrow diameter distribution. The catalyst calcined at 700 °C, possessing moderate MSI, was found to be the most suitable catalyst for the growth of high quality CNTs with the diameter of 7.70±0.77 nm and the carbon yield of as high as 647.4%.

  5. Nb-doped TiO2/carbon composite supports synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Keerthi; Neburchilov, Vladimir; Alzate, Vanesa; Baker, Ryan; Neagu, Roberto; Zhang, Jiujun; Campbell, Stephen; Ye, Siyu

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we report the use of both ultrasonic spray pyrolysis and microwave-assisted polyol reduction methods to synthesize Nb-doped TiO2/carbon (25 wt% Nb0.07Ti0.93O2/75 wt% carbon) composite supports and Pt0.62Pd0.38 alloy catalysts, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized supports and their Pt0.62Pd0.38 supported catalysts are evaluated using several methods including XRD, TEM, BET surface area analysis, TGA, as well as ICP-MS elemental analysis. The electronic conductivities and thermal/chemical stabilities of the supports are also evaluated with respect to their possible use as catalyst supports. Electrochemical measurements for oxygen reduction activity of the Pt0.62Pd0.38 alloy catalysts supported on oxide/carbon composites are also carried out in order to check their suitability for possible PEM fuel cell applications. The results show that 20wt%Pt0.62Pd0.38/25 wt%(Nb0.07Ti0.93O2)-75 wt%C catalysts exhibit enhanced mass activities compared to those of commercially available 48wt% Pt/C and home-made 20wt% Pt62Pd38/C catalysts.

  6. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  7. Carbon Nano Tube Supported Pd Catalyst: Effect of Support Textual Properties with Pre-Treatment Method of Pd Particle.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Bok; Kim, Ji Sun; Baek, Jae Ho; Kim, Myung Hwan; Kim, Yangdo; Lee, Man Sig

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work is to be compared the effect of supports textural properties with pre-treatment method on dispersion of Pd particle. The CNTs were functionalized by different concentration of acid in order to obtain materials with different chemical and physical properties. The characteristics of functionalized CNTs were investigated by FT-IR and Rama spectropy. The Pd/CNTs catalysts prepared on support having the different surface properties were characterized by XRD, FE-TEM and CO-chemisorption. When pretreated 8M concentration, the CNTs has the highest amount of oxygen functional group and ID/IG ratio, in this study. Pd/CNT8M has high dispersion and small particle size. From these results, we confirmed that characteristics of Pd/CNTs catalyst such as particle size and dispersion of Pd are influenced by density of oxygen functional group and disorder of CNTs. And we have observed that acid treatment concentration of 8M is sufficient to functionalize the CNTs by introducing -COOH group of CNTs surfaces. PMID:26726641

  8. Structural and Morphological Properties of Carbon Supports: Effect on Catalyst Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Young, Alan; Dutta, Monica; Ahmad, Zaid; Colbow, Vesna; Wessel, Silvia; Ye, Siyu

    2010-07-01

    The object of this work was to identify correlations between performance losses of Pt electrocatalysts on carbon support materials and the chemical and morphological parameters that describe them. Accelerated stress testing, with an upper potential of 1.2 V, was used to monitor changes to cathode properties, including kinetic performance and effective platinum surface area losses. The structure and chemical compositions were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Digital Image Processing. As this is an ongoing study, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions, though a trend between support surface area overall performance loss was found to exist.

  9. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m2 g-1) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates.

  10. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m2 g−1) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates. PMID:26912370

  11. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m(2) g(-1)) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates. PMID:26912370

  12. Raman spectrometry of carbon nanotubes using an Al-catalyst supported layer on nickel film deposited on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saengpeng, J.; Pakdee, U.; Chiangga, S.; Rattanasakulthong, W.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on Ni catalyst with Al catalyst supported layer prepared on silicon substrate at different temperatures by TCVD. TEM images clearly showed the multi-wall structure of carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and SEM images revealed that the average diameters of MWCNTs were 116, 121, 142 and 162 nm for the growing temperatures of 600, 700, 800 and 900°C, respectively. The increase of tube diameter was due to the difference of Ni particle size and distribution after pretreatment. Raman spectrum revealed the two peaks of the D and G band at 1282- 1290 and 1588-1598 cm-1, respectively. The tubes grown at 800°C showed a shoulder peak of G band at 1598 cm-1. The minimum of defect induced disorder (ID/IG) of 1.19 was found at 800°C whereas the maximum disorder of 1.70 was observed at 600°C. All results confirm that the tube growth at 800°C shows the minimum imperfective disorder and the tube diameter can be manipulated by the Ni particle size and distribution.

  13. Enhancing the available specific surface area of carbon supports to boost the electroactivity of nanostructured Pt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Holade, Yaovi; Morais, Claudia; Servat, Karine; Napporn, Teko W; Kokoh, K Boniface

    2014-12-14

    We report increasing improvements in the available specific surface area of the commonly used Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack EC-600JD carbons by simple thermal pre-treatment. The treated Vulcan and Ketjenblack substrates have a specific surface area of 322 and 1631 m(2) g(-1), respectively, instead of 262 and 1102 m(2) g(-1) for the as-received materials, which is a 23 and 48% improvement. Subsequently, when used as platinum nanoparticle (3 nm) supports, the electrochemical active surface area is enhanced by factors of 2.2 and 1.2 for treated Vulcan and Ketjenblack carbons, respectively. Furthermore, electrochemical investigations have highlighted a surprisingly improved catalytic activity for the pre-treated Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack EC-600JD supported Pt nanoparticles. In fact, the synthesized nanostructures from the so-called "Bromide Anion Exchange" method exhibit good catalytic activity toward glucose electrooxidation, both in the alkaline medium and the phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4. More importantly, the present catalysts are four times more active than those in the literature prepared under similar conditions for glucose dehydrogenation at low potential (0.27 V vs. Reversible Hydrogen Electrode). Consequently, these remarkable trends uncovered herein provide ample new strategic routes for the pre-treatment of Vulcan XC 72R and Ketjenblack carbons for widespread uses. PMID:25351933

  14. Carbon-riveted Pt catalyst supported on nanocapsule MWCNTs-Al2O3 with ultrahigh stability for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zheng-Zhi; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Qu, Wei-Li; Rivera, Harry; Gu, Da-Ming; Yin, Ge-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Pt catalyst supported on nanocapsule MWCNTs-Al2O3 (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNTs) catalyst has been prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process (MAPP). The results of electrochemical measurements show that the nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst has higher activity due to more uniform dispersion and smaller size of Pt nanoparticles, and higher stability ascribed to the stronger metal-support interaction (SMSI) between Pt nanoparticles and nanocapsule support than in Pt/MWCNTs. Furthermore, the carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst has been designed and synthesized on the basis of in situ carbonization of glucose. The physical characteristics such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have indicated that α-Al2O3 indeed entered into the inside of the MWCNTs and formed a nanocapsule support of MWCNTs with α-Al2O3 as stuffing. The accelerated potential cycling tests (APCT) show that carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 possesses 10 times the stability of Pt/C and has 4.5 times the life-span of carbon-riveted Pt/TiO2-C reported in our previous work. The significantly enhanced stability for carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst is attributed to the reasons as follows: the inherently excellent mechanical resistance and stability of α-Al2O3 and MWCNTs in acidic and oxidative environments; SMSI between Pt nanoparticles and the nanocapsule support; the anchoring effect of the carbon layers formed during the carbon-riveting process (CRP); the increase of Pt(0) composition during CRP.

  15. Facile method to control the diameter and density of carbon nanotubes by using a catalyst-embedded supporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Han, Jaeseok; Im, Hyunsik; Choi, WonChel; Park, Young S.; Yoon, Seok-Beom

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated an effective method to control the diameter and the density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by introducing a catalyst-embedded supporting layer (CSL) prepared by using rf-magnetron sputtering with a mixed target consisting of Fe and Al2O3. The type of CNTs was changed from single-walled CNTs with a diameter of 0.85 ~ 1.55 nm to multi-walled CNTs with increasing rf-magnetron sputtering power. The controllability of the diameter and the density of the CNTs was confirmed to have been improved by using the rf power during the sputtering of the CSL and the concentration of Fe in the mixed target, respectively.

  16. Chemical kinetic considerations for postflame synthesis of carbon nanotubes in premixed flames using a support catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, Prarthana; Gore, Jay

    2007-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a grid supported cobalt nanocatalyst were grown, by exposing it to combustion gases from ethylene/air rich premixed flames. Ten equivalence ratios ({phi}) were investigated, as follows: 1.37, 1.44, 1.47, 1.50, 1.55, 1.57, 1.62, 1.75, 1.82, and 1.91. MWCNT growth could be observed for the range of equivalence ratios between 1.45 and 1.75, with the best yield restricted to the range 1.5-1.6. A one-dimensional premixed flame code with a postflame heat loss model, including detailed chemistry, was used to estimate the gas phase chemical composition that favors MWCNT growth. The results of the calculations show that the mixture, including the water gas shift reaction, is not even in partial chemical equilibrium. Therefore, past discussions of compositional parameters that relate to optimum carbon nanotube (CNT) growth are revised to include chemical kinetic effects. Specifically, rapid departures of the water gas shift reaction from partial equilibrium and changes in mole fraction ratios of unburned C{sub 2} hydrocarbons to hydrogen correlate well with experimentally observed CNT yields. (author)

  17. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  18. Direct Methylation of Amines with Carbon Dioxide and Molecular Hydrogen using Supported Gold Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Xian-Long; Tang, Gao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Jiang, Zheng; Zhong, Xin-Hua; Su, Dang Sheng; Wang, Jian-Qiang

    2015-10-26

    The N-methylation of amines with CO2 and H2 is an important step in the synthesis of bioactive compounds and chemical intermediates. The first heterogeneous Au catalyst is reported for this methylation reaction with good to excellent yields. The average turnover frequency (TOF) based on surface Au atoms is 45 h(-1) , which is the highest TOF value ever reported for the methylation of aniline with CO2 and H2 . Furthermore, the catalyst is tolerant toward a variety of amines, which includes aromatic, aliphatic, secondary, and primary amines. Preliminary mechanistic studies suggest that the N-alkyl formamide might be an intermediate in the N-methylation of amine process. Moreover, through a one-pot process, it is possible to convert primary amines, aldehydes, and CO2 into unsymmetrical tertiary amines with H2 as a reductant in the presence of the Au catalyst. PMID:26364582

  19. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  20. Carbon supported Ag nanoparticles as high performance cathode catalyst for H2/O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhichao; Qi, Ji; Li, Wenzhen

    2013-01-01

    A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-platinum metal catalyst—carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C). XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm) and narrow size distribution (2–9 nm) are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80°C. PMID:24790944

  1. Synthesis of 3D graphite oxide-exfoliated carbon nanotube carbon composite and its application as catalyst support for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailin; Kakade, Bhalchandra A.; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2014-08-01

    The restacking of graphene or reduced graphite oxide (r-GO) is commonly regarded as a severe obstacle for potential applications. We propose the application of exfoliated carbon nanotube (e-CNT) as an effective carbon spacer for fabricating a sandwich-like three-dimensional (3D) carbon composite with GO. The 3D carbon combination of GO + e-CNT is successfully prepared via homogenously mixing of GO and e-CNT in an aqueous dispersion in which carbon spacers are homogenously intercalated with graphene layers. With the addition of a carbon spacer, the BET surface area of 3D carbon (51.6 m2 g-1) is enhanced by a factor of three compared with r-GO (17.2 m2 g-1) after thermal reduction. In addition, the 3D GO + e-CNT supported PtPd catalyst (PtPd-GO + e-CNT) shows homogenous distribution of PtPd nanoparticles of 3.9 ± 0.6 nm in size, with an enlarged electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) value of 164 m2 g-1 and a mass activity of 690 mA mg-1 toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), which is the typical anode reaction for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC).

  2. Mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticles with high specific surface area for cyclohexene hydrogenation: Outstanding catalytic activity of NaOH-treated catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskás, R.; Varga, T.; Grósz, A.; Sápi, A.; Oszkó, A.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Extremely high specific surface area mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts were prepared with both impregnation and polyol-based sol methods. The silica template used for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon was removed by both NaOH and HF etching. Pd/mesoporous carbon catalysts synthesized with the impregnation method has as high specific surface area as 2250 m2/g. In case of NaOH-etched impregnated samples, the turnover frequency of cyclohexene hydrogenation to cyclohexane at 313 K was obtained ~ 14 molecules • site- 1 • s- 1. The specific surface area of HF-etched samples was higher compared to NaOH-etched samples. However, catalytic activity was ~ 3-6 times higher on NaOH-etched samples compared to HF-etched samples, which can be attributed to the presence of sodium and surface hydroxylgroups of the catalysts etched with NaOH solution.

  3. Beneficial effects of rhodium and tin oxide on carbon supported platinum catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Layciane A.; Morais, Claudia; Napporn, Teko W.; Kokoh, K. Boniface; Olivi, Paulo

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates ethanol electrooxidation on Pt/C, PtxRhy/C, Pt-SnO2/C, and PtxRhy-SnO2/C catalysts synthesized by the Pechini and microwave-assisted polyol methods. The catalysts are characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The electrochemical properties of these electrode materials are examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments in acid medium. The products obtained during ethanol electrolysis are identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adsorbed intermediates are evaluated by an in situ reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy technique combined with cyclic voltammetry. Catalysts performance in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is also assessed. The electrical performance of the electrocatalysts in a single DEFC at 80 °C decreases in the following order Pt70Rh30SnO2 > Pt80Rh20SnO2 > Pt60Rh40SnO2 ∼ PtSnO2 > PtxRhy ∼ Pt, showing that the presence of SnO2 enhances the ability of Pt to catalyze ethanol electrooxidation.

  4. Beneficial effects of rhodium and tin oxide on carbon supported platinum catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Layciane A.; Morais, Claudia; Napporn, Teko W.; Kokoh, K. Boniface; Olivi, Paulo

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates ethanol electrooxidation on Pt/C, PtxRhy/C, Pt-SnO2/C, and PtxRhy-SnO2/C catalysts synthesized by the Pechini and microwave-assisted polyol methods. The catalysts are characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The electrochemical properties of these electrode materials are examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments in acid medium. The products obtained during ethanol electrolysis are identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adsorbed intermediates are evaluated by an in situ reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy technique combined with cyclic voltammetry. Catalysts performance in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is also assessed. The electrical performance of the electrocatalysts in a single DEFC at 80 °C decreases in the following order Pt70Rh30SnO2 > Pt80Rh20SnO2 > Pt60Rh40SnO2 ∼ PtSnO2 > PtxRhy ∼ Pt, showing that the presence of SnO2 enhances the ability of Pt to catalyze ethanol electrooxidation.

  5. A study of different polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes as a Pt-Co catalyst support for methanol oxidation fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jiping; Wei, Wei; Huang, Xiaobin; Tao, Yiming; Chen, Kuiyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    2012-07-01

    The composite of polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes is prepared by a simple and efficient synthesis method and regarded as an improved catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell. Catalyst of Pt-Co supported on polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes is prepared using mixed reducing agents. The PZAF/MWCNTs, PZS/MWCNTs, Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs and Pt-Co/PZS-MWCNTs are measured by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs, Pt-Co/PZS-MWCNTs catalysts for methanol oxidation has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The composite of Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs shows a good distribution, small particle size and high mass activity.

  6. Production of carbon nanotubes: Chemical vapor deposition synthesis from liquefied petroleum gas over Fe-Co-Mo tri-metallic catalyst supported on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Sudibandriyo, M.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes were produced by chemical vapor deposition method to meet the specifications for hydrogen storage. So far, the various catalyst had been studied outlining their activities, performances, and efficiencies. In this work, tri-metallic catalyst consist of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used. The catalyst was prepared by wet-impregnation method. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was used as carbon source. The synthesis was conducted in atmospheric fixed bed reactor at reaction temperature range 750 - 850 °C for 30 minutes. The impregnation method applied in this study successfully deposed metal component on the MgO support surface. It found that the deposited metal components might partially replace Mg(OH)2 or MgO molecules in their crystal lattice. Compare to the original MgO powder; it was significant increases in pore volume and surface area has occurred during catalyst preparation stages. The size of obtained carbon nanotubes is ranging from about 10.83 nm OD/4.09 nm ID up to 21.84 nm OD/6.51 nm ID, which means that multiwall carbon nanotubes were formed during the synthesis. Yield as much as 2.35 g.CNT/g.catalyst was obtained during 30 minutes synthesis and correspond to carbon nanotubes growth rate of 0.2 μm/min. The BET surface area of the obtained carbon nanotubes is 181.13 m2/g and around 50 % of which is contributed by mesopores. Micropore with half pore width less than 1 nm contribute about 10% volume of total micro and mesopores volume of the carbon nanotubes. The existence of these micropores is very important to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes.

  7. Carbon fiber cloth supported Au nano-textile fabrics as an efficient catalyst for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction in acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-09-01

    The size-controlled hierarchical textile-like Au nanostructures supported carbon fiber cloth (Au NTs/CFC) is successfully fabricated through a simple low-cost electrochemical route. The electrodes are characterised by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. Without any conducting carbons and polymer binders, the 3D electrode with unique structure is directly used as the electrocatalyst for H2O2 reduction in acid solution and the catalytic performance is evaluated by voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits much higher catalytic activity and remarkably improved utilization of Au than Au nanoparticles (Au NPs/CFC) prepared by the same method owing to its unique structure. In the solution of 3.0 mol L-1 H2SO4 + 0.1 mol L-1 H2O2, with the reduction potential of 0 V, the current of -0.72 A cm-2 mg-1 can be obtained on Au NTs/CFC electrode and only a current of -0.09 A cm-2 mg-1 can be achieved on Au NPs/CFC electrode. All these results reveal that the novel Au NTs/CFC electrode exhibits excellent catalytic performance and superior stability for H2O2 electroreduction in acid medium, benefitting from the unique 3D structure which can ensure high utilization of catalyst.

  8. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. PMID:27144965

  9. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy study of L-zeolite- and silica-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.B.; Laska, T.E.; Balaraman, P.; Root, T.W.; Dumesic, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    NMR studies of CO adsorbed on small Pt particles show evidence of changes in the metallic nature of these particles with size. Large particles on silica or the exterior of zeolite crystallites have conduction-band electrons that cause a Knight shift for adsorbed CO. Small particles in zeolite cavities are diamagnetic clusters, and yield spectra for linear and bridging carbonyls similar to those of transition-metal cluster compounds. {sup 13}C NMR of CO offers a simple probe of metal dispersion and particle size for these Pt catalysts and other noble metal systems. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Conversion of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol via dimethyl succinate over rhenium nano-catalyst supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ung Gi; Kim, Jeong Kwon; Lee, Joongwon; Lee, Jong Kwon; Yi, Jongheop; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Copper-containing mesoporous carbons (XCu-MC) with different copper content (X = 8.0, 12.7, 15.9, 23.3, and 26.8 wt%) were prepared by a single-step surfactant-templating method. Rhenium nano-catalysts supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbons (Re/XCu-MC) were then prepared by an incipient wetness method. Re/XCu-MC (X = 8.0, 12.7, 15.9, 23.3, and 26.8 wt%) catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm, HR-TEM, FT-IR, and H2- TPR analyses. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol (BDO) via dimethyl succinate (DMS) was carried out over Re/XCu-MC catalysts in a batch reactor. The effect of copper content on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of Re/XCu-MC catalysts in the hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO was investigated. Re/XCu-MC catalysts retained different physicochemical properties depending on copper content. In the hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO, yield for BDO showed a volcano-shaped trend with respect to copper content. Thus, an optimal copper content was required to achieve maximum catalytic performance of Re/XCu-MC. It was also observed that yield for BDO increased with increasing the amount of hydrogen consumption by copper in the Re/XCu-MC catalysts. PMID:25958619

  11. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  12. An investigation into factors affecting the stability of carbons and carbon supported platinum and platinum/cobalt alloy catalysts during 1.2 V potentiostatic hold regimes at a range of temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, S. C.; Hudson, S. L.; Thompsett, D.; Theobald, B.

    To meet automotive targets for fuel cell operation and allow higher temperature operation an understanding of the factors affecting carbon and platinum stability is critical. The stability of both carbons and carbon supported platinum and platinum/cobalt alloy catalysts was studied during 1.2 V versus RHE potentiostatic hold tests using carbon and catalyst coated electrodes in a three-chamber wet electrolyte cell at a range of temperatures. At 80 °C the wt% of carbon corroded increases with increasing BET area. Surface oxidation was followed electrochemically using the quinone/hydroquinone redox couple. Increasing temperature, time at 1.2 V and wt% platinum on the carbon increases surface oxidation. Although increasing temperature was shown to increase the extent of carbon corrosion, catalysing the carbon did not significantly change how much carbon was corroded. Platinum stability was investigated by electrochemical metal area loss (ECA). Platinum catalysts on commercial carbons lost more ECA with increasing temperature. A platinum/cobalt alloy on a low surface area carbon was demonstrated to be more stable to both carbon corrosion and metal area loss at temperatures up to 80 °C than platinum catalysts on commercial carbons, making this material an excellent candidate for higher temperature automotive operation.

  13. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  14. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  15. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning of platinum-graphite catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: comparison between platinum-supported on graphite and intercalated in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilquin, J. Y.; Côté, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J. P.; Denès, G.

    Platinum intercalated in graphite and Pt supported on graphite have been synthesized as catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells in order to test the effect of carbon monoxide adsorption on their electrochemical properties. These materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, neutron activation analysis and cyclic voltammetry in Nafion-based films in contact with H 2SO 4 solution at pH 0.5 Pt intercalates are indeed tridimensional Pt cluster inclusions in a perturbed graphite matrix. Hydrogen electrosorption measurements demonstrate that Pt supported on graphite has three times more active sites than Pt intercalated in graphite even if Pt loadings (16 ± 4 Pt wt.%) and the size of Pt clusters (3.4 ± 0.4 nm) are similar for both catalysts. Pt supported on graphite and intercalated in graphite are equally poisoned by carbon monoxide.

  17. Nanosized CuO and ZnO Catalyst Supported on Honeycomb-Typed Monolith for Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Min; Ahn, Won-Ju; Jo, Woong-Kyu; Song, Jin-Hun; Oh, Chang-Yeop; Jeong, Young-Shin; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Sohn, Bo-Kyun; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin; Ahn, Byeong-Kwon; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most serious problems in the world. Conversion of CO2 to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) was studied using catalytic chemical methods. Honeycomb-typed monolith used as catalyst support was 400 cell/inch2. Pretreatment of the monolith surface was carried out by thermal treatment and acid treatment. Monolith-supported nanosized CuO-ZnO catalysts were prepared by wash-coat method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using SEM, TEM, and XRD. The catalytic activity for CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH was investigated using a flow-type reactor with varying reaction temperature, reaction pressure and contact time. Conversion of CO2 was increased with increasing reaction temperature, but selectivity to CH3OH was decreased. Optimum reaction temperature was about 250 degrees C under 20 atm. Because of the reverse water gas shift reaction. PMID:26328404

  18. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Kang, Peng; Bakir, Mohammed; Lapides, Alexander M; Dares, Christopher J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-12-29

    Developing sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world's continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd-H sites and Cu-CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices. PMID:26668386

  19. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Kang, Peng; Bakir, Mohammed; Lapides, Alexander M.; Dares, Christopher J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world’s continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd–H sites and Cu–CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices. PMID:26668386

  20. Nanoparticles of Ag with a Pt and Pd rich surface supported on carbon as a new catalyst for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Pech, I. E.; Gervasio, Dominic F.; Godínez-Garcia, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Pérez-Robles, J. F.

    2015-02-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles enriched with platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) on their surfaces (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1) are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon (C) to form a new catalyst (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes. This catalyst is prepared in one pot by reducing Ag and then Pt and Pd metal salts with sodium borohydride in the presence of trisodium citrate then adding XC-72 while applying intense ultrasound. The metallic Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1 nanoparticles contain 2 weight percent of Pt, are spherical and have an average size less than 10 nm as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At the ORR potentials, Ag nanoparticles on carbon (Ag/C) rapidly lose Ag by dissolution and show no more catalytic activity for the ORR than the carbon support, whereas Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C is a stable catalyst and exhibits 1.4 and 1.6 fold greater specific activity, also 3.6 and 2.8 fold greater mass activity for ORR in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution than comparable Pt/C and Pt0.5Pd0.5/C catalysts with the same Pt loading as determined for thin-films of these catalysts on a rotating-disk electrode (TF-RDE). Using silver nanoparticles increases Pt utilization and therefore decreases Pt-loading and cost of a catalyst for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode.

  1. Effect of nitriding/nanostructuration of few layer graphene supported iron-based particles; catalyst in graphene etching and carbon nanofilament growth.

    PubMed

    Baaziz, Walid; Melinte, Georgian; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Janowska, Izabela

    2014-08-14

    Stable, highly faceted and dispersed iron nitride particles supported on few layer graphene are obtained by ammonia decomposition on iron-based particles at the temperature commonly used for the synthesis of N-doped CNTs and graphene etching. The TEM/EELS analysis reveals nitrogen diffusion in a bulk of the particles. The resulting facet FeNx catalyst exhibits high activity in the etching of graphene, which is assisted by catalyst reorganization. Ammonia decomposition is used for the first time for graphene etching, while the highly faceted catalyst has an impact on the etched channels structures. According to the shape of the active planes of the catalyst, the etching results in sharp "V" channel ends and often "step-like" edges. The FeNx morphology proves previously reported triangularisation of arches in highly N-doped carbon nanotubes. The conditioning of the catalyst by its shaping and nitrogen incorporation is investigated additionally in the carbon nanostructure formation, for decomposition of ethane. The herringbone CNFs, "hollow" bamboo-like CNFs/CNTs or CNTs are effectively observed. PMID:24964374

  2. Impact of Mo and Ce on growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapour deposition using MgO-supported Fe catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hendawy, Abdel-Nasser A.; Andrews, Robert J.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2009-05-01

    A series of nine catalysts containing Ce/Fe and Mo/Fe at various loadings on MgO supports have been studied as catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using a methane carbon source. Our results show that the Ce/Fe system is very suitable as a catalyst that favours SWCNT growth, and we question the special importance that has been attributed to Mo as an additive to Fe-based catalysts for SWCNT growth, as it appears that Ce is equally effective. Our results indicate that dehydroaromatization (DHA) is not a defining step for the growth mechanism, as has been suggested for Mo/Fe systems previously, and show that Ce and Mo do not seriously perturb the well-known Fe/MgO system for growth of high quality SWCNT. Using Raman spectroscopy, we have shown that the Ce/Fe/MgO catalyst system favours growth of SWCNTs with a different distribution of chiralities compared to the analogous Mo/Fe/MgO system.

  3. Simultaneous formation of nitrogen and sulfur-doped transition metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction through pyrolyzing carbon-supported copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xin; Shi, Jingjing; Ma, Chengyu; Fan, Mengyang; Bai, Zhengyu; Chen, Zhongwei; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we report a spontaneous formation of copper (Cu-N-S/C) catalysts containing both nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) elements using a one-step pyrolysis of carbon supported copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuTSPc/C). The obtained catalysts exhibit high catalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. Through electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations, several observations are reached as follows: (1) different pyrolysis temperatures can result in different catalyst structures and performances, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature is found to be 700 °C; (2) the electron transfer number of the ORR process catalyzed by the unpyrolyzed catalyst is about 2.5, after the pyrolysis, this number is increased to 3.5, indicating that the pyrolysis process can change the ORR pathway from a 2-electron transfer dominated process to a 4-electron transfer dominated one; (3) increasing catalyst loading from 40 μg cm-2 to 505 μg cm-2 can effectively improve the catalytic ORR activity, under which the percentage of H2O2 produced decreases sharply from 39.5% to 7.8%; and (4) the Cu ion can bond on pyridinic-N, graphite-N and C-Sn-C to form Cu-N-S/C catalyst active sites, which play the key role in the ORR activity.

  4. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  5. Promotion of oxygen reduction reaction durability of carbon-supported PtAu catalysts by surface segregation and TiO₂ addition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Wei; Chen, Hong-Shuo; Lai, Chien-Ming; Lin, Jiunn-Nan; Tsai, Li-Duan; Wang, Kuan-Wen

    2014-02-12

    Highly effective carbon supported-Pt75Au25 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are prepared though titanium dioxide modification and post heat treatment. After accelerated durability test (ADT) of 1700 cycles, the ORR activity of PtAu/C catalysts modified by TiO2 and air heat treatment is 3 times higher than that of the commercial Pt/C. The enhancement of ORR activity is attributed to surface and structural alteration by air-induced Pt surface segregation and lower unfilled d states. On the contrary, for TiO2 modified and H2 treated PtAu/C catalysts, the deterioration of the ORR activity may be due to the loss of electrochemical surface area after ADT and the increase of d-band vacancy. PMID:24447040

  6. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using sewage sludge based activated carbon supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Sewage sludge of biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl₂ as activation agent, which supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts (including SBAC) to improve the performance of ozonation of real biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalysts significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal and the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. On the basis of positive effect of higher pH and significant inhibition of radical scavengers in catalytic ozonation, it was deduced that the enhancement of catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals and the possible reaction pathway was proposed. Moreover, the prepared catalysts showed superior stability and most of toxic and refractory compounds were eliminated at successive catalytic ozonation runs. Thus, the process with economical, efficient and sustainable advantages was beneficial to engineering application. PMID:24907577

  7. Sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes - A mixed proton-electron conducting support for Pt catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinwei; Zhu, Hong; Guo, Zhijun; Wei, Yongsheng; Wang, Fanghui

    2011-03-01

    We report on the synthesis of sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites as new supports of Pt catalyst (Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs) with the aims to enhance electron and proton conductivity and also catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. The Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst is synthesized by a combination of improved sol-gel and pulse-microwave assisted polyol methods. The surface presence, morphology and structure of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst for ethanol oxidation reactions are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst exhibits higher catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation than Pt supported on non-sulfated SnO2/MWCNTs composites.

  8. A highly stable anode, carbon-free, catalyst support based on tungsten trioxide nanoclusters for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Meiling; Hou, Ming; Zhang, Huabing; Li, Guangfu; Lu, Wangting; Wei, Zidong; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2012-05-01

    Durability is an important issue in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). One of the major challenges lies in the degradation caused by the oxidation of the carbon support under high anode potentials (under fuel starvation conditions). Herein, we report highly stable, carbon-free, WO(3) nanoclusters as catalyst supports. The WO(3) nanoclusters are synthesized through a hard template method and characterized by means of electron microscopy and electrochemical analysis. The electrochemical studies show that the WO(3) nanoclusters have excellent electrochemical stability under a high potential (1.6 V for 10 h) compared to Vulcan XC-72. Pt nanoparticles supported on these nanoclusters exhibit high and stable electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrogen. The catalyst shows negligible loss in electrochemically active surface area (ECA) after an accelerated durability test, whereas the ECA of the Pt nanoparticles immobilized on conventional carbon decreases significantly after the same oxidation condition. Therefore, Pt/WO(3) could be considered as a promising alternative anode catalyst for PEMFCs. PMID:22532479

  9. Activity, short-term stability (poisoning tolerance) and durability of carbon supported Pt-Pr catalysts for ethanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Patricia G.; Antolini, Ermete; Perez, Joelma

    2014-04-01

    Pt-Pr/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a modified formic acid method, and their activity for carbon monoxide and ethanol oxidation, their short term stability and durability were compared to that of commercial Pt/C and Pt-Sn/C (3:1) catalysts. By derivative voltammetry (DV) it was found that ethanol electro-oxidation takes place by two main pathways at different potentials. It was observed that, in the presence of Pr, ethanol electro-oxidation takes place mostly through the pathway at lower potential, which is the most interesting for fuel cell application. The Pt-Pr/C catalysts were less tolerant to poisoning by ethanol oxidation intermediate species than Pt/C. Durability test by a repetitive potential cycling under Ar atmosphere revealed a good structural stability of Pt-Pr/C catalysts. A repetitive potential cycling under CO atmosphere carried out on the Pt-Pr/C (1:1) catalyst, instead, indicated a structural change, likely by formation of a core-shell structure.

  10. Tailoring (n,m) structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes by modifying reaction conditions and the nature of the support of CoMo catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Giulio; Zhang, Liang; Balzano, Leandro; Sakulchaicharoen, Nataphan; Tan, Yongqiang; Resasco, Daniel E

    2006-02-01

    The (n,m) population distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes obtained on supported CoMo catalysts has been determined by photoluminescence and optical absorption. It has been found that the (n,m) distribution can be controlled by varying the gaseous feed composition, the reaction temperature, and the type of catalyst support used. When using CO as a feed over CoMo/SiO2 catalysts, increasing the synthesis temperature results in an increase in nanotube diameter, without a change in the chiral angle. By contrast, by changing the support from SiO2 to MgO, nanotubes with similar diameter but different chiral angles are obtained. Finally, keeping the same reaction conditions but varying the composition of the gaseous feed results in different (n,m) distribution. The clearly different distributions obtained when varying catalysts support and/or reaction conditions demonstrate that the (n,m) distribution is a result of differences in the growth kinetics, which in turn depends on the nanotube cap-metal cluster interaction. PMID:16471791

  11. The enhancement effect of nitrogen, fluorine-codoped titanium dioxide on the carbon supported platinum nano-catalyst for methanol electrooxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang; Yao, Shikui; Zhu, Jianbing; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2015-03-01

    TiO2 (anatase) codoped with nitrogen and fluorine is synthesized by a simple solid state route, using urea and ammonium fluoride as sources of nitrogen and fluorine, respectively. N,F-TiO2 and carbon are mixed up physically as hybrid support of Pt nanoparticles for methanol electrooxidation. TEM shows that the utilization of the hybrid support leads to the uniform distribution and small particles size of Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in Pt-N,F-TiO2/C catalyst. COad stripping experiment results indicate that the addition of N,F-TiO2 facilitates the oxidative removal of CO on Pt surface. Furthermore, cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric experiments show that the prepared Pt-N,F-TiO2/C catalyst exhibits much better catalytic activity and stability compared to Pt-TiO2/C, Pt/C (JM) and Pt/C (hm) catalysts. For instance, the peak current and the stable current at 7200 s of the Pt-N,F-TiO2/C catalyst are about 1.85 and 2.66 times of the Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The catalytic performance of the Pt-N,F-TiO2/C is also evaluated in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), which exhibits a maximum power density of 51.6 mW cm-2, 1.65 times of an analogs fuel cell using Pt/C (JM) as an anode catalyst. Therefore, the N,F-TiO2 has great application prospect as a high-performance electrocatalyst support for methanol electrooxidation in DMFC.

  12. Nickel supported carbon nanofibers as an active and selective catalyst for the gas-phase hydrogenation of 2-tert-butylphenol.

    PubMed

    Díaz, José Antonio; Díaz-Moreno, Rebeca; Silva, Luz Sánchez; Dorado, Fernando; Romero, Amaya; Valverde, José Luis

    2012-08-15

    Nickel supported fishbone carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been prepared by vacuum impregnation (VI) and homogeneous deposition-precipitation (HDP) methods with different nickel loadings (ca. 5%, 9% and 12%) with the aim to study the influence of the metal incorporation method and the nickel loading in the catalytic activity of gas-phase hydrogenation of 2-tert-butylphenol (2-TBP). Moreover, the influence of the nature of the support was also studied by preparing nickel catalysts supported on other carbon (active carbon (AC) and graphite (G)) and non-carbonaceous materials (alumina (AL) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)). Different techniques were employed to characterize both the supports and the final Ni catalysts: atomic absorption spectrometry, N(2) adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic results revealed that the nickel particle size and support properties affected directly to both the catalytic activity of hydrogenation of 2-TBP, and the rate of secondary reactions such as cis to trans isomerization and 2-tert-butylcyclohexanone (2-TBCN) hydrogenation. PMID:22682327

  13. Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

  14. Corrosion-resistant catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; LaConti, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    High-surface-area carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 (Cabot Corp.) and graphitized carbon blacks such as 2700{degree}C heat-treated Black Pearls 2000 (HTBP) (Cabot Corp.) have found widespread applications as catalyst supports in phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). However, due to the operating temperatures and pressures being utilized in PAFCs currently under development, the carbon-based cathode catalyst supports suffer from corrosion, which decreases the performance and life span of a PAFC stack. The feasibility of using alternative, low-cost, corrosion-resistant catalyst support (CRCS) materials as replacements for the cathode carbon support materials was investigated. The objectives of the program were to prepare high-surface-area alternative supports and to evaluate the physical characteristics and the electrochemical stability of these materials. The O{sub 2} reduction activity of the platinized CRCS materials was also evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Thermal and electrochemical stability of tungsten carbide catalyst supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhina, H.; Campbell, S.; Kesler, O.

