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Sample records for carbon transverse relaxation

  1. Carbonyl carbon transverse relaxation dispersion measurements and ms-micros timescale motion in a protein hydrogen bond network.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Rieko; Baber, James; Louis, John M; Torchia, Dennis A

    2004-06-01

    A constant-time, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation, R(2), dispersion experiment for carbonyl carbons was designed and executed to detect micros-ms time-scale dynamics of protein backbone carbonyl sites. Because of the large (ca. 55 Hz) C(alpha)-C' J-coupling, the carbonyl signal intensity is strongly modulated as the spacing between CPMG pulses is varied, in uniformly (13)C enriched proteins, unless care is taken to minimize the perturbation of the C(alpha) magnetization by the CPMG pulses. CPMG pulse trains consisting of either a band-selective pulse, such as RE-BURP, or rectangular (with an excitation null in the C(alpha) region of the spectrum) pulses were employed in order to minimize C' signal modulation by C(alpha)-C' J-coupling. The performance of these types of CPMG refocusing pulses was assessed by computer simulation, and by comparing dispersion profiles measured for (1) uniformly [(13)C,(15)N, (2)H] ((2)H at non-labile hydrogen sites) labeled, and (2) uniformly (15)N/selectively-(13)C' labeled samples of HIV-1 protease bound to a potent inhibitor, DMP323. In addition, because the uniformly (13)C/(15)N/(2)H labeled sample was well suited to measure (15)N and (1)H R(2) dispersion as well as (13)C' dispersion, conformational exchange in the inter subunit beta-sheet hydrogen-bond network of the inhibitor-bound protease was elucidated using relaxation dispersion data of all three types of nuclei. PMID:15014232

  2. Correlation of transverse relaxation time with structure of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-09-01

    Transverse spin-spin relaxation of liquids entrapped in nanocavities with different orientational order is theoretically investigated. Based on the bivariate normal distribution of nanocavities directions, we have calculated the anisotropy of the transverse relaxation time for biological systems, such as collagenous tissues, articular cartilage, and tendon. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant. The calculation results for the transverse relaxation time explain the angular dependence observed in MRI experiments with biological objects. The good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by adjustment of only one parameter which characterizes the disorder in fiber orientations. The relaxation time is correlated with the degree of ordering in biological tissues. Thus, microstructure of the tissues can be revealed from the measurement of relaxation time anisotropy. The clinical significance of the correlation, especially in the detection of damage must be evaluated in a large prospective clinical trials.

  3. Optimal experimental dynamical decoupling of both longitudinal and transverse relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xing-Long; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Feng, Guanru; Li, Hang; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-02-01

    Both longitudinal and transverse relaxations exist in the practical environment. Their simultaneous eliminations are extremely demanding in real applications. Previous experimental work has focused mainly on the suppression of transverse relaxation. In this paper we investigate the performance of three important dynamical decoupling schemes—quadratic dynamical decoupling, periodic dynamical decoupling, and concatenated dynamical decoupling—in an environment with hybrid errors. We propose a method to engineer arbitrary environment by modulating the control field. The technique developed here is universal and can be applied to other quantum information processing systems. Three-dimensional filter functions technique is utilized to analyze the fidelity decay of a one-qubit state protected by dynamical decoupling sequences. This enables us to quantitatively compare the performance of different dynamical decoupling sequences and demonstrate the superiority of quadratic dynamical decoupling in experiments for the first time. Our work reveals that quadratic dynamical decoupling is optimal conditioned on the appropriate noise properties. The difference of constructing dynamical decoupling sequences with various Pauli pulses is also investigated.