    The thermal and electrochemical stability of tungsten carbide (WC), with and without a catalyst dispersed on it, have been investigated to evaluate the potential suitability of the material as an oxidation-resistant catalyst support. Standard techniques currently used to disperse Pt on carbon could not be used to disperse Pt on WC, so an alternative method was developed and used to disperse Pt on both commercially available WC and on carbon for comparison of stability. Electrochemical testing was performed by applying oxidation cycles between +0.6 V and +1.8 V to the support-catalyst material combinations and monitoring the activity of the supported catalyst over 100 oxidation cycles. Comparisons of activity change with cumulative oxidation cycles were made between C and WC supports with comparable loadings of catalyst by weight, solid volume, and powder volume. WC was found to be more thermally and electrochemically stable than currently used carbon support material Vulcan XC-72R. However, further optimization of the particle sizes and dispersion of Pt/WC catalyst/support materials and of comparison standards between new candidate materials and existing carbon-based supports are required.

  16. Carbon cloth supported electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.; Ammon, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    A flow-by anode is disclosed made by preparing a liquid suspension of about to about 18% by weight solids, the solids comprising about 3.5 to about 8% of a powdered catalyst of platinum, palladium, palladium oxide, or mixtures thereof; about 60 to about 76% carbon powder (support) having a particle size less than about 20 m.mu.m and about 20 to about 33% of an inert binder having a particle size of less than about 500 m.mu.m. A sufficient amount of the suspension is poured over a carbon cloth to form a layer of solids about 0.01 to about 0.05 cm thick on the carbon cloth when the electrode is completed. A vacuum was applied to the opposite side of the carbon cloth to remove the liquid and the catalyst layer/cloth assembly is dried and compressed at about 10 to about 50 MPa's. The binder is then sintered in an inert atmosphere to complete the electrode. The electrode is used for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in a sulfur based hybrid cycle for the decomposition of water.

  17. Dehydration of glycerol over niobia-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Yi; Ok, Hye Jeong; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over nanosized niobia-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts was performed to investigate the effect of the silicotungstic acid loading on the catalytic performance of the catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by following an impregnation method with different HSiW loadings in the range of 10-50 wt%. The prepared catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption, XRD, FT-IR, TPD of ammonia, and TGA. Dehydration of glycerol was conducted in an autoclave reactor under the conditions of controlled reaction temperatures under corresponding pressure. Increasing HSiW loading rapidly increased the acidity of HSiW/Nb205 catalyst and rate of glycerol conversion, but acrolein selectivity decreased due to enhanced deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposit. Consequently, it was confirmed that catalytic activity for the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was dependant on the acidity of catalyst and can be controlled by HSiW loading. PMID:23646735

  18. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  19. Durability testing at 5 atmospheres of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for gas turbine engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, B. A.; Lee, H. C.; Osgerby, I. T.; Heck, R. M.; Hess, H.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of CATCOM catalysts and catalyst supports was experimentally demonstrated in a combustion environment under simulated gas turbine engine combustor operating conditions. A test of 1000 hours duration was completed with one catalyst using no. 2 diesel fuel and operating at catalytically-supported thermal combustion conditions. The performance of the catalyst was determined by monitoring emissions throughout the test, and by examining the physical condition of the catalyst core at the conclusion of the test. Tests were performed periodically to determine changes in catalytic activity of the catalyst core. Detailed parametric studies were also run at the beginning and end of the durability test, using no. 2 fuel oil. Initial and final emissions for the 1000 hours test respectively were: unburned hydrocarbons (C3 vppm):0, 146, carbon monoxide (vppm):30, 2420; nitrogen oxides (vppm):5.7, 5.6.

  20. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  1. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  2. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  3. Structural and Morphological Properties of Carbon Supports: Effect of Catalyst degradation, ECS Transactions 33(1), 425 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; A. Young; M. Dutta; Z. Ahmad; V. Colbow; S. Wessel; S. Ye

    2011-04-01

    The object of this work was to identify correlations between performance losses of Pt electrocatalysts on carbon support materials and the chemical and morphological parameters that describe them. Accelerated stress testing, with an upper potential of 1.2 V, was used to monitor changes to cathode properties, including kinetic performance and effective platinum surface area losses. The structure and chemical compositions were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Digital Image Processing. As this is an ongoing study, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions, though a trend between support surface area overall performance loss was found to exist.

  4. High activity of carbon nanotubes supported binary and ternary Pd-based catalysts for methanol, ethanol and formic acid electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuchun; Ma, Guanshui; Bai, Zhongchao; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we have synthesized a series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes supported Pd, PdCu(molar ratio 1:1), PdSn(1:1) and PdCuSn(1:1:1) catalysts by chemical reduction with NaBH4 as a reducing agent. These catalysts are characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. During the potential cycling activation, it is found that the additive Cu is prone to suffer leaching while the dissolution of Sn rarely occurs. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that, the co-alloying of Pd with Cu and Sn can trigger the best catalytic activity enhancement as compared with the binary PdCu/CNTs, PdSn/CNTs and mono-component Pd/CNTs catalysts. The PdCuSn/CNTs reveals the most excellent activities toward methanol, ethanol and formic acid electro-oxidation and the corresponding mass activity can attain to 395.94, 872.70 and 534.83 mA mg-1 Pd, respectively. The possible promotion effect of additive Sn or/and Cu on the electrocatalytic activity improvement is also analyzed.

  5. Investigation of carbon supported PtW catalysts as CO tolerant anodes at high temperature in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2016-09-01

    The CO tolerance mechanism and the stability of carbon supported PtW electrocatalysts are evaluated in the anode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at two different temperatures. The electrocatalysts are characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron spectroscopy. Employed electrochemical techniques include cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping, fuel cell polarization, and online mass spectrometry. At a cell temperature of 85 °C, the PtW/C catalyst shows higher CO tolerance compared to Pt/C due an electronic effect of WOx in the Pt 5d band, which reduces the CO adsorption. An increase in hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO is observed for both the catalysts at a higher temperature, due to the decrease of the Pt-CO coverage. A reduction in the current densities occurs for the PtW/C catalyst in both polarization curves and cyclic voltammograms after 5000 cycles of the anode in the range of 0.1-0.7 V vs. RHE at 50 mVs-1. This decrease in performance is assigned to the dissolution of W, with a consequent increase in the membrane resistivity. However, the observed decline of performance is small either in the presence of pure H2 or in the presence of H2/CO.

  6. Activity and stability studies of titanates and titanate-carbon nanotubes supported Ag anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Mokhtar; Khairy, M.; Eid, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Titanate-SWCNT; synthesized via exploiting the interaction between TiO2 anatase with oxygen functionalized SWCNT, supported Ag nanoparticles and Ag/titanate are characterized using XRD, TEM-EDX-SAED, N2 adsorption, Photoluminescence, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. These samples are tested for methanol electrooxidation via using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurements. It is shown that Ag/titanate nanotubes exhibited superior electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation (4.2 mA cm-2) than titanate-SWCNT, Ag/titanate-SWCNT and titanate. This study reveals the existence of a strong metal-support interaction in Ag/titanate as explored via formation of Ti-O-Ag bond at 896 cm-1 and increasing surface area and pore volume (103 m2 g-1, 0.21 cm3 g-1) compared to Ag/titanate-SWCNT (71 m2 g-1, 0.175 cm3 g-1) that suffers perturbation and defects following incorporation of SWCNT and Ag. Embedding Ag preferably in SWCNT rather than titanate in Ag/titanate-SWCNT disturbs the electron transfer compared to Ag/titanate. Charge transfer resistance depicted from Nyquist impedance plots is found in the order of titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate-SWCNT > Ag/titanate. Accordingly, Ag/titanate indicates a slower current degradation over time compared to rest of catalysts. Conductivity measurements indicate that it follows the order Ag/titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate > titanate-SWCNT declaring that SWCNT affects seriously the conductivity of Ag(titanate) due to perturbations caused in titanate and sinking of electrons committed by Ago through SWCNT.

  7. Graphene supported heterogeneous catalysts for Li-O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaf, M.; Tocoglu, U.; Kartal, M.; Akbulut, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this study production and characterization of free-standing and flexible (i) graphene, (ii) α-MnO2/graphene, (iii) Pt/graphene (iv) α-MnO2/Pt/graphene composite cathodes for Li-air batteries were reported. Graphene supported heterogeneous catalysts were produced by a facile method. In order to prevent aggregation of graphene sheets and increase not only interlayer distance but also surface area, a trace amount multi-wall carbon nano tube (MWCNT) was introduced to the composite structure. The obtained composite catalysts were characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analyze and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical characterization tests including galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement of catalyst were carried out by using an ECC-Air test cell. These highly active graphene supported heterogeneous composite catalysts provide competitive properties relative to other catalyst materials for Li-air batteries.

  8. Design and preparation of highly active carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and platinum catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huanqiao; Xiao, Pu; Qiu, Xinping; Zhu, Wentao

    A novel electrocatalyst structure of carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and Pt (Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT) is reported. The Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts are prepared by a combination of improved sol-gel and ethylene glycol reduction methods. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the sulfated TiO 2 is amorphous and is coated uniformly on the surface of the CNTs. Pt nanoparticles of about 3.6 nm in size are homogenously dispersed on the sulfated TiO 2 surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis proves that the CNT surfaces are modified with sulfated TiO 2 and a high concentration of SO x, and adsorbed OH species exist on the surface of the sulfated TiO 2. Electrochemical studies are carried out using chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts have much higher catalytic activity and CO tolerance for methanol electrooxidation than Pt/TiO 2/CNTs, Pt/CNTs and commercial Pt/C.

  9. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    catalyst composition in an amount of about 5 to 25 (especially 7) percent by weight, SnO2 is present in an amount of about 30 to 40 (especially 40) percent by weight, and silica gel is present in an amount of 45 to 55 (especially 50) percent by weight. The composition of this catalyst was suggested by preliminary experiments in which a Pt/SnO2 catalyst was needed for bound water to enhance its activity. These experimental results suggested that if the water were bound to the surface, this water would enhance and prolong catalyst activity for long time periods. Because the catalyst is to be exposed to a laser gas mixture, and because a CO2 laser can tolerate only a very small amount of moisture, a hygroscopic support for the catalyst would provide the needed H2O into the gas. Silica gel is considered to be superior because of its property to chemisorb water on its surface over a wide range of moisture content.

  10. Carbon nanotube-supported Au-Pd alloy with cooperative effect of metal nanoparticles and organic ketone/quinone groups as a highly efficient catalyst for aerobic oxidation of amines.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiping; Chen, Jiashu; Kang, Jincan; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2016-05-21

    Functionalised carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Au-Pd alloy nanoparticles were highly efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of amines. We achieved the highest turnover frequencies (>1000 h(-1)) for the oxidative homocoupling of benzylamine and the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine. We discovered a cooperative effect between Au-Pd nanoparticles and ketone/quinone groups on CNTs. PMID:27125360

  11. Ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as efficient catalysts for selective conversion of synthesis gas to diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jincan; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2009-01-01

    Diesel do nicely: The title system is a highly selective Fischer-Tropsch catalyst for the production of C(10)-C(20) hydrocarbons (diesel fuel). The C(10)-C(20) selectivity strongly depends on the mean size of the Ru nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a mean size around 7 nm exhibit the highest C(10)-C(20) selectivity (ca. 65%) and a relatively higher turnover frequency for CO conversion. PMID:19248073

  12. Integrated current collector and catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Bregoli, Lawrence J.

    1985-10-22

    An integrated current collecting electrode for a molten carbonate fuel cell includes a corrugated metal conductive strip positioned in contact with a catalyst layer. The corrugations of the metal strip form a plurality of gas channels immediately adjacent the surface of the catalyst through which a reactant gas flows. Each channel is filled with a particulate material to maintain separation between the metal strip and the catalyst in ensuring gas channel integrity. The catalyst may be in the form of a compacted, particulate material provided the particle size of the material within the gas channels is larger than that of the catalyst particles to prevent catalyst migration to the metal conductor and provide reactant gas access to the catalyst layer. The gas channels formed by the corrugations of the metal strip are arranged in an offset pattern along the direction of gas flow for improved reactant gas distribution to the catalyst layer. The particulate material positioned within the gas flow channels may be a ceramic conductor such as a perovskite or a spinel for enhanced current collection.

  13. Integrated current collector and catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Bregoli, L.J.

    1984-10-17

    An integrated current collecting electrode for a molten carbonate fuel cell includes a corrugated metal conductive strip positioned in contact with a catalyst layer. The corrugations of the metal strip form a plurality of gas channels immediately adjacent the surface of the catalyst through which a reactant gas flows. Each channel is filled with a particulate material to maintain separation between the metal strip and the catalyst in ensuring gas channel integrity. The catalyst may be in the form of a compacted, particulate material provided the particle size of the material within the gas channels is larger than that of the catalyst particles to prevent catalyst migration to the metal conductor and provide reactant gas access to the catalyst layer. The gas channels formed by the corrugations of the metal strip are arranged in an offset pattern along the direction of gas flow for improved reactant gas distribution to the catalyst layer. The particulate material positioned within the gas flow channels may be a ceramic conductor such as a perovskite or a spinel for enhanced current collection.

  14. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing

    2012-03-20

    A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the invention comprises an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane therebetween, the anode and the cathode each comprising a patterned sheet of longitudinally aligned transition metal-containing carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon nanotubes are in contact with and are aligned generally perpendicular to the membrane, wherein a catalytically active transition metal is incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  15. Control of carbon monoxide (CO) from automobile exhaust by a dealuminated zeolite supported regenerative MnCo2O4 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Arun, P S; Ranjith, B P; Shibli, S M A

    2013-03-19

    We synthesized MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst with very high porosity on the surface of dealuminated zeolite molecular sieves (DAZMS) for CO oxidation under actual automobile conditions. The MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst was selected on the basis of preliminary DFT study using the software ADF BAND. The MnCo(2)O(4) catalyst had comparatively higher CO adsorption energy and very low oxygen vacancy formation energy. The synthesized MnCo(2)O(4)/DAZMS catalyst was characterized by XRD, XRF, BET, SEM, and Confocal Microscopy. The Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that porosity of the dealuminated zeolite surface was significantly enhanced after the catalyst loading process. The completely precious metal free and DAZMS-supported catalyst exhibited excellent CO oxidation ability with renewed activity for seven months under actual automobile conditions with reference to normal and cold start conditions. The synthesized MnCo(2)O(4)/DAZMS not only exhibited surprisingly high catalytic activity for CO oxidation at a temperature resembling a cold start period but was also sufficiently stable/active under actual automobile conditions and ambient conditions containing large amounts of CO,H(2)O,CO(2), and NO(x) at 155-715 °C. These significant results revealed the flexible use of the present catalyst system for a wide variety of automobiles from a small gasoline-fuelled vehicle to a large diesel-fuelled vehicle that may produce high CO-content exhaust. PMID:23406461

  16. Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

    1984-05-25

    This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopic investigations of bimetallic FeCo, FeNi, and FeRu model catalysts supported on magnesium hydroxide carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Nagorny, K.; Bubert, S.

    1987-11-01

    FeCo, FeNi, and FeRu alloys supported on basic magnesium carbonate have been prepared by precipitation from salt solutions at 340 K onto the support using ion exchange and have been subsequently annealed for 20 h under argon. The reduction, oxidation, and sintering behavior of the samples under H/sub 2/ or CO exposure has been investigated at 723 K by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The comparison of the resonance absorption areas of the spectra taken at 4 and 295 K allowed the calculation of the Debye temperatures and Debye-Waller factors of the different components. From the Debye-Waller factors the relative fractions could be extrapolated to the conditions at 0 K. The kinetics of the H/sub 2/ exposure showed an increase in the reduction velocity as well as in the degree of reduction in the sequence FeCo < FeNi < FeRu. Above a critical particle diameter a phase separation occurred because of the segregation of an iron-rich phase at the surface of the alloy particles. The kinetics of the CO exposure demonstrated that with FeCo clusters iron(III) surface oxide layers form, whereas with FeNi clusters iron(II) surface oxide layers are generated. FeCo clusters with a cobalt content of 25% form only unstable surface carbides, whereas clusters with a cobalt content of about 5% form stable bulk carbides. The velocity of carbide formation increases with decreasing particle size. Based on the present data a model is proposed which explains the behavior of FeMe/magnesium hydroxide carbonates catalysts in H/sub 2/ and CO atmospheres.

  18. Nanosized CuO and ZnO catalyst supported on titanium chip for conversion of carbon dioxide to methyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeong-Seok; Park, Chul-Min; Kim, Ki-Joong; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Chung, Min-Chul; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Sang-Chai; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2013-08-01

    In order to reutilize spent metallic titanium chips (TC) as catalyst support or photocatalytic materials, the surface of the TC was modified by thermal treatment under air atmosphere. TC-supported nanosized CuO and ZnO catalysts were prepared by impregnation (IMP) and co-precipitation (CP) method, respectively. The catalytic activity for CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH was investigated using a flow-typed reactor under various reaction pressures. The crystals of CuO and ZnO was well formed on TC. CO2 conversion, CH3OH selectivity, and CH3OH yield were obtained as a function of time on stream over CuO-ZnO/TC catalysts. Conversion of CO2 to CH3OH over CuO-ZnO/TC catalyst by CP method and CuO/ZnO/TC catalyst by IMP method were ca. 16% and ca. 12%, respectively. Conversion of CO2 over CuO-ZnO/TC catalyst by CP method was increased with increasing reaction temperature in the range of 15-30 atm. Maximum selectivity and yield to CH3OH over CuO-ZnO/TC at 250 degrees C were ca. 90% at 20 atm and ca. 18.2% at 30 atm, respectively. PMID:23882842

  19. Mo-Fe catalysts supported on activated carbon for synthesis of liquid fuels by the Fischer-Tropsch process: effect of Mo addition on reducibility, activity, and hydrocarbon selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; James Wright; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2006-12-15

    The effects of Mo loading (0-12 wt %) on the properties of activated-carbon- (AC-) supported Fe-Cu-K catalysts and their performance for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are studied. Physicochemical properties studied include particle size, reducibility, and dispersion, and catalytic properties include activity, selectivity, and stability. Catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and CO chemisorption. Catalyst performance was studied at 310-320{sup o}C, 2.2 MPa, 3 Nl/g-cat/h, and H{sub 2}/CO = 0.9. Reaction results in a fixed-bed reactor show that addition of 6% Mo into the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalyst improves catalyst stability without sacrificing activity, but activity is suppressed dramatically on a 12% Mo-loaded catalyst. Detectable hydrocarbons of C{sub 1} to C{sub 34} are produced on the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalysts with or without Mo. However, the addition of Mo results in the production of more CH{sub 4} and less C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons. The Mo promoter greatly enhances secondary reactions of olefins, leading to a large amount of internal olefins (i.e., other than 1-olefins) in the product. TPR shows that a strong interaction between Fe and Mo oxides is present, and the extent of reduction of Fe is suppressed after addition of Mo to the Fe-Cu-K catalyst. CO-chemisorption and XRD studies show increased iron dispersion and decreased particle size of the iron carbide and iron oxide after the addition of Mo. Segregation of iron active sites, thereby preventing them from agglomerating, and a larger number of active sites on the 6% Mo catalyst are possible reasons for the improved stability and higher activity of Mo-promoted catalysts. 54 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  1. Performance and durability of carbon black-supported Pd catalyst covered with silica layers in membrane-electrode assemblies of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keitaro; Ito, Mizuki; Sato, Yasushi; Takenaka, Sakae; Kishida, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Pd metal particles supported on a high surface area carbon black (Pd/CB) were covered with silica layers to improve the durability under severe cathode condition of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The performance and the durability of the silica-coated Pd/CB (SiO2/Pd/CB) were investigated by rotating disk electrode (RDE) in aqueous HClO4 and single cell test of the membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs). SiO2/Pd/CB showed excellent durability exceeding Pt/CB during potential cycle in single cell test as well as in RDE measurement while Pd/CB significantly degraded. Furthermore, the MEA using SiO2/Pd/CB as the cathode catalyst showed higher performance than that using Pd/CB even in the initial state. The catalytic activity of SiO2/Pd/CB was higher than that of Pd/CB, and the drop of the cell performances due to the inhibition of electron conduction, proton conduction, and oxygen diffusion by the silica layer was not significant. It has been shown that the silica-coating is a very practical technique that can stabilize metal species originally unstable in the cathode condition of PEMFCs without a decrease in the cell performance.

  2. Catalyst-support interactions: Electronic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles T.

    2012-08-01

    Oxide materials typically used as supports for the active metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalysts are known to influence catalytic activity through strong metal-support interactions. Researchers have now revealed electronic interactions between platinum and ceria that go well beyond known effects and lead to excellent catalytic activity.

  3. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing

    2010-07-20

    A method of making a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane there between. A bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated in the nanotubes forms at least one portion of the MEA and is in contact with the membrane. A combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into a first reaction zone maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is transmitted to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes. The nanotubes are in contact with a portion of the MEA at production or being positioned in contact thereafter. Methods of forming a PEMFC are also disclosed.

  4. Fly ash zeolite catalyst support for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campen, Adam

    This dissertation research aimed at evaluating a fly ash zeolite (FAZ) catalyst support for use in heterogeneous catalytic processes. Gas phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) over a fixed-bed of the prepared catalyst/FAZ support was identified as an appropriate process for evaluation, by comparison with commercial catalyst supports (silica, alumina, and 13X). Fly ash, obtained from the Wabash River Generating Station, was first characterized using XRD, SEM/EDS, particle size, and nitrogen sorption techniques. Then, a parametric study of a two-step alkali fusion/hydrothermal treatment process for converting fly ash to zeolite frameworks was performed by varying the alkali fusion agent, agent:flyash ratio, fusion temperature, fused ash/water solution, aging time, and crystallization time. The optimal conditions for each were determined to be NaOH, 1.4 g NaOH: 1 g fly ash, 550 °C, 200 g/L, 12 hours, and 48 hours. This robust process was applied to the fly ash to obtain a faujasitic zeolite structure with increased crystallinity (40 %) and surface area (434 m2/g). Following the modification of fly ash to FAZ, ion exchange of H+ for Na+ and cobalt incipient wetness impregnation were used to prepare a FTS catalyst. FTS was performed on the catalysts at 250--300 °C, 300 psi, and with a syngas ratio H2:CO = 2. The HFAZ catalyst support loaded with 11 wt% cobalt resulted in a 75 % carbon selectivity for C5 -- C18 hydrocarbons, while methane and carbon dioxide were limited to 13 and 1 %, respectively. Catalyst characterization was performed by XRD, N2 sorption, TPR, and oxygen pulse titration to provide insight to the behavior of each catalyst. Overall, the HFAZ compared well with silica and 13X supports, and far exceeded the performance of the alumina support under the tested conditions. The successful completion of this research could add value to an underutilized waste product of coal combustion, in the form of catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  5. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  6. Nanoparticles of Ag with a Pt and Pd rich surface supported on carbon as a new catalyst for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Pech, I. E.; Gervasio, Dominic F.; Pérez-Robles, J. F.

    2015-02-01

    In the first part of this work, the feasibility of developing a catalyst with high activity for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid media and with low Pt loading was demonstrated by over coating a silver (Ag) nanoparticle with a shell of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) [7]. The results show that best activity is not directly related to a higher PtPd loading on the surface of the Ag. The best catalyst in a series of this type of catalyst is found with Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C which gives a specific activity for oxygen reduction, jk (in units of mA cm-2 of real area), of 0.07 mA cm-2 at 0.85 V vs. NHE, as compared to 0.04 mA cm-2 when with a commercial Pt on carbon catalyst (Pt20/C) is used in an identical electrode except for the catalyst. The mass activity, jm (in units of mA μg-1 of Pt), for Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C is 0.04 mA μg-1 of Pt at 0.85 V vs. NHE, whereas that for the Pt20/C gives 0.02 mA μg-1 of Pt, showing Ag@Pt0.3Pd0.3/C is a lower-cost catalyst, because using a Ag core and Pd with Pt in the shell gives the highest catalytic activity using less Pt.

  7. XPS analysis by exclusion of a-carbon layer on silicon carbide nanowires by a gold catalyst-supported metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang-Hun; Kim, Myoung-Hwa; Hyun, Jae-Sung; Kim, Young Dok; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2010-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nano-structures would be favorable for application in high temperature, high power, and high frequency nanoelectronic devices. In this study, we have deposited cubic-SiC nanowires on Au-deposited Si(001) substrates using 1,3-disilabutane as a single molecular precursor through a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. The general deposition pressure and temperature were 3.0 x 10(-6) Torr and 1000 degrees C respectively, with the deposition carried out for 1 h. Au played an important role as a catalyst in growing the SiC nanowires. SiC nanowires were grown using a gold catalyst, with amorphous carbon surrounding the final SiC nanowire. Thus, the first step involved removal of the remaining SiO2, followed by slicing of the amorphous carbon into thin layers using a heating method. Finally, the thinly sliced amorphous carbon is perfectly removed using an Ar sputtering method. As a result, this method may provide more field emission properties for the SiC nanowires that are normally inhibited by the amorphous carbon layer. Therefore, exclusion of the amorphous carbon layer is expected to improve the overall emission properties of SiC nanowires. PMID:20355494

  8. Influence of the nature of a Co-catalyst support on the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, A.L.; Budtsov, V.S.; Krylova, A.Yu.

    1994-12-31

    The chemical preparation of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is described. Cobalt was utilized as the catalyst, and aluminosilicates were utilized as catalyst supports. Catalyst activity and specificity are described.

  9. DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

    2011-05-24

    The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to

  10. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  11. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  12. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Rieke, Peter C.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    A series of cathodes using Pt supported onto graphene sheets with different contents of carbon black in the catalyst layer were prepared and characterized. Carbon black was added as a spacer between two-dimensional graphene sheets in the catalyst layer to study its effect on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Electrochemical properties and surface morphology of the cathodes with and without carbon black were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, ac-impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical polarization technique, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that carbon black effectively modifies the array of graphene supports, resulting in more Pt nanoparticles available for electrochemical reaction and better mass transport in the catalyst layer.

  13. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  14. Siloxene-supported catalysts for ethylene polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Badley, R.D.; Johnson, M.M. )

    1993-06-01

    A new type of Ziegler ethylene polymerization catalyst has been formed using as a support, siloxene, a layer compound with an empirical formula of Si[sub 2]H[sub 2]O. Siloxene is a reducing compound, and it reacts with excess TiCl[sub 4], giving an inactive brown solid with 5.2% Ti and 8.0% Cl. However, when additional TiCl[sub 4] is reduced by a metal alkyl and precipitated onto the brown solid, a catalyst with moderate activity is formed. Maximum activity for ethylene polymerization was obtained when the catalyst was pretreated with n-butylmagnesium, contained 0.06 g CaCl[sub 2]/g siloxene, and was run at 80[degrees]C with 40-50 ppm of TEA cocatalyst. These catalysts are very active in the initial portion of the reaction, but the activity decreases rapidly over the first 30 min. Their hydrogen response and hexene incorporation is similar to that observed with other Ziegler catalysts. 17 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M. A.; Daza, L.

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used.

  16. Optimized CeO2 content of the carbon nanofiber support of PtRu catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitomo, Hikari; Ishitobi, Hirokazu; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A series of CeO2 embedded carbon nanofibers, CECNFs, with different CeO2 contents was prepared by an electrospinning technique. About 15 wt% PtRu nanoparticles were deposited on the fibers, and the effect of the CeO2 content on the methanol oxidation activity of the catalyst, PtRu/CECNF, was investigated. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and CO stripping electrochemical measurements and physical characterization along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were carried out on the prepared catalysts. The mass activity of the PtRu was significantly increased by the CeO2 addition up to Ce/C = 0.4, and the maximized activity was 2 times higher than that without CeO2. The increased activity was attributed to the strong interaction between the metal and oxide in the embedded nanofiber structure. A DMFC with the PtRu/CECNF exhibited more than 2.5 times high power density with one half the PtRu loading compared to that of the commercial catalyst, PtRu/Ccom.

  17. Comparison of the performance of activated carbon-supported noble metal catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, A.; Sandt, E.J.A.X. van de; Hollander, M.A. den; Bekkum, H. van; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1998-07-01

    The hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} over 1 wt% palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and rhenium on activated carbon has been studied in a micro-flow reactor, in a temperature range of 450--540 K, H{sub 2}/CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} feed ratios between 1.5 and 6, a pressure of 0.4 MPa, and a WHSV of 1 g/(g{center_dot}h). The main products of the reaction for all investigated catalysts were CHClF{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, and methane. According to their performance, the catalysts could be divided into four groups: rhenium showing no conversion of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, palladium with a high selectivity for CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, iridium and ruthenium with a high selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}, and platinum and rhodium with moderate selectivity for CHClF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. The adsorption of chlorine on the metal surface plays an important role in the selectivity. Strong chlorine adsorption leads to a higher selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}. These results are consistent with a reaction mechanism in which difluorocarbene is the key intermediate. Apparently, the same kinetic network applies to all metals studied. The performance of the catalysts changed as a function of time on stream. Palladium, rhodium, and especially ruthenium deactivated during reaction, whereas the activity of iridium and platinum increased. This can be explained by two opposite effects. On the one hand, the dispersion of all catalysts increased during reaction, which can explain an increase in activity as a function of time on stream. Apparently, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} hydrogenolysis conditions are suitable for dispersing noble metal catalysts on activated carbon. On the other hand, deactivation takes place by the adsorption of chlorine and deposits of heavy halogenated products.

  18. Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald; Withers, Howard P.

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  19. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fly ash derived catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dunens, Oscar M; MacKenzie, Kieran J; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an allotrope of carbon with unique properties that make them potentially useful in a vast range of applications. However, CNTs are predominantly produced using expensive and/or nonrecyclable catalyst supports, e.g., mesoporous silica and alumina. In this work, coal combustion fly ash, a bulk waste product with limited uses, was impregnated with iron nitrate and successfully used as a substrate to produce industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition. CNTs were analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The most successful catalyst trialed at 650 degrees C using ethylene as a carbon source was a 5 wt % Fe fly ash catalyst, which produced a CNT yield in respect to metal loading of approximately 82.5%. The MWNTs had outer diameters of between 12 and 20 nm with a reasonable degree of wall graphitization (I(G)/I(D) of 1.17). Advantages of utilizing fly ash as a catalyst support are its availability at low cost at the megaton scale, its high thermal stability, and suitability for use in industrial fluidized bed reactors. Potential applications for the fly ash produced CNTs include use in composite materials. PMID:19921910

  20. Ruthenium carbonyl catalyst supported on ceric oxide for preparation of olefins from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  1. Ruthenium carbonyl catalyst supported on ceric oxide for preparation of olefins from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Pierantozzi, R.

    1985-04-02

    A catalyst comprising a ruthenium carbonyl compound deposited on a cerium oxide-containing support material provides for the selective synthesis of low molecular weight olefinic hydrocarbons from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  2. Growth of carbon nanotubes using nanocrystalline carbon catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong Seob; Choi, Eun Chang; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-03-01

    The basic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) involves dissociation of hydrocarbon molecules over a metal layer as a catalyst. Generally, the metals used for the catalyst include nickel, cobalt, gold, iron, platinum, and palladium. However, the metal catalyst used with CNTs could have a harmful influence on the electrical properties of electronic devices. Therefore, we propose the use of nanocrystalline carbon (nc-C) as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs. We used a nc-C catalyst layer deposited by the closed-field unbalanced magnetron (CFUBM) sputtering method, and CNTs were grown by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) method with ammonia (NH 3) as a pretreatment and acetylene gas (C 2H 2) as a carbon source. The CNTs were grown on the nc-C layers pretreated with a variation of the pretreatment time. The characteristics of the pretreated nc-C layers and the grown CNTs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Also, the structural variation of the pretreated nc-C layers was investigated by Raman measurement. We used the nc-C catalyst without metal, and we confirmed that our CNTs were composed with only carbon elements through an EDS measurement. Also, the pretreatment time was attributed to the growth of CNTs.

  3. Chemisorption on supported-metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, S. G.; Bose, S. M.; Sulston, K. W.

    1988-07-01

    A Gree-function formalism is developed to describe the electronic and chemisorption properties of a supported-metal composite substrate. Within the framework of the tight-binding approximation, the metal catalyst is represented by a finite chain of d-orbitals, while the semi-infinite semiconductor support is characterized by a linear chain of alternating s- and p-orbitals. The Anderson-Newns model is used to calculate the chemisorption energy and adatom charge transfer for hydrogen chemisorption on the Ni/ZnO composite system.

  4. Interaction of carbon and sulfur on metal catalysts. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.

    1988-01-21

    Goal is to study selective poisoning by fractional monolayers of chemisorbed sulfur on metal catalysts. A Pt catalyst on alumina support has been synthesized. Stabilized Fe catalysts without and with half monolayers of chemicsorbed S have been prepared. These catalysts, along with a Ni-alumina reference catalyst, will be used in experimental studies. 2 figs.

  5. Coarse-pored ceramic supports for pyrolysis catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Potapova, L.L.; Cherches, B.Kh.; Egiazarov, Yu.G.

    1988-03-20

    One promising trend in improvement of pyrolysis of hydrocarbon feedstocks is the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the process. The industrial use of highly effective catalysts would result in substantially increased product yields and in decrease of energy consumption in comparison with the requirements of drastic thermal processes. The aims of the present work were to obtain a mechanically strong coarse-pored ceramic support for pyrolysis catalysts and to study the influence of various factors on formation of its structure. The support material was made from an industrial ceramic mass of the following composition (%): koalin 30, plastic refractory clay 21, quartz 32, pegmatite 17. Various additives were used for formation of a porous structure: noncombustible highly porous (pumice, claydite), partially combustible (shungite), and completely combustible (SKT) activated carbon). The authors results show that 15 mass % of SKT carbon (particle size 0.1-0.2 mm) and 1-2 mass % of sodium trimetaphosphate should be added to the ceramic mass. The crushing strength of the resultant support samples reaches 550-630 kg/cm/sup 2/, with 34-35% porosity. Under the optimal conditions of pyrolysis of a straight-run gasoline fraction the catalyst obtained by deposition of 12 mass % of In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 4% K/sub 2/O on the synthesized support gives a yield of 39-41 mass % of ethylene and 61-62 mass % of unsaturated C/sub 2/-C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons, with 88-90 mass % gasification.

  6. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  7. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  8. Attrition resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2004-05-25

    A catalyst support having improved attrition resistance and a catalyst produced therefrom. The catalyst support is produced by a method comprising the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina having no catalytic material added thereto with an acidic aqueous solution having an acidity level effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the calcined .gamma.-alumina.