  4. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-15

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation in muscle water.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M; Puon, P S

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the nonexponentiality of proton spin echoes of skeletal muscle has been carefully examined. It is shown that the slowly decaying part of the proton spin echoes is not due to extracellular water. First, for muscle from mice with in vivo deuteration, the deuteron spin echoes were also nonexponential, but the slowly decaying part had a larger weighing factor. Second, for glycerinated muscle in which cell membranes were disrupted, the proton spin echoes were similar to those in intact muscle. Third, the nonexponentiality of the proton spin echoes in intact muscle increased when postmortem rigor set in. Finally, when the lifetimes of extracellular water and intracellular water were taken into account in the exchange, it was found that the two types of water would not give two resolvable exponentials with the observed decay constants. It is suggested that the unusually short T2's and the nonexponential character of the spin echoes of proton and deuteron in muscle water are mainly due to hydrogen exchange between water and functional groups in the protein filaments. These groups have large dipolar or quadrupolar splittings, and undergo hydrogen exchange with water at intermediate rates. The exchange processes and their effects on the spin echoes are pH-dependent. The dependence of transverse relaxation of pH was observed in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers. PMID:7272437

  6. Electron spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes: Dyakonov-Perel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yuriy; Zavada, John; Kim, Ki Wook

    2010-03-01

    The long standing problem of unaccountable short spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) meets a disclosure in terms of curvature-mediated spin-orbital interaction that leads to spin fluctuating precession analogous to Dyakonov-Perel mechanism. Strong anisotropy imposed by arbitrary directed magnetic field has been taken into account in terms of extended Bloch equations. Especially, stationary spin current through CNT can be controlled by spin-flip processes with relaxation time as less as 150 ps, the rate of transversal polarization (i.e. decoherence) runs up to 1/(70 ps) at room temperature while spin interference of the electrons related to different valleys can be responsible for shorter spin dephasing. Dependencies of spin-relaxation parameters on magnetic field strength and orientation, CNT curvature and chirality have been analyzed.

  7. Direct Visualization of Short Transverse Relaxation Time Component (ViSTa)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Hong; Bilello, Michel; Schindler, Matthew; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Detre, John A.; Lee, Jongho

    2013-01-01

    White matter of the brain has been demonstrated to have multiple relaxation components. Among them, the short transverse relaxation time component (T2 < 40 ms; T2* < 25 ms at 3T) has been suggested to originate from myelin water whereas long transverse relaxation time components have been associated with axonal and/or interstitial water. In myelin water imaging, T2 or T2* signal decay is measured to estimate myelin water fraction based on T2 or T2* differences among the water components. This method has been demonstrated to be sensitive to demyelination in the brain but suffers from low SNR and image artifacts originating from ill-conditioned multi-exponential fitting. In this study, a novel approach that selectively acquires short transverse relaxation time signal is proposed. The method utilizes a double inversion RF pair to suppress a range of long T1 signal. This suppression leaves short T2* signal, which has been suggested to have short T1, as the primary source of the image. The experimental results confirms that after suppression of long T1 signals, the image is dominated by short T2* in the range of myelin water, allowing us to directly visualize the short transverse relaxation time component in the brain. Compared to conventional myelin water imaging, this new method of direct visualization of short relaxation time component (ViSTa) provides high quality images. When applied to multiple sclerosis patients, chronic lesions show significantly reduced signal intensity in ViSTa images suggesting sensitivity to demyelination. PMID:23796545

  8. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4+

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4+, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole–dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the 15N–1H and 1H–1H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to 15N-ammonium bound to a 41 kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1 ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest. PMID:25128779

  9. Measurement of the true transverse nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in the presence of field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Gladden, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    A measure of the nuclear spin transverse relaxation time T2, as determined using the nuclear magnetic resonance Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, provides unique information characterizing the microstructure of porous media which are themselves ubiquitous across fields of petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. However, the CPMG measurement is sensitive to diffusion in large magnetic field gradients. Under such conditions an effective relaxation time T_{2,eff} is observed instead, described by a combination of relaxation and diffusion exponents. The relaxation exponent always varies as nte (where n is the number, and te is the temporal separation, of spin echoes). The diffusion exponent varies as nt_e^k, where 1 < k ⩽ 3, although the exact analytic form is often unknown. Here we present a general approach to separating the influence of relaxation and diffusion by utilizing a composite diffusion exponent. Any T_{2,eff} component with a power of k > 1 is removed to provide a measure of the true T2 relaxation time distribution from CPMG data acquired in the presence of a strong background gradient. We apply the technique to discriminate between the effects of relaxation and diffusion in porous media using catalysts and rocks as examples. The method is generally applicable to any CPMG measurements conducted in the presence of a static magnetic field gradient.