  9. Influence of sp(3)-sp(2) Carbon Nanodomains on Metal/Support Interaction, Catalyst Durability, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Campos-Roldán, Carlos A; Ramos-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Huerta, Rosa G; Vargas García, Jorge R; Balbuena, Perla B; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, platinum nanoparticles were impregnated by two different techniques, namely the carbonyl chemical route and photodeposition, onto systematically surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The different interactions between platinum nanoparticles with sp(2)-sp(3) carbon nanodomains were investigated. The oxidation of an adsorbed monolayer of carbon monoxide, used to probe electronic catalytic modification, suggests a selective nucleation of platinum nanoparticles onto sp(2) carbon nanodomains when photodeposition synthesis is carried out. XPS attests the catalytic center electronic modification obtained by photodeposition. DFT calculations were used to determine the interaction energy of a Pt cluster with sp(2) and sp(3) carbon surfaces as well as with oxidized ones. The interaction energy and electronic structure of the platinum cluster presents dramatic changes as a function of the support surface chemistry, which also modifies its catalytic properties evaluated by the interaction with CO. The interaction energy was calculated to be 8-fold higher on sp(3) and oxidized surfaces in comparison to sp(2) domains. Accelerated Stability Test (AST) was applied only on the electronic-modified materials to evaluate the active phase degradation and their activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The stability of photodeposited materials is correlated with the surface chemical nature of supports indicating that platinum nanoparticles supported onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the highest sp(2) character show the higher stability and activity toward ORR. PMID:27494283

  10. In situ FTIR investigation of acetic acid electrooxidation on carbon supported Pt-Sn based trimetallic catalysts: Influence of the nature of the third metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhan, Seden; Léger, Jean-Michel; Kadırgan, Figen

    2014-12-01

    The effect of adding a third metal (Ni, Co, Pd, Rh) to Pt-Sn/C catalyst has been investigated for the adsorption and oxidation of acetic acid in acidic medium using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the decomposition of acetic acid on the surface leads to the formation of different intermediate species and products such as acetate, acetyl, carbonate, CO and CO2. The reaction pathway of CO2 production proceeds via the formation of acetyl or carbonate through surface acetate species. It has been found that the selectivity of the acetate was enhanced by the addition of any third metal. However, the presence of Pd or Co increases the relative intensity of IR band for CO2. This is probably due to success in facilitating of the Csbnd C bond cleavage of acetyl. On the other hand, the conversion of acetate to carbonate is strongly affected by the adsorbed water, as is evident from the pronounced changes in the OH stretching region with the presence of Pd or Ni.

  11. Design strategies for the molecular level synthesis of supported catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Staci L; Marks, Tobin J; Stair, Peter C

    2012-02-21

    Supported catalysts, metal or oxide catalytic centers constructed on an underlying solid phase, are making an increasingly important contribution to heterogeneous catalysis. For example, in industry, supported catalysts are employed in selective oxidation, selective reduction, and polymerization reactions. Supported structures increase the thermal stability, dispersion, and surface area of the catalyst relative to the neat catalytic material. However, structural and mechanistic characterization of these catalysts presents a formidable challenge because traditional preparations typically afford complex mixtures of structures whose individual components cannot be isolated. As a result, the characterization of supported catalysts requires a combination of advanced spectroscopies for their characterization, unlike homogeneous catalysts, which have relatively uniform structures and can often be characterized using standard methods. Moreover, these advanced spectroscopic techniques only provide ensemble averages and therefore do not isolate the catalytic function of individual components within the mixture. New synthetic approaches are required to more controllably tailor supported catalyst structures. In this Account, we review advances in supported catalyst synthesis and characterization developed in our laboratories at Northwestern University. We first present an overview of traditional synthetic methods with a focus on supported vanadium oxide catalysts. We next describe approaches for the design and synthesis of supported polymerization and hydrogenation catalysts, using anchoring techniques which provide molecular catalyst structures with exceptional activity and high percentages of catalytically significant sites. We then highlight similar approaches for preparing supported metal oxide catalysts using atomic layer deposition and organometallic grafting. Throughout this Account, we describe the use of incisive spectroscopic techniques, including high

  12. Life Support Catalyst Regeneration Using Ionic Liquids and In Situ Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Karr, Laurel J.; Paley, Mark S.; Donovan, David N.; Kramer, Teersa J.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen recovery from metabolic carbon dioxide is an enabling capability for long-duration manned space flight. Complete recovery of oxygen (100%) involves the production of solid carbon. Catalytic approaches for this purpose, such as Bosch technology, have been limited in trade analyses due in part to the mass penalty for high catalyst resupply caused by carbon fouling of the iron or nickel catalyst. In an effort to mitigate this challenge, several technology approaches have been proposed. These approaches have included methods to prolong the life of the catalysts by increasing the total carbon mass loading per mass catalyst, methods for simplified catalyst introduction and removal to limit the resupply container mass, methods of using in situ resources, and methods to regenerate catalyst material. Research and development into these methods is ongoing, but only use of in situ resources and/or complete regeneration of catalyst material has the potential to entirely eliminate the need for resupply. The use of ionic liquids provides an opportunity to combine these methods in a technology approach designed to eliminate the need for resupply of oxygen recovery catalyst. Here we describe the results of an initial feasibility study using ionic liquids and in situ resources for life support catalyst regeneration, we discuss the key challenges with the approach, and we propose future efforts to advance the technology.

  13. Development of Novel Supported Gold Catalysts: A Materials Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Since Haruta et al. discovered that small gold nanoparticles finely dispersed on certain metal oxide supports can exhibit surprisingly high activity in CO oxidation below room temperature, heterogeneous catalysis by supported gold nanoparticles has attracted tremendous attention. The majority of publications deal with the preparation and characterization of conventional gold catalysts (e.g., Au/TiO{sub 2}), the use of gold catalysts in various catalytic reactions, as well as elucidation of the nature of the active sites and reaction mechanisms. In this overview, we highlight the development of novel supported gold catalysts from a materials perspective. Examples, mostly from those reported by our group, are given concerning the development of simple gold catalysts with single metal-support interfaces and heterostructured gold catalysts with complicated interfacial structures. Catalysts in the first category include active Au/SiO{sub 2} and Au/metal phosphate catalysts, and those in the second category include catalysts prepared by pre-modification of supports before loading gold, by post-modification of supported gold catalysts, or by simultaneous dispersion of gold and an inorganic component onto a support. CO oxidation has generally been employed as a probe reaction to screen the activities of these catalysts. These novel gold catalysts not only provide possibilities for applied catalysis, but also furnish grounds for fundamental research.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch reaction studies with supported ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.C.; Mulder, H. )

    1993-09-01

    An investigation was undertaken to examine the production of low molecular weight alkenes (C[sub 2][sup =] to C[sup =][sub 4]) and high molecular weight hydrocarbons (C[sub 5]+) from synthesis gas in a fixed bed reactor with supported ruthenium catalyst. The catalyst used consisted of 0.5% ruthenium on gamma-alumina with a 43% metal dispersion. An experimental reactor consisting of a single 12.5-mm-diameter stainless-steel tube with catalyst packings up to 1 m long, surrounded by an aluminium block with heating elements and an outer insulating ceramic block was used. The effect of temperature, synthesis gas composition (CO/H[sub 2]), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), and bed length on carbon monoxide conversion and selectivity was examined and results are reported. The presence of secondary reactions consisting of hydrogenation and chain growth involving alkenes along the reactor bed was observed. These reactions favour the formation of alkanes and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. The alkene to alkane ratio in the product can be increased by restricting the hydrogenation reaction with the use of a synthesis gas mixture with a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio.

  15. Growth Mechanism Of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared By Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes were synthesized by fluidized floating catalyst method which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C using camphor oil as carbon source and Argon as carrier gas. Optimum concentration for trimetal alloy catalyst; Fe/Ni/Mg has been found to be the suitable catalyst for producing carbon nanotubes at high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. The morphology of carbon nanotubes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). This result demonstrates that fluidized floating catalyst method is suitable for effective formation of CNTs with average size ˜11.5 nm. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case.

  16. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  17. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  18. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  19. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-12-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

  20. Effect of support materials on supported platinum catalyst prepared using a supercritical fluid deposition technique and their catalytic performance for hydrogen-rich gas production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Burçak; Irmak, Sibel; Hesenov, Arif; Erbatur, Oktay; Erkey, Can

    2012-11-01

    A number of supported Pt catalysts have been prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide deposition technique using various supports. The reduction of Pt precursor to metal performed by heat treatment under nitrogen flow. The prepared catalysts were evaluated for gasification of wheat straw biomass hydrolysates and glucose solution for hydrogen-rich gas production. The activities of the catalysts were highly affected by distribution, amount and particle sizes of platinum on the support. In general carbon-based supported Pt catalysts exhibited better catalytic activity compared to other supports to be used. Compared to biomass hydrolysate feed, gasification of glucose always resulted in higher volume of gas mixture, however, hydrogen selectivity was decreased in all catalyst except multi-walled carbon nanotube. The deposition of Pt particles inner side of that support makes the large organic substrates inaccessible to reach and react with those metal particles. PMID:22939187

  1. Method of forming supported doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-04-22

    A method of forming a supported oxidation catalyst includes providing a support comprising a metal oxide or a metal salt, and depositing first palladium compound particles and second precious metal group (PMG) metal particles on the support while in a liquid phase including at least one solvent to form mixed metal comprising particles on the support. The PMG metal is not palladium. The mixed metal particles on the support are separated from the liquid phase to provide the supported oxidation catalyst.

  2. Membrane fuel cell cathode catalysts based on titanium oxide supported platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Christian; Jusys, Zenonas; Wassner, Maximilian; Hüsing, Nicola; Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-07-21

    The potential of platinum catalysts supported on pure, nitrogen-, or carbon-doped titania for application in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, is investigated. The oxide supports are synthesized by using a sol-gel route. Modification with nitrogen and carbon doping is achieved by thermal decomposition of urea and the structure-directing agent P123. Platinum nanoparticles are prepared by reduction of a Pt(IV) salt in ethylene glycol and subsequently immobilized on different support materials. Structural and electronic properties of the support materials and the resulting catalysts are characterized by various methods, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results and electrochemical characterization of the support materials and platinum nanoparticle catalysts indicate distinct support effects in the catalysts. The electrocatalytic performance of these catalysts in the ORR, as determined in rotating ring disc electrode measurements, is promising. Also here, distinct support effects can be identified. Correlations with the structural/electronic and the electrochemical properties are discussed, as well as the role of metal-support interactions. PMID:24850442

  3. Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

    1999-06-29

    We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

  4. Characteristics of catalyst for carbon monoxide coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.H.; Ma, X.; He, F.; Chen, H.F.

    1995-07-01

    The use of carbon monoxide to produce organic compounds is an important research area for the future. In particular the carbon monoxide coupling reaction takes place at moderate reaction conditions,with low consumption of energy, to produce oxalic acid and oxalate. The chemicals are feedstocks for ethylene glycol synthesis by hydrogenation of oxalate, as well as for products such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, polymers, and fine chemicals. The carbon monoxide coupling reaction on supported metal catalysts Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pd-Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used to study the characteristics of the catalyst under different conditions. The results indicated that the catalytic activation temperature influenced the catalytic activity and that there was an optimum activation temperature. The characteristics of effective coupling catalysts were found to be smaller surface areas and bigger pores, for example the {alpha}-phase of aluminum oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis results show that the catalytic reaction of CO coupling occurs via a redox mechanism.

  5. A Catalyst for Collaboration: Supporting Technology in Teaching through Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alway, Mark; Lewis, Tom; Macklin, Scott

    The Web-based Catalyst Initiative was created at the University of Washington (UW) to support innovation in teaching through technology. The approach utilizes participatory design techniques in the development of next generation technologies in order to scale beyond early to second wave adopters. Catalyst is the product of a support strategy that…

  6. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  7. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  8. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  9. Oxidation-resistant catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhina, Harmeet

    In automotive applications, when proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are subjected to frequent startup-shutdown cycles, a significant drop in performance is observed. One reason for this drop in performance is oxidation of the carbon in the catalyst layer when cathode potential excursions as high as 1.5V are observed. In this work, non-carbon based catalyst support materials were studied. The materials investigated include: tungsten carbide (WC), tungsten oxide (WOx), and niobium (Nb) or tungsten (W) doped titania. Platinum was dispersed on commercial samples of WC and WO x. Stability tests were performed by stepping the materials between 0.6 to 1.8V. Higher stability of both WC and WOx was observed compared to carbon based commercial catalyst (HiSpec 4000). The performance of Pt supported on WC or WOx was found to be lower than that of Pt/C due to poor dispersion of Pt on these low surface area commercial powders. High surface area Nb and W doped titania materials synthesized using sol-gel techniques were subjected to several heat treatments and atmospheres, and their resulting physical properties characterized. The materials' phase changes and their impact on electrical conductivity were evaluated. W doped titania was found to be resistive, and for Nb doped titania, the rutile phase was found to be more conductive than the anatase phase. Conventionally, 10-50 wt% Pt is supported on carbon, but as the non-carbon catalyst support materials have different densities, similar mass ratios of catalyst to support will not result in directly comparable performances. It is recommended that the ratio of Pt surface area to the support surface area should be similar when comparing Pt supported on carbon to Pt supported on a non-carbon support. A normalization approach was investigated in this work, and the ORR performance of 40wt.%Pt/C was found to be similar to that of 10wt.%Pt/Nb-TiO2. Fuel cell performance tests showed significantly higher stability of Pt on Nb

  10. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Effect of Reducing Agent for Aqueous-Phase Synthesis Over Ru Nanoparticle and Supported Ru Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pendyala, Venkat Ramana Rao; Shafer, Wilson D.; Jacobs, Gary; Graham, Uschi M.; Khalid, Syed; Davis, Burtron H.

    2014-12-27

    The effect of the reducing agent on the performance of a ruthenium nanoparticle catalyst was investigated during aqueous-phase Fischer–Tropsch synthesis using a 1 L stirred tank reactor in the batch mode of operation. For the purpose of comparison, the activity and selectivity of NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst were also studied. NaBH4 and hydrogen were used as reducing agents in our study, and hydrogen reduced catalysts exhibited higher activities than the NaBH4 reduced catalysts, because of higher extent of reduction and a relatively lower tendency toward agglomeration of Ru particles. The Ru nanoparticle catalyst displayed higher activities than the NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst for both reducing agents. NaBH4 reduced catalysts are less active and the carbon dioxide selectivity is higher than the hydrogen reduced catalysts. The activity of the supported Ru catalyst (Ru/NaY) was 75 % of that of the Ru nanoparticle catalyst, and has the benefit of easy wax/catalyst slurry separation by filtration. Finally, the hydrogen reduced supported Ru catalyst exhibited superior selectivity towards hydrocarbons (higher C5+ selectivity and lower selectivity to methane) than all other catalysts tested.

  11. Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  12. Growth of carbon nanotubes on surfaces: the effects of catalyst and substrate.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Angel Berenguer; Geng, Junfeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of synthesising air-stable, nearly monodispersed bimetallic colloids of Co/Pd and Fe/Mo of varying compositions as active catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Using these catalysts we have investigated the effects of catalyst and substrate on the carbon nanostructures formed in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. We will show how it is possible to assess the influence of both the catalyst and the support on the controlled growth of carbon nanotube and nanofiber arrays. The importance of the composition of the catalytic nuclei will be put into perspective with other results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of other synthetic parameters such as the nature of the nanoparticle catalysts will also be analysed and discussed in detail. PMID:23882847

  13. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  14. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Titanium Dioxide as a Catalyst Support in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    The lack of stability is a challenge for most heterogeneous catalysts. During operations, the agglomeration of particles may block the active sites of the catalyst, which is believed to contribute to its instability. Recently, titanium oxide (TiO2) was introduced as an alternative support material for heterogeneous catalyst due to the effect of its high surface area stabilizing the catalysts in its mesoporous structure. TiO2 supported metal catalysts have attracted interest due to TiO2 nanoparticles high activity for various reduction and oxidation reactions at low pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, TiO2 was found to be a good metal oxide catalyst support due to the strong metal support interaction, chemical stability, and acid-base property. The aforementioned properties make heterogeneous TiO2 supported catalysts show a high potential in photocatalyst-related applications, electrodes for wet solar cells, synthesis of fine chemicals, and others. This review focuses on TiO2 as a support material for heterogeneous catalysts and its potential applications. PMID:25383380

  16. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  17. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rehr, J J; Vila, F D

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of "dynamic structural disorder" (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale. PMID:24712802

  18. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei Fang; Li, Li; Wang, Shaobin; Zhu, Zhonghua; Lu, Gaoqing; Yan, Zifeng

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H2 adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. PMID:17547209

  19. Catalytic ammonia decomposition over industrial-waste-supported Ru catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pei Fang Ng; Li Li; Shaobin Wang; Zhonghua Zhu; Gaoqing Lu; Zifeng Yan

    2007-05-15

    Industrial solid wastes (fly ash and red mud, a by-product of the aluminium industry) have been employed as supports for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Physical and chemical treatments on red mud were conducted and these modified supports were also used for preparation of Ru-based catalysts. Those Ru catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as N2 adsorption, H{sub 2} adsorption, XRD, XPS, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and were then tested for catalytic ammonia decomposition to hydrogen. It was found that red-mud-supported Ru catalyst exhibits higher ammonia conversion and hydrogen production than fly-ash-supported catalyst. Heat and chemical treatments of the red mud greatly improve the catalytic activity. Moreover, a combination of acid and heat treatments produces the highest catalytic conversion of ammonia. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Supported molybdenum carbide catalysts: Structure-function relationships for hydrodenitrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Dolce, G.M.; Thompson, L.T.

    1997-12-31

    There continues to be a need for new catalysts that can efficiently upgrade petroleum crudes. Heavy oils and coal-derived liquids contain higher levels of nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen than conventional light crudes, and therefore require more rigorous refining. Currently available commercial catalysts are not as active and efficient at hydrotreating these heavy oils compared to light crudes. Early transition metal carbides and nitrides have been shown to be active for the hydrotreatment of model compounds and petroleum crudes. In this paper the authors describe their investigations of the structural and compositional properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported molybdenum carbides and efforts to correlate these properties with their pyridine and quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activities. The HDN activities of the materials scaled linearly with the loading and oxygen chemisorptive uptake. Oxygen chemisorption results also suggested that the molybdenum carbide particles were highly dispersed and perhaps raft-like. Using temperature programmed desorption and infrared spectroscopy of carbon monoxide, they were able to identify two types of sites on the carbides; sites on top of the particle and sites at the perimeter. They have tentatively concluded that the most active sites for HDN were on top of the supported carbide particles.

  1. Hydroliquefaction of coal with supported catalysts: 1980 status review

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, Leon M.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Tischer, Richard E.

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of the program have been to determine catalyst deactivation kinetic models and catalyst deactivation modes for supported Co-Mo and Ni-Mo catalysts used primarily in coal liquefaction via the H-COAL process. Emphasis has been on developing methods to increase catalyst usage by determining how to decrease catalyst replacement rates in the process and how to decrease catalyst poisoning. An important conclusion reached via model analysis and verified by experiment is that larger diameter (1/16 in.) catalysts resist poisoning deactivation much more than smaller (1/32 in.) catalysts over extended periods (60 to 110 hours) of time. If this trend can be verified, it gives a powerful tool for reducing catalyst replacement rate in the H-COAL ebullated bed system by factors of 2 or more. A second conclusion is that poisoning of catalysts occurs by several possible mechanisms or modes. Indirect or direct evidence of all these modes can be presented, though the relative importance of each mechanism has not been established. The modes include (a) poisoning by coking - with gradual increase in C/H ratio (more refractory coke) with time, (b) poisoning by metallization (selective/non-selective adsorption of inorganics such as Ti and Fe on the catalyst), (c) sintering - increase in larger pores/decrease in surface area, and (d) parallel poisoning by irreversible nitrogen compound adsorption.

  2. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  3. Atomic structure of PtCu nanoparticles in PtCu/C catalysts prepared by simultaneous and sequential deposition of components on carbon support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, L. A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Pryadchenko, V. V.; Bugaev, A. L.; Avakyan, L. A.; Belenov, S. V.; Guterman, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocatalysts PtCu/C with different distribution of components in bimetallic PtCu nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous and sequential deposition of Cu and Pt on carbon support. Electrochemical stability of the obtained samples PtCu/C was studied using the cyclic voltammetry. Characterization of atomic structure of as prepared PtCu NPs and obtained after acid treatment was performed by Pt L 3- and Cu K-edge EXAFS using the technique for determining local structure parameters of the absorbing atom under strong correlations among them. EXAFS derived parameters were used for generation of structural models of PtCu NPs by the method of cluster simulations. Within this approach, the models of atomic structure of PtCu NPs obtained by the two methods of synthesis, before and after post treatment and after two months from their preparation were revealed.

  4. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  5. Supported Oxide Catalysts from Chelating Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Centurion, Dario

    Supported Fe catalysts and, in particular, Fe and substituted MFI zeolites have attracted industrial and academic attention due to their ability to promote selective catalytic reduction of NOx and selective partial oxidation of hydrocarbons. It is generally accepted that some form of highly dispersed, binuclear or atomically-isolated metal species are involved in the selective processes catalyzed these materials. Several studies have sought to reproduce the structures and reactivity of these substituted zeolites on dierent supports. Given that specialized reagents or preparation conditions that are required in some of these preparation methods, and that multiple surface structures are often formed, this dissertation aimed to develop a route to highly dispersed supported transition metals using commonly available reactants and synthesis routes. Described here is a straightforward and effective procedure to control dispersion and surface speciation of Fe on SiO2 and CeO2 through incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) of the support with aqueous, anionic complexes of Fe3+ and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) followed by oxidative heat-treatment. On SiO2, this method preferentially creates isolated surface structures up to loading of 0.9 Fe nm-2 if using alkali counter-cations. This isolated species display classic 'single-site' behavior|constant turn over frequency (TOF) with increasing Fe surface density|in the oxidation of adamantane with H 2O2, indicating active sites are equally accessible and equally active within this range of surface density. Additionally, TOF increases linearly with electronegativity of the alkali counter-cation, suggesting electronic promotion. Conversely, IWI of unprotected Fe3+ produces agglomerates less active in this reaction. On CeO2, the sterics and negative charge imparted on Fe 3+ by EDTA4- inhibits incorporation of Fe into surface vacancies. Instead, formation of two-dimensional oligomeric structures which can undergo Fe3+-Fe2

  6. Supported Molten Metal Catalysis. A New Class of Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra Datta; Ajeet Singh; Manuela Serban; Istvan Halasz

    2006-06-02

    We describe a new class of heterogeneous catalysts called supported molten metal catalysis (SMMC), in which molten metal catalysts are dispersed as nanodroplets on the surface of porous supports, allowing much larger active surface area than is possible in conventional contacting techniques for catalytic metals that are molten under reaction conditions, thus greatly enhancing their activity and potential utility. Specific examples of different types of reactions are provided to demonstrate the broad applicability of the technique in designing active, selective, and stable new catalysts. It is shown that dispersing the molten metal on a support in the suggested manner can enhance the rate of a reaction by three to four orders of magnitude as a result of the concomitant increase in the active surface area. New reaction examples include {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported molten Te (melting point 450 C) and Ga (MP 30 C) catalysts for bifunctional methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation. These catalysts provide activity similar to conventional Pt-based catalysts for this with better resistance to coking. In addition, results are described for a controlled pore glass supported molten In (MP 157 C) catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ethanol in the presence of water, demonstrating activities superior to conventional catalysts for this reaction. A discussion is also provided on the characterization of the active surface area and dispersion of these novel supported catalysts. It is clear based on the results described that the development of new active and selective supported molten metal catalysts for practical applications is entirely plausible.

  7. Effect of a carrier's nature on the activation of supported iron catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazak, V. O.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Pankina, G. V.; Khodakov, A. Y.; Ordomsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect a carrier's nature has on the activation of supported iron catalysts in a stream of pure carbon monoxide CO is investigated. It is shown that iron is mainly present in the form of magnetite Fe3O4 in case of carbon supports and in the form of hematite Fe2O3 for silica gel supports. It is shown that all activated samples are chiefly made up of the Hägg carbide χ-Fe5C2, but its concentration is higher for the carbon supports.

  8. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  9. Precious metal catalysts with oxygen-ion conducting support

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, P.S.; Sundaresan, S.

    1993-08-03

    A three-way supported catalyst is described for treatment of combustion gas emissions from mobile or stationary sources, comprising: an oxygen-ion conducting support material having surface area at least about 20 m[sup 2]/gm, and two active metals selected from the group consisting of (1) platinum and rhodium and (2) palladium and rhodium dispersed on the support material in overall amount of about 0.01-2.2 wt. % of the catalyst.

  10. Enhancement of Nitrite Reduction Kinetics on Electrospun Pd-Carbon Nanomaterial Catalysts for Water Purification.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Hu, Maocong; Wang, Xianqin; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2016-07-20

    We report a facile synthesis method for carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported Pd catalysts via one-pot electrospinning and their application for nitrite hydrogenation. A mixture of Pd acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and nonfunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce Pd/CNF-MWCNT catalysts. The addition of MWCNTs with a mass loading of 1.0-2.5 wt % (to PAN) significantly improved nitrite reduction activity compared to the catalyst without MWCNT addition. The results of CO chemisorption confirmed that the addition of MWCNTs increased Pd exposure on CNFs and hence improved catalytic activity. PMID:27387354

  11. Effect of nitrogen post-doping on a commercial platinum-ruthenium/carbon anode catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, April R.; Wood, Kevin N.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Joghee, Prabhuram; Olson, Tim S.; Bender, Guido; Dinh, Huyen N.; Gennett, Thomas; Richards, Ryan M.; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    This work investigates the effects of after-the-fact chemical modification of a state-of-the-art commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). A commercial PtRu/C (JM HiSPEC-10000) catalyst is post-doped with nitrogen by ion-implantation, where "post-doped" denotes nitrogen doping after metal is carbon-supported. Composition and performance of the PtRu/C catalyst post-modified with nitrogen at several dosages are evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), rotating disk electrode (RDE), and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for DMFC. Overall, implantation at high dosage results in 16% higher electrochemical surface area and enhances performance, specifically in the mass transfer region. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) results show that after 5000 cycles of accelerated durability testing to high potential, the modified catalyst retains 34% more electrochemical surface area (ECSA) than the unmodified catalyst. The benefits of nitrogen post-doping are further substantiated by DMFC durability studies (carried out for 425 h), where the MEA with the modified catalyst exhibits higher surface area and performance stability in comparison to the MEA with unmodified catalyst. These results demonstrate that post-doping of nitrogen in a commercial PtRu/C catalyst is an effective approach, capable of improving the performance of available best-in-class commercial catalysts.

  12. Studying the fischer tropsch synthesis on alumina support cobalt base catalyst in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oues, Adnan Khalil

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composed of cobalt supported on alumina was prepared. This catalyst was cobalt/alumina (Co/AL2O3). The physical characterization of the catalyst was conducted using surface area analysis through the BET method, and particle size analysis. Fischer-Tropsch experiments were conducted in a fixed bed reactor. A flow rate of 100sml/min was selected based experimentally. Two temperatures were 330, and 350°C, and three different pressures as follows 145, 217.6, and 290 psig. The results were evaluated and studied based on conversion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, in addition to selectivity of products.

  13. Supported organometallic catalysts for hydrogenation and Olefin Polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Ahn, Hongsang

    2001-01-01

    Novel heterogeneous catalysts for the which hydrogenation of olefins and arenes with high conversion rates under ambient conditions and the polymerization of olefins have been developed. The catalysts are synthesized from Ziegler-type precatalysts by supporting them on sulfate-modified zirconia.

  14. Highly active carbon supported palladium catalysts decorated by a trace amount of platinum by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction for formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuopeng; Li, Muwu; Han, Mingjia; Wu, Xin; Guo, Yong; Zeng, Jianhuang; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun

    2015-03-01

    Aimed at reducing platinum usage and improved catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, a series of Pt decorated Pd/C catalysts are prepared by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction between freshly prepared Pd/C ink and H2PtCl6 in an aqueous solution. The catalysts with 4 nm particle sizes and 20 wt.% loadings have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical evaluations by cyclic voltammetry are conducted to test out the CO tolerance and catalytic activities. In addition to XPS analysis, a theoretical calculation has been attempted the first time to find out the surface Pd/Pt molar ratios. The decay rate of the catalysts has been evaluated by the percentage of the forward/backward peak current retained using the value at the 20th cycle divided by that in the first cycle. Compared with a Pd/C benchmark, all Pt decorated Pd/C register enhanced activity while the cost remains virtually unchanged. The optimized catalyst is found to have a Pd/Pt molar ratio of 75:1 but with 2.5 times activity relative to that of Pd/C.

  15. Durability testing of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for gas turbine engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, R. M.; Chang, M.; Hess, H. W.; Mroz, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents new information on the durability of a CATCOM catalyst operating at low-emission combustion temperatures (about 1527 K) with a liquid fuel, No. 2 diesel. Information on the activity of No. 2 diesel after 1000 hr of aging is given. In addition, a unique in situ activity test developed for monitoring the subtle changes in the catalyst activity of the CATCOM catalyst is also detailed. The study demonstrated the feasibility of using a CATCOM catalyst in catalytically supported thermal combustion for extended operating periods

  16. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  17. Characterization of the surface chemical properties of activated carbons for catalyst preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The demands placed on activated carbon based technologies have outpaced fundamental studies of the relationship between the surface properties of carbons and their performance as adsorbents or as catalyst supports. This research is directed toward an understanding how the surface functionalities of activated carbons affect the catalytic phase impregnated onto the carbon support. The surface functionalities were characterized by acidity measurements employing gaseous base adsorption and aqueous base neutralization procedures. The results were examined with a simple amphoteric surface ionization model. An alternative technique to conventional potentiometric titration, designated mass titration, was developed. Employing this method, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the adsorbent was determined by the asymptotic pH value in the plot of pH vs. mass fraction of solid added to water. The methodology developed here for evaluating the PZC was used to investigate the effects of surface treatment with nitric acid on the PZC of carbons. The PZC decreased from 10 for the untreated carbon to 3.5 for the carbon receiving the most intense oxidation treatment. The carbon supported nickel precursors derived from the ion exchange procedures were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and their properties as a gasification catalyst were evaluated. The hydrogen consumption during TPR increased and the ignition temperature decreased as either the acidity of the carbon support increased or the PZC decreased. It is proposed that the PZC can be used as an index to characterize the carbon surface as a suitable support for a heterogeneous catalyst.

  18. Steam reforming of glycerol for hydrogen production over supported nickel catalysts on alumina.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ga Young; Kim, Young Chul; Moon, Dong Ju; Seo, Gon; Park, Nam Cook

    2013-01-01

    The experiment was carried out to produce hydrogen through steam reforming of glycerol over nano-sized Ni catalysts supported on alumina (Al2O3). The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, metal dispersion, XRD, TPR, NH3-TPD and SEM. 15 wt% Ni/Al2O3 catalysts presented carbon nano fiber after the catalyst was used. However, when the Ni loading was higher than that of 15 wt%, the catalytic activity reduced, and the increase of the Ni particle size and the formation of graphitic carbon occurred. The Ni/SiO2(70)-Al2O3 with the high surface area and the small Ni particle size promoted the catalytic activity and could easily reduce from NiO to Ni, inhibiting the formation of NiAl2O4. PMID:23646792

  19. Theoretical study of support effect of Au catalyst for glucose oxidation of alkaline fuel cell anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Hamatake, Yumi; Kazuno, Hiroki; Kishida, Takayuki; Koyama, Michihisa

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically analyzed the glucose oxidation reaction mechanism and reaction activity of Au catalyst supported by carbon (graphite(0 0 0 1), (1 0 1 bar 0), and (1 1 2 bar 0)) and oxide (ZrO2(1 1 1) and SnO2(1 1 0)) in alkaline solution environment by using density functional theory method. We observed large stabilization of Au catalyst on support materials due to the electron transfer in the case of graphite(1 1 2 bar 0) and SnO2(1 1 0) systems. The catalytic activity for glucose oxidation reaction over Au supported by graphite(1 0 1 bar 0) and (1 1 2 bar 0) is calculated to be low in comparison with those of unsupported system. We found that SnO2(1 1 0) supported Au catalyst shows high activity toward the glucose oxidation. One of the main factors for the observed high catalytic activity is charge transfer from Au catalyst to support materials. When the atomic charge of Au catalyst becomes positive by the support effect, the activity of glucose oxidation reaction on Au catalyst is improved.

  20. Renewable and metal-free carbon nanofibre catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bijandra; Asadi, Mohammad; Pisasale, Davide; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Rosen, Brian A.; Haasch, Richard; Abiade, Jeremiah; Yarin, Alexander L.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2013-12-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst system for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into energy-rich products is a major research topic. Here we report the catalytic ability of polyacrylonitrile-based heteroatomic carbon nanofibres for carbon dioxide reduction into carbon monoxide, via a metal-free, renewable and cost-effective route. The carbon nanofibre catalyst exhibits negligible overpotential (0.17 V) for carbon dioxide reduction and more than an order of magnitude higher current density compared with the silver catalyst under similar experimental conditions. The carbon dioxide reduction ability of carbon nanofibres is attributed to the reduced carbons rather than to electronegative nitrogen atoms. The superior performance is credited to the nanofibrillar structure and high binding energy of key intermediates to the carbon nanofibre surfaces. The finding may lead to a new generation of metal-free and non-precious catalysts with much greater efficiency than the existing noble metal catalysts.

  1. Durability testing at one atmosphere of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for automotive gas turbine engine combustors, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, R. M.; Chang, M.; Hess, H.; Carrubba, R.

    1977-01-01

    The durability of catalysts and catalyst supports in a combustion environment was experimentally demonstrated. A test of 1000 hours duration was completed with two catalysts, using diesel fuel and operating at catalytically supported thermal combustion conditions. The performance of the catalysts was determined by monitoring emissions throughout the test, and by examining the physical condition of the catalyst core at the conclusion of the test. The test catalysts proved to be capable of low emissions operation after 1000 hours diesel aging, with no apparent physical degradation of the catalyst support.

  2. Highly active carbon supported ternary PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7) catalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline and acid media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Fuchun; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Zhonghua; Ma, Zizai; Li, Ruixue

    2016-04-15

    A series of trimetallic PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7)/C catalysts with varied Pt content have been synthesized by co-reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. These catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The electrochemical results show that, after adding a minor amount of Pt dopant, the resultant PdSnPtx/C demonstrated more superior catalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation as compared with that of mono-/bi-metallic Pd/C or PdSn/C in alkaline solution and the PdSnPt0.2/C with optimal molar ratio reached the best. In acid solution, the PdSnPt0.2/C also depicted a superior catalytic activity relative to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The possible enhanced synergistic effect between Pd, Sn/Sn(O) and Pt in an alloyed state should be responsible for the as-revealed superior ethanol electro-oxidation performance based upon the beneficial electronic effect and bi-functional mechanism. It implies the trimetallic PdSnPt0.2/C with a low Pt content has a promising prospect as anodic electrocatalyst in fields of alkali- and acid-type direct ethanol fuel cells. PMID:26851453

  3. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Goldberg, Robert I.

    1987-04-07

    A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: and for olefinic hydrocarbons: where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  4. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  5. Catalyst-infiltrated supporting cathode for thin-film SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yamahara, Keiji; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe,Lutgard C.

    2004-04-12

    The fabrication and electrochemical performance of co-fired,LSM-SYSZ [i.e., La0.65Sr0.30MnO3 (LSM) - (Sc2O3)0.1(Y2O3)0.01(ZrO2)0.89] supported thin-film cells were examined using humidified hydrogen as a fuel. Co-firing of bi-layers and tri-layers was successful at 1250 C by optimizing the amount of carbon pore formers. A power density of a factor of 2.5 higher than that recently reported for the same type of cell at 800 C [3] was obtained for a cell with cobalt infiltration into the supporting cathode: the peak power densities were 455, 389, 285, 202, 141mW/cm2 at 800, 750, 700, 650, 600 C, respectively, and in most cases power densities at 0.7V exceeded more than 90 percent of the peak output. Increasing the cathode porosity from 43 to 53 percent improved peak power densities by as much as 1.3, shifting the diffusion limitation to high current densities. Cobalt infiltration into the support improved those by as much as a factor of 2 due to a significant reduction in non-ohmic resistance. These results demonstrate that cobalt catalyst-infiltrated LSM can be effective and low-cost supporting electrodes for reduced temperature, thin film SOFCs.

  6. Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

  7. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas

    DOEpatents

    Kustes, William A.; Hausberger, Arthur L.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

  9. Control of metal nanocrystal size reveals metal-support interface role for ceria catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cargnello, Matteo; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V T; Gordon, Thomas R; Diaz, Rosa E; Stach, Eric A; Gorte, Raymond J; Fornasiero, Paolo; Murray, Christopher B

    2013-08-16

    Interactions between ceria (CeO2) and supported metals greatly enhance rates for a number of important reactions. However, direct relationships between structure and function in these catalysts have been difficult to extract because the samples studied either were heterogeneous or were model systems dissimilar to working catalysts. We report rate measurements on samples in which the length of the ceria-metal interface was tailored by the use of monodisperse nickel, palladium, and platinum nanocrystals. We found that carbon monoxide oxidation in ceria-based catalysts is greatly enhanced at the ceria-metal interface sites for a range of group VIII metal catalysts, clarifying the pivotal role played by the support. PMID:23868919

  10. Control of Metal Nanocrystal Size Reveals Metal-Support Interface Role for Ceria Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cargnello, M; Doan-Nguyen, VVT; Gordon, TR; Diaz, RE; Stach, EA; Gorte, RJ; Fornasiero, P; Murray, CB

    2013-08-15

    Interactions between ceria (CeO2) and supported metals greatly enhance rates for a number of important reactions. However, direct relationships between structure and function in these catalysts have been difficult to extract because the samples studied either were heterogeneous or were model systems dissimilar to working catalysts. We report rate measurements on samples in which the length of the ceria-metal interface was tailored by the use of monodisperse nickel, palladium, and platinum nanocrystals. We found that carbon monoxide oxidation in ceria-based catalysts is greatly enhanced at the ceria-metal interface sites for a range of group VIII metal catalysts, clarifying the pivotal role played by the support.

  11. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  12. Investigating the Dispersion Behavior in Solvents, Biocompatibility, and Use as Support for Highly Efficient Metal Catalysts of Exfoliated Graphitic Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ayán-Varela, M; Villar-Rodil, S; Paredes, J I; Munuera, J M; Pagán, A; Lozano-Pérez, A A; Cenis, J L; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2015-11-01

    The liquid-phase exfoliation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) to afford colloidal dispersions of two-dimensional flakes constitutes an attractive route to facilitate the processing and implementation of this novel material toward different technological applications, but quantitative knowledge about its dispersibility in solvents is lacking. Here, we investigate the dispersion behavior of exfoliated g-C3N4 in a wide range of solvents and evaluate the obtained results on the basis of solvent surface energy and Hildebrand/Hansen solubility parameters. Estimates of the three Hansen parameters for exfoliated g-C3N4 from the experimentally derived data yielded δD ≈ 17.8 MPa(1/2), δP ≈ 10.8 MPa(1/2), and δH ≈ 15.4 MPa(1/2). The relatively high δH value suggested that, contrary to the case of other two-dimensional materials (e.g., graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides), hydrogen-bonding plays a substantial role in the efficient interaction, and thus dispersibility, of exfoliated g-C3N4 with solvents. Such an outcome was attributed to a high density of primary and/or secondary amines in the material, the presence of which was associated with incomplete condensation of the structure. Furthermore, cell proliferation tests carried out on thin films of exfoliated g-C3N4 using murine fibroblasts suggested that this material is highly biocompatible and noncytotoxic. Finally, the exfoliated g-C3N4 flakes were used as supports in the synthesis of Pd nanoparticles, and the resulting hybrids exhibited an exceptional catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroarenes. PMID:26465228

  13. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X S

    2013-11-21

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in D-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. PMID:24072134

  14. Influence of modifiers on the performance of Ru-supported catalysts on the stereoselective hydrogenation of 4-acetamidophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachiller-Baeza, B.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodríguez-Ramos, I.

    2007-03-01

    Ruthenium-supported catalysts modified by the addition of Mg, Na or Ce were studied in the selective hydrogenation of paracetamol (4-acetamidophenol) to cis- and trans-4-acetamidocyclohexanol. In both series, catalysts supported on carbon or on alumina, the modified catalysts were more selective to the trans isomer than the corresponding monometallic catalysts. However, the modified catalysts, particularly the supported on carbon, were less active. Moreover, there is a reduction in the hydrogenolysis reaction of the OH group on carbon-supported catalysts. The enhancement observed in the stereoselectivity for the modified catalysts may be explained by an alteration in the acid-base properties of the catalyst surface, which eventually control the mode of adsorption of the molecule of paracetamol and probably the tautomeric equilibrium of the 4-acetamidocyclohexene-1-ol intermediate. The optimum amount of promoter to improve the stereoselectivity seems to depend on the inherent acid-base characteristics of both the modifier and the support. Therefore, the proper adjustment or fine tuning of these parameters is crucial for obtaining the best results in terms of stereoselectivity.

  15. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X. S.

    2013-10-01

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal.Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03813k

  16. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Support Effect on the Low-Temperature Hydrogenation of Benzene over PtCo Bimetallic and the Corresponding Monometallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Lonergan, W; Zhu, Y; Xie, Y; Chen, J

    2009-01-01

    PtCo bimetallic and Co, Pt monometallic catalysts supported on ?-Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2 and activated carbon (AC) were prepared and evaluated for the hydrogenation of benzene at relatively low temperatures (343 K) and atmospheric pressure. Results from flow reactor studies showed that supports strongly affected the catalytic properties of different bimetallic catalysts. AC supported PtCo bimetallic catalysts exhibited significantly better performance than the other bimetallic catalysts, and all the bimetallic catalysts possessed higher activity than the corresponding monometallic catalysts. Results from CO chemisorption and H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) studies suggested that different catalysts possessed different properties in chemisorption capacity and reduction behavior, and AC supported PtCo catalysts possessed significantly higher CO chemisorption capacity compared to the other catalysts. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis provided additional information regarding the formation of Pt-Co bimetallic bonds and metallic particle size distribution in the PtCo bimetallic catalysts on different supports.

  18. Sulfur and carbon deposition on Claus catalysts examined

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.; Downing, J.C.; Fleming, H.L.

    1985-11-04

    The authors discuss Alcoa's study of the deactivation of Claus catalysts caused by sulfur and carbon deposits. Although these two deactivation mechanisms are primarily affected by operation a study of the causes, extent, avoidance and reversal of these mechanisms yields information useful to both catalyst manufacturers and users. As a result of these studies, the following procedures are recommended for extending catalyst life and to increase catalyst activity: Conduct heat soak, exceed 280/sup 0/C, high frequency in third bed; minimize toluene levels; use SP-100 for alkylated aromatics, COS and/or CS/sub 2/ decomposition.

  19. Highly efficient and reusable CNT supported iron(ii) catalyst for microwave assisted alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Martins, L M D R S; Ribeiro, A P C; Carabineiro, S A C; Figueiredo, J L; Pombeiro, A J L

    2016-04-19

    The highly efficient eco-friendly synthesis of ketones (yields over 99%) from secondary alcohols is achieved by combination of [FeCl2{η(3)-HC(pz)3}] (pz = pyrazol-1-yl) supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and microwave irradiation, in a solvent-free medium. The carbon homoscorpionate iron(ii) complex is the first one of this class to be used as catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols. PMID:27007743

  20. Direct decomposition of methane over SBA-15 supported Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudukudy, Manoj; Yaakob, Zahira; Akmal, Zubair Shamsul

    2015-03-01

    Thermocatalytic decomposition of methane is an alternative route for the production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanomaterials. In this work, a set of novel Ni, Co and Fe based bimetallic catalysts supported over mesoporous SBA-15 was synthesized by a facile wet impregnation route, characterized for their structural, textural and reduction properties and were successfully used for the methane decomposition. The fine dispersion of metal oxide particles on the surface of SBA-15, without affecting its mesoporous texture was clearly shown in the low angle X-ray diffraction patterns and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. The nitrogen sorption analysis showed the reduced specific surface area and pore volume of SBA-15, after metal loading due to the partial filling of hexagonal mesopores by metal species. The results of methane decomposition experiments indicated that all of the bimetallic catalysts were highly active and stable for the reaction at 700 °C even after 300 min of time on stream (TOS). However, a maximum hydrogen yield of ∼56% was observed for the NiCo/SBA-15 catalyst within 30 min of TOS. A high catalytic stability was shown by the CoFe/SBA-15 catalyst with 51% of hydrogen yield during the course of reaction. The catalytic stability of the bimetallic catalysts was attributed to the formation of bimetallic alloys. Moreover, the deposited carbons were found to be in the form of a new set of hollow multi-walled nanotubes with open tips, indicating a base growth mechanism, which confirm the selectivity of SBA-15 supported bimetallic catalysts for the formation of open tip carbon nanotubes. The Raman spectroscopic and thermogravimetric analysis of the deposited carbon nanotubes over the bimetallic catalysts indicated their higher graphitization degree and oxidation stability.

  1. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. PMID:25973732

  2. Copper catalysts for soot oxidation: alumina versus perovskite supports.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, F E; Bueno-López, A; Illán-Gómez, M J; Adamski, A; Ura, B; Trawczynski, J

    2008-10-15

    Copper catalysts prepared using four supports (Mg- and Sr-modified Al2O3 and MgTiO3 and SrTiO3 perovskites) have been tested for soot oxidation by 02 and NOx/O2. Among the catalysts studied, Cu/SrTiO3 is the most active for soot oxidation by NOx/O2 and the support affects positively copper activity. With this catalyst, and under the experimental conditions used, the soot combustion by NOx/O2 presents a considerable rate from 500 degrees C (100 degrees C below the uncatalysed reaction). The Cu/ SrTiO3 catalyst is also the most effective for NOx chemisorption around 425 degrees C. The best activity of Cu/SrTiO3 can be attributed to the improved redox properties of copper originated by Cu-support interactions. This seems to be related to the presence of weakly bound oxygen on this sample. The copper species present in the catalyst Cu/SrTiO3 can be reduced more easily than those in other supports, and for this reason, this catalyst seems to be the most effective to convert NO into NO2, which explains its highest activity for soot oxidation. PMID:18983091

  3. Synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea with gold-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A; Ab Rahim, Mohd Hasbi; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jenkins, Robert L; Carley, Albert F; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Knight, David W; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-04-21

    The reaction of glycerol with urea to form glycerol carbonate is mostly reported in the patent literature and to date there have been very few fundamental studies of the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, most previous studies have involved homogeneous catalysts whereas the identification of heterogeneous catalysts for this reaction would be highly beneficial. This is a very attractive reaction that utilises two inexpensive and readily available raw materials in a chemical cycle that overall, results in the chemical fixation of CO(2). This reaction also provides a route to up-grade waste glycerol produced in large quantities during the production of biodiesel. Previous reports are largely based on the utilisation of high concentrations of metal sulfates or oxides, which suffer from low intrinsic activity and selectivity. We have identified heterogeneous catalysts based on gallium, zinc, and gold supported on a range of oxides and the zeolite ZSM-5, which facilitate this reaction. The addition of each component to ZSM-5 leads to an increase in the reaction yield towards glycerol carbonate, but supported gold catalysts display the highest activity. For gold-based catalysts, MgO is the support of choice. Catalysts have been characterised by XRD, TEM, STEM and XPS, and the reaction has been studied with time-on-line analysis of products via a combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC, (13)C NMR and GC-MS analysis to evaluate the reaction pathway. Our proposed mechanism suggests that glycerol carbonate forms via the cyclization of a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl carbamate and that a subsequent reaction of glycerol carbonate with urea yields the carbamate of glycerol carbonate. Stability and reactivity studies indicate that consecutive reactions of glycerol carbonate can limit the selectivity achieved and reaction conditions can be selected to avoid this. The effect of the catalyst in the proposed mechanism is discussed. PMID:21258674

  4. Synthesis and characterization of supported sugar catalyst by dip coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Siambun, N. J.; Safie, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    Sugar catalyst is a novel solid acid catalyst with reactivity comparable to that of sulphuric acid in biodiesel production. However, the fine powder form of sugar catalyst with the non-porous structure might cause large pressure drop in a packed bed reactor due to low bed porosity, affecting the reaction conversion especially in gas phase reaction. Furthermore, higher pressure drop requires higher electrical energy to drive the fluid through. Increasing the particle size is anticipated to be able to overcome the pressure drop matter. Hence, a deposition of sugar catalyst on larger particle materials was studied. Three types of materials were used for this investigation namely aluminum, silica and clay. The deposition was done via dip-coating method. The materials were characterized for their total acidity, thermal stability, functional groups, surface area, and element composition. The total acidity for SCDCAl, SCDCSi, and SCDCCl were 0.9 mmol/g, 0.2 mmol/g, and 0.4 mmol/g, respectively. The ratio of char deposited on SCDCAl, SCDCSi and SCDCCl were 0.9 g of support/g of carbon, 0.040 g of support/g of carbon, and 0.014 g of support/g of carbon respectively. FTIR and EDX analyses were carried out to determine the presence of active sites of the catalysis by identifying the functional groups such as -COOH, -OH, -SO3H. The results showed that -SO3H was detected on the surface of synthesized catalysts, except for SCDCC1.The pore size of SCDCAl, SCDCSi and SCDCCl were classified as macropores because the average diameter were greater than 50nm.. The catalysts were stable up to 400°C. The results showed that the dipcoating method could deposit sugar catalyst on aluminum, silica, and clay at low total acidity concentration.

  5. Nanoscale metal oxide and supported metal catalysts for Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kan

    The dissertation work focuses on research and development of durable nanoscale catalysts and supports for rechargeable Li-air batteries that use aqueous catholytes. Transition metal oxides, TiO2 and Nb2 O5 in particular, were prepared from a sol-gel process in the form of nanocoatings (5˜50 nm) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and studied as catalyst supports. Carbon doping in the oxides and post annealing significantly increased their electronic conductivity. Pt catalyst on the support with TiO 2 (Pt/c-TiO2/CNTs) showed a much better oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity than a commercial Pt on carbon black (Pt/C). Negligible loss (< 3%) in ORR activity was found in Pt/c-TiO2/CNTs as compared to more than 50% loss in Pt/C, demonstrating a significantly improved durability in the developed catalysts. However, Pt/c-Nb2O5/CNTs was found to be worse in ORR activity and durability, suggesting that c-Nb 2O5/CNTs may not be a good support. CNTs have fibrous shape and would provide a unique porous structure as electrode. Their buckypapers were made and used to support catalysts of Pt and IrO2 in the cathodes of Li-air batteries with sulfuric acid catholyte. At low Pt loading (5 wt.%) without IrO2 on the buckypaper cathode, the Li-air cell achieved a discharging capacity of 306 mAh/g and a specific energy of 1067 Wh/kg at 0.2 mA/cm2. A significant charge overpotential reduction (˜ 0.3 V) was achieved when IrO2 was also used to form a bifunctional catalyst with Pt on the buckypapers. The round trip efficiency was increased from 72% to 81% with the bifunctional cathode, demonstrating a higher energy conversion efficiency.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Bartosz; Terzyk, Artur P.; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A.; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2014-09-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices.

  7. Supported Molecular Catalysts: Synthesis, in-situ Characterization and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Haw

    2010-12-14

    The technological advantages of solid catalysts (robustness for operation at high temperatures, lack of corrosion, and ease of separation of products) can be combined with the advantages of soluble catalysts (e.g., selectivity) by synthesis of structurally discrete, nearly uniform catalysts on supports. Our goal is to synthesize, characterize, test, and model such catalysts and their reactions, thereby opening a door to unprecedented fundamental understanding of the properties of such materials. We employ molecular chemistry in nano-scale cages of zeolites and on surfaces of tailored porous solids for the precise synthesis of catalysts with discrete, uniform, well-defined sites, primarily mononuclear metal complexes, characterizing them (sometimes in the functioning state) with a broad range of complementary experimental techniques and using computational chemistry to interpret the results, map out reaction paths, provide bases for the design of new catalysts, improve methods of data analysis, and identify key experiments. The effort is directly in support of DOE's energy, environmental, and national security missions as well as the support of DOE’s basic science mission to develop the tools and understanding needed for the success of the applied mission areas. The research is demonstrating progress in understanding, modeling, and controlling chemical reactivity at interfaces to develop a fundamental understanding of how to control catalytic reactions for a broad range of applications.

  8. Partial oxidation of methane over Rh/supported-ceria catalysts: Effect of catalyst reducibility and redox cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Villalpando, M.D.; Berry, D.A.; Gardner, T.H.

    2008-06-01

    Partial oxidation of methane (POM) was studied over Rh/(Ce0.56Zr0.44)O2 x, Rh/(Ce0.91Gd0.09)O2 x, Rh/(Ce0.71Gd0.29)O2 x and Rh/(Ce0.88La0.12)O2 x. The effect of catalyst reducibility and redox cycles was investigated. It was found that the type of doped-ceria support and its reducibility played an important role in catalyst activity. It was also observed that redox cycles had a positive influence on H2 production, which was enhanced as the number of redox cycle increased. Results of carbon formation are discussed as a function of ionic conductivity. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) profiles, BET surface area, ionic conductivity and XRD patterns were determined to characterize catalysts. Catalytic tests revealed that of the materials tested, Rh/(Ce0.56Zr0.44)O2 x was the most active material for the production of syngas, which correlates with its TPR profile. It was observed that doping CeO2 with Zr, rather than with La or Gd caused an enhanced reducibility of Rh/supported-ceria catalysts.

  9. Electronic metal-support interactions in single-atom catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingping; Huang, Zhiwei; Amghouz, Zakariae; Makkee, Michiel; Xu, Fei; Kapteijn, Freek; Dikhtiarenko, Alla; Chen, Yaxin; Gu, Xiao; Tang, Xingfu

    2014-03-24

    The synthesis of single-atom catalysts and the control of the electronic properties of catalytic sites to arrive at superior catalysts is a major challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. A stable supported single-atom silver catalyst with a controllable electronic state was obtained by anti-Ostwald ripening. An electronic perturbation of the catalytic sites that is induced by a subtle change in the structure of the support has a strong influence on the intrinsic reactivity. The higher depletion of the 4d electronic state of the silver atoms causes stronger electronic metal-support interactions, which leads to easier reducibility and higher catalytic activity. These results may improve our understanding of the nature of electronic metal-support interactions and lead to structure-activity correlations. PMID:24599751

  10. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of small, essentially molecular metal complexes and metal clusters on support surfaces have brought new insights to catalysis and point the way to systematic catalyst design. We summarize recent work unraveling effects of key design variables of site-isolated catalysts: the metal, metal nuclearity, support, and other ligands on the metals, also considering catalysts with separate, complementary functions on supports. The catalysts were synthesized with the goal of structural simplicity and uniformity to facilitate incisive characterization. Thus, they are essentially molecular species bonded to porous supports chosen for their high degree of uniformity; the supports are crystalline aluminosilicates (zeolites) and MgO. The catalytic species are synthesized in reactions of organometallic precursors with the support surfaces; the precursors include M(L)2(acetylacetonate)1-2, with M = Ru, Rh, Ir, or Au and the ligands L = C2H4, CO, or CH3. Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 are used as precursors of supported metal clusters, and some such catalysts are made by ship-in-a-bottle syntheses to trap the clusters in zeolite cages. The simplicity and uniformity of the supported catalysts facilitate precise structure determinations, even in reactive atmospheres and during catalysis. The methods of characterizing catalysts in reactive atmospheres include infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and complementary methods include density functional theory and atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging of individual metal atoms. IR, NMR, XANES, and microscopy data demonstrate the high degrees of uniformity of well-prepared supported species. The characterizations determine the compositions of surface metal complexes and clusters, including the ligands and the metal-support

  11. Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Michael S.; Wachs, Israel E.; Knowles, William V.

    2010-11-02

    A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

  12. The generation of efficient supported (Heterogeneous) olefin metathesis catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, Robert H

    2013-04-05

    Over the past decade, a new family of homogeneous metathesis catalysts has been developed that will tolerate most organic functionalities as well as water and air. These homogeneous catalysts are finding numerous applications in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the production of functional polymers. In addition the catalysts are being used to convert seed oils into products that can substitute for those that are now made from petroleum products. Seed oils are unsaturated, contain double bonds, and are a ready source of linear hydrocarbon fragments that are specifically functionalized. To increase the number of applications in the area of biomaterial conversion to petrol chemicals, the activity and efficiency of the catalysts need to be as high as possible. The higher the efficiency of the catalysts, the lower the cost of the conversion and a larger number of practical applications become available. Active supported catalysts were prepared and tested in the conversion of seed oils and other important starting materials. The outcome of the work was successful and the technology has been transferred to a commercial operation to develop viable applications of the discovered systems. A biorefinery that converts seed oils is under construction in Indonesia. The catalysts developed in this study will be considered for the next generation of operations.

  13. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by High Melting Point Metal Oxide Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yang; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    We report on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from Co oxide catalysts. The concept is using the relatively lower mobility of metal oxide (than metal) to suppress catalyst aggregation at high temperatures. Compared to the SWNTs grown by pre-reduced catalysts, SWNTs grown from oxidized Co catalysts have shown narrower diameter distribution and smaller average diameter. Different growth parameters are discussed regarding the resulting morphology of SWNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the information that Co catalysts are transformed to Co3O4 after reduction-calcination process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicate that Co3O4 has decomposed to CoO before growth at a typical growth temperature (800 ºC) in Ar atmosphere. We propose that CoO has higher melting point than Co and thus is more stable during the growth. Our results indicate that besides the bimetallic catalysts, monometallic catalytic system could also be useful in stabilizing the catalysts to grow chirality-specific SWNTs by transforming the relatively low melting point metal catalysts to high melting point metal oxide catalysts. Yang Qian was supported through ``Global Leader Program for Social Design and Management''.

  14. Supported chromium-molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1988-05-31

    This patent describes the process for preparing a supported hydroprocessing catalyst. The process comprising compositing a quantity of a particulate, porous catalyst support material comprising one or more refactory oxides with one or more catalyst precursor salts and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 200/sup 0/C up to about 600/sup 0/, in the presence of a sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur bearing compound is present in excess of that contained in the catalyst precursor and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The catalyst precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture therof and a cation comprising trivalent chromium or a mixture of trivalent chromium with one or more divalent promoter metals selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and a mixture thereof wherein the trivalent chromium and divalent promoter metals are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand, L.

  15. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  17. Development of heterogeneous catalysts for hydroformylation of 1-hexene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteel, Anne Eugenie

    The hydroformylation of alkenes is a major commercial process used for the production of oxygenated organic compounds. When the hydroformylation reaction is performed using a homogeneous catalyst, an organic or aqueous solvent is employed and a significant effort must be expended to recover the catalyst so it can be recycled. The hydroformylation of long-chain alkenes using homogeneous catalysts in aqueous solution is compromised because of the low-solubility of C5 alkenes and above. Development of a selective heterogeneous catalyst would allow simplification of the process design in an integrated system that minimizes waste generation. Recent studies have shown that a supercritical fluid may be used as a solvent for hydroformylation reactions. The use of carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent offers optimal environmental performance because it is non-toxic, non-flammable and plentiful, and presents advantages for ease of product separation. In particular, we have considered the conversion of 1-hexene to heptanal using rhodium-phosphine catalysts tethered to supports insoluble in supercritical carbon dioxide to demonstrate the advantages and understand the limitations of a solid-catalyzed process. One of the limitations of supported catalysts is the inability to control product selectivity. To remedy this problem, we have developed tethered rhodium-phosphine catalysts with modified silica and controlled-pore size MCM-41 and MCM-20 supports that provide improved selectivity and conversion relative to their nonporous equivalents. Platinum and palladium catalysts analogous to those of rhodium were also investigated. The synthesis and characterization of the rhodium, platinum and palladium complexes and evaluation of their catalytic activity and selectivity for hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide is described in this dissertation.

  18. Effect of lithium carbonate on nickel catalysts for direct internal reforming MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Yun, Jung-Sook; Kwon, Heock-Hoi; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Lee, Ho-In

    Despite many advantages of the direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) in producing electricity, there are many problems to solve before practical use. The deactivation of reforming catalyst by alkali like lithium is one of the major obstacles to overcome. A promising method is addition of TiO 2 into the Ni/MgO reforming catalyst, which resulted in the increased resistance to lithium poisoning as we previously reported. To understand how added titania worked, it is necessary to elucidate the deactivation mechanism of the catalysts supported on metal oxides such as MgO and MgO-TiO 2 composite oxide. Several supported nickel catalysts deactivated by lithium carbonate were prepared, characterized and evaluated. The Ni/MgO catalyst turned out to be most vulnerable to lithium deactivation among the employed catalysts. The activity of the Ni/MgO gradually decreased to zero with increasing amount of lithium addition. Deactivation by lithium addition resulted from the decrease of active site due to sintering of nickel particles as well as the formation of the Li yNi xMg 1- x- yO ternary solid solution. These were evidenced by H 2 chemisorption, temperature programmed reduction, and XRD analyses. As an effort to minimize Li-poisoning, titanium was introduced to MgO support. This resulted in the formation of Ni/Mg 2TiO 4, which seemed to increase resistance against Li-poisoning.

  19. Ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst for dehydrogenation of propane to propylene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Qing-Fang; Agula, Bao; Zhao, Xu; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2011-08-01

    Metal-free ordered mesoporous carbons were demonstrated to be robust catalysts for direct dehydrogenation of propane to propylene, in the absence of any auxiliary steam, exhibiting high activity and selectivity, as well as long catalytic stability, in comparison with nanostructured carbons. PMID:21687889

  20. Direct imaging of copper catalyst migration inside helical carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lifeng; Yu, Liyan; Cui, Zuolin; Dong, Hongzhou; Ercius, Peter; Song, Chengyu; Duden, Thomas

    2012-01-27

    By using a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEM/TEM) at an acceleration voltage of only 80 kV, we demonstrate that, due to the low solubility of copper (Cu) in carbon and its affinity with oxygen (O), single-crystal Cu catalysts dissociate into small cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles after the growth of carbon nanofibers, and Cu2O nanoparticles ultimately localize on the fiber surfaces. This new finding is a step toward a better understanding of the interactions between Cu catalysts and carbon nanomaterials and could suggest a simple and effective method for eliminating Cu impurities from the fibers. PMID:22172975

  1. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  2. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  3. Partial Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in a Segmented Bed Using Oxide-based Catalysts and Oxygen-conducting Supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.

    Two objectives for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons to produce synthesis gas are investigated herein: (1) the effect of oxygen-conducting supports with partially substituted mixed-metal oxide catalysts, and (2) a segmented bed approach using different catalyst configurations. Excess carbon deposition was the primary cause of catalyst deactivation, and was the focus of the experiments for both objectives. The formation and characterization of deposited carbon was examined after reaction for one of the selected catalysts to determine the quantity and location of the carbon on the catalyst surface leading to deactivation. A nickel-substituted barium hexaaluminate (BNHA), with the formula BaAl 11.6Ni0.4O18.8, and a Rh-substituted lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore (LCZR) with the formula La1.89Ca0.11 Zr1.89Rh0.11, were combined with two different doped ceria supports. These supports were gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) and zirconium-doped ceria (ZDC). The active catalyst phases were combined with the supports in different ratios using different synthesis techniques. The catalysts were characterized using several different techniques and were tested under partial oxidation (POX) of n-tetradecane (TD), a diesel fuel surrogate. It was found that the presence of GDC and ZDC reduced the formation of carbon for both catalysts; the optimal ratio of catalyst to support was different for the hexaaluminate and the pyrochlore; a loading of 20 wt% of the pyrochlore with ZDC produced the most stable performance in the presence of common fuel contaminants (>50 h); and, the incipient wetness impregnation synthesis method of applying the active catalyst to the support produced more stable product yields than the catalyst prepared by a solid-state mixing technique. Different hexaaluminate and pyrochlore catalysts were used in different configurations in a segmented bed approach. The first strategy was to promote the indirect reforming mechanism by placing a combustion catalyst in the

  4. Ultra-long Pt nanolawns supported on TiO2-coated carbon fibers as 3D hybrid catalyst for methanol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, TiO2 thin film photocatalyst on carbon fibers was used to synthesize ultra-long single crystalline Pt nanowires via a simple photoreduction route (thermally activated photoreduction). It also acted as a co-catalytic material with Pt. Taking advantage of the high-aspect ratio of the Pt nanostructure as well as the excellent catalytic activity of TiO2, this hybrid structure has the great potential as the active anode in direct methanol fuel cells. The electrochemical results indicate that TiO2 is capable of transforming CO-like poisoning species on the Pt surface during methanol oxidation and contributes to a high CO tolerance of this Pt nanowire/TiO2 hybrid structure. PMID:22546416

  5. Preparation of Supported Metal Catalysts by Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Improved Catalytic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Troy D.

    Creating catalysts with enhanced selectivity and activity requires precise control over particle shape, composition, and size. Here we report the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize supported Ni, Pt, and Ni-Pt catalysts in the size regime (< 3 nm) where nanoscale properties can have a dramatic effect on reaction activity and selectivity. This thesis presents the first ALD synthesis of non-noble metal nanoparticles by depositing Ni on Al2O3 with two half-reactions of Ni(Cp)2 and H2. By changing the number of ALD cycles, Ni weight loadings were varied from 4.7 wt% to 16.7 wt% and the average particle sizes ranged from 2.5 to 3.3 nm, which increased the selectivity for C 3H6 hydrogenolysis by an order of magnitude over a much larger Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Pt particles were deposited by varying the number of ALD cycles and the reaction chemistry (H2 or O 2) to control the particle size from approximately 1 to 2 nm, which allowed lower-coordinated surface atoms to populate the particle surface. These Pt ALD catalysts demonstrated some of the highest oxidative dehydrogenation of propane selectivities (37%) of a Pt catalyst synthesized by a scalable technique. Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a reaction of interest due to the recent increased recovery of natural gas, but this reaction is hindered from industrial implementation because the Ni catalysts are plagued by deactivation from sintering and coking. This work utilized Ni ALD and NiPt ALD catalysts for the DRM reaction. These catalysts did not form destructive carbon whiskers and had enhanced reaction rates due to increased bimetallic interaction. To further limit sintering, the Ni and NiPt ALD catalysts were coated with a porous alumina matrix by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The catalysts were evaluated for DRM at 973 K, and the MLD-coated Ni catalysts outperformed the uncoated Ni catalysts in either activity (with 5 MLD cycles) or stability (with 10 MLD cycles). In summary, this thesis developed a

  6. Spectroscopic studies of alumina-supported nickel catalysts precursors. Part I. Catalysts prepared from acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna-Patkowska, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel alumina-supported catalysts were prepared from acidic solutions of nickel nitrate by the CIM and DIM methods (classical and double impregnation, respectively). The catalysts exhibited different nickel species due to the existence of various metal-support interaction strengths. As a consequence, the reducibility and other surface properties changed as a function of the preparation method. The aim of this work was to study the interaction between the metal precursor and the alumina surface by means of FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) and FT-IR/PAS (FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy).

  7. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matt; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-07

    In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850°C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR

  8. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  9. Nanoscale zirconia as a nonmetallic catalyst for graphitization of carbon and growth of single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Stephen A; Baumann, Theodore F; Bayer, Bernhard C; Blume, Raoul; Worsley, Marcus A; MoberlyChan, Warren J; Shaw, Elisabeth L; Schlögl, Robert; Hart, A John; Hofmann, Stephan; Wardle, Brian L

    2009-09-01

    We report that nanoparticulate zirconia (ZrO(2)) catalyzes both growth of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and graphitization of solid amorphous carbon. We observe that silica-, silicon nitride-, and alumina-supported zirconia on silicon nucleates single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes upon exposure to hydrocarbons at moderate temperatures (750 degrees C). High-pressure, time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of these substrates during carbon nanotube nucleation and growth shows that the zirconia catalyst neither reduces to a metal nor forms a carbide. Point-localized energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) confirms catalyst nanoparticles attached to CNTs are zirconia. We also observe that carbon aerogels prepared through pyrolysis of a Zr(IV)-containing resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer aerogel precursor at 800 degrees C contain fullerenic cage structures absent in undoped carbon aerogels. Zirconia nanoparticles embedded in these carbon aerogels are further observed to act as nucleation sites for multiwall carbon nanotube growth upon exposure to hydrocarbons at CVD growth temperatures. Our study unambiguously demonstrates that a nonmetallic catalyst can catalyze CNT growth by thermal CVD while remaining in an oxidized state and provides new insight into the interactions between nanoparticulate metal oxides and carbon at elevated temperatures. PMID:19663436

  10. Au and Pt nanoparticle supported catalysts tailored for H-2 production: From models to powder catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    T. D. Nguyen-Phan; Baber, A. E.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2015-12-10

    The use of metal nanoparticles (NPs), including Au and Pt, supported over oxides has been pivotal, and is ever increasing in enabling catalytic reactions which target the production of hydrogen. We review here the most recent works pertaining to the fundamental understanding of the structure, morphology, growth, characterization, and intrinsic phenomenological properties of Au– and Pt– based catalysts that influence the reactivity and selectivity to target hydrogen production. We draw on surface science and theoretical methods of model and powder catalysts using high resolution imaging, spectroscopy, scattering experiments, and theoretical studies. Based on these insights we identify key aspects ofmore » studies of supported metal nanoparticle (NP) catalysts for several reactions. The main focus of this review is on the intersection of catalytic chemistry related to the water-gas shift (WGS), oxygenate steam reforming (OSR), and solarassisted reactions (SAR).« less

  11. Au and Pt nanoparticle supported catalysts tailored for H-2 production: From models to powder catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    T. D. Nguyen-Phan; Baber, A. E.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2015-12-10

    The use of metal nanoparticles (NPs), including Au and Pt, supported over oxides has been pivotal, and is ever increasing in enabling catalytic reactions which target the production of hydrogen. We review here the most recent works pertaining to the fundamental understanding of the structure, morphology, growth, characterization, and intrinsic phenomenological properties of Au– and Pt– based catalysts that influence the reactivity and selectivity to target hydrogen production. We draw on surface science and theoretical methods of model and powder catalysts using high resolution imaging, spectroscopy, scattering experiments, and theoretical studies. Based on these insights we identify key aspects of studies of supported metal nanoparticle (NP) catalysts for several reactions. The main focus of this review is on the intersection of catalytic chemistry related to the water-gas shift (WGS), oxygenate steam reforming (OSR), and solarassisted reactions (SAR).

  12. An evaluation of Pt sulfite acid (PSA) as precursor for supported Pt catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Regalbuto, J.R.; Ansel, O.; Miller, J.T.

    2010-11-12

    As a catalyst precursor, platinum sulfite acid (PSA) is easy to use and not relatively expensive, and is a potentially attractive precursor for many types of supported catalysts. The ultimate usefulness for many catalyst applications will depend on the extent that Pt can be dispersed and sulfur eliminated. To our knowledge, there exists no detailed characterization in the catalysis literature of PSA and the nanoparticulate Pt phases derived from it during catalyst pretreatment. To this end a series of supports including alumina, silica, magnesia, niobia, titania, magnesia and carbon were contacted with PSA solutions and subsequently analyzed with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize the Pt species formed upon impregnation, calcination, and reduction. While all catalysts show retention of some S, reasonably small particle sizes with relatively little Pt-S can in some instances be produced using PSA. The amount of retained sulfur appears to decrease with decreasing surface acidity, although even the most acidic supports (niobia and silica) display some storage of S even while only Pt-O bands are observed after calcination or reoxidation. More sulfur was eliminated by high temperature calcinations followed by reduction in hydrogen, at the expense of increasing Pt particle size.

  13. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-01

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions. PMID:25191790

  14. STRONTIUM AS AN EFFICIENT PROMOTER FOR SUPPORTED PALLADIUM HYDROGENATION CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of strontium promotion is studied for a series of supported palladium catalysts such as Pd/zeolite-β, Pd/Al2O3, Pd/SiO2, Pd/hydrotalcite and Pd/MgO. Strontium is found to be an effective promoter for enhancing the metal area, perce...