  10. Distributions of transverse relaxation times for soft-solids measured in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelcea, R. I.; Fechete, R.; Culea, E.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2009-02-01

    The single-sided NMR-MOUSE sensor that operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields is used to record a CPMG 1H transverse relaxation decay by CPMG echo trains for a series of cross-linked natural rubber samples. Effective transverse relaxation rates 1/ T2,short and 1/ T2,long were determined by a bi-exponential fit. A linear dependence of transverse relaxation rates on cross-link density is observed for medium to large values of cross-link density. As an alternative to multi-exponential fits the possibility to analyze the dynamics of soft polymer network in terms of multi-exponential decays via the inverse Laplace transformation was studied. The transient regime and the effect of the T1/ T2 ratio in inhomogeneous static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on the CPMG decays were studied numerically using a dedicated C++ program to simulate the temporal and spatial dependence of the CPMG response. A correction factor T2/ T2,eff is derived as a function of the T1/ T2 ratio from numerical simulations and compared with earlier results from two different well logging devices. High-resolution T1- T2 correlations maps are obtained by two-dimensional Laplace inversion of CPMG detected saturation recovery curves. The T1- T2 experimental correlations maps were corrected for the T1/ T2 effect using the derived T2/ T2,eff correction factor.

  11. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations.

  12. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations. PMID:27343483

  13. Differences in Patellar Cartilage Thickness, Transverse Relaxation Time, and Deformational Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Colletti, Patrick M.; Powers, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The origin of patellofemoral pain (PFP) may be associated with the inability of the patellofemoral joint cartilage to absorb and distribute patellofemoral joint forces. Hypothesis When compared with a pain-free control group, young active women with PFP will demonstrate differences in their baseline patellar cartilage thickness and transverse (T2) relaxation time, as well as a less adaptive response to an acute bout of joint loading. Study Design Controlled laboratory study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Ten women between the ages of 23 to 37 years with PFP and 10 sex-, age-, and activity-matched pain-free controls participated. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the patellofemoral joint was performed at baseline and after participants performed 50 deep knee bends. Differences in baseline cartilage thickness and T2 relaxation time, as well as the postexercise change in patellar cartilage thickness and T2 relaxation time, were compared between groups. Results Individuals with PFP demonstrated reductions in baseline cartilage thickness of 14.0% and 14.1% for the lateral patellar facet and total patellar cartilage, respectively. Similarly, individuals with PFP exhibited significantly lower postexercise cartilage thickness change for the lateral patellar facet (2.1% vs 8.9%) and the total patellar cartilage (4.4% vs 10.0%) when compared with the control group. No group differences in baseline or postexercise change in T2 relaxation time were found. Conclusion The findings suggest that a baseline reduction in patellar cartilage thickness and a reduced deformational behavior of patellar cartilage following an acute bout of loading are associated with presence of PFP symptoms. PMID:20962335

  14. Aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles: Colloidal stability, specific absorption rate, and transverse relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saville, Steven Lee

    The design, functionalization, characterization, and applications of magnetic nanoparticles have garnered significant interest over the past several decades. While this area has garnered increasing attention, several questions remain unanswered about the stability of these systems and it's influence on their biomedical applications. To help answer these questions about the stability of these, a novel tri(nitroDOPA) terminated polymer based ligand has been developed for the stabilization of magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis involves a process in which ethylene oxide is polymerized using a trivinyl initiator, modified with carboxylic acid using a free radical addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid, and then functionalized with nitroDOPA using N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. This polymer has displayed robust adhesion even in harsh chemical environments, out performing many polymers used today for the stabilization of magnetite. Along these same lines, the effects of instability of these systems were analyzed in both MRI and magnetic hyperthermia applications. It is widely known that formation of linear aggregates (i.e. chains) occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. In this work the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate and heating rate in magnetic hyperthermia of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles are examined. The results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal

  15. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  16. The effect of iron in MRI and transverse relaxation of amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meadowcroft, Mark D; Peters, Douglas G; Dewal, Rahul P; Connor, James R; Yang, Qing X

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of neural iron is known to occur during the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The visualization of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques with MRI has largely been credited to rapid proton relaxation in the vicinity of plaques as a result of focal iron deposition. The goal of this work was to determine the relationship between local relaxation and related focal iron content associated with Aβ plaques. Alzheimer's disease (n=5) and control tissue (n=3) sample slices from the entorhinal cortex were treated overnight with the iron chelator deferoxamine or saline, and microscopic gradient-echo MRI datasets were taken. Subsequent to imaging, the same slices were stained for Aβ and iron, and then compared with regard to parametric R2 * relaxation maps and gradient-echo-weighted MR images. Aβ plaques in both chelated and unchelated tissue generated MR hypo-intensities and showed relaxation rates significantly greater than the surrounding tissue. The transverse relaxation rate associated with amyloid plaques was determined not to be solely a result of iron load, as much of the relaxation associated with Aβ plaques remained following iron chelation. The data indicate a dual relaxation mechanism associated with Aβ plaques, such that iron and plaque composition synergistically produce transverse relaxation. PMID:25530083

  17. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  18. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaci, S.; Boboia, S.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-01

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe2O3) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  19. Probing Wettability in Carbonate Rocks by Multi-Frequency NMR Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, J.-P.; Nicot, B.; Ligneul, P.

    2011-03-01

    We present a new method for probing wettability of rock/oil/brine systems using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD). Unlike conventional transverse relaxation studies, this approach gives a direct probe of the dynamical surface affinity of fluids, thus allowing the separation of wetting from non-wetting fluids through their typical NMRD features. To quantify these features we introduce a microscopic dynamical surface affinity index which measures the dynamical correlation (i.e. microscopic wettability) between a diffusive fluid and fixed paramagnetic relaxation sources at the pore surfaces. We apply this technique to carbonate reservoir rocks of bimodal porosity saturated with oil (Sw = 0%), brine (Sw = 100%) and mixture of oil/brine (Swirr).

  20. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saville, Steven L.; Woodward, Robert C.; House, Michael J.; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R.; St Pierre, Tim G.; Mefford, O. Thompson

    2013-02-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R2 measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications.It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to

  1. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications. PMID:23389324

  2. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T{sub 2}, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T{sub 2} provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T{sub 2} distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T{sub 2} is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form −ant{sub e}{sup k} (where n is the number and t{sub e} the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T{sub 2} distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  3. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  4. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries. PMID:25494741

  5. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  6. Dynamic relaxation of the elastic properties of hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, J.; Koskinen, J.; Kaukonen, M.; Nieminen, R.; Scheibe, H.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of enhanced atomic mobility on the growth of hard carbon films was examined. Tetrahedrally bonded amorphous carbon films were deposited by condensing energetic carbon ions using an arc-discharge deposition method. The deposition temperature varied between 50 and 400{degree}C. The dependence of elastic properties on deposition temperature was examined by determining the frequency-dependent propagation velocity of ultrasonic surface acoustic waves induced by a laser. A remarkable decrease in elastic coefficient was revealed above the deposition temperature of 300{degree}C and complete relaxation was obtained at 400{degree}C. This observation was analyzed by using a simple model which was in turn supported by molecular dynamics simulations. The relaxation turns out to be a thermally activated, dynamic process with an activation energy of 0.57 eV. Possible relaxation mechanisms associated with the migration of atoms or defects on a growing surface are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  8. Bone marrow segmentation based on a combined consideration of transverse relaxation processes and Dixon oscillations.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Mukund; Jarrett, Delma Y; Mulkern, Robert V