  15. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  16. Atomistic Description of Reaction Intermediates for Supported Metathesis Catalysts Enabled by DNP SENS.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ta-Chung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Mougel, Victor; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Obtaining detailed structural information of reaction intermediates remains a key challenge in heterogeneous catalysis because of the amorphous nature of the support and/or the support interface that prohibits the use of diffraction-based techniques. Combining isotopic labeling and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of surface enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SENS) towards surface species in heterogeneous alkene metathesis catalysts; this in turn allows direct determination of the bond connectivity and measurement of the carbon-carbon bond distance in metallacycles, which are the cycloaddition intermediates in the alkene metathesis catalytic cycle. Furthermore, this approach makes possible the understanding of the slow initiation and deactivation steps in these heterogeneous metathesis catalysts. PMID:26953812

  17. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Amama, Placidus B; Islam, Ahmad E; Saber, Sammy M; Huffman, Daniel R; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-02-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from "inactive" to "active" is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design. PMID:26781333

  18. Interaction of carbon and sulfur on metal catalysts: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.; Vajo, J.

    1989-02-17

    At high coverage, sulfur generally deactivates metal catalysts, but at low coverage, chemisorbed sulfur can have a more subtle effect on catalyst activity and selectivity. The general goal of the current project is to examine fundamental aspects of selective poisoning by fractional monolayers of chemisorbed sulfur on a variety of metal catalysts used for commercially important reactions such as hydrocarbon re-forming, light alkane steam re-forming, and hydrocarbon synthesis. Specific objectives of the research program are to experimentally measure as a function of coverage the influence of chemisorbed sulfur on the thermodynamics, reactivity, and structure of surface and bulk carbon occupying both dispersed and well-characterized metal catalyst surfaces. Special methods, such as reversible sulfur chemisorption on supported metals and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) characterization of catalyst carbon, have been developed that are well suited to examining the interaction of sulfur and carbon on metal surfaces. New analytical instruments with greatly improved sensitivity have been recently developed and applied: a helium discharge ionization detector (DID) is being used with a gas recirculation thermodynamic system, and the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) technique is used with surface carbon segregation systems.

  19. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  20. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  1. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  2. Hydrogen production from biomass gasification using biochar as a catalyst/support.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dingding; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Daqian; Yang, Haiping; Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Xianhua; Chen, Hanping

    2016-09-01

    Biochar is a promising catalyst/support for biomass gasification. Hydrogen production from biomass steam gasification with biochar or Ni-based biochar has been investigated using a two stage fixed bed reactor. Commercial activated carbon was also studied as a comparison. Catalyst was prepared with an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, specific surface and porosity analysis, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron micrograph. The effects of gasification temperature, steam to biomass ratio, Ni loading and bio-char properties on catalyst activity in terms of hydrogen production were explored. The Ni/AC catalyst showed the best performance at gasification temperature of 800°C, S/B=4, Ni loading of 15wt.%. Texture and composition characterization of the catalysts suggested the interaction between volatiles and biochar promoted the reforming of pyrolysis volatiles. Cotton-char supported Ni exhibited the highest activity of H2 production (64.02vol.%, 92.08mgg(-1) biomass) from biomass gasification, while rice-char showed the lowest H2 production. PMID:27240230

  3. Carbon nanotube patterning with capillary micromolding of catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Ryu, Choonghan; Lee, Sungwoo; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-11-01

    Patterning of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber has been achieved by catalyst patterning using capillary micromolding process. Iron acetate catalyst nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and mold was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The ethanol solution containing catalyst nanoparticles was filled into the microchannel formed between PDMS mold and Si-wafer by capillary force. The capillary action of different solvents was simulated by commercial CFD-ACE+ simulation code to determine optimal solvents. Simulated result shows that the choice of solvent was critical in this capillary filling process. After the catalyst patterning, MWNT was grown at 700 approximately 800 degrees C by PECVD process using CH4 and Ar gas in a scale of approximately 10 micro-meters in a tubular inductively coupled plasma reactor. Grown CNTs were analyzed by FE-SEM and Raman Spectroscopy. PMID:18047145

  4. Structure and Reactivity Investigations on Supported Bimetallic Au-Ni Catalysts Used for Hydrocarbon Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Ya-Huei; King, David L.; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Wang, Yong; Heald, S.

    2006-12-10

    The addition of small quantities of gold to the surface of supported nickel catalysts has been described as a means to retard carbon formation during hydrocarbon steam reforming. Calculations by others have indicated that gold locates at the most catalytically active (step and edge) sites that also serve as nucleation sites for carbon formation. In this paper we describe experiments to characterize the Ni-Au interactions on bimetallic Au-Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts at various Ni and Au loadings. The catalyst structure was investigated using EXAFS/XANES spectroscopy and adsorption-desorption measurements with H2 and N2O. Evidence for surface alloy formation is provided in the Ni K and Au LIII edge EXAFS measurements of Au-promoted 8.8%Ni/MgAl2O4, especially at Au loadings ?0.2 wt.%. At higher Au concentrations, there is evidence for a combination of alloy and segregated Au species. H2 chemisorption and N2O temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements showed a significant decrease in total surface sites, or surface site reactivity, on Au modified Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst. The XANES structure is consistent with perturbation of the electronic structure of both the Ni and Au atoms as a result of alloy formation. TGA studies with steam/n-butane feed confirmed the ability of Au to retard coke deposition under low S/C reforming conditions, although carbon formation was not fully suppressed. When testing for methane steam reforming, a lower initial activity and deactivation rate resulted from Au promotion of the Ni catalyst. However, both catalysts showed a declining activity with time. The lack of a direct correlation between the surface characterization results and catalytic activity is most likely a result of decreasing effectiveness of the surface alloy with increasing temperature.

  5. Supported phosphate and carbonate salts for heterogeneous catalysis of triglycerides to fatty acid methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Stephanie Lynne

    Fatty acid methyl esters made from vegetable oil, or biodiesel, have been identified as a substitute for diesel derived from crude oil. Biodiesel is currently made using a homogeneous base catalyst to perform the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol to generate fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The use of a homogeneous catalyst necessitates additional purification of the product and byproducts before sale, and the catalyst is consumed and discarded. The development of a heterogeneous basic catalyst for the production of FAME is desirable. Tribasic phosphate salts and dibasic carbonate salts are active for the production of FAME but generally operate as homogeneous catalysts. Supporting these phosphate and carbonate salts on mesoporous MCM-41, microporous silica gel, and nonporous a-alumina proved successful to greater or lesser degrees depending on the identity of the support and pretreatment of the support. Although these salts were supported and were active for the production of FAME from canola oil, they proved to be operating as homogeneous catalysts due to leaching of the active species off the surface of the support. Further investigation of the active species present in the tribasic phosphate catalysts identified the active support as orthophosphate, and NMR studies revealed the phosphorus to be present as orthophosphate and diphosphate in varying proportions in each catalyst. Evaluation of the acid-washing support pretreatment process revealed that the exposure of the support to acid plays a large role in the development of activity on the surface of the catalyst, but manipulation of these parameters did not prevent leaching of the active site off the surface of the catalyst. Alternate methods of support pretreatment were no more effective in preventing leaching. Tribasic phosphate supported on silica gel is not effective as a heterogeneous catalyst for FAME production from triglycerides because of the lack of stability of the phosphate on the

  6. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  7. Reduced graphene oxide supported Au nanoparticles as an efficient catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianqin; Huo, Yujia; Yang, Jing; Chang, Sujie; Ma, Yunsheng; Huang, Weixin

    2013-09-01

    Various Au/C catalysts were prepared by Au nanoparticels supported on different carbonaceous supports including reduced graphene oxide (RGO), activated carbon (AC) and graphite (GC) using sol-immobilization method. Au/RGO shows a much higher activity than Au/AC and Au/GC in the liquid phase aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The superior catalytic performance of Au/RGO may be related to the presence of surface O-containing functional groups and moderate graphite character of RGO supports.

  8. Supported Copper, Nickel and Copper-Nickel Nanoparticle Catalysts for Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiann-Horng

    Hydrogen is being considered worldwide as a future replacement for gasoline, diesel fuel, natural gas in both the transportation and non-transportation sectors. Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of widely available primary energy sources, including coal, natural gas, biomass, solar, wind, and nuclear power. Coal, the most abundant fossil fuel on the planet, is being looked at as the possible future major source of H2, due to the development of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell technologies (IGFC). The gasification of coal produces syngas consisting of predominately carbon monoxide and hydrogen with some remaining hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and water. Then, the water-gas shift reaction is used to convert CO to CO2 and additional hydrogen. The present work describes the synthesis of model Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni catalysts prepared from metal colloids, and compares their behavior in the WGS reaction to that of traditional impregnation catalysts. Initially, we systematically explored the performance of traditional Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni WGS catalysts made by impregnation methods. Various bimetallic Cu-Ni catalysts were prepared by supported impregnation and compared to monometallic Cu and Ni catalysts. The presence of Cu in bimetallic catalysts suppressed undesirable methanation side reaction, while the Ni component was important for high WGS activity. Colloidal Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles obtained by chemical reduction were deposited onto alumina to prepare supported catalysts. The resulting Cu and Ni nanoparticle catalysts were found to be 2.5 times more active in the WGS reaction per unit mass of active metal as compared to catalysts prepared by the conventional impregnation technique. The powder XRD and HAADF-STEM provided evidence supporting the formation of Cu-Ni particles containing the Cu core and Cu-Ni alloy shell. The XPS data indicated surface segregation of Cu in

  9. Alumoxane precursors to designer catalysts and catalyst supports: Catalytic oxidation of dichloromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.L.; Wong, C.; Harlan, C.J.; Kareiva, A.; Barron, A.R.

    1997-12-31

    Carboxylato-alumoxanes are aluminum-oxygen macromolecules consisting of a boehmite-like core surrounded by a sheath of carboxylate groups. The alumoxanes may be processed like organic polymers yet when fired are readily transformed into ceramic oxides. The alumoxanes can be precisely doped at room temperature in aqueous solution with a range of metal cations to prepare novel catalyst and catalyst support materials. The ease of introduction of multiple cations into the alumina lattice via the alumoxane approach provides a method for fine-tuning catalyst support properties and the fabrication of new catalyst materials themselves. Manganese-doped alumina (Mn-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), formed via the doping of an alumoxane with Mn at room temperature, is presented as an example where the alumoxane route provides enhanced catalytic performance over traditional approaches for the low temperature catalytic oxidation of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs). The Mn-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed from the Mn-doped alumoxane is compared with MnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared by the incipient wetness method, and commercial Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the oxidation/destruction of dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}).

  10. Hydrogenation of aniline on a low-percentage, supported rhodium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ualikhanova, A.; Temirbulatova, A.E.

    1992-01-10

    The products of hydrogenation of aniline and their derivatives exhibit biological activity and are used in the pharmaceutical industry for preparation of analgesic, antipyretic, and sulfanilamide drugs. Up to 30% of the total consumption of aniline is for synthesis of drugs. Hydrogenation of aniline on platinum metals supported on carbon was studied by Rylander et al. The authors investigated the catalytic properties of rhodium supported on oxides in saturation of aniline with hydrogen in water. In most cases, the amount of noble metal in the supported catalyst was 5%. Decreasing the concentration of active phase in the catalyst is economically advantageous. The features of hydrogenation of aniline in the presence of 1% Rh/MgO in solutions with wide variation of the technological parameters of the process were investigated in the present study. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of 0-A12O3- Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts for Butane Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Kim, Hack-Sung; Stair, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction; Structure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Quantification of Surface VOx Species on Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Conclusion; Acknowledgements; and References.

  12. Inhibition of carbon formation during steam reforming of methane using thiol-coated nickel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudghiri-Hassani, H.; Rakass, S.; Abatzoglou, N.; Rowntree, P.

    n-Butanethiol-impregnated, micrometric, pristine Ni powder (Ni-C 4S) was tested as a catalyst for use in the steam reforming of methane, using X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The catalytic activities of both the pristine Ni and the Ni-C 4S powders were measured at 700 °C, under conditions that favoured (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 2:1), and did not favour (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 1:2) formation of surface carbon. The results show that: (a) Ni-C 4S demonstrates both high catalytic activity and stability during the 21 h duration test; (b) under conditions favouring the deposition of surface carbon, the Ni-C 4S retained both its efficiency and structural integrity, while the catalytic activity of the Ni was reduced by ∼70% and the catalyst pellets lost their integrity; (c) the amount of deposited carbon in the case of the Ni-C 4S catalyst was significantly lower than that observed for the Ni catalyst, in spite of the longer testing duration. It was concluded that the thiols pre-treatment of Ni surfaces, to be subsequently used in the production of catalysts supported SOFC anodes, can considerably increase their "active life span" this being a critical attribute in respect of their eventual commercialization.

  13. Strong metal-support interaction and catalytic properties of anatase and rutile supported palladium catalyst Pd/TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanzhi; Fan, Yining; Yang, Hanpei; Xu, Bolian; Feng, Lingyun; Yang, Mingfeng; Chen, Yi

    2003-04-01

    In situ EPR investigation by using CO as probe molecules shows that even pre-reduced by H 2 at lower temperature results in SMSI for anatase titania supported palladium catalyst, but not for rutile titania supported palladium catalyst. The reason of the different behavior between rutile and anatase titania supported palladium catalyst is discussed. The very different catalytic properties between anatase and rutile titania supported palladium catalyst pre-reduced at lower temperature, and the rapid change of conversion and selectivity of titania supported palladium catalyst with the elevation of pre-reduction temperature further confirm the above-mentioned results.

  14. Electroreductive dechlorination of chlorophenols with Pd catalyst supported on solid electrode.

    PubMed

    Caixia; Matsunaga, Atsushi; Tezuka, Meguru

    2013-12-01

    Electroreductive dechlorination of chlorophenols with Pd catalyst supported on solidelectrode was studied. As solid electrodes, carbon cloth (CC), carbon felt (CF) and titanium mesh were used, and palladium was plated on solid electrodes by either electrolytic or electroless method. On each electrode with Pd, chlorophenols were qualitatively dechlorinated to phenol, while they were entirely intact on electrodes without Pd. Moreover, neither base electrode nor plating method significantly affected the activity of Pd as far as it was sufficiently loaded on the electrode. Based on the results in the experiments using one electrode repeatedly, Pd catalyst proved to possess a satisfactory duarability under the present condition. It was suggested that the reactive species responsinble for the dechlorination of chlorophenols could be formed during preliminary electrolysis. Thus, (Pd)x-H resulting from the adsorption of electrogenerated hydrogen on metallic Pd might be assumed most probable. PMID:25078820

  15. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Goldberg, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  16. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

    1985-11-06

    A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  17. Understanding support mediated activity by investigating highly active, thermally stable, silica supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Rashkeev, Sergey; Pennycook, Stephen J; Schwartz, Viviane; Mullins, David R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    2.5 nm gold nanoparticles were grown on a fumed silica support using the physical vapor deposition technique magnetron sputtering. Combining electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and catalytic studies revealed that the silica supported gold catalysts are thermally stable when annealed in an oxygen containing environment up to at least 500oC. This surprising stability is attributed to the absence of residual halide impurities and a strong bond between gold and defects at the silica surface (2.7 - 3.8 eV), as estimated from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Au/SiO2 catalysts are slightly less active for CO oxidation than the prototypical Au/TiO2 catalysts, however they can be regenerated far more easily, fully recovering the activity of a freshly prepared catalyst after deactivation.

  18. Characterization of the activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Marcelo S.; Santos, Rudye K. S.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    This paper reports results of studies of the catalytic activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol. Co/Al 2O 3, Co/SiO 2, and Co/MgO catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The results showed the presence of Co 3O 4 and CoO x species interacting with Al 2O 3 or MgO and formed after a calcination step. It was evident that only Co 0 sites are active for the steam reforming of ethanol. All materials showed high levels of ethanol conversion, with molar yields of about 70% of hydrogen and 30% of CO+CO 2+CH 4 in the gaseous mixture. The Co/Al 2O 3 catalyst also produced ethylene through a dehydration reaction of ethanol. It is proposed that the methane formation on Co/SiO 2 catalysts occurs by methanation of CO and by ethanol decomposition. After 9 h of reaction, 14-24% (w/w) of carbon was deposited on all catalysts, indicating that a well characterized deactivation of the materials is due to coke deposition.

  19. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-12-01

    An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH4 and H2O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  20. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  1. Improving the durability of methanol oxidation reaction electro-catalysts through the modification of carbon architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin N.

    Carbon materials represent one of the largest areas of studied research today, having integrated applications stretching from energy production and storage to medical use and far beyond. One of these many intriguing applications is fuel cells, which offers the promise of clean electricity through a direct electrochemical energy conversion process. Unfortunately, at the present time the cost per watt-hour produced by fuel cells is more expensive than conventional methods of energy production/storage (i.e. combustion engines, batteries, etc.). Under the umbrella of fuel cell systems, methanol is a promising fuel source because of its high energy density and convenience of direct liquid fuel operation. In this field, recent advancements are bringing direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) closer to commercial viability. However, just as in other fuel cell systems, further improvements are greatly needed, particularly in the area of catalyst durability. This need for improved durability has led to increased research activity focused on improving catalyst stability and utilization. This thesis explores one of the most promising areas of enhancing catalyst-support interactions; namely, modification of carbon support architectures. Through the use of heteroatom modifiers, such as nitrogen, fuel cell support systems can be enhanced in such a way as to improve metal nucleation and growth, catalyst durability and catalytic activity. To this end, this thesis employs advanced characterization techniques to study the changes in catalyst particle morphology before and after nitrogen modification of the support structure. These results clearly show the beneficial effects of nitrogen moieties on carbon structures and help elucidate the effects of nitrogen on the stability of supported catalytic nanoparticles systems. Similarly, the novel concept of post-modifying commercially available supported catalysts with nitrogen ion implantation gives further insight into the behavior of

  2. Strategies for designing supported gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer K; Freakley, Simon J; Carley, Albert F; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-03-18

    Hydrogen peroxide is a widely used chemical but is not very efficient to make in smaller than industrial scale. It is an important commodity chemical used for bleaching, disinfection, and chemical manufacture. At present, manufacturers use an indirect process in which anthraquinones are sequentially hydrogenated and oxidized in a manner that hydrogen and oxygen are never mixed. However, this process is only economic at a very large scale producing a concentrated product. For many years, the identification of a direct process has been a research goal because it could operate at the point of need, producing hydrogen peroxide at the required concentration for its applications. Research on this topic has been ongoing for about 100 years. Until the last 10 years, catalyst design was solely directed at using supported palladium nanoparticles. These catalysts require the use of bromide and acid to arrest peroxide decomposition, since palladium is a very active catalyst for hydrogen peroxide hydrogenation. Recently, chemists have shown that supported gold nanoparticles are active when gold is alloyed with palladium because this leads to a significant synergistic enhancement in activity and importantly selectivity. Crucially, bimetallic gold-based catalysts do not require the addition of bromide and acids, but with carbon dioxide as a diluent its solubility in the reaction media acts as an in situ acid promoter, which represents a greener approach for peroxide synthesis. The gold catalysts can operate under intrinsically safe conditions using dilute hydrogen and oxygen, yet these catalysts are so active that they can generate peroxide at commercially significant rates. The major problem associated with the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide concerns the selectivity of hydrogen usage, since in the indirect process this factor has been finely tuned over decades of operation. In this Account, we discuss how the gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts have active sites for the

  3. Metal-support bonds in supported metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    This research project, now in its third year, is an investigation of the synthesis, structure, and bonding of a family of metal complexes, clusters, and particles on the surfaces of high-area metal oxide supports. The focus is the structure of the metal-support interface. Surface species have been prepared by synthetic organometallic chemistry on the support surfaces. The organometallic precursors are complexes of W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt, including W(CO){sub 6}, HRe(CO){sub 5}, Re{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}, H{sub 2}Os(CO){sub 4}, Ir({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}){sub 3}, and Pt({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}){sub 2}. The supports are primarily MgO and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The surface species have been characterized by infrared and EXAFS spectroscopies, among other techniques. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  5. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nanofibers using iron nanoparticles as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Ramana, G. Venkata; Padya, Balaji; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Jain, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    Amongst various carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have lately attracted considerable interest as a promising reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. CNFs are often synthesized using copper nanoparticles as catalysts and by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work iron (Fe) nanoparticles are used as catalysts to synthesize amorphous carbon nanofibers. This owes significance since Fe nanoparticles often lead to tubes rather than fibers. Fe nanoparticles (size ˜30-60nm) are prepared by first mixing an appropriate quantity of potassium sodium tartrate tetrahydrate salt with iron (II) chloride dehydrate to obtain iron tartrate and then dried and heated in vacuum oven at about 250°C to remove tartrate. In a subsequent step, CNFs are obtained by using CVD. Acetylene was used as the carbon source in the CVD process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show the formation of nanofibers whose diameter is dependent on the size of Fe catalysts. Raman scattering from the fibers show that they are made up of carbon and are amorphous.

  6. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using tin oxide based catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Jorgensen, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The preparation conditions for precious metal/tin oxide catalysts were optimized for maximum carbon monoxide/oxygen recombination efficiency. This was achieved by controlling the tin digestion, the peptization to form the sol, the calcination process and the method of adding the precious metals. Extensive studies of the tin oxide structure were carried out over the temperature range 20 to 500 C in air or hydrogen environments using Raman scattering and X ray diffraction. Adsorbed species on tin oxide, generated in an environment containing carbon monoxide, gave rise to a Raman band at about 1600 cm(exp -1) which was assigned to carbonaceous groups, possible carbonate.

  7. Selective recovery of catalyst layer from supporting matrix of ceramic-honeycomb-type automobile catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wantae; Kim, Boungyoung; Choi, Doyoung; Oki, Tatsuya; Kim, Sangbae

    2010-11-15

    Natural resources of platinum group metals (PGMs) are limited and their demand is increasing because of their extensive uses in industrial applications. The low rate of production of PGMs due to low concentration in the related natural ores and high cost of production have made the recovery of PGMs from previously discarded catalytic converters a viable proposition. The ceramic-honeycomb-type automobile catalytic converter contains appreciable amount of PGMs. These valuable substances, which are embedded in the catalyst layer and covered on the surface of the supporting matrix, were selectively recovered by attrition scrubbing. The attrition scrubbing was effective for the selective recovery of catalyst layer. The process was convinced as the comminution and separation process by physical impact and shearing action between particles in the scrubbing vessel. The catalyst layer was dislodged from the surface of the supporting matrix into fine particles by attrition scrubbing. The recovery of Al(2)O(3) and total PGMs in the fraction less than 300 μm increased with the residence time whereas their contents in the recovered materials slightly decreased. The interparticle scrubbing became favorable when the initial input size increased. However, the solid/liquid ratio in the mixing vessel was slightly affected by the low density of converter particles. PMID:20728274

  8. Iron-based dehydrogenation catalysts supported on zirconia. I. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Boot, L.A.; Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, J.W.

    1996-09-15

    Zirconia-supported iron oxide catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, followed by drying and calcination in air. Characterization of the catalysts were performed with electron microscopy combined with element analysis (HR-TEM/EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and thermomagnetic analysis. A homogeneous distribution of the iron containing phase can be obtained by using the metal complexes ammonium iron (III) citrate or ammonium (III) iron EDTA. A simple salt, such as iron nitrate, proved to be less suitable for this purpose. By HR-TEM/EDAX, it was shown that coverage of the zirconia support had been accomplished. XRL showed that crystalline Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were formed at loadings {ge} 3 wt% Fe. TPR studies point to a bi-modal particle size distribution for the catalysts with 3 wt% Fe. Above this loading (>3 wt%) bulk properties prevail in TPR, whereas at lower loadings (<3 wt%) no distinct iron oxide species could be indicated. Magnetization measurements confirmed the results obtained by TPR. Catalysts prepared by coimpregnation of iron and potassium were also studied. TEM and XRD results show that a well-dispersed phase is obtained, but from XRD only potassium carbonate and no iron oxide or ferrite is evident. It was also found that the presence of potassium increases the onset of reduction of the iron phase by about 100{degrees}C. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Selective hydrogenation of phenylacetylene on pumice-supported palladium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Duca, D; Liotta, L.F.; Deganello, G.

    1995-06-01

    The liquid phase, selective hydrogenation of phenylacetylene on pumice-supported palladium catalysts has been studied for a large range of metallic dispersions (14% {le} D{sub x} {le} 62%). The kinetics were analyzed by a five-parameter mathematical model. The mechanism was determined by the contribution of three basic routes involving only surface species in the rate-determining steps. The hydrogenation of phenylacetylene to styrene is {open_quotes}structure insensitive{close_quotes}. The disappearance rate constant of styrene produced from phenylacetylene is slightly lower than that of phenylacetylene and does not change in the case of the direct hydrogenation of styrene on the same Pd/pumice catalyst. However, Q{sub 3} (the ratio of adsorption constants K{sub Eb}/K{sub St}, where Eb is ethylbenzene and St is styrene), which is typical of a zero-order reaction (Q{sub 3}{r_arrow}0) in the case of the direct hydrogenation, is practically constant (Q{sub 3}{approx_equal}2) in the case of dehydrogenation of styrene produced from phenylacetylene. This is explained by the formation, in the latter case, of polymeric species or other species which are difficult to hydrogenate and by the consequent occupation of active sites so that the adsorption of styrene is inhibited. These species are also thought to be responsible for a flattening effect in the catalytic activity. Activity and selectivity data are critically analyzed and compared with those reported for other supported palladium catalysts. Since Pd/pumice catalysts also show high activity and selectivity at high metal dispersions, they could be of interest for industrial applications. 48 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Effect of Pt and Fe catalysts in the transformation of carbon black into carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Myrseth, Velaug; Kosinski, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    In this research carbon nanotubes and carbon nano onion-like structures were synthesized from carbon black using metal catalysts at 400 °C and 700 °C. Platinum and iron-group metals were used as catalysts for the transformation of CB into graphitized nanocarbon and the effect of both metals was compared. The synthesized products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization shows that this process is very efficient in the synthesis of high quality graphitized products from amorphous carbon black, even though the process temperature was relatively low in comparison with previous studies. Distinguished graphitic walls of the newly formed carbon nanostructures were clearly visible in the HRTEM images. Possible growth difference related to the type of catalyst used is briefly explained with the basis of electron vacancies in d-orbitals of metals.

  11. Reactions over catalysts confined in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiulian; Bao, Xinhe

    2008-12-21

    We review a new concept for modifying the redox properties of transition metals via confinement within the channels of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and thus tuning their catalytic performance. Attention is also devoted to novel techniques for homogeneous dispersion of metal nanoparticles inside CNTs since these are essential for optimization of the catalytic activity. PMID:19048128

  12. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  13. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-03-19

    A method and composition are disclosed for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, copper, cobalt, manganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  14. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schanke, D.; Bergene, E.; Adnanes, E.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of the highly exothermic nature of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, heat transfer considerations limit the maximum conversion per pass in fixed-bed processes, whereas slurry reactors can operate at higher conversions. During Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt catalysts, high conversions will generate high partial pressures of water at the reactor exit, due to the low water gas shift activity of cobalt. In addition, the extensive back-mixing in slurry reactors will give a relatively uniform concentration profile in the reactor, characterized by a high concentration of water and low reactant concentrations. From the commercial iron-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in fixed-bed (Arge) reactors it is known that the catalyst deactivates by oxidation of iron by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O near the exit of the reactor. Although bulk oxidation of cobalt during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is not thermodynamically favored, it was early speculated that surface oxidation of cobalt could occur during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of the present work is to describe the influence of water on the deactivation behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported cobalt catalysts. The possibility of cobalt oxidation during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was investigated by model studies.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Cluster-Derived Supported Bimetallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Richard D; Amiridis, Michael D

    2008-10-10

    New procedures have been developed for synthesizing di- and tri-metallic cluster complexes. The chemical properties of the new complexes have been investigated, particularly toward the activation of molecular hydrogen. These complexes were then converted into bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles on silica and alumina supports. These nanoparticles were characterized by electron microscopy and were then tested for their ability to produce catalytic hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons and for the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of hydrogen. The bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles exhibited far superior activity and selectivity as hydrogenation catalysts when compared to the individual metallic components. It was found that the addition of tin greatly improved the selectivity of the catalysts for the hydrogenation of polyolefins. The addition of iron improves the catalysts for the selective oxidation of CO by platinum in the presence of hydrogen. The observations should lead to the development of lower cost routes to molecules that can be used to produce polymers and plastics for use by the general public and for procedures to purify hydrogen for use as an alternative energy in the hydrogen economy of the future.

  16. Synthesis of highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Yue-Jiang; Yang, Hou-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2011-05-01

    Highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber (Pd/CNF) catalyst is synthesized by NaBH4 reduction with trisodium citrate as the stabilizing agent. The obtained Pd/CNF catalyst is characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of ca. 3.8 nm are highly dispersed on the CNF support even with a small ratio of citrate to Pd precursor, which is believed to be due to the pH adjustment of citrate stabilized colloidal Pd nanoparticles. The cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques show that the obtained Pd/CNF catalyst exhibits good catalytic activity and stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

  17. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-Ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amama, Placidus B.; Islam, Ahmad E.; Saber, Sammy M.; Huffman, Daniel R.; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-01-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from ``inactive'' to ``active'' is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design.There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the

  18. Oxygen reduction catalyzed by gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiannan; Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Fucai; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Electrochemical studies showed that the composites demonstrated apparent ORR activity in alkaline media, and the sample with a 30% Au mass loading was identified as the best catalyst among the series, with a performance comparable to that of commercial Pt/C, but superior to those of Au102 nanoclusters and carbon nanosheets alone, within the context of onset potential, kinetic current density, and durability. The results suggest an effective approach to the preparation of high-performance ORR catalysts based on gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets.Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as

  19. Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Keith James Stanger

    2003-05-31

    The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-{alpha}-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by {sup 31}P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]{sub 4}, [Rh(COD){sub 2}]{sup +}BF{sub 4}{sup -}, [Rh(COD)Cl]{sub 2}, and RhCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O, adsorbed on SiO{sub 2} are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H{sub 2} at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO{sub 2} are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh{sub 3}) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

  20. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Gleize, Jérôme; Lamura, Gianrico; Hérold, Claire; Vigolo, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel-yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni2+ ions, belonging to NiCl2 formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl2 compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature.

  1. Manganese oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, manganese oxide-supported iron (Fe/MnO) was prepared by impregnation of powdered manganese (II) oxide with aqueous iron(III) nitrate and subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments. It was then employed as a catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) and its steady-state activity and selectivity behavior was observed. The FTS reaction studies were run with nearly equimolal carbon monoxide/hydrogen feed at 515 and 540 K, 7.9 and 14.8 bar pressure. Feed conversion level was kept low in order to avoid transport limitations, and was varied by adjusting space velocity. The FTS reaction rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to unpromoted iron catalysts, the Fe/MnO catalysts were more active for the water-gas shift reaction and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversion, lower temperature and higher pressure. The olefin selectivity was high and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. Catalysts calcined at higher temperature exhibited stronger effects of promotion, and yielded unusually high selectivity for C/sub 2/ to C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons at low temperature and high pressure. The general conclusion is that manganese promotion or iron can promote FTS selectivity towards low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high carbon dioxide formation. The Fe/MnO was also physically examined using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Iron and manganese were found to interact strongly in the calcined catalyst, though extensive phase separation occurred during reduction. The promoting effects are apparently due to partial surface coverage of iron with MnO, the extent of which is enhanced by wetter reducing conditions.

  2. Single atom catalysts on amorphous supports: A quenched disorder perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Baron; Scott, Susannah L.

    2015-03-14

    Phenomenological models that invoke catalyst sites with different adsorption constants and rate constants are well-established, but computational and experimental methods are just beginning to provide atomically resolved details about amorphous surfaces and their active sites. This letter develops a statistical transformation from the quenched disorder distribution of site structures to the distribution of activation energies for sites on amorphous supports. We show that the overall kinetics are highly sensitive to the precise nature of the low energy tail in the activation energy distribution. Our analysis motivates further development of systematic methods to identify and understand the most reactive members of the active site distribution.

  3. Low temperature oxidation using support molten salt catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W.; Czerpak, Peter J.; Hilbert, Patrick M.

    2003-05-20

    Molten salt reactions are performed by supporting the molten salt on a particulate support and forming a fluidized bed of the supported salt particles. The method is particularly suitable for combusting hydrocarbon fuels at reduced temperatures, so that the formation NO.sub.x species is reduced. When certain preferred salts are used, such as alkali metal carbonates, sulfur and halide species can be captured by the molten salt, thereby reducing SO.sub.x and HCl emissions.

  4. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura; Su, Dangshen; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  5. Robust bifunctional aluminium–salen catalysts for the preparation of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Rulev, Yuri A; Gugkaeva, Zalina; Maleev, Victor I

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new one-component aluminium-based catalysts for the reaction between epoxides and carbon dioxide have been prepared. The catalysts are composed of aluminium–salen chloride complexes with trialkylammonium groups directly attached to the aromatic rings of the salen ligand. With terminal epoxides, the catalysts induced the formation of cyclic carbonates under mild reaction conditions (25–35 °C; 1–10 bar carbon dioxide pressure). However, with cyclohexene oxide under the same reaction conditions, the same catalysts induced the formation of polycarbonate. The catalysts could be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused. PMID:26664580

  6. The role of carbon overlayers on Pt-based catalysts for H2-cleanup by CO-PROX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Sarria, F.; Garcia-Dali, S.; Palma, S.; Jimenez-Barrera, E. M.; Oliviero, L.; Bazin, P.; Odriozola, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the effect of the activation method on the catalytic activity of Pt-based catalysts supported on alumina in the PROX reaction. For this, model Pt/Al2O3 catalysts with variable amounts of acetic acid were prepared and their thermal evolution studied by FTIR spectroscopy. From the analysis of the nature of the platinum surface upon acetic acid decomposition and the gas phase evolved products, we have demonstrated the formation of partially hydrogenated carbon overlayers that tailor the activity of Pt-based catalysts in the PROX reaction.

  7. Carbon support oxidation in PEM fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, S.; Finsterwalder, F.; Frank, G.; Hartmann, R.; Merten, C.

    Oxidation of the cathode carbon catalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFC) has been examined. For this purpose platinum supported electrodes and pure carbon electrodes were fabricated and tested in membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The in situ experiments account for the fuel cell environment characterized by the presence of a solid electrolyte and water in the gas and liquid phases. Cell potential transients occurring during automotive fuel cell operation were simulated by dynamic measurements. Corrosion rates were calculated from CO 2 and CO concentrations in the cathode exhaust measured by non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR). Results from these potentiodynamic measurements indicate that different potential regimes relevant for carbon oxidation can be distinguished. Carbon corrosion rates were found to be higher under dynamic operation and to strongly depend on electrode history. These characteristics make it difficult to predict corrosion rates accurately in an automotive drive cycle.

  8. Development of Cu xFe/Al 2O 3 catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide guided by magnetic methods, Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boellaard, E.; van Bruggen, J. M.; Geus, J. W.; van der Kraan, A. M.

    1993-04-01

    A copper-iron catalyst for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been prepared using a supported stoichiometric cyanide complex. Conversion of the cyanide precursor to a metallic catalyst appeared to be a precious process. Copper and iron in the bimetallic particles easily separate by thermal treatment and upon exposure to carbon monoxide, as revealed from Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy. During Fischer-Tropsch reaction the catalyst exhibits a rapid decline of activity. Magnetisation measurements on spent catalysts indicate that the deactivation is caused by a fast conversion of metallic iron to initially unstable carbides which transform ultimately to more stable carbides.