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that gradient-echo sampling of single spin echoes can be used to isolate the signal from trabecular bone marrow, with high-quality segmentation and surface reconstructions resulting from the application of simple post-processing strategies. Theoretical expressions of the time-domain single-spin-echo signal were used to simulate signals from bone marrow, non-bone fatty deposits and muscle. These simulations were compared with and used to interpret signals obtained by the application of the gradient-echo sampling of a spin-echo sequence to image the knee and surrounding tissues at 1.5 T. Trabecular bone marrow has a much higher reversible transverse relaxation rate than surrounding non-bone fatty deposits and other musculoskeletal tissues. This observation, combined with a choice of gradient-echo spacing that accentuates Dixon-type oscillations from chemical-shift interference effects, enabled the isolation of bone marrow signal from surrounding tissues through the use of simple image subtraction and thresholding. Three-dimensional renderings of the marrow surface were then readily generated with this approach - renderings that may prove useful for bone morphology assessment, e.g. for the measurement of femoral anteversion. In conclusion, understanding the behavior of signals from bone marrow and surrounding tissue as a function of time through a spin echo facilitates the segmentation and reconstruction of bone marrow surfaces using straightforward post-processing strategies that are typically available on modern radiology workstations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866627

  9. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  10. NMR permeability estimators in `chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  11. NMR permeability estimators in "chalk" carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cutoff. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cutoffs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  12. Determination of transverse relaxation rates in systems with scalar-coupled spins: The role of antiphase coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous line-widths that arise from transverse relaxation tend to be masked by B0 field inhomogeneity and by multiplets due to homonuclear J-couplings. Besides well-known spin-locking sequences that lead to signals that decay with a rate R1ρ without any modulations, alternative experiments allow one to determine the transverse relaxation rates R2 in systems with scalar-coupled spins. We evaluate three recent strategies by experiment and simulation: (i) moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG sequences (Dittmer and Bodenhausen, 2006 [2]), (ii) multiple-quantum filtered (MQF) sequences (Barrère et al., 2011 [4]) and (iii) PROJECT sequences (Aguilar et al., 2012 [5]). Experiments where the J-evolution is suppressed by spin-locking measure the pure relaxation rate R2(Ix) of an in-phase component. Experiments based on J-refocusing yield a mixture of in-phase rates R2(Ix) and antiphase rates R2(2IySz), where the latter are usually faster than the former. Moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG and PROJECT methods can be applied to systems with many coupled spins, but applications of MQF sequences are limited to two-spin systems since modulations in larger systems can only partly be suppressed.

  13. Creep and inverse stress relaxation behaviors of carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Misak, H E; Sabelkin, V; Miller, L; Asmatulu, R; Mall, S

    2013-12-01

    Creep, creep recovery and inverse stress relaxation behaviors of carbon nanotube yarns that consisted of 1-, 30-, and 100-yarn(s) were characterized. Primary and secondary creep stages were observed over the duration of 336 h. The primary creep stage lasted for about 4 h at an applied load equal to 75% of the ultimate tensile strength. The total strain in the primary stage was significantly larger in the carbon nanotube multi-yarn than in the carbon nanotube 1-yarn. In the secondary stage, 1-yarn also had a smaller steady state strain rate than the multi-yarn, and it was independent of number of yarns in multi-yarn. Strain response under cyclic creep loading condition was comparable to its counterpart in non-cyclic (i.e., standard) creep test except that strain response during the first cycle was slightly different from the subsequent cycles. Inverse creep (i.e., strain recovery) was observed in the 100-yarn during the cyclic creep tests after the first unloading cycle. Furthermore, inverse stress relaxation of the multi-yarns was characterized. Inverse stress relaxation was larger and for longer duration with the larger number of yarns. PMID:24266232

  14. Analysis of 31P MAS NMR spectra and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and transversal relaxation of M13 and TMV are analyzed by use of a model, which includes both local backbone motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecules and overall rotational diffusion of the rod-shaped virions about their length axis. Backbone motions influence the sideband intensities by causing a fast restricted reorientation of the phosphodiesters. To evaluate their influence on the observed sideband patterns, we extend the model that we used previously to analyze nonspinning 31P NMR lineshapes (Magusin, P.C.M.M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993a. Biophys. J. 64:1861-1868) to magic angle spinning NMR experiments. Backbone motions also influence the conformation of the phosphodiesters, causing conformational averaging of the isotropic chemical shift, which offers a possible explanation for the various linewidths of the centerband and the sidebands observed for M13 gels under various conditions. The change of the experimental lineshape of M13 as a function of temperature and hydration is interpreted in terms of fast restricted fluctuation of the dihedral angles between the POC and the OCH planes on both sides of the 31P nucleus in the nucleic acid backbone. Backbone motions also seem to be the main cause of transversal relaxation measured at spinning rates of 4 kHz or higher. At spinning rates less than 2 kHz, transversal relaxation is significantly faster. This effect is assigned to slow, overall rotation of the rod-shaped M13 phage about its length axis. Equations are derived to simulate the observed dependence of T2e on the spinning rate. PMID:8038391

  15. Analysis of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    The experimentally observed 31P lineshapes and transversal relaxation of 15% (wt/wt) M13, 30% M13, and 30% tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are compared with lineshapes and relaxation curves that are simulated for various types of rotational diffusion using the models discussed previously (Magusin, P. C. M. M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:1851-1860). It is found that isotropic diffusion cannot explain the observed lineshape effects. A rigid rod diffusion model is only successful in describing the experimental data obtained for 15% M13. For 30% M13 the experimental lineshape and relaxation curve cannot be interpreted consistently and the TMV lineshape cannot even be simulated alone, indicating that the rigid rod diffusion model does not generally apply. A combined diffusion model with fast isolated motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid dominating the lineshape and a slow overall rotation of the virion as a whole, which mainly is reflected in the transversal relaxation, is able to provide a consistent picture for the 15 and 30% M13 samples, but not for TMV. Strongly improved lineshape fits for TMV are obtained assuming that there are three binding sites with different mobilities. The presence of three binding sites is consistent with previous models of TMV. The best lineshapes are simulated for a combination of one mobile and two static sites. Although less markedly, the assumption that two fractions of DNA with different mobilities exist within M13 also improves the simulated lineshapes. The possible existence of two 31P fractions in M13 sheds new light on the nonintegral ratio 2.4:1 between the number of nucleotides and protein coat subunits in the phage: 83% of the viral DNA is less mobile, suggesting that the binding of the DNA molecule to the protein coat actually occurs at the integral ratio of two nucleotides per protein subunit. PMID:8369412

  16. Mapping proteoglycan-bound water in cartilage: improved specificity of matrix assessment using multiexponential transverse relaxation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, David A.; Roque, Remigio A.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Irrechukwu, Onyi; Doty, Stephen; Longo, Dan; Pleshko, Nancy; Spencer, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Association of MR parameters with cartilage matrix components remains an area of ongoing investigation. Multiexponential analysis of non-localized transverse relaxation data has previously been used to quantify water compartments associated with matrix macromolecules in cartilage. We extend this to mapping the proteoglycan-bound water fraction (wPG) in cartilage, using mature and young bovine nasal cartilage model systems, towards the goal of matrix component-specific imaging. wPG from mature and young bovine nasal cartilage was 0.3±0.04 and 0.22±0.06, respectively, in agreement with biochemically-derived proteoglycan content and proteoglycan-to-water weight ratios. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopic-derived proteoglycan maps normalized by water content (IR-PGww) showed spatial correspondence with wPG maps. Extensive simulation analysis demonstrated that the accuracy and precision of our determination of wPG was within 2%, which is substantially smaller than the observed tissue differences. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing imaging-based multiexponential analysis of transverse relaxation data to map proteoglycan in cartilage. PMID:21264931