  9. Supported iron nanoparticles as catalysts for sustainable production of lower olefins.

    PubMed

    Torres Galvis, Hirsa M; Bitter, Johannes H; Khare, Chaitanya B; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Dugulan, A Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P

    2012-02-17

    Lower olefins are key building blocks for the manufacture of plastics, cosmetics, and drugs. Traditionally, olefins with two to four carbons are produced by steam cracking of crude oil-derived naphtha, but there is a pressing need for alternative feedstocks and processes in view of supply limitations and of environmental issues. Although the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has long offered a means to convert coal, biomass, and natural gas into hydrocarbon derivatives through the intermediacy of synthesis gas (a mixture of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide), selectivity toward lower olefins tends to be low. We report on the conversion of synthesis gas to C(2) through C(4) olefins with selectivity up to 60 weight percent, using catalysts that constitute iron nanoparticles (promoted by sulfur plus sodium) homogeneously dispersed on weakly interactive α-alumina or carbon nanofiber supports. PMID:22344440

  10. Ion scattering analysis of alumina supported model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josek, K.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Knözinger, H.; Taglaucr, E.

    1992-02-01

    The surface of supported oxide and metal catalysts, namely MoO 3/Al 2O 3 or Rh/Al 2O 3, is systematically studied using model systems. For this purpose, plane Al samples were oxidized in different ways and this support material was impregnated from the liquid phase or by evaporation. The elemental depth distribution was examined by low energy ion scattering and sputter etching (ISS) at different primary energies. By fitting Gaussian- or Lorentzian-type functions to the spectra, the use of peak heights or integrals for the interpretation is discussed. The dependence of the peak width on the chemical character is related to inelastic energy losses during scattering. ISS results from model systems are compared with those from real powder catalysts. The surface coverage with the active component was studied by additionally using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). These methods, combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), lead to an explanation of the adsorption kinetics of molybdate on alumina from aqueous solution by pore-filling.

  11. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P. )

    1988-09-01

    The pore structures of two types of catalyst support material were studied: {gamma}-alumina and silica aerogel. The alumina samples were commercial catalyst supports made in 1/8 inch diameter pellet form by Harshaw Chemical. Aerogels were prepared by forming a gel in a two-step, base-catalyzed process using TEOS, followed by supercritical drying to form the aerogel. Two different aerogels were made, one undergoing the drying process immediately after gel formation (non-aged), and the other being aged in the gel state for two weeks in a basic solution of 0.1 molar NH{sub 4}OH at 323 K before being supercritically dried (aged). The aging process is believed to alter the aerogel pore structure. The pore size distribution of the alumina material was determined via NMR and compared to results obtained by mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption/condensation techniques. The pore size distributions of the two aerogel samples were measured via NMR and nitrogen adsorption/condensation; the material was too compressible for porosimetry.

  12. Supported Molecular Iridium Catalysts: Resolving Effects of Metal Nuclearity and Supports as Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing; Serna, Pedro; Aydin, Cerem; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2012-02-07

    The performance of a supported catalyst is influenced by the size and structure of the metal species, the ligands bonded to the metal, and the support. Resolution of these effects has been lacking because of the lack of investigations of catalysts with uniform and systematically varied catalytic sites. We now demonstrate that the performance for ethene hydrogenation of isostructural iridium species on supports with contrasting properties as ligands (electron-donating MgO and electron-withdrawing HY zeolite) can be elucidated on the basis of molecular concepts. Spectra of the working catalysts show that the catalytic reaction rate is determined by the dissociation of H{sub 2} when the iridium, either as mono- or tetra-nuclear species, is supported on MgO and is not when the support is the zeolite. The neighboring iridium sites in clusters are crucial for activation of both H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} when the support is MgO but not when it is the zeolite, because the electron-withdrawing properties of the zeolite support enable even single site-isolated Ir atoms to bond to both C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2} and facilitate the catalysis.

  13. Growth of single and double walled carbon nanotubes over Co/V/MgO catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yujing; Qu, Meizhen; Zhou, Gumin; Lin, Haoqiang

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co/V/MgO has remarkable catalytic activity on the growth of SWCNTs and DWCNTs. {yields} The diameter of CNTs can be controlled by adjusting molar ratio of Co-V to MgO. {yields} The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} is critical to the synthesis of thin CNTs. -- Abstract: High quality single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were synthesized on Co/V/MgO catalysts by catalytic decomposition of CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2}. Raman spectroscopy data revealed that the diameters of as-prepared SWCNTs are 1.28 and 0.73 nm. The diameter value of DWCNTs from Raman analysis also showed a narrow diameter distribution. Using field emission transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it was found that the diameter of carbon nanotubes can be controlled mainly by adjusting the molar ratio of Co-V versus the MgO support. The structure properties of catalysts were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} may play an important role in preserving carbon in the catalyst particle and favoring the dissociation balance of CH{sub 4}.

  14. Synthesis of 3D structured graphene as a high performance catalyst support for methanol electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yecheng; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Zhuofeng; Yu, Jimmy C

    2015-07-01

    A simple process for preparing 3D structured graphene (3D-G) by a solution combustion method is reported. The product was deposited with platinum and used for methanol electro-oxidation. The catalyst shows a considerable enhancement in both the activity and stability towards methanol electro-oxidation reaction. Characterization reveals that the Pt/3D-G catalyst has a more negative onset potential as well as a higher electrochemically active specific surface area than a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst exhibits higher tolerance to corrosion than carbon black. This work provides an efficient way for preparing 3D-G as a promising support for the oxidation of small organic molecules in fuel cells. PMID:26058677

  15. Synthesis of 3D structured graphene as a high performance catalyst support for methanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yecheng; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Zhuofeng; Yu, Jimmy C.

    2015-06-01

    A simple process for preparing 3D structured graphene (3D-G) by a solution combustion method is reported. The product was deposited with platinum and used for methanol electro-oxidation. The catalyst shows a considerable enhancement in both the activity and stability towards methanol electro-oxidation reaction. Characterization reveals that the Pt/3D-G catalyst has a more negative onset potential as well as a higher electrochemically active specific surface area than a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the catalyst exhibits higher tolerance to corrosion than carbon black. This work provides an efficient way for preparing 3D-G as a promising support for the oxidation of small organic molecules in fuel cells.

  16. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Suljo Linic

    2008-12-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  17. Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles

  18. Effective catalytic conversion of cellulose into high yields of methyl glucosides over sulfonated carbon based catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dora, Sambha; Bhaskar, Thallada; Singh, Rawel; Naik, Desavath Viswanatha; Adhikari, Dilip Kumar

    2012-09-01

    An amorphous carbon based catalyst was prepared by sulfonation of the bio-char obtained from fast pyrolysis (N(2) atm; ≈ 550°C) of biomass. The sulfonated carbon catalyst contained high acidity of 6.28 mmol/g as determined by temperature programmed desorption of ammonia of sulfonated carbon catalyst and exhibited high catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Amorphous carbon based catalyst containing -SO(3)H groups was successfully tested and the complete conversion of cellulose in methanol at moderate temperatures with high yields ca. ≥ 90% of α, β-methyl glucosides in short reaction times was achieved. The methyl glucosides formed in methanol are more stable for further conversion than the products formed in water. The carbon catalyst was demonstrated to be stable for five cycles with slight loss in catalytic activity. The utilization of bio-char as a sulfonated carbon catalyst provides a green and efficient process for cellulose conversion. PMID:22776237

  19. Electronically conducting proton exchange polymers as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, M.C.; Qi, Z.; Pickup, P.G.

    1999-06-01

    A variety of supported catalysts were prepared by the chemical deposition of Pt and Pt-Ru particles on chemically prepared poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and PEDOT/polyvinylsulfate (PVS) composites. The polymer particles were designed to provide a porous, proton-conducting and electron-conducting catalyst support for use in fuel cells. These polymer-supported catalysts were characterized by electron microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and conductivity measurements. Their catalytic activities toward hydrogen and methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction were evaluated in proton exchange membrane fuel-cell-type gas diffusion electrodes. Activities for oxygen reduction comparable to that obtained with a commercial carbon-supported catalyst were observed, whereas those for hydrogen and methanol oxidation were significantly inferior, although still high for prototype catalysts.

  20. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) over nickel catalysts supported on cationic surfactant-templated mesoporous aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Pil; Chung, Jin Suk; Song, In Kyu

    Two types of mesoporous γ-aluminas (denoted as A-A and A-S) are prepared by a hydrothermal method under different basic conditions using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) as a templating agent. A-A and A-S are synthesized in a medium of ammonia solution and sodium hydroxide solution, respectively. Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 catalysts (Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S) are then prepared by an impregnation method, and are applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of a mesoporous γ-Al 2O 3 support on the catalytic performance of Ni/γ-Al 2O 3 is investigated. The identity of basic solution strongly affects the physical properties of the A-A and A-S supports. The high surface-area of the mesoporous γ-aluminas and the strong metal-support interaction of supported catalysts greatly enhance the dispersion of nickel species on the catalyst surface. The well-developed mesopores of the Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts prohibit the polymerization of carbon species on the catalyst surface during the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, both Ni/A-A and Ni/A-S catalysts give better catalytic performance than the nickel catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al 2O 3 (Ni/A-C). In addition, the Ni/A-A catalyst is superior to the Ni/A-S catalyst. The relatively strong metal-support interaction of Ni/A-A catalyst effectively suppresses the sintering of metallic nickel and the carbon deposition in the steam reforming of LNG. The large pores of the Ni/A-A catalyst also play an important role in enhancing internal mass transfer during the reaction.

  1. Adsorption and plasma-catalytic oxidation of acetone over zeolite-supported silver catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Quang Hung; Sanjeeva Gandhi, M.; Mok, Young Sun

    2015-01-01

    The abatement of acetone using a combination of non-thermal plasma, catalysis and adsorption was investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor packed with silver-coated zeolite pellets serving as both adsorbent and catalyst. The removal of acetone in this reactor system was carried out by cyclic operation comprising two repetitive steps, namely, adsorption followed by plasma-catalytic oxidation. The effects of the zeolite-supported silver catalyst on the reduction of unwanted ozone emission and the behavior for the formation of gaseous byproducts were examined. The experimental results showed that the zeolite-supported catalyst had a high acetone adsorption capacity of 1.07 mmol g-1 at 25 °C. Acetone with a concentration of 300 ppm was removed from the gas stream and enriched on the zeolite surface during the adsorption step of the cyclic process (100 min). In the succeeding step, the adsorbed acetone was plasma-catalytically treated under oxygen-flowing atmosphere to recover the adsorption capability of the surface. The plasma-catalytic oxidation of the acetone adsorbed in the previous 100 min adsorption step was completed in 15 min. The abatement of acetone by the cyclic adsorption and plasma-catalytic oxidation process was able to increase the performance of the reactor with respect to the energy efficiency, compared to the case of continuous plasma-catalytic treatment. The use of the zeolite-supported silver catalyst largely decreased the emission of unreacted ozone and increased the amount of gaseous byproducts such as carbon oxides and aldehydes due to the enhanced oxidation of the adsorbed acetone and intermediates.

  2. Oxygen reduction catalyzed by gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiannan; Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Fucai; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-03-28

    Nanocomposites based on p-mercaptobenzoic acid-functionalized gold nanoclusters, Au102(p-MBA)44, and porous carbon nanosheets have been fabricated and employed as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Au102(p-MBA)44 clusters were synthesized via a wet chemical approach, and loaded onto carbon nanosheets. Pyrolysis at elevated temperatures led to effective removal of the thiolate ligands and the formation of uniform nanoparticles supported on the carbon scaffolds. The nanocomposite structures were characterized by using a wide range of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and BET nitrogen adsorption/desorption. Electrochemical studies showed that the composites demonstrated apparent ORR activity in alkaline media, and the sample with a 30% Au mass loading was identified as the best catalyst among the series, with a performance comparable to that of commercial Pt/C, but superior to those of Au102 nanoclusters and carbon nanosheets alone, within the context of onset potential, kinetic current density, and durability. The results suggest an effective approach to the preparation of high-performance ORR catalysts based on gold nanoclusters supported on carbon nanosheets. PMID:26940367

  3. Supported chromium-molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, R.R.; Ho, T.C.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1986-12-02

    A process is described for hydrotreating a hydrocarbon feed which comprises contacting the feed at a temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C. and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst obtained by compositing a quantity of inorganic refractory oxide support material with one or more precursor salts. Then the composite is heated at elevated temperature of at least about 150/sup 0/C., in the presence of excess sulfur in the form of one or more sulfur-bearing compounds and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture thereof and a cation comprising trivalent chromium or a mixture of trivalent chromium with one or more divalent promoter metals selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Co, Mn, Zn, and Cu wherein the trivalent chromium and divalent promoter metals are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand, L. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to hydrotreat at least a portion of the feed.

  4. Pristine and supported ZnO-based catalysts for phenazopyridine degradation with direct solar light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilal, Hikmat S.; Al-Nour, Ghazi Y. M.; Zyoud, Ahed; Helal, Muath H.; Saadeddin, Iyad

    2010-04-01

    In search for safe techniques to manage waste pharmaceutical compounds drained in water, solar-driven degradation of phenazopyridine (a model drug) was investigated in aqueous media using different ZnO-based catalyst systems. Naked ZnO, CdS-sensitized ZnO (ZnO/CdS) and activated carbon-supported ZnO (AC/ZnO) have been studied. Both naked ZnO and AC/ZnO were highly efficient in mineralizing phenazopyridine, reaching complete removal in ˜50 min, with AC/ZnO having the higher edge. The ZnO/CdS system showed lower efficiency, due to screening of light by CdS. Moreover, the tendency of CdS to leach out Cd 2+ ions discouraged the use of CdS as sensitizer in this work. In both ZnO and AC/ZnO systems, the photo-degradation reaction was induced by the UV tail of the solar light. The visible region, with wavelength longer than 400 nm, failed to induce photo-degradation. The reaction was faster with higher catalyst loading, until a maximum efficiency was reached at a certain concentration. The rate of reaction increased with higher drug concentrations up to a certain limit. The effect of pH value was studied, and the catalysts showed highest efficiencies at pH close to 7. Stability of ZnO to degradation was studied. Both catalyst systems showed lowered efficiencies on recovery and reuse. The results suggest that complete mineralization of waste drugs, commonly dumped in sewage water, with direct solar light is a potentially feasible strategy using the AC/ZnO catalyst.

  5. Clustering of metal atoms in organic media. II. Effect of support on nickel catalysts prepared by solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, K.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1982-02-26

    Highly dispersed Ni/support catalysts were prepared from toluene-solvated nickel atoms (solvated metal atom dispersed or SMAD). Catalysts were prepared on MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/, and carbon, and their activities were tested for hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane, hydrogenation of toluene, dehydrogenation of isopropyl alcohol, and methanation of carbon monoxide. Conventional catalysts were also studied and compared with the SMAD systems. The effect of the support on SMAD catalyst activities was minimal for hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane, hydrogenation of toluene, and dehydration of isopropyl alcohol. However, conventional catalysts showed a significant effect of support when these reactions were studied. This difference between SMAD and conventional catalysts is attributed to the presence of an insulating layer of carbonaceous species between Ni and the support in the SMAD systems. Conversely, catalyst activity for methanation of carbon monoxide was significantly affected by support, especially MgO. This phenomenon reflects a synergistic effect of MgO when Ni is present, where CO can be adsorbed readily on MgO which apparently aids in the initial CO reduction step. The SMAD method in combination with high surface area supports yields highly dispersed catalysts with very small particle sizes. Carbon, a support with a particularly high surface area, allows formation of the smallest particle sizes, and this phenomenon is believed to indicate a direct dependency ofmetal particle size on the surface area of the support. The implications of this finding on the mechanism of particle formation are discussed, as well as the observation of optimum nickel particle size effects for the reactions studied. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-21

    Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

  7. Graphite-Conjugated Rhenium Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokjoon; Gallagher, James R; Miller, Jeffrey T; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-02-17

    Condensation of fac-Re(5,6-diamino-1,10-phenanthroline)(CO)3Cl to o-quinone edge defects on graphitic carbon surfaces generates graphite-conjugated rhenium (GCC-Re) catalysts that are highly active for CO2 reduction to CO in acetonitrile electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies establish the formation of surface-bound Re centers with well-defined coordination environments. GCC-Re species on glassy carbon surfaces display catalytic currents greater than 50 mA cm(-2) with 96 ± 3% Faradaic efficiency for CO production. Normalized for the number of Re active sites, GCC-Re catalysts exhibit higher turnover frequencies than that of a soluble molecular analogue, fac-Re(1,10-phenanthroline)(CO)3Cl, and turnover numbers greater than 12,000. In contrast to the molecular analogue, GCC-Re surfaces display a Tafel slope of 150 mV/decade, indicative of a catalytic mechanism involving rate-limiting one-electron transfer. This work establishes graphite-conjugation as a powerful strategy for generating well-defined, tunable, heterogeneous electrocatalysts on ubiquitous graphitic carbon surfaces. PMID:26804469

  8. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  9. HYDRODEHALOGENATION OF 1- TO 3-CARBON HALOGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER USING A PALLADIUM CATALYST AND HYDROGEN GAS. (R825421)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Supported palladium (Pd) metal catalysts along with H2 gas show
    significant potential as a technology which can provide rapid, on-site
    destruction of halogenated groundwater contaminants. Pd catalyzes the rapid
    hydrodehalogenation of nine 1- to 3-carbon ...

  10. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  11. Graphyne-supported single Fe atom catalysts for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Du, Pan; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Chenxin

    2015-01-14

    Single atom catalysts (SACs) are highly desirable for the effort to maximize the efficiency of metal atom use. However, the synthesis of SACs is a major challenge that largely depends on finding an appropriate supporting substrate to achieve a well-defined and highly dispersed single atom. This work demonstrates that, based on the density functional theory (DFT) calculation, graphyne is a good substrate for single Fe atom catalysts. The Fe atom can be tightly embedded in a graphyne sheet with a high binding energy of ∼4.99 eV and a high diffusion energy barrier of ∼1.0 eV. The graphyne-supported Fe (Fe-graphyne) SAC shows high catalytic activity towards CO oxidation, which is often regarded as a prototype reaction for designing atomic-scale catalysts. We studied the adsorption characteristics of CO and O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs, and simulated the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation involving Fe-graphyne. The simulation results indicate that O2 binding on Fe-graphyne is much stronger than that of CO, and the adsorbed O2 prior to occupy the Fe atoms as the co-existence of O2 and CO. The reaction of CO oxidation by adsorbed O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs favors to proceed via the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism with the energy barrier of as low as ∼0.21 eV in the rate-limiting step. Calculation of the electronic density of states (DOS) of each reaction step demonstrates that the strong interaction of the O2 and Fe adatom promotes the CO oxidation on Fe-graphyne SACs. The results presented here suggest that graphyne could provide a unique platform to synthesize SACs, and the Fe-graphyne SACs could find potential use in solving the growing environmental problems caused by CO emission from automobiles and industrial processes, in removing CO contamination from vehicle exhaust and in fuel cells. PMID:25429422

  12. Enhanced Fischer-Tropsch synthesis performance of iron-based catalysts supported on nitric acid treated N-doped CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Renjie; Xu, Yan; Ma, Xinbin

    2015-08-01

    Iron-based catalysts supported on N-doped CNTs (NCNTs) treated by various concentrations of nitric acid for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were investigated. An improved catalytic performance for the iron catalyst supported on acid treated NCNTs was obtained and the suitable nitric acid concentration was 10 M. The physiochemical properties of the NCNTs and the corresponding catalysts were characterized by BET, TEM, XRD, XPS, TGA and H2-TPR. The acid treatment removed the impurity and amorphous carbon, damaged the bamboo-like structure and increased the number of oxygen-containing functional groups and graphitization degree on the NCNTs. The more iron particles located inside the channels of NCNTs, the better catalytic FTS performance due to high dispersion and reducibility.

  13. Zinc recovery from spent ZnO catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hua-Ching; Lin, Chun-I.; Chen, Hsi-Kuei

    2004-02-01

    Zinc recovery from the spent zinc oxide catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate was studied using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spent zinc oxide catalyst was determined to be composed of 87.5 wt pct zinc oxide and 3.1 wt pct zinc sulfide. The results of X-ray diffractometry revealed that calcium carbonate decomposed to calcium oxide and carbon dioxide; zinc oxide and zinc sulfide were reduced to zinc vapor and carbon monoxide evolving from solid sample; and sulfur content was scavenged as calcium sulfide remained in the solid. Steps involved in this reaction system were summarized to explain the overall reaction. The experimental results of atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery can be increased by increasing either the sample height, the reaction temperature or the initial bulk density. Furthermore, they were found to increase with decrease in either the argon flow rate, the molar ratio of Zntotal/C, the molar ratio of Zntotal/CaCO3, the grain size of the spent catalyst, the agglomerate size of carbon, or the agglomerate size of calcium carbonate. Empirical expressions of the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery have been determined.

  14. Effective immobilisation of a metathesis catalyst bearing an ammonium-tagged NHC ligand on various solid supports.

    PubMed

    Skowerski, Krzysztof; Białecki, Jacek; Czarnocki, Stefan J; Żukowska, Karolina; Grela, Karol

    2016-01-01

    An ammonium-tagged ruthenium complex, 8, was deposited on several widely available commercial solid materials such as silica gel, alumina, cotton, filter paper, iron powder or palladium on carbon. The resulting catalysts were tested in toluene or ethyl acetate, and found to afford metathesis products in high yield and with extremely low ruthenium contamination. Depending on the support used, immobilised catalyst 8 shows also additional traits, such as the possibility of being magnetically separated or the use for metathesis and subsequent reduction of the obtained double bond in one pot. PMID:26877803

  15. Effective immobilisation of a metathesis catalyst bearing an ammonium-tagged NHC ligand on various solid supports

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Jacek; Czarnocki, Stefan J; Żukowska, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Summary An ammonium-tagged ruthenium complex, 8, was deposited on several widely available commercial solid materials such as silica gel, alumina, cotton, filter paper, iron powder or palladium on carbon. The resulting catalysts were tested in toluene or ethyl acetate, and found to afford metathesis products in high yield and with extremely low ruthenium contamination. Depending on the support used, immobilised catalyst 8 shows also additional traits, such as the possibility of being magnetically separated or the use for metathesis and subsequent reduction of the obtained double bond in one pot. PMID:26877803

  16. Catalytic supports on the base of activated anthracites and synthetic carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchik, S. B.; Tikhonova, L. P.; Tarasenko, Yu. A.; Galushko, O. L.; Galushko, L. Ya.; Fonseca, I. M.

    2006-06-01

    Selective adsorption of platinum group metals (PMG) on activated carbons from a multi-component model and technological solutions was proposed for the preparation of heterogeneous-supported catalysts. Activated natural anthracites and a nitrogen-containing synthetic carbon are considered as carriers for Pd-supported catalysts. Their catalytic activity was studied in the Pd-catalyzed reactions of hydrogen peroxide decomposition and chloride ions oxidation by manganese(III). On the base of the obtained results, novel high sensitive analytical methods both for direct determination of supported-metal quantity and palladium oxidation states on the surface of spent adsorbents are suggested.

  17. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  18. Palladium nanoparticles on hierarchical carbon surfaces: A new architecture for robust nano-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijwani, Hema; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2012-12-01

    Surface activity of heterogeneous catalysts can be enhanced if their sizes are reduced to nanometers. However, loose nanomaterials pose potential health and environmental risks. This issue has been addressed by attachment of palladium nanoparticles on multi-scale hierarchical carbon supports that have exceptionally high surface area per volume. The supports consist of porous carbon foam whose surface has been either chemically functionalized, or morphologically altered by grafting of carbon-nanotubes. It is seen that whereas chemical functionalization does provide some increase in nano-catalyst loading, morphological modification is significantly more powerful. It has the potential to create orders of magnitude increase in catalytic activity within the same overall volume. The synthesis techniques have been investigated in sufficient detail to provide significant control over the density and size of nanoparticles. Abundant distribution of nanoparticles is observed even within the deeper pores of the microcellular foam. The nanoparticles are seen to be metallic Pd having face centered cubic structure. Additionally, the nano-particles and nanotubes are durable, and remain attached to the base support after long periods of rapid rotation in water. These robust hybrid structures show promise in future applications such as sensors, water purification systems, fuel cell electrodes and hydrogen storage sponges.

  19. Organophilic worm-like ruthenium nanoparticles catalysts by the modification of CTAB on montmorillonite supports.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Limei; Qi, Xiaolong; Jiang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yafen; Fu, Haiyan; Chen, Hua

    2013-02-15

    A supported Ru catalyst was prepared by using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) intercalated montmorillonite as the supporting matrix. The as-prepared Ru catalyst was subsequently characterized by XRD, XPS, N(2) sorption, TEM, and dispersibility measurement. The results showed that the Ru nanoparticles were in the modified montmorillonite interlayers, and the morphology of Ru nanoparticle was worm-like. Moreover, this supported Ru catalyst could be well dispersed in organic solvents such as toluene. The catalyst exhibited high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of quinoline even without stirring. PMID:23141762

  20. Metal and precursor effect during 1-heptyne selective hydrogenation using an activated carbon as support.

    PubMed

    Lederhos, Cecilia R; Badano, Juan M; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX>PdNRX>PtClRX≫RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX=PdNRX>RuClRX>PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  1. Optimization of Fe/Ni/Mg Trimetallic Catalyst for Carbon Nanotubes Growth by Using Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Fluidized floating catalyst method has been used for preparing carbon nanotubes with average size ˜11 nm which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C. Optimum concentration of the Fe/Ni/Mg metal alloy catalyst has been found to be at 2.133% for producing carbon nanotubes with high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. From the PXRD analyses, graphite layers detected which provide an indication of the degree of graphitic character. However, by using the Scherrer equation is not suitable for carbon nanotubes as the value is slightly different from the average diameter determine from FESEM micrographs. Since the metallic alloy was obtained by calcining the respective nitrates, it is expected to have residual entrapped nitrogen, which may bond with the depositing CNTs as observed from FTIR spectroscopy.

  2. Performance enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by catalyst and support layer modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy David

    Possible enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) was investigated by modifying catalyst and support layers. Platinum (Pt) and platinum cobalt (Pt xCo1-x) alloys were prepared by pulsed electrodeposition onto Toray carbon paper. Composite supports composed of either commercial multi-walled nanofiber (MWNF) mats or MWNF layers on a commercial backing were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the surface structure, composition, and catalyst loading. Various electrochemical techniques with a wet electrochemical cell, a Nuvant multi-array system, and a Scribner fuel cell system were used to study and rank the effectiveness of the catalysts and supports toward both the methanol oxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The activity toward methanol oxidation of the electrodeposited Pt catalyst was found to be dependent on the deposited mass. Further comparisons between commercial electrodes in the Nuvant system showed these deposits can yield activities comparable to those of commercially available electrodes. The structure of the Pt electrodeposits was highly non-uniform due to the H2 evolution during the deposition process blocking the cathodes surface. The activities of the planar structured PtxCo1-x deposits were insignificant for both oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. The composition of the deposits ranged from 5 to 15 at% Pt. It was found by both the Nuvant and Scribner systems that the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode would enhance the performance of a DMFC anode. In the Nuvant system, the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode also enhanced the PEM cathode activity. This however was not corroborated by Scribner analysis, showing a

  3. Carbon-resistant Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ supported solid oxide fuel cells using Ni-Cu-Fe alloy cermet as on-cell reforming catalyst and mixed methane-steam as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Bin; Li, Meng; Luo, Jing-li; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Two types of anode-supported cell are fabricated by tape casting, screen printing and sintering processes. The first one is a conventional anode supported cell (ASC); and the other, namely CASC, contains an extra layer of Ni-Cu/Ni-Fe alloys-BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1Yb0.1O3-δ (NCF-BZCYYb) cermet catalyst on the surface of the anode-support. Using CH4-3 mol. % H2O as the fuel, the initial performance of the CASC is moderately improved, compared with that of the ASC; the power density of the CASC and ASC at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C remain stable on the level of 470 mW cm-2 for approximately 11 and 0.8 h, respectively, before cell disintegration caused by carbon formation. The performances of the CASC in the fuel of CH4-33.3 mol. % H2O are significantly increased above the level of the ASC, demonstrating an initial peak power density ranging from 280 to 1638 mW cm-2 at temperatures between 600 and 800 °C and a stable power density of 485 mW cm-2 at 500 mA cm-2 and 800 °C for 48 h. Carbon deposition in the anode region of the tested CASC cell is not detected, as the NCF-BZCYYb is a more active catalyst than the Ni-Zr0.92Y0.08O2-δ (YSZ) anode-support for CH4 steam reforming.

  4. Obtaining Carbon Nanomaterials on a Ni-Mo-Bentonite Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sataeva, G. E.; Daurenbek, N. M.; Myrzakhmet, M. K.

    2014-05-01

    Investigations into obtaining granulated sorbents based on bentonite clays of the Kyngrack fi eld have been carried out. A pilot-production technology for obtaining carbon composite materials (sorbents and catalysts) has been proposed. The process of formation of catalytic carbon in composites based on Ni-Mo bentonite has been studied on a semicommercial continuous laboratory reactor. It has been established that tubular-fibrous nanosize particles are predominantly formed in the pyrolysis of methane with a Ni-Mo-bentonite catalyst. The efficiency of activation of these sorbents is influenced by the concentration of the clay in them and by their temperature, and also by the consumption of an acid and the time of contact between the solvent and the acid. The structure of the formed nanotubes and nanofibers has been determined with a scanning electron microscope. Optimum parameters and kinetic regularities of the process of obtaining nanotubes and nanofibers at the intermolecular level through their pyrolysis from methane have been obtained.

  5. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  6. Selective Oxidation of n-Hexane by Cu (II) Nanoclusters Supported on Nanocrystalline Zirconia Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Shankha Shubhra; Ghosh, Shilpi; Adak, Shubhadeep; Singh, Raghuvir; Saran, Sandeep; Bal, Rajaram

    2015-08-01

    Cu (II) nanoclusters supported on nanocrystalline zirconia catalyst (with size ~15 nm), was prepared by using cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium in a hydrothermal synthesis method. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, XPS, TGA, SEM, TEM, FTIR and ICP-AES. The catalyst was found to be efficient in selective oxidation of n-hexane to 2-hexanol. An n-hexane conversion of 55%, with a 2-hexanol selectivity of 70% was achieved over this catalyst in liquid phase, without the use of any solvent. The catalyst can be reused several times without any significant activity loss. PMID:26369156

  7. Carbon monoxide tolerant platinum electrocatalysts on niobium doped titania and carbon nanotube composite supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, William A.; Huang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    In the anode of electrochemical cells operating at low temperature, the hydrogen oxidation reaction is susceptible to poisoning from carbon monoxide (CO) which strongly adsorbs on platinum (Pt) catalysts and increases activation overpotential. Adsorbed CO is removed by oxidative processes such as electrochemical stripping, though cleaning can also cause corrosion. One approach to improve the tolerance of Pt is through alloying with less-noble metals, but the durability of alloyed electrocatalysts is a critical concern. Without sacrificing stability, tolerance can be improved by careful design of the support composition using metal oxides. The bifunctional mechanism is promoted at junctions of the catalyst and metal oxides used in the support. Stable metal oxides can also form strong interactions with catalysts, as is the case for platinum on titania (TiOx). In this study, niobium (Nb) serves as an electron donor dopant in titania. The transition metal oxides are joined to functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) supports in order to synthesize composite supports. Pt is then deposited to form electrocatalysts which are characterized before fabrication into anodes for tests as an electrochemical hydrogen pump. Comparisons are made between the control from Pt-CNT to Pt-TiOx-CNT and Pt-Ti0.9Nb0.1Ox-CNT in order to demonstrate advantages.

  8. Studies of supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hercules, D.M.

    1995-10-26

    This report describes a series of studies on the following: Mo/titania and Mo/alumina catalysts for thiophene hydrodesulfurization; absorption of metal oxyanion on alumina; particle size effects for Co/silica catalyst for CO hydrogenation; correlation of Mo oxidation states with benzene hydrogenation activity; factor analysis for curve fitting Mo ESCA spectra; and quantitative Raman and ESCA characterization of W/titania catalysts. 27 refs.

  9. Carbon Deposition Onto Ni-Based Catalysts for Combined Steam/CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-02-01

    The present study was performed to suppress carbon deposition by Ce and Fe onto Ni-based catalysts in combined steam/CO2 reforming of methane (CSCRM), which is a process for producing synthesis gas (H2:CO = 2:1) for gas-to-liquids (GTL). The catalytic reaction was evaluated at 900 degrees C and 20 bar with a reactant feed ratio CH4:CO2:H20:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and gas hourly space velocity GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Ce and Fe modified Ni/gamma-A120, catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), H2 chemisorption, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and SEM. Ce- and Fe-modified Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited remarkable activity and stability during the CSCRM over the course of 50 hours. It suggested that the Ni(12)-Ce(5)-Fe(5)/Al2O3 catalyst shows highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity. PMID:27433622

  10. Surface-reconstructed graphite nanofibers as a support for cathode catalysts of fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-04-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs), on which surface graphite edges were reconstructed into nano-loops, were explored as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells. The high degree of graphitization, as well as the surface-reconstructed nano-loops that possess topological defects for uniform metal deposition, resulted in an improved performance of the GNF-supported Pt catalyst. PMID:21336405

  11. Different routes to methanol: inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of adsorbates on supported copper catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Timur; Friedrich, Matthias; Parker, Stewart F; Studt, Felix; Lennon, David; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2016-06-29

    We have investigated methanol synthesis with model supported copper catalysts, Cu/ZnO and Cu/MgO, using CO/H2 and CO2/H2 as feedstocks. Under CO/H2 both catalysts show chemisorbed methoxy as a stable intermediate, the Cu/MgO catalyst also shows hydroxyls on the support. Under CO2/H2 the catalysts behave differently, in that formate is also seen on the catalyst. For the Cu/ZnO catalyst hydroxyls are present on the metal whereas for the Cu/MgO hydroxyls are found on the support. These results are consistent with a recently published model for methanol synthesis and highlight the key role of ZnO in the process. PMID:27075638

  12. Different routes to methanol: Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of adsorbates on supported copper catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kandemir, Timur; Friedrich, Matthias; Parker, Stewart F.; Studt, Felix; Lennon, David; Schlögl, Robert; Behrens, Malte

    2016-04-14

    We have investigated methanol synthesis with model supported copper catalysts, Cu/ZnO and Cu/MgO, using CO/H2 and CO2/H2 as feedstocks. Under CO/H2 both catalysts show chemisorbed methoxy as a stable intermediate, the Cu/MgO catalyst also shows hydroxyls on the support. Under CO2/H2 the catalysts behave differently, in that formate is also seen on the catalyst. For the Cu/ZnO catalyst hydroxyls are present on the metal whereas for the Cu/MgO hydroxyls are found on the support. Furthermore, these results are consistent with a recently published model for methanol synthesis and highlight the key role of ZnO in the process.

  13. Direct observation of morphological evolution of a catalyst during carbon nanotube forest growth: new insights into growth and growth termination.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seojeong; Lee, Jaegeun; Kim, Hwan-Chul; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Zakharov, Dmitri N; Maruyama, Benji; Stach, Eric A; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-28

    In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests. PMID:26700058

  14. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  15. Carbon nanofiber supported bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Jiang, Yue; Niu, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with sodium citrate as the stabilizing agent and sodium borohydride as the reducing agent. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization indicates that the synthesized PdAu particles are well dispersed on the CNF surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization indicates that the alloying degree of the synthesized PdAu nanoparticles can be improved by adding tetrahydrofuran to the synthesis solution. The results of electrochemical characterization indicate that the addition of Au can promote the electrocatalytic activity of Pd/C catalyst for formic acid oxidation and the CNF supported high-alloying PdAu catalyst possesses better electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid oxidation than either the CNF supported low-alloying PdAu catalyst or the CNF supported Pd catalyst.