  17. Transversely isotropic elastic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lianxi; Li, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Five independent effective elastic moduli of a transversely isotropic multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) are studied by analyzing its deformations under four loading conditions, i.e., axial tension, torsional moment, in-plane biaxial tension, and in-plane tension-compression stress. Two distributions of the tension loading on the outermost tube and on all tubes are considered, which correspond to the tensile and compressive Young’s moduli. The general relations between the interwall stresses and strains are linearized due to the small strain condition, where the interwall stresses correspond to the variation of the interwall van der Waals forces. Three interwall elastic constants are used to characterize the linear relations associated with three basic interwall deformation modes, i.e., normal deformation in radial direction and two shear deformations in axial and circumferential directions. By taking each tube as a single-walled carbon nanotube, the analytical expressions for the interwall shear stress under the tensile loading on the outermost tube and five elastic moduli of a double-walled carbon nanotube are first obtained. Then, a replacement method is proposed to derive the corresponding expressions for the cases of more walls than two. These analytical expressions are plotted for the case of MWNT’s composed of armchair tubes, where the interwall elastic constants are approximated as the corresponding ones of the graphite. The effect of the wall number, diameter, chirality, and length of the MWNT on the shear stress and five elastic moduli are displayed and discussed.

  18. Relaxation of virtual cathode oscillations due to transverse effects in a crossed-field diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, K.L.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies of cylindrical and planar cross-field diodes indicate the transverse dimension plays a role in delaying the onset of virtual cathode oscillations for currents injected above the theoretical limiting current. For 1d and 2d planar devices, the limiting current for the magnetized and unmagnetized diodes is examined for cold and thermal injection. A significant difference between the 1d and 2d smooth diodes is that the transverse direction gives an extra degree of freedom which is found to warm the electrons rapidly. The mechanism of this warming appears to be an instability in the transverse direction. The simulations show three different states; laminar flow, virtual cathode oscillation and warm flow. Warm flow occurs when the electron has a spread of energy, either due to an instability or by thermal injection, when they pas through the potential minimum. Birdsall and Bridges showed that a small thermal spread of injected electrons damps virtual cathode oscillations. This warming effect allows warm flow to exist on the 2d state diagram which is not found on the 1d state diagram for cold emission. Parameter space is explored on these state diagrams for B = 0 and B = B{sub Hull} for J near state transitions (J {approx_equal} J{sub C}).

  19. Separation of collagen-bound and porous bone water transverse relaxation in mice: proposal of a multi-step approach.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Magda; Keller, Daniel; Wurnig, Moritz C; Eberhardt, Christian; Weiger, Markus; Eberli, Daniel; Boss, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The separation and quantification of collagen-bound water (CBW) and pore water (PW) components of the cortical bone signal are important because of their different contribution to bone mechanical properties. Ultrashort TE (UTE) imaging can be used to exploit the transverse relaxation from CBW and PW, allowing their quantification. We tested, for the first time, the feasibility of UTE measurements in mice for the separation and quantification of the transverse relaxation of CBW and PW in vivo using three different approaches for T2 * determination. UTE sequences were acquired at 4.7 T in six mice with 10 different TEs (50-5000 μs). The transverse relaxation time T2 * of CBW (T2 *cbw ) and PW (T2 *pw ) and the CBW fraction (bwf) were computed using a mono-exponential (i), a standard bi-exponential (ii) and a new multi-step bi-exponential (iii) approach. Regions of interest were drawn at multiple levels of the femur and vertebral body cortical bone for each mouse. The sum of the normalized squared residuals (Res) and the homogeneity of variance were tested to compare the different methods. In the femur, approach (i) yielded mean T2 * ± standard deviation (SD) of 657 ± 234 μs. With approach (ii), T2 *cbw , T2 *pw and bwf were 464 ± 153 μs, 15 777 ± 10 864 μs and 57.6 ± 9.9%, respectively. For approach (iii), T2 *cbw , T2 *pw and bwf were 387 ± 108 μs, 7534 ± 2765 μs and 42.5 ± 6.2%, respectively. Similar values were obtained from vertebral bodies. Res with approach (ii) was lower than with the two other approaches (p < 0.007), but T2 *pw and bwf variance was lower with approach (iii) than with approach (ii) (p < 0.048). We demonstrated that the separation and quantification of cortical bone water components with UTE sequences is feasible in vivo in mouse models. The direct bi-exponential approach exhibited the best approximation to the measured signal curve with the lowest residuals; however, the newly

  20. Ultrafast direct modulation of transverse-mode coupled-cavity VCSELs far beyond the relaxation oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach for bandwidth augmentation for direct modulation of VCSELs using transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is raised, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. The base structure is similar to that of 3QW VCSELs with 980 nm wavelength operation. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs was limited by 9-10 GHz, the 3-dB bandwidth of TCC VCSEL with aperture diameters of 8.5×8.5μm2 and 3×3μm2 are increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. Our current bandwidth achievement on the larger aperture size is 29 GHz which is limited by the used photo-detector. To the best of our knowledge this is the fastest 980 nm VCSEL.

  1. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing.

    PubMed

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven; Ouyang, Bo; Chou, James J

    2015-04-01

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine decreases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of μs-ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel. PMID:25724842

  2. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from Hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven; Bo, Ouyang; Chou, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine deceases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of µs – ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel. PMID:25724842

  3. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  4. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  5. Investigation of Relationships Between Transverse Relaxation Rate, Diffusion Coefficient, and Labeled Cell Concentration in Ischemic Rat Brain Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Athiraman, Hemanthkumar; Jiang, Quan; Ding, Guang Liang; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Wang, Lei; Arbab, Ali S.; Li, Qingjiang; Panda, Swayam; Ledbetter, Karen; Rad, Ali M.; Chopp, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MRI has been used to evaluate labeled cell migration and distribution. However, quantitative determination of labeled cell concentration using MRI has not been systematically investigated. In the current study, we investigated the relationships between labeled cell concentration and MRI parameters of transverse relaxation rate, R2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), in vitro in phantoms and in vivo in rats after stroke. Significant correlations were detected between iron concentration or labeled cell concentration and MRI measurements of R2, ADC, and ADC×R2 in vitro. In contrast, in vivo labeled cell concentration did not significantly correlate with R2, ADC, and ADC×R2. A major factor for the absence of a significant correlation between labeled cell concentration and MRI measurements in vivo may be attributed to background effects of ischemic tissue. By correcting the background effects caused by ischemic damage, ΔR2 (difference in R2 values in the ischemic tissue with and without labeled cells) exhibited a significant correlation to labeled cell concentration. Our study suggests that MRI parameters have the potential to quantitatively determine labeled cell concentration in vivo. PMID:19107898

  6. Rapid and accurate measurement of transverse relaxation times using a single shot multi-echo echo-planar imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Damian J; Moore, Rachel J; Marciani, Luca; Gowland, Penny A

    2004-09-01

    Methods for making rapid and accurate measurements and maps of the transverse relaxation time from a single free induction decay (FID) are proposed. The methods use a multi-echo sequence in combination with B1 insensitive (hyperbolic secant or BIREF2b) refocusing pulses and rapid echo-planar imaging techniques. The results were calibrated against a single spin echo echo-planar imaging sequence using a phantom containing a range of CuSO4 concentrations. The mean percentage absolute difference between the multi-echo and single-echo results was 3% for the multi-echo sequence using the hyperbolic secant refocusing pulse, and 7% for the multi-echo sequence using the BIREF2b refocusing pulse, compared to 13% for a multi-echo sequence using a nonselective sinc refocusing pulse. The use of the sequences in vivo has been demonstrated in studies of gastric function, i.e., the measurement of gastric