  16. Direct observation of morphological evolution of a catalyst during carbon nanotube forest growth: new insights into growth and growth termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seojeong; Lee, Jaegeun; Kim, Hwan-Chul; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Maruyama, Benji; Stach, Eric A.; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests.In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05547d

  17. Tungsta and platinum-tungsta supported on zirconia catalysts for alkane isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.; Lotero, E.; Parra, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Tungsta- and platinum-tungsta supported on zirconia catalysts (WZ and PtWZ) were tested for isomerization of n-butane with hydrogen at 573 K. The catalysts reduction kinetics and the chemical state of tungsten were studied by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and conventional temperature-programmed (TPR) techniques. Platinum was found to catalyze the reduction of the support and the tungsta co-catalyst. An effective n-butane isomerization catalyst results from the combination of high-temperature calcination and low-temperature reduction. Pyridine adsorption, as monitored by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS), indicates that water of reduction generates Bronsted acid sites.

  18. Methanol Oxidation Using Ozone on Titania-Supported Vanadium Catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation of methanol has been conducted at mild temperatures of 100 to 250NC using V2O5/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, surface area measurements, and temperature-programmed desorption of methanol. ...

  19. Alumina-supported Pd-Ag catalysts for low-temperature CO and methanol oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Pd-Ag bimetallic catalysts, supported on gamma-Al2O3, have been evaluated as exhaust catalysts for methanol-fueled vehicles. Laboratory studies have shown that a 0.01% Pd-5% Ag catalyst has greater CO and CH3OH oxidation activity than either 0.01% Pd or 5% Ag catalysts alone. Moreover, Pd and Ag interact synergistically in the bimetallic catalyst to produce greater CO and CH3OH oxidation rates and lower yields of methanol partial oxidation products than expected from a mixture of the single-component catalysts. The Pd-Ag synergism results from Pd promoting the rate of O2 adsorption and reaction with CO and CH3OH on Ag. Rate enhancement by the bimetallic catalyst is greatest at short reactor residence times where the oxygen adsorption rate limits the overall reaction rate.

  20. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  1. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Catalyst for Gas-Phase Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Rui; Feng, Zhenbao; Liu, Hongyang; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-07-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were directly used as a sustainable and green catalyst to convert ethanol into acetaldehyde in the presence of molecular oxygen. The C=O groups generated on the nanocarbon surface were demonstrated as active sites for the selective oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. The transformation of disordered carbon debris on the CNT surface to ordered graphitic structures induced by thermal-treatment significantly enhanced the stability of the active C=O groups, and thus the catalytic performance. A high reactivity with approximately 60 % ethanol conversion and 93 % acetaldehyde selectivity was obtained over the optimized CNT catalyst at 270 °C. More importantly, the catalytic performance was quite stable even after 500 h, which is comparable with a supported gold catalyst. The robust catalytic performance displayed the potential application of CNTs in the industrial catalysis field. PMID:27282126

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of purified catalyst-free single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaka, Mujtaba; Ito, Yasuhiro; Wang, Huiliang; Yan, Wenjing; Robertson, Alex; Wu, Yimin A; Rümmeli, Mark H; Staunton, David; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Morton, John J L; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H

    2010-12-28

    Electron paramagnetic resonance of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been bedevilled by the presence of paramagnetic impurities. To address this, SWCNTs produced by laser ablation with a nonmagnetic PtRhRe catalyst were purified through a multiple step centrifugation process in order to remove amorphous carbon and catalyst impurities. Centrifugation of a SWCNT solution resulted in sedimentation of carbon nanotube bundles containing clusters of catalyst particles, while isolated nanotubes with reduced catalyst particle content remained in the supernatant. Further ultracentrifugation resulted in highly purified SWCNT samples with a narrow diameter distribution and almost no detectable catalyst particles. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were detected only for samples which contained catalyst particles, with the ultracentrifuged SWCNTs showing no EPR signal at X-band (9.4 GHz) and fields < 0.4 T. PMID:21082779

  3. Synthesis of superparamagnetic carbon nanotubes immobilized Pt and Pd pincer complexes: highly active and selective catalysts towards cyclohexane oxidation with dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Machado, Kelly; Mishra, Jaya; Suzuki, Shinzo; Mishra, Gopal S

    2014-12-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Ni/Co have been prepared using an arc discharge technique and Ni/Co-carbon composite rods in an inert atmosphere and were surface modified using 3-aminophenyl trimethoxysilane. These NH2-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes have been used as a novel support for Pd((II)) and Pt((II)) pincer complexes immobilized as magnetic nano-catalysts. The morphology of the support and the catalysts have been characterized by IR, EPR, SEM, TGA, TEM, XRD, AAS and EDS analysis. These magnetic nano-catalysts have been tested on the industrially important cyclohexane (Cy-hx) oxidation with O2 and significantly high TONs of 1678 to 1946 were achieved under solvent free and relatively mild conditions. The SWNTs/Pd catalyst provided the best conversion, 22.7%, but the SWNTs/Pt system also provided a good conversion of 20.7%. PMID:25340475

  4. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane on dynamically rearranging supported chloride catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Christian A; van Veen, André C; Lercher, Johannes A

    2014-09-10

    Ethane is oxidatively dehydrogenated with a selectivity up to 95% on catalysts comprising a mixed molten alkali chloride supported on a mildly redox-active Dy2O3-doped MgO. The reactive oxyanionic OCl(-) species acting as active sites are catalytically formed by oxidation of Cl(-) at the MgO surface. Under reaction conditions this site is regenerated by O2, dissolving first in the alkali chloride melt, and in the second step dissociating and replenishing the oxygen vacancies on MgO. The oxyanion reactively dehydrogenates ethane at the melt-gas phase interface with nearly ideal selectivity. Thus, the reaction is concluded to proceed via two coupled steps following a Mars-van-Krevelen-mechanism at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interface. The dissociation of O2 and/or the oxidation of Cl(-) at the melt-solid interface is concluded to have the lowest forward rate constants. The compositions of the oxide core and the molten chloride shell control the catalytic activity via the redox potential of the metal oxide and of the OCl(-). Traces of water may be present in the molten chloride under reaction conditions, but the specific impact of this water is not obvious at present. The spatial separation of oxygen and ethane activation sites and the dynamic rearrangement of the surface anions and cations, preventing the exposure of coordinatively unsaturated cations, are concluded to be the origin of the surprisingly high olefin selectivity. PMID:25118821

  5. The Effect of Pressure on CO2 Reforming of Methane and the Carbon Deposition Route Using Noble Metal Catalysts (book chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, A.; Johnson, C.D.

    2007-03-01

    Dry reforming of methane and 13C-labeled methane were studied over Pt/ZrO2, Pt/Ce-ZrO2, and 1wt%Rh/Al2O3 at several pressures. It appears that carbon deposited on the catalysts resulted from both methane and CO2. The presence of approximately equal ratios of 13C- and 12C-containing products suggests that the oxygen exchange reaction between CO adn CO2 is very fast. Temperature-programmed oxidation of carbon formed on the catalysts indicates that Co disproportionation contributes significantly to carbon deposition at lower and higher pressures. The Rh/alumina supported catalyst is the most resistant toward carbon desposition both at lower and higher pressures. In all catalysts, methane and CO2 conversion as well as H2/CO ratios decreased wtih increasing pressure.

  6. Vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) of organosulfur compounds over supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    Sulfur in transportation fuels remains a leading source of SOx emissions from vehicle engines and is a major source of air pollution. The very low levels of sulfur globally mandated for transportation fuels in the near future cannot be achieved by current practices of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for sulfur removal, which operate under severe conditions (high T, P) and use valuable H2. Novel vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) processes of selectively oxidizing various organosulfur compounds (carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), thiophene, 2,5-dimenthylthiophene) typically found in various industrial streams (e.g., petroleum refining, pulp and paper) into valuable chemical intermediates (H 2CO, CO, H2, maleic anhydride and concentrated SO2) has been extensively studied. This research has primarily focused on establishing the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of these selective oxidation reactions over well-defined supported metal oxide catalysts. The selective oxidation reactions of COS + O2 → CO + SO2; 2CS2 + 5O2 → 2CO + 4SO2; CH3SH + 2O 2 → H2CO + SO2 + H2O; C4 H4S + 3O2 → C4H2O 3 + H2O + SO2; were studied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the supported metal oxide phases were 100% dispersed on the oxide substrate. All the catalysts were highly active and selective for the oxidesulfurization of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, and thiophene between 290--330°C, 230--270°C, 350--400°C, and 250--400°C, respectively and did not deactivate. The TOFs (turnover frequency, normalized activity per active catalytic site) for all ODS reactions over supported vanadia catalysts, only containing molecularly dispersed surface vanadia species, varied within one order of magnitude and revealed the V-O-Support bridging bond was involved in the critical rate-determining kinetic steps. The surface reaction mechanism for each reaction was revealed by in situ IR (infrared) and

  7. Chemisorption of CO[sub 2] on alumina-supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, F.M.; Kozminski, K.D.; Slike, J.M.; Ciccone, F.; Houalla, M. ); Scierka, S.J.; Eberhardt, M.A.; Hercules, D.M. )

    1993-02-01

    One of the limitations in using CO[sub 2] chemisorption to monitor surface coverage is that the method is based on selective chemisorption of the catalyst support. Thus, only certain support-active phase combinations are suitable for characterization using this technique. The objective of the present study is to examine CO[sub 2] chemisorption on a wider variety of catalysts (Mo, W, V, Cr, and Re supported on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). Catalysts are prepared by equilibrium adsorption in order to ensure that the active phase is uniformly distributed over the support.

  8. Supports and modified nano-particles for designing model catalysts.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C P; Dostert, K-H; Hollerer, M; Stiehler, C; Calaza, F; Schauermann, S; Shaikhutdinov, S; Sterrer, M; Freund, H-J

    2016-07-01

    In order to design catalytic materials, we need to understand the essential causes for material properties resulting from its composite nature. In this paper we discuss two, at first sight, diverse aspects: (a) the effect of the oxide-metal interface on metal nanoparticle properties and (b) the consequences of metal particle modification after activation on the selectivity of hydrogenation reactions. However, these two aspects are intimately linked. The metal nanoparticle's electronic structure changes at the interface as a catalyst is brought to different reaction temperatures due to morphological modifications in the metal and, as we will discuss, these changes in the chemistry lead to changes in the reaction path. As the morphology of the particle varies, facets of different orientations and sizes are exposed, which may lead to a change in the surface chemistry as well. We use two specific reactions to address these issues in some detail. To the best of our knowledge, the present paper reports the first observations of this kind for well-defined model systems. The changes in the electronic structure of Au nanoparticles due to their size and interaction with a supporting oxide are revealed as a function of temperature using CO2 activation as a probe. The presence of spectator species (oxopropyl), formed during an activation step of acrolein hydrogenation, strongly controls the selectivity of the reaction towards hydrogenation of the unsaturated C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond vs. the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond on Pd(111) when compared with oxide-supported Pd nanoparticles. PMID:27064816

  9. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  10. Towards liquid fuels from biosyngas: effect of zeolite structure in hierarchical-zeolite-supported cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sartipi, Sina; Alberts, Margje; Meijerink, Mark J; Keller, Tobias C; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek

    2013-09-01

    Wax on, wax off: Bifunctional cobalt-based catalysts on zeolite supports are applied for the valorization of biosyngas through Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. By using these catalysts, waxes can be hydrocracked to shorter-chain hydrocarbons, increasing the selectivity towards the C5 -C11 (gasoline) fraction. The zeolite topology and the amount and strength of acid sites are key parameters to maximize the performance of these bifunctional catalysts, steering Fischer-Tropsch product selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons. PMID:23765635

  11. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using a tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Gudde, Nicholas J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the steps involved in the development by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) of a catalytic device for the recombination of carbon monoxide and oxygen in a CO2 laser system. It contrasts the differences between CO oxidation for air purification and for laser environmental control, but indicates that there are similarities between the physical specifications. The principal features of catalytic devices are outlined and some experimental work described. This includes measurements concerning the structure and mechanical properties of the artifact, the preparation of the catalyst coating and its interaction with the gaseous environment. The paper concludes with some speculation about the method by which the reaction actually occurs.

  12. Ferromagnetic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by Fe catalyst arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Byeongchul; Yeom, Tae Ho; Lee, Soo Hyung

    2009-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were directly synthesized by a hydrogen arc discharge method using only Fe catalyst. The synthesized carbon materials indicated high-purity SWCNTs with Fe catalyst encapsulated with several graphite layers. The diameter of Fe catalysts encapsulated with graphene layers is 1.5-2.0 nm. From the ferromagnetic resonance measurements, the as-synthesized SWCNTs show the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. The ferromagnetic properties of SWCNTs would be attributed to Fe catalysts encapsulated by graphite layers.

  13. Potassium promotion of iron oxide dehydrogenation catalysts supported on magnesium oxide: 1. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stobbe, D.E.; Buren, F.R. van ); Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, J.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Catalysts of iron oxide supported on magnesium oxide and promoted with potassium were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of preshaped magnesium oxide support pellets with a solution of an iron complex, either ammonium iron (III) citrate or ammonium iron (III) EDTA and potassium carbonate. Iron and potassium were applied wither simultaneously or consecutively. As determined using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic measurements, calcination above 923 K results in the formation of a mixed oxide of iron and potassium, viz., KFeO[sub 2]. After calcination at 973 K the average crystallite size of the KFeO[sub 2] phase is about 300 [angstrom]. The formation of KFeO[sub 2] appeared to have a strong retarding effect on the reduction of the iron oxide phase to metallic iron. It was found that the KFeO[sub 2] phase is unstable in atomspheric air due to reaction with carbon dioxide and moisture to form potassium (hydrogen) carbonate and (hydrated) iron oxide.

  14. Platinum nanoparticles on carbon-nanotube support prepared by room-temperature reduction with H2 in ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent as catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuying; Dou, Zhengjie; Fang, Yanxiong; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Zeng, Jianhuang; Hou, Zhaohui; Liao, Shijun

    2016-02-01

    Polyol approach is commonly used in synthesizing Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. However, the application of this process consumes a great deal of time and energy, as the reduction of precursors requires elevated temperatures and several hours. Moreover, the ethylene glycol and its oxidizing products bound to Pt are difficult to remove. In this work, we utilize the advantages of ethylene glycol and prepare Pt nanoparticles through a room-temperature hydrogen gas reduction in an ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent, which is followed by subsequent harvesting by carbon nanotubes as electrocatalysts. This method is simple, facile, and time-efficient, as the entire room-temperature reduction process is completed in a few minutes. As the solvent changes from water to an ethylene glycol/water mix, the size of Pt nanoparticles varies from 10 to 3 nm and their shape transitions from polyhedral to spherical. Pt nanoparticles prepared in a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene glycol/water are uniformly dispersed with an average size of ∼3 nm. The optimized carbon nanotube-supported Pt electrocatalyst exhibits excellent methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction activities. This work demonstrates the potential use of mixed solvents as an approach in materials synthesis.

  15. Supported, Alkali-Promoted Cobalt Oxide Catalysts for NOx Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Morris D. Argyle

    2005-12-31

    A series of cobalt oxide catalysts supported on alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized with varying contents of cobalt and of added alkali metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. Unsupported cobalt oxide catalysts and several cobalt oxide catalysts supported ceria (CeO{sub 2}) with varying contents of cobalt with added potassium were also prepared. The catalysts were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and were examined for NO{sub x} decomposition activity. The CoO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and particularly the CoO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts show N{sub 2}O decomposition activity, but none of the catalysts (unsupported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} or those supported on ceria or alumina) displayed significant, sustained NO decomposition activity. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts, N{sub 2}O decomposition activity was observed over a range of reaction temperatures beginning about 723 K, but significant (>50%) conversions of N{sub 2}O were observed only for reaction temperatures >900 K, which are too high for practical commercial use. However, the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts display N{sub 2}O decomposition rates similar to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts at much lower reaction temperatures, with activity beginning at {approx}573 K. Conversions of >90% were achieved at 773 K for the best catalysts. Catalytic rates per cobalt atom increased with decreasing cobalt content, which corresponds to increasing edge energies obtained from the UV-visible spectra. The decrease in edge energies suggests that the size and dimensionality of the cobalt oxide surface domains increase with increasing cobalt oxide content. The rate data normalized per mass of catalyst that shows the activity of the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts increases with increasing cobalt oxide content. The combination of these data suggest that supported cobalt oxide species similar to bulk Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are inherently more active than

  16. Tip Growth Of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained By Pyrolyzation Of Camphor Oil With Zeolite Embedded With Fe/Ni/Mn Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Highly efficient synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of camphor oil, on a zeolite support impregnated with Fe/Ni/Mn (molar ratio of Fe:Ni:Mn = 1:1:1) catalyst in the temperature range from 550-950° C by the thermal CVD method. Besides the surface fluidization of the catalyst nanoparticles themselves, assistance of the metal oxides embedded in zeolite supports is supposed to be responsible for high activity and selectivity of the Fe/Ni/Mn catalyst over which carbon source (camphor oil) successfully decomposes. The CNT yield was higher at 850° C and can be considered as the optimum deposition temperature. This result demonstrates that zeolite impregnated with the catalyst Fe/Ni/Mn is a suitable support for effective formation of CNTs. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case. The as-grown CNTs were characterized by FESEM and FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. SUPPORTED LIQUID CATALYSTS FOR REMOVAL OF HIGH TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan W. Weimer; Peter Czerpak; Patrick Hilbert

    2000-01-01

    A novel catalytic synthesis gas oxidation process using molten carbonate salts supported on compatible fluidized iron oxide particles (supported-liquid-phase-catalyst (SLPC) fluidized bed process) was investigated. This process combines the advantages of large scale fluidized bed processing with molten salt bath oxidation. Molten salt catalysts can be supported within porous fluidized particles in order to improve mass transfer rates between the liquid catalysts and the reactant gases. Synthesis gas can be oxidized at reduced temperatures resulting in low NO{sub x} formation while trace sulfides and halides are captured in-situ. Hence, catalytic oxidation of synthesis gas can be carried out simultaneously with hot gas cleanup. Such SLPC fluidized bed processes are affected by inter-particle liquid capillary forces that may lead to agglomeration and de-fluidization of the bed. An understanding of the origin and strength of these forces is needed so that they can be overcome in practice. Process design is based on thermodynamic free energy minimization calculations that indicate the suitability of eutectic Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures for capturing trace impurities in-situ (< 1 ppm SO{sub x} released) while minimizing the formation of NO{sub x}(< 10 ppm). Iron oxide has been identified as a preferred support material since it is non-reactive with sodium, is inexpensive, has high density (i.e. inertia), and can be obtained in various particle sizes and porosities. Force balance modeling has been used to design a surrogate ambient temperature system that is hydrodynamically similar to the real system, thus allowing complementary investigation of the governing fluidization hydrodynamics. The primary objective of this research was to understand the origin of and to quantify the liquid capillary interparticle forces affecting the molten carbonate SLPC fluidized bed process. Substantial theoretical and experimental exploratory results indicate process

  18. Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over supported palladium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Keshav Chand; Krishna, R.; Chandra Shekar, S.; Singh, Beer

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of CO with ozone had been studied over Al2O3 and SiO2 supported Pd nanoparticles which was synthesized by two different methods. The polyol method mainly resulted in highly dispersed Pd particles on the support, while the impregnation method resulted in agglomeration Pd particles on the support. Supported Pd nanoparticles synthesized from PdCl2 in the presence of poly ( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) by chemical reduction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 BET surface area, pore size distributions, CO chemisorption, TEM and H2-temperature programmed reduction. The physico-chemical properties were well correlated with activity data. Characterizations of XRD and TEM show that the surface Pd nanoparticles are highly dispersed over Al2O3 and SiO2. The catalytic activity was dependent upon ozone/CO ratio, contact times, and the reaction temperature. The extent of carbon monoxide oxidation was proportional to the catalytically ozone decomposition. The PVP synthesized Pd/A2O3 catalyst had been found to be highly active for complete CO removal at room temperature. The higher activity of the nanocatalyst was attributed to small particle size and higher dispersion of Pd over support.

  19. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  20. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  1. The Effect of Cobalt Loading on Fischer Tropsch Synthesis Over Silicon Carbide Supported Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Suk; Jung, Jae Sun; Moon, Dong Ju

    2015-01-01

    A series of Co (5-30 wt%) based SiC supported catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and investigated for FTS reaction. The FTS reaction was carried out in a fixed bed reactor system with the H2/CO molar ratio of 2, reaction temperature of 230 degrees C and reaction pressure of 20 bar for 120 h. All catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption, XRD, TPR, SEM and TEM techniques. It was found that 15 wt% Co/SiC catalyst showed better catalytic performance with high selectivity of C(5+) hydrocarbons than the other catalysts. The results, suggest that the catalytic performance of the catalysts depends on average pore size of support and surface density of cobalt, metal and support interactions. PMID:26328368

  2. Graphene oxide supported molybdenum cluster: first heterogenized homogeneous catalyst for the synthesis of dimethylcarbonate from CO2 and methanol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subodh; Khatri, Om P; Cordier, Stéphane; Boukherroub, Rabah; Jain, Suman L

    2015-02-16

    The octahedral molybdenum cluster-based compound, Cs2 Mo6 Br(i) 8 Br(a) 6 was immobilized on graphene oxide (GO) by using a facile approach. High resolution transmission electron microscopy results revealed that molybdenum clusters were uniformly distributed on the GO nanosheets. Cs2 Mo6 Br(i) 8 Br(a) 6 was attached to the GO support via chemical interaction between apical ligands of Mo6 Br(i) 8 Br(a) 6 cluster units and oxygen functionalities of GO, as revealed by XPS studies. The developed material was used for the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate by reduction of carbon dioxide. The synthesized catalyst, that is, GO-Cs2 Mo6 Br(i) 8 Br(a) x , exhibited higher catalytic efficiency than its homogeneous analogue without using dehydrating agent. The catalyst was found to be efficiently recyclable without significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25537229

  3. Oxidative-reforming of model biogas over NiO/Al2O3 catalysts: The influence of the variation of support synthesis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asencios, Yvan J. O.; Elias, Kariny F. M.; Assaf, Elisabete M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, nickel catalysts (20 wt%) supported on γ-Al2O3 were prepared by the impregnation method. The γ-Al2O3, was synthesized by precipitation of bayerite gel obtained from aluminum scrap. The synthetic conditions of the bayerite gel varied as follows: precipitation pH ranging from 6 to 7; ageing temperature ranging from 25 to 80 °C, the calcination temperature for all samples was 500 °C. The catalysts and the supports were analyzed by temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), physisorption of N2 (BET), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Isopropanol decomposition reactions over the catalysts were carried out to evaluate their acidity. SEM images of the spent catalysts showed that the morphology of the carbon formed during the reaction is of the filamentous type. The TPR analysis of the catalysts showed the presence of NiO species weakly interacted with the support as well as stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric nickel aluminate, the reduction of these species was also observed by XANES analysis. XRD analysis of the fresh catalyst showed peaks assigned to NiO, NiAl2O4 and γ-Al2O3. The best catalysts (samples NiAl7-25 and NiAl7-80) synthesized in this report showed high stability and high conversion values (CH4 (70%) and CO2 (78%)). These catalysts showed better performance than the catalyst supported on commercial γ-Al2O3, which showed a high coke formation which affected the course of the reaction. The γ-Al2O3 synthesized from bayerite obtained at neutral pH conditions was the best support for nickel catalysts in the oxidative-reforming of model biogas.

  4. Magnetic silica supported palladium catalyst: synthesis of allyl aryl ethers in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and benign procedure for the synthesis of aryl allyl ethers has been developed using phenols, allyl acetates and magnetically recyclable silica supported palladium catalyst in water; performance of reaction in air and easy separation of the catalyst using an external mag...

  5. Titania-Supported Catalysts for Levulinic Acid Hydrogenation: Influence of Support and its Impact on γ-Valerolactone Yield.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, A M; Grams, J; Jędrzejczyk, M; Matras-Michalska, J; Keller, N; Ostojska, K; Sautet, P

    2015-05-11

    A series of titania-supported ruthenium and platinum catalysts was investigated in the levulinic acid hydrogenation towards γ-valerolactone, a key reaction for the catalytic transformation of biomass. It was shown that various morphologies and phases of titania strongly influence the physicochemical and catalytic properties of supported Ru and Pt catalysts in different ways. In the case of the catalyst supported on mixed TiO2 phases, Ru particles are exclusively located on the minority rutile crystallites, whereas such an effect was not observed for platinum. The platinum catalyst activity could be increased when the metal was dispersed on the large surface-area anatase, which was not the case for ruthenium as a result of its agglomeration on this support. The activity of ruthenium on anatase could be increased in two ways: a) when RuO2 formation during catalyst preparation was avoided; b) when pure anatase support material was modified so that it exhibited no microporosity. The obtained results allow a better understanding of the role of the support for Ru and Pt catalysts. PMID:25641864

  6. Combinatorial Optimization of Heterogeneous Catalysts Used in the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Verma, Sunita; Delzeit, Lance; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2000-01-01

    Libraries of liquid-phase catalyst precursor solutions were printed onto iridium-coated silicon substrates and evaluated for their effectiveness in catalyzing the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The catalyst precursor solutions were composed of inorganic salts and a removable tri-block copolymer (EO)20(PO)70(EO)20 (EO = ethylene oxide, PO = propylene oxide) structure-directing agent (SDA), dissolved in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Sample libraries were quickly assayed using scanning electron microscopy after CVD growth to identify active catalysts and CVD conditions. Composition libraries and focus libraries were then constructed around the active spots identified in the discovery libraries to understand how catalyst precursor composition affects the yield, density, and quality of the nanotubes. Successful implementation of combinatorial optimization methods in the development of highly active, carbon nanotube catalysts is demonstrated, as well as the identification of catalyst formulations that lead to varying densities and shapes of aligned nanotube towers.

  7. Monolith catalysts for closed-cycle carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.; Badlani, Ajay

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to explore ways of making a monolithic form of catalyst for CO2 lasers. The approach chosen was to pelletize the catalyst material, Au/MnO2 powder, and epoxy the pellets to stainless steel sheets as structural supports. The CO oxidation reaction over Au/MnO2 powder was found to be first overall, and the reaction rate constant at room temperature was 4.4 +/- 0.3 cc/(g x sec). The activation energy was 5.7 kcal/mol. The BET surface area of the pellets was found to vary from 125 to 140 sq m/g between different batches of catalyst. Pellets epoxied to stainless steel strips showed no sign of fracture or dusting when subjected to thermal tests. Pellets can be dropped onto hard surfaces with chipping of edges but no breakage of the pellets. Mechanical strength tests performed on the pellets showed that the crush strength is roughly one-fourth of the pelletizing force. The apparent activity and activation energy over the pellets were found to be less than over the powdered form of the catalyst. The lower apparent activity and activation energy of the pellets are due to the fact that the internal surface area of a pellet is not exposed to the reactant concentration present in the flowing gas as a result of intrapellet diffusion resistance. Effectiveness factors varied from 0.44, for pellets having thickness of 2 mm and attached with epoxy to a stainless steel strip. The epoxy and the stainless steel strip were found to simply block off one of the circular faces of the pellets. The epoxy did not penetrate the pellets and block the active sites. The values of the effective diffusivities were estimated to be between 2.3 x 10(exp -3) and 4.9 x 10(exp -3) sq cm/s. With measurements performed on one powder sample and one pellet configuration, reasonable accurate predictions can be made of conversions that would be obtained with other pellet thickness and configurations.

  8. Alumina supported molybdenum catalyst for lignin valorization: Effect of reduction temperature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Cui, Kai; Hao, Wenyue; Ma, Rui; Tian, Ye; Li, Yongdan

    2015-09-01

    Alumina supported molybdenum catalysts were prepared with an impregnation method. The activity of the catalyst in the ethanolysis of Kraft lignin to C6-C11 molecules, i.e. alcohols, esters, monophenols, benzyl alcohols and arenes, was tested in a batch reactor at 280 °C with initial 0 MPa nitrogen. The complete conversion of lignin to small molecular chemicals was achieved without the formation of tar or char. The reduction temperature during the catalyst preparation was proved to have a profound effect on the activity of the catalyst. The overall product yield firstly increases and then decreases with the increase of the reduction temperature in a range of 500-800 °C. The maximum yield up to 1390 mg/g lignin was obtained with the catalyst reduced at 750 °C. Furthermore, the catalyst showed an excellent recyclability, where no significant loss of the catalytic activity was exhibited after 5 runs. PMID:26004558

  9. Nanostructured TiOx as a catalyst support material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Richard S.

    Recent interest in the development of new catalyst support materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has stimulated research into the viability of TiO2-based support structures. Specifically, substoichiometric TiO2 (TiOx) has been reported to exhibit a combination of high conductivity, stability, and corrosion resistance. These properties make TiOx-based support materials a promising prospect when considering the inferior corrosion resistance of traditional carbon-based supports. This document presents an investigation into the formation of conductive and stable TiOx thin films employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) and a post deposition oxygen reducing anneal (PDORA). Techniques for manufacturing TiOx-based catalyst support nanostructures by means of ALD in conjunction with carbon black (CB), anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silicon nanowires (SiNWs) will also be presented. The composition and thickness of resulting TiOx thin films was determined with the aid of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Film crystal structure was determined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Film conductivity was calculated using four-point probe (4-PP) and film thickness measurement data. Resulting thin films show a significant decrease of oxygen in ALD TiOx films corresponding with a great increase in conductivity following the PDORA. The effectiveness of the PDORA was also found to be highly dependent on ALD process parameters. TiOx-based nanostructures were coated with platinum using one of three Pt deposition techniques. First, liquid phase deposition (LPD), which was performed at room temperature, provided equal access to catalyst support material surfaces which were suspended in solution. Second, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), which was performed at 450°C, provided good Pt

  10. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  11. Resolving Interparticle Heterogeneities in Composition and Hydrogenation Performance between Individual Supported Silver on Silica Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Supported metal nanoparticle catalysts are commonly obtained through deposition of metal precursors onto the support using incipient wetness impregnation. Typically, empirical relations between metal nanoparticle structure and catalytic performance are inferred from ensemble averaged data in combination with high-resolution electron microscopy. This approach clearly underestimates the importance of heterogeneities present in a supported metal catalyst batch. Here we show for the first time how incipient wetness impregnation leads to 10-fold variations in silver loading between individual submillimeter-sized silica support granules. This heterogeneity has a profound impact on the catalytic performance, with 100-fold variations in hydrogenation performance at the same level. In a straightforward fashion, optical microscopy interlinks single support particle level catalytic measurements to structural and compositional information. These detailed correlations reveal the optimal silver loading. A thorough consideration of catalyst heterogeneity and the impact thereof on the catalytic performance is indispensable in the development of catalysts. PMID:26618052

  12. Hydrogasification of carbon adsorbed on sulfur-poisoned dispersed metal catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.; Wood, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    The temperature programmed reaction of 1- to 10-atom hydrogen (TPRH) with carbon deposited on alumina supported Ni, Ru, and Co and on fused Fe catalysts has been developed to examine the effect of sulfur poisoning on coking rates and the nature of the deposited carbon. A new procedure, passivation by carbon deposition on clean reduced metals and low temperature (20--50 C) exposure to recirculate dilute H{sub 2}S with moderate 0.1 atm partial pressure of CO{sub 2} was used to slow the rate of sulfur chemisorption. This method facilitated slow uniform sulfur chemisorption to fractional saturation coverages. Fractional sulfur poisoning generally blocked sites of active surface carbon (or hydrocarbon fragments) while suppressing rates of hydrogasification as shown by the increasing temperatures in the TPRH hydrogasification rate versus temperature spectra. Fractional sulfur poisoning (e.g., half saturation) appears to inhibit H{sub 2} gasification with surface carbon surprisingly without strongly affecting catalytic activity. Sulfur poisoning to saturation levels (defined here as {approximately}1 ppm H{sub 2}S in 1-atm H{sub 2} at 500 C) always results in complete loss of activity and is also marked by the growth of a very unreactive form of carbon.

  13. Alkoxymagnesium halide supports for heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.M.; Tirendi, C.F.; Amata, R.J.; Band, E.I. )

    1993-03-31

    Solid ClMg(OEt) (1) has been prepared and characterized for the first time as a pure, spectroscopically homogeneous material. The novel material, Cl[sub 3]Mg[sub 2]OEt (2), has also been prepared and characterized as a pure, spectroscopically homogeneous solid. These materials are made by stepwise alcoholysis and chlorination of butylethylmagnesium. CP/MAS [sup 13]C NMR (cross-polarization/magic angle spinning carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra of 1 and 2 show well-defined ethyl group environments in each material: 1 ([delta], ppm), 59.3 (OCH[sub 2]CH[sub 3]), 19.7 (OCH[sub 2]CH[sub 3]); 2, ([delta], ppm), 63.4 (OCH[sub 2]CH[sub 3]), 19.1 ppm (OCH[sub 2]CH[sub 3]). X-ray powder diffraction pattern measurements show that 1 (d[sub max] = 9.30 [Angstrom]) and 2 (d[sub max] = 9.93 [Angstrom]) are different from each other from MgCl[sub 2] (d[sub max] = 8.26 [Angstrom]) and Mg(OEt)[sub 2] (d[sub max] = 9.82 [Angstrom]). These compounds are high surface area, microporous materials (1, 233 m[sup 2]/g by BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption isotherm)) and pore volume 0.33 cm[sup 3]/g at P/P[sub 0] = 0.98; 2, 299 m[sup 2]/g by BET and pore volume 0.42 cm[sup 3]/g at P/P[sub 0] = 0.98). After reaction with TiCl[sub 4] and activation with Al(i-Bu)[sub 3], these materials are active Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts (30 psig H[sub 2], 100 psig total C[sub 2]H[sub 4] pressure, 85[degrees]C: 1 yields 30.4 kg of PE/(g of Ti h) (kg of polyethylene/(g of titanium hour)), M[sub w] = 144,000, M[sub n] = 9,020; 2 yields 56.9 kg of PE/(g of Ti h), M[sub w] = 110,000, M[sub n] = 13,800. 12 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Stability and catalytic performance of vanadia supported on nanostructured titania catalyst in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootenaei, A. H. Shahbazi; Towfighi, J.; Khodadadi, A.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Titanate nanotubes with a high specific surface area were synthesized by the simple hydrothermal method and investigated as support for V2O5 catalyst in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODP). The structures of pristine nanotubes as well as the prepared catalysts were investigated by XRD, Raman, FTIR, HRTEM, SEM, EDS, BET, and XPS techniques. The characterization of the as-synthesized nanotubes showed the synthesis of hydrogen titanate nanotube. The incipient wetness impregnation method was utilized to prepare VTNT-x (x = 5, 10, and 15 wt.% vanadia supported on nanotube) together with VTi5 (5 wt.% vanadia supported on Degussa P25). The anatase phase was developed in VTNT-x catalysts upon calcination along with specific surface area loss. Higher vanadia loading resulted in the lowering of support capacity in maintaining vanadia in dispersed state such that eventually crystalline vanadia appeared. The measured catalyst activity demonstrates that in spite of major support surface area loss in VTNT-5 catalyst, the propylene yield is superior in comparison with VTi5 catalyst. The catalyst activity can be correlated with maximum reduction temperature. Deactivation of VTi5 and VTNT-5 as well as VTNT-15 were studied for 3,000 min time-on-stream. It was found that the activity of VTNT-5 catalyst remain unchanged while a decline in catalytic activity observed in VTi5 and VTNT-15 catalysts. The development of rutile was considered as being a major element in the deactivation of the investigated catalysts which is influenced by the presence of vanadium and reaction atmosphere.

  15. Mechanistic aspects of the ethanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Maria Cruz; Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Kondarides, Dimitris I; Verykios, Xenophon E; Fierro, Jose Luis G

    2010-03-25

    Mechanistic aspects of ethanol steam reforming on Pt, Ni, and PtNi catalysts supported on gamma-Al(2)O(3) are investigated from the analysis of adsorbed species and gas phase products formed on catalysts during temperature-programmed desorption of ethanol and during ethanol steam reforming reaction. DRIFTS-MS analyses of ethanol decomposition and ethanol steam reforming reactions show that PtNi and Ni catalysts are more stable than the Pt monometallic counterpart. Ethanol TPD results on Ni, Pt, and NiPt catalysts point to ethanol dehydrogenation and acetaldehyde decomposition as the first reaction pathways of ethanol steam reforming over the studied catalysts. The active sites responsible for the acetaldehyde decomposition are easily deactivated in the first minutes on-stream by carbon deposits. For Ni and PtNi catalysts, a second reaction pathway, consisting in the decomposition of acetate intermediates formed over the surface of alumina support, becomes the main reaction pathway operating in steam reforming of ethanol once the acetaldehyde decomposition pathway is deactivated. Taking into account the differences observed in the mechanism of ethanol decomposition, the better stability observed for PtNi catalyst is proposed to be related with a cooperative effect between Pt and Ni activities together with the enhanced ability of Ni to gasify the methyl groups formed by decomposition of acetate species. On the contrary, monometallic catalysts are believed to dehydrogenate these methyl groups forming coke that leads to deactivation of metal particles. PMID:19824680

  16. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, G G

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu{sub 2}O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu{sub 2}O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu{sub 2}O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu{sub 2}O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  17. Particle size, precursor, and support effects in the hydrogenolysis of alkanes over supported rhodium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Coq, B.; Dutartre, R.; Figueras, F.; Tazi, T. )

    1990-04-01

    A series of Rh catalysts of widely varying dispersion has been prepared using {gamma}-alumina as support and Rh acetylacetonate (Rh(acac){sub 3}) as precursor. The hydrogenolyses of n-hexane (nH), methylcyclopentane (MCP), and 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (TeMB) were investigated as model reactions. Clear dependence of turnover frequency on Rh particle size is observed for nH and MCP hydrogenolysis, but only slight changes of selectivities occur with these alkanes. By contrast, large modifications of both specific activity and selectivity appear when TeMB is reacted. TeMB hydrogenolysis is thus a reliable tool for studying modifications of the surface structure of rhodium particles. This probe was used to investigate the effects of precursor and support on rhodium catalysts. The effect of chlorine is appreciable and shifts the selectivity of TeMB hydrogenolysis toward that of large particles. This is attributed to a different morphology of the rhodium particles. When the effect of dispersion of the metal is taken into account, no support effect is observed when SiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2} is used as support. The different properties of rhodium on MgO can also be attributed to a different morphology of the particles. For Rh/TiO{sub 2} prepared from RhCl{sub 3} {center dot} 3H{sub 2}O, the catalytic properties are similar to those of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of moderate dispersion whatever temperature is used for reduction. Rh/TiO{sub 2} prepared from Rh(acac){sub 3} and reduced at 573 and 773 K simulates the catalytic properties of particles smaller than indeed observed. This effect can be interpreted by a partial coverage of the Rh surface by TiO{sub x} species (SMSI). This SMSI effect disappears upon reduction at 873 K.

  18. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report heremore » a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A∙cm-3 at 0.9 V or 450 A∙cm-3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed.« less

  20. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A∙cm-3 at 0.9 V or 450 A∙cm-3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed.

  1. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A⋅cm−3 at 0.9 V or 450 A⋅cm−3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed. PMID:26261338

  2. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal-organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di-Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A ⋅ cm(-3) at 0.9 V or 450 A ⋅ cm(-3) extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed. PMID:26261338

  3. Polymer network/carbon layer on monolith support and monolith catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to an improved monolith catalytic reactor and a monolith support. The improvement in the support resides in a polymer network/carbon coating applied to the surface of a porous substrate and a catalytic metal, preferably a transition metal catalyst applied to the surface of the polymer network/carbon coating. The monolith support has from 100 to 800 cells per square inch and a polymer network/carbon coating with surface area of from 0.1 to 15 m.sup.2 /gram as measured by adsorption of N.sub.2 or Kr using the BET method.

  4. Magnesium oxide-supported ziegler catalyst modified with acid and higher alkanol, and process for preparing narrow MWD HDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, J.T.T.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a coordination-catalyst suitable for the polymerization of olefins. It comprises a titanium component and an organoaluminum compound reducing agent on a magnesium oxide support which has been pre-treated with a molar deficiency of a carboxylic acid with respect to the magnesium oxide support. The titanium component is the reaction product of an alkanol having 5 to 12 carbon atoms and TiCl/sub 4/ with the molar ratio of the alkanol to the TiCl/sub 4/ being about 0.5 to about 1.5.

  5. The structure of nano-palladium deposited on carbon-based supports

    SciTech Connect

    Pikna, Ľubomír; Milkovič, Ondrej; Saksl, Karel; Heželová, Mária; Smrčová, Miroslava; Puliš, Pavel; Michalik, Štefan; Gamcová, Jana

    2014-04-01

    Nano-palladium catalysts, prepared using the same procedure with the same metal content (3 wt%) and two different supports, activated carbon (Pd/C) and activated carbon—multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd/C/CNT), are discussed. The simple technique of deposition reduction was applied in the preparation of these two types of Pd catalysts. TEM, XRD analysis, EXAFS signal analysis, and XANES were used for sample characterization. In both samples, transmission electron microscopy identified nanosized Pd particles with nearly spherical morphology but different sizes. The mean diameters of the particles on Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT were estimated to be 5.4 nm and 7.8 nm, respectively. The EXAFS signal analysis showed that Pd atoms on the particle surfaces were coordinated by 4 oxygens to form a PdO monolayer covering a metallic core. The XANES signal analysis indicated a smaller particle size for Pd/C (∅ 5 nm) than for Pd/C/CNT (∅ 10 nm), in good agreement with the TEM observations. - Graphical abstract: Visualization of metallic core (left), oxide monolayer (middle) and nanoparticle of diameter 5 nm (right). - Highlights: • Pd catalysts were prepared on two types of supports: carbon and carbon nanotubes. • BET, TEM, XRD characterization of prepared catalysts. • XAFS: Concentration of Pd in samples Pd/C and Pd/C/CNT. • EXAFS and XANES signal analysis of catalysts. • Visualisation of atoms arrangement at the Pd nanoparticle surface.

  6. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  7. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  8. Steam Reforming of Ethylene Glycol over MgAl₂O₄ Supported Rh, Ni, and Co Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Xing, Rong; Albrecht, Karl O.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2015-11-25

    Steam reforming of ethylene glycol (EG) over MgAl₂O₄ supported metal (15 wt.% Ni, 5 wt.% Rh, and 15 wt.% Co) catalysts were investigated using combined experimental and theoretical methods. Compared to highly active Rh and Ni catalysts with 100% conversion, the steam reforming activity of EG over the Co catalyst is comparatively lower with only 42% conversion under the same reaction conditions (500°C, 1 atm, 119,000 h⁻¹, S/C=3.3 mol). However, CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst is remarkably lower. For example, by varying the gas hour space velocity (GHSV) such that complete conversion is achieved for all the catalysts, CH₄ selectivity for the Co catalyst is only 8%, which is much lower than the equilibrium CH₄ selectivity of ~ 24% obtained for both the Rh and Ni catalysts. Further studies show that varying H₂O concentration over the Co catalyst has a negligible effect on activity, thus indicating zero-order dependence on H₂O. These experimental results suggest that the supported Co catalyst is a promising EG steam reforming catalyst for high hydrogen production. To gain mechanistic insight for rationalizing the lower CH₃ selectivity observed for the Co catalyst, the initial decomposition reaction steps of ethylene glycol via C-O, O-H, C-H, and C-C bond scissions on the Rh(111), Ni(111) and Co(0001) surfaces were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Despite the fact that the bond scission sequence in the EG decomposition on the three metal surfaces varies, which leads to different reaction intermediates, the lower CH₄ selectivity over the Co catalyst, as compared to the Rh and Ni catalysts, is primarily due to the higher barrier for CH₄ formation. The higher S/C ratio enhances the Co catalyst stability, which can be elucidated by the facile water dissociation and an alternative reaction path to remove the CH species as a coking precursor via the HCOH formation. This work was financially supported by the United

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Transition Metal Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yura; Park, Eun-Sil; Mees, Karina; Park, Ho-Seon; Willert-Porada, Monika; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers were synthesized on transition metal (Fe, Co, Cu) catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The variations of thickness and surface of the fibers were investigated according to the concentration of the transition metal. In order to prepare the metal catalysts for synthesis, transition metal nitrate and copper nitrate at a weight ratio were dissolved in distilled water. The obtained catalyst precipitates were filtered and then dried for more than 24 hours at 110 degrees C. Carbon nanofibers were synthesized by using ethylene gas of carbon source by CVD after pulverization of the fully-dried catalyst precipitates. They were characterized by SEM, EDS, Raman, XRD, XPS and TG/DTA, and their specific surface area was measured by BET. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of the metal catalysts. Especially, uniform carbon nanofibers grew when the concentration ratio of Fe and Cu was 7:3, and that of Co and Cu was 6:4. Carbon nanofibers synthesized under such concentration conditions had the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts of different concentration ratios, and revealed high amorphicity as well as high specific surface area. PMID:26716326

  10. Characterization of Al2O3 Supported Nickel Catalysts Derived from RFNon-thermal Plasma Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Ben W; Helleson, Michael J; Shi, Chunkai; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Schwartz, Viviane; Liang, Chengdu; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts derived from non-thermal plasma techniques have previously shown unusual and highly advantageous catalytic properties including room temperature reduction, unusual metal particle structure and metal-support interactions, and enhanced selectivity and stability. This study focuses on the characterization of Al2O3 supported Ni catalysts derived from the RF non-thermal plasma technique with in-situ XRD, TPR-MS and STEM and on relating the results to the enhanced activity and stability of benzene hydrogenation. The results suggest that catalysts with plasma treatments before impregnation are relatively easier to be reduced and result in better activities under mild reduction conditions. These plasma treatments stabilize the nickel particle sizes of air(B) and H2(B) catalysts at 600 C by slowing down the sintering process. Plasma treatments after the impregnation of precursors, on the other hand, tend to delay the growth of nickel particles below 600 C, forming smaller Ni particles, but with a sudden increase in particle size near 600 C. It suggests that the structure of Ni nitrate and the metal-support interaction have been altered by the plasma treatments. The reduction patterns of plasma 1 treated catalysts are, therefore, changed. The catalyst with a combination plasma treatment demonstrates that the effect of a combination plasma treatment is larger than either the plasma treatment before or after the impregnation alone. Both plasma treatments before and after the impregnation of metal precursor play important roles in modifying supported metal catalysts.

  11. Towards stable catalysts by controlling collective properties of supported metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Zečević, Jovana; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jong, Krijn P; de Jongh, Petra E

    2013-01-01

    Supported metal nanoparticles play a pivotal role in areas such as nanoelectronics, energy storage/conversion and as catalysts for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. However, the tendency of nanoparticles to grow into larger crystallites is an impediment for stable performance. Exemplarily, loss of active surface area by metal particle growth is a major cause of deactivation for supported catalysts. In specific cases particle growth might be mitigated by tuning the properties of individual nanoparticles, such as size, composition and interaction with the support. Here we present an alternative strategy based on control over collective properties, revealing the pronounced impact of the three-dimensional nanospatial distribution of metal particles on catalyst stability. We employ silica-supported copper nanoparticles as catalysts for methanol synthesis as a showcase. Achieving near-maximum interparticle spacings, as accessed quantitatively by electron tomography, slows down deactivation up to an order of magnitude compared with a catalyst with a non-uniform nanoparticle distribution, or a reference Cu/ZnO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst. Our approach paves the way towards the rational design of practically relevant catalysts and other nanomaterials with enhanced stability and functionality, for applications such as sensors, gas storage, batteries and solar fuel production. PMID:23142841

  12. Growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes on glass substrate with an amorphous carbon catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Keun; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Dong; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Byungyou

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates with microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were used as a catalyst layer to grow metal-free CNTs. The a-C films were deposited on Corning glass substrates using RF magnetron sputtering with the use of a carbon target (99.99%) at room temperature. They were pretreated with hydrogen plasma using a microwave PECVD at 600 degrees C. Then, CNTs were prepared using microwave PECVD with a mixture of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The CNTs were grown at different substrate temperatures (400 degrees C, 500 degrees C, and 600 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Other conditions were fixed. The growth trends of CNTs against substrate temperature were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The structure of a-C catalyst layer and grown CNTs were measured by Raman spectroscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images showed that the CNTs had bamboo-like multi-walled structures. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed that the CNTs consisted of only carbon. PMID:22409050

  13. Dehydration of Glycerin to Acrolein Over Heteropolyacid Nano-Catalysts Supported on Silica-Alumina.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hun; Choi, Jung Ho; Choi, Jun Seon; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    A series of H3PW12O40 nano-catalysts supported on silica-alumina (XH3PW12O40/SA (X = 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30)) with different H3PW12O40 content (X, wt%) were prepared, and they were applied to the dehydration of glycerin to acrolein. The effect of H3PW12O40 content on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of XH3PW12O40/SA nano-catalysts was investigated. Surface area and pore volume of XH3PW12O40/SA catalysts decreased with increasing H3PW12O40 content. Formation of H3PW12O40 aggregates was observed in the catalysts with high H3PW12O40 loading. Brønsted acidity of the catalysts showed a volcano-shaped trend with respect to H3PW12O40 content. It was revealed that yield for acrolein increased with increasing Brønsted acidity of XH3PW12O40/SA catalysts. Brønsted acidity of XH3PW12O40/SA catalysts served as a crucial factor determining the catalytic performance in the dehydration of glycerin. Among the catalysts tested, 25H3PW12O40/SA catalyst with the largest Brønsted acidity showed the best catalytic performance. PMID:26726511

  14. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2001-10-26

    There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx}1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

  15. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2000-11-17

    There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx} 1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

  16. Carbon deposition in the Bosch process with ruthenium and ruthenium-iron alloy catalysts. M.S. Thesis. Final Report, Jan. 1981 - Jul. 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.; Sophonpanich, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of ruthenium and the alloys 50Ru50Fe and 33Ru67Fe as alternatives to iron, nickel, and cobalt catalysts in recovering oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide was investigated. Carbon deposition boundaries over the unsupported alloys are reported. Experiments were also carried out over 50Ru50Fe and 97Ru3Fe3 catalysts supported on gamma-alumina to determine their performance in the synthesis of low molecular weight olefins. High production of ethylene and propylene would be beneficial for an improvement of an overall Bosch process, as a gas phase containing high olefin content would enhance carbon deposition in a Bosch reactor.

  17. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  18. Investigation of low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts. [for Spacelab atmosphere control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.; Katan, T.; Ray, C. D.; Lamparter, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon monoxide generation rates related to the use of commerical equipment in Spacelab, added to the normal metabolic and subsystem loads, will produce carbon monoxide levels in excess of the maximum allowable concentration. In connection with the sensitivity of carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts to poisoning at room temperature, catalysts for an oxidation of carbon monoxide at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that platinum and palladium are the only effective room temperature catalysts which are effective at 333 K. Hopcalite was ineffective at ambient temperatures, but converted CO with 100 percent efficiency at 333 K. Poisoning tests showed the noble metal catalysts to be very sensitive, and Hopcalite to be very resistant to poisoning.

  19. Supported transition-metal oxide catalysts for reduction of sulfur dioxide with hydrogen to elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Ching-Huei; Weng, Hung-Shan

    2004-08-01

    This work is for the purpose to find a high performance catalyst for the catalytic reduction of SO2 with H2 as a reducing agent. NiO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was found to be the most active catalyst among the seven gamma-Al2O3-supported metal-oxide catalysts tested. With NiO as the active species, of the supports tested, gamma-Al2O3 was the most suitable one and the optimal Ni content was 16 wt%. Using this NiO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst, we found that the optimal feed ratio of H2/SO2 is 2:1 and the catalyst presulfided with H2 + H2S exhibits a higher performance than that pretreated with H2 or He. XRD patterns reveal that the nickel oxide experienced a transformation to Ni3S2 and NiS, and then to NiS2, the most active nickel sulfide, during the reaction process. The reason for the highest catalyst activity of 16 wt% Ni was attributed to the largest amount of NiS2. Water vapor in the feed gas reactant caused inhibition of catalyst activity, whereas H2S promoted the reduction of SO2. These phenomena were rationalized with the aid of Claus reaction. PMID:15212907

  20. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    SciTech Connect

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer chains.

  1. Kinetics of oxygen-enhanced water gas shift on bimetallic catalysts and the roles of metals and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugai, Junichiro

    The post-processing of reformate is an important step in producing hydrogen (H2) with low carbon monoxide (CO) for low temperature fuel cells from syn-gas. However, the conventional process consists of three steps, i.e. two steps of water gas shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PROX) of CO, and it is not suitable for mobile applications due to the large volume of water gas shift (WGS) catalysts and conditioning and/or regeneration necessary for these catalysts. Aiming at replacing those three steps by a simple one-step process, small amount of oxygen was added to WGS (the reaction called oxygen-enhanced water gas shift or OWGS) to promote the reaction kinetics and low pyrophoric ceria-supported bimetallic catalysts were employed for stable performance in this reaction. Not only CO conversion, but also H2 yield was found to increase by the O2 addition on CeO2-supported catalysts. The characteristics of OWGS, high H2 production rate at 200 to 300°C at short contact time where unreacted O2 exists, evidenced the impact of O2 addition on surface species on the catalyst. Around 1.5 of reaction order in CO for various CeO2-supported metal catalysts for OWGS compared to reaction orders in CO ranging from -0.1 to 0.6 depending on metal species for WGS shows O2 addition decreases CO coverage to free up the active sites for co-reactant (H2O) adsorption and activation. Among the monometallic and bimetallic catalysts, Pt-Cu and Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts were superior to monometallic catalysts in OWGS. These bimetallic components were found to form alloys where noble metal is surrounded mainly by Cu to have strong interaction between noble metal and copper resulting in high OWGS activity and low pyrophoric property. The metal loadings were optimized for CeO2-supported Pd-Cu bimetallic system and 2 wt% Pd with 5 -- 10 wt% Cu were found to be the optimum for the present OWGS condition. In the kinetic study, Pd in Pd-Cu was shown to increase the active sites for H2O

  2. Mononuclear, trinuclear, and metallic rhenium catalysts supported on MgO: Effects of structure on catalyst performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirlin, P.S.; Gates, B.C. ); Knoezinger, H. )

    1990-11-01

    MgO-supported Re catalysts were prepared from (HRe(CO){sub 5}) and (H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}) to give isolated Re subcarbonyls and ensembles of three Re subcarbonyls, respectively. The latter sample was reduced in H{sub 2} to give Re metal crystallites on the support. The reactivities of the various surface species were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction, temperature-programmed desorption, and wet chemical experiments. The samples were probed as catalysts for the structure-insensitive propene hydrogenation and the structure-sensitive cyclopropane isomerization/hydrogenolysis. The supported Re complexes formed from (HRe(CO){sub 5}) and MgO catalyze the alkene hydrogenation but not the C-C bond rupture. The ensembles of these complexes formed from (H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}) catalyze both, in this respect resembling supported crystallites of Re metal partially poisoned with CO. It is inferred that neighboring metal centers are required for the C-C bond rupture, whereas isolated metal centers are active for the hydrogenation. The catalyst containing Re metal is also active for both of these conversions and is the only one of these samples that is active for the isomerization of cyclopropane to give propene.

  3. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Zheng, Mengjia; Han, Yuxiang; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO2, CeO2, Al2O3 and SiO2 were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO2 was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO2 and pd-Pd/TiO2. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO2 catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO2 catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd loading amount, the Pd catalyst supported on TiO2 exhibited a much higher catalytic activity than those on other supports. Furthermore, dp-Pd/TiO2 was found to be more active than im-Pd/TiO2 and pd-Pd/TiO2.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nitride: Influence of Surface Hydroxyls on Low Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Joseph A; Dudney, Nancy J; Li, Meijun; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Veith, Gabriel M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of 2.5 nm gold clusters on the oxygen free and chemically labile support carbon nitride (C3N4). Despite having small particle sizes and high enough water partial pressure these Au/C3N4 catalysts are inactive for the gas phase and liquid phase oxidation of carbon monoxide. The reason for the lack of activity is attributed to the lack of surface OH groups on the C3N4. These OH groups are argued to be responsible for the activation of CO in the oxidation of CO. The importance of basic OH groups explains the well document dependence of support isoelectric point versus catalytic activity.

  5. The effect of supports on the activity and selectivity of Co - Ni alloy catalysts for CO hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Tatsumi; Horiuchi, Nobuhiko; Eguchi, Koichi; Arai, Hiromichi )

    1991-07-01

    The CO hydrogenation activity of 50Co50Ni alloy catalysts strongly depended on the oxide support. Electron-donating oxides such as MgO, PbO, and ZnO lowered the overall activity of the 50Co50Ni metal. The CO conversion as well as the chain growth probability was high over 50Co50Ni/TiO{sub 2} and 50Co50Ni/MnO{sub 2}. The infrared spectra of adsorbed NO indicated that the electron density of the 50Co50Ni metal was low when it was supported on electron-accepting oxide. The results of desorption measurements suggest that metal-support interaction has a great influence on the surface concentration of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, and adsorption of carbon monoxide and hydrogen is weakened by increasing the electronegativity of the oxide support. Since the rate of H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange correlated well with the CO hydrogenation rate, activation of hydrogen is of primary importance in this catalyst system. The low electron density of the alloy supported on the electron-accepting oxides such as TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} weakens CO adsorption, resulting in an increase in surface coverage of hydrogen. Thus sufficient coverage of hydrogen leads to a high CO hydrogenation rate.

  6. Effect of Support on the Activity of Ag-based Catalysts for Formaldehyde Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianghao; Li, Yaobin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Min; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Changbin; He, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Ag-based catalysts with different supports (TiO2, Al2O3 and CeO2) were prepared by impregnation method and subsequently tested for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO) at low temperature. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst showed the distinctive catalytic performance, achieving the complete HCHO conversion at around 95 °C. In contrast, the Ag/Al2O3 and Ag/CeO2 catalysts displayed much lower activity and the 100% conversion was reached at 110 °C and higher than 125 °C, respectively. The Ag-based catalysts were next characterized by several methods. The characterization results revealed that supports have the dramatic influence on the Ag particle sizes and dispersion. Kinetic tests showed that the Ag based catalyst on the TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 supports have the similar apparent activation energy of 65 kJ mol−1, indicating that the catalytic mechanism keep immutability over these three catalysts. Therefore, Ag particle size and dispersion was confirmed to be the main factor affecting the catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. The Ag/TiO2 catalyst has the highest Ag dispersion and the smallest Ag particle size, accordingly presenting the best catalytic performance for HCHO oxidation. PMID:26263506

  7. Decreased methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide using zeolite/cobalt-manganese oxide composite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Johns, M; Landon, P; Alderson, T; Hutchings, G J

    2001-12-01

    A composite catalyst comprising a physical mixture of a zeolite and a cobalt/manganese oxide Fischer-Tropsch catalyst decreases the formation of methane in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide without significantly affecting conversion. PMID:12240011

  8. Nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable palladium (Pd) catalyst: a selective and sustainable oxidation protocol with high turnover number

    EPA Science Inventory

    A magnetic nanoparticle-supported ruthenium hydroxide catalyst was readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials and shown to catalyze hydration of nitriles with excellent yield in benign aqueous medium. Catalyst recovery using an external magnetic field, superior activity...

  9. MCM-41-supported cobalt-molybdenum catalysts for deep hydrodesulfurization of diesel and jet fuel feedstocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Uday Tsrpr

    Regulatory issues require new catalysts for the deep hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of refractory polyaromatic sulfur compounds such as 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT) present in diesel and jet fuel. Molybdenum sulfide (MoS2 ) supported on mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 and promoted by cobalt was hypothesized to have superior activity for deep HDS because of MCM-41's (1) high surface area and uniform mesopores and (2) superior acidity as compared to conventional supports such as gamma-alumina (gamma-Al 2O3). This study examines the role of MCM-41 as a support for new cobalt (Co)-molybdenum (Mo) HDS catalysts. At CoO-MoO3 loadings typical of commercially available HDS catalysts, MCM-41-supported catalysts were only slightly better. At higher loadings---27.0% (by weight) MoO3 and 5.8% CoO---MCM-41-supported catalysts were twice more active than the commercial catalyst. This difference in activities is related to the degree of MoS2 stacking. Remarkable increase in the conversion of 4,6-DMDBT was observed over MCM-41-supported catalysts with decreasing SiO2/Al2O 3 ratio. More significantly, the SiO2/Al2O 3 ratio of MCM-41 has a profound effect on product distribution and catalyst selectivity. Irrespective of CoO-MoO3 loading, catalysts using MCM-41 with a SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of 50 convert more of 4,6-DMDBT through the highly desirable hydrogenolysis pathway. The acidity of these catalysts was measured and correlated to their selectivities for hydrogenolysis and hydrocracking. Co-Mo/MCM-41 continued to demonstrate activities twice that of the commercial catalyst for the HDS of 4,6-DMDBT in petroleum-derived feedstocks such as light cycle oil. However, for a blend of coal- and petroleum-derived feedstocks, nitrogen from the coal-derived liquid inhibited both catalysts for the HDS of 4,6-DMDBT. Basic nitrogen, e.g., quinoline, significantly retards the HDS of 4,6-DMDBT over both catalysts. Non-basic carbazole, on the other hand, inhibited the MCM-41-supported

  10. A combinatorial study on catalytic synergism in supported metal catalysts for fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Yusuke; Shioyama, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    In order to accelerate the catalyst development for the increasing demand on the fuel cell technology, it has been attempted to adopt a combinatorial approach. The catalytic synergism, often observed on the supported metal catalysts for the fuel cell utilization, has been subjected to study. It is proposed herein that not only a comparison of catalysts in one reaction, but also the comparison of interrelated reactions by use of a common catalyst library brings about important information to elucidate the catalytic synergism. Preliminary results of the comparison between the water-gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of MeOH on a given set of catalyst library are presented. An important indicator to predict the serendipitous synergism is expected to be obtained from such information by use of artificial intelligence.

  11. Characterization of Fe/C catalysts supported on Al2O3, SiO2 and TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodya, J. A. L.; Seda, T.; Strydom, A. M.; Manzini, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of Fe/C catalysts synthesized by ball milling and deposited onto Al2O3, SiO2 and TiO2 supports are reported. Ball milling α-Fe and C in the presence of these supports produced peculiar solid solutions in which antiferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic iron phases doped with Al, Si and Ti coexist. Mössbauer spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction data show no evidence of any FexC phase. Instead, oxidation took place even though carbon (graphite) was present. All the catalysts were found to exhibit strong metal-support interactions, with the strongest interactions found in the TiO2 supported catalyst.

  12. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  13. Alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Chuang, K.T.

    1998-08-01

    The effectiveness of alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for the destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill was evaluated in a slurry reactor at 463 K and an oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa. The effects of catalyst preparation procedures, such as metal loading, calcination, or reduction treatment on the catalytic activities, were also tested. Alumina-supported palladium catalysts were found to be more effective than supported manganese, iron, or platinum catalysts. The rate of oxidation over Pd/alumina catalyst was significantly higher than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. Adding Ce on the alumina support was found to promote the activity of alumina-supported Pt catalyst but inhibit the activity of alumina-supported Pd catalyst. The reaction mechanisms for the catalytic wet oxidation process and the roles of Ce on catalytic activity for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in wastewater are discussed.

  14. Supported Molecular Catalysts: Synthesis, In-Situ Characterization and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Mark E.

    2009-03-13

    The objectives of our work are: (i) to create solid catalysts with active sites that can function in a cooperative manner to enhance reactivity and selectivity, and (ii) to prepare solid catalysts that can perform multiple reactions in a network that in some cases would not be possible in solution due to the incompatibilities of the various catalytic entities (for example an acid and a base). We carried out extensive reactions to test the nature of the cooperative effect caused by thiol/sulfonic acid interactions. The acid/thiol combination provided an example where the two organic groups should be positioned as close to one another as possible. We also studied a system where this is not possible (acid-base). We investigated simultaneously incorporating acid and base groups into the same material. For the case of acid and bases, there is an optimal separation distance (too close allows for neutralization while too far eliminates any cooperative behavior).

  15. Cluster-derived supported catalysts and their use

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.

    1982-11-01

    Concerns studies focused on the direct catalytic production of ethanol from CO and H/sub 2/ at low pressures. Among the C/sub 2/ chemicals, ethanol can be the key compound, not only for the chemical industry but also for transportation fuel. Since ethanol is easily converted, with conventional catalysts such as alumina, to ethylene, direct ethanol synthesis from coal-derived synthesis gas (CO + H/sub 2/) is a possible largescale base for ethylene. Ethanol is conventionally made by fermentation of biomass and green plants and by the hydration of ethylene. But both sources may be insufficient to cover future demands. Topics include metal carbonyl cluster-derived catalysts; preparation and characterization; and synthesis under the elevated pressures of syngas. Presents graph showing variation of the oxygenated product yields by changing the specific velocities of syngas.

  16. Existing technology transfer report: second-stage support. [SRC hydrotreating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, D.

    1984-06-01

    Since the economics of SRC hydrotreating depends greatly on both catalyst life and the type of reactor system, an extensive research program was initiated to address several issues pertaining to the design and operation of a large-scale SRC hydrotreater, including catalyst activity and aging, reactor design, and catalyst replacement rate. The objectives of this program were to (1) study the hydrotreating of SRC in an upflow fixed-bed reactor, (2) study the hydrotreating of SRC in a downflow fixed-bed reactor, (3) compare the performances of upflow and downflow fixed-bed reactors, (4) study the fluid dynamics of upflow and downflow fixed-bed reactors, and (5) study the activity, selectivity, and aging of a specially prepared monolithic catalyst for hydroprocessing SRC. APCI focused its work on the fixed-bed reactor, since it was conventionally used in hydrotreating petroleum products. The active materials used to prepare the catalysts were metals selected from Groups VI and VIII of the periodic table. Catalysts such as cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-molybdenum, and nickel-tungsten supported on alumina were tested. These catalysts are usually poisoned by the ash present in coal-derived materials. Therefore, another aspect of the internally funded program was to develop an ash-tolerant catalyst to successfully hydrotreat SRC. An ash-tolerant catalyst was prepared by supporting the catalytic metals on a honeycomb (monolithic) structure. The honeycomb structure was thought to be extremely ash resistant because of its high geometric surface area per unit volume and large open cross-sectional area. Furthermore, liquid flow in the channels of the honeycomb was expected to be laminar, with little or no induced turbulence due to form friction. Activity of the so-called ash-tolerant honeycomb (monolithic) catalyst was measured for SRC hydrotreating in a catalytic fixed-bed reactor, using both upflow and downflow operating modes. 2 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Transition Metal Phosphide Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 as Highly Selective Hydrodeoxygenation Catalysts for the Production of Advanced Biofuels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxing; Ochoa-Hernández, Cristina; de la Peña O'Shea, Víctor A; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M; Serrano, David P

    2015-09-01

    A series of catalysts constituted by nanoparticles of transition metal (M = Fe, Co, Ni and Mo) phosphides (TMP) dispersed on SBA-15 were synthesized by reduction of the corresponding metal phosphate precursors previously impregnated on the mesostructured support. All the samples contained a metal-loading of 20 wt% and with an initial M/P mole ratio of 1, and they were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, H2-TPR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Metal phosphide nanocatalysts were tested in a high pressure continuous flow reactor for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of a methyl ester blend containing methyl oleate (C17H33-COO-CH3) as main component (70%). This mixture constitutes a convenient surrogate of triglycerides present in vegetable oils, and following catalytic hydrotreating yields mainly n-alkanes. The results of the catalytic assays indicate that Ni2P/SBA-15 catalyst presents the highest ester conversion, whereas the transformation rate is about 20% lower for MoP/SBA-15. In contrast, catalysts based on Fe and Co phosphides show a rather limited activity. Hydrocarbon distribution in the liquid product suggests that both hydrodeoxygenation and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reactions occur simultaneously over the different catalysts, although MoP/SBA-15 possess a selectivity towards hydrodeoxygenation exceeding 90%. Accordingly, the catalyst based on MoP affords the highest yield of n-octadecane, which is the preferred product in terms of carbon atom economy. Subsequently, in order to conjugate the advantages of both Ni and Mo phosphides, a series of catalysts containing variable proportions of both metals were prepared. The obtained results reveal that the mixed phosphides catalysts present a catalytic behavior intermediate between those of the monometallic phosphides. Accordingly, only marginal enhancement of the yield of n-octadecane is obtained for the catalysts with a Mo/Ni ratio of 3. Nevertheless, owing to this high selectivity

  18. Catalytic etherification of glycerol to produce biofuels over novel spherical silica supported Hyflon® catalysts.

    PubMed

    Frusteri, Francesco; Frusteri, Leone; Cannilla, Catia; Bonura, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    Etherification of glycerol (GLY) with isobutylene (IB) to produce biofuels was investigated in liquid phase using spherical silica supported Hyflon® catalysts (SSHC). As reference catalyst, Amberlyst® 15 (A-15) acid ion-exchange resin was used. Experiments were carried out in batch mode at a reaction temperature ranging from 323 to 343 K. SSHC were found to be very effective systems in etherification of glycerol with IB, providing cumulative di- and tri-ethers yields higher than that obtained by using A-15 catalyst. Furthermore, such catalysts were stable and easily reusable; no leaching of active phase was observed. The formation of poly-substituted ethers, suitable additives for conventional fuels, was favored by operating at an isobutylene/glycerol molar ratio >3 and low reaction time (<6 h); however, the concentration of mono-ether reached values lower than 3 wt.% only when SSHC catalyst was used. Turnover frequency of glycerol (TOF(GLY)) highlighted that SSHC systems were much more active than A-15 catalyst: the accessibility and nature of active sites and the surface properties of catalysts were indicated as the main factors affecting the catalytic behavior. A lower acid site density of SSHC than that of A-15 catalyst was decisive in preventing the occurrence of oligomerization reaction which leads to the formation of di-isobutylene (DIB), precursors of gummy products. PMID:22705542

  19. Platinum-Tin Nano-Catalysts Supported on Alumina for Direct Dehydrogenation of n-Butane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Hyun; Hong, Ung Gi; Park, Gle; Yoo, Yeonshick; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2015-10-01

    Al2O3 supports were prepared by a precipitation method using various basic solutions (NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, and Na2CO3) as precipitation agents, and Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts were then prepared by a sequential impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were applied to the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene. The effect of precipitation agents on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts in the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Catalytic performance of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 nano-catalysts decreased in order of Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (KOH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NH4OH) > Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (Na2CO3). Among the catalysts tested, Pt/Sn/Al2O3 (NaOH) nano-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance in terms of yield for total dehydrogenation products (TDP, n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene). Hydrogen chemisorption experiments revealed that platinum surface area of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic performance. Yield for TDP increased with increasing platinum surface area of the catalyst. PMID:26726508

  20. Vapor Phase Dehydration of Glycerol to Acrolein Over SBA-15 Supported Vanadium Substituted Phosphomolybdic Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    Vapor phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was investigated over heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts containing vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid (H4PMo11VO40) supported on mesoporous SBA-15. A series of HPA catalysts with HPA loadings varying from 10-50 wt% were prepared by impregnation method on SBA-15 support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3, pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, pore size distribution and specific surface area measurements. The nature of acidic sites was examined by pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy. XRD results suggest that the active phase containing HPA was highly dispersed at lower loadings on the support. FT-IR and Raman spectra results confirm that the presence of primary Keggin ion structure of HPA on the support and it was not affected during the preparation of catalysts. Pore size distribution results reveal that all the samples show unimodel pore size distribution with well depicted mesoporous structure. NH3-TPD results suggest that the acidity of catalysts increased with increase of HPA loading. The findings of acidity measurements by FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption reveals that the catalysts consist both the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites and the amount of Brønsted acidic sites are increasing with HPA loading. SBA-15 supported vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalysts are found to be highly active during the dehydration reaction and exhibited 100% conversion of glycerol (10 wt% of glycerol) and the acrolein selectivity was appreciably changed with HPA active phase loading. The catalytic functionalities during glycerol dehydration are well correlated with surface acidity of the catalysts. PMID:26373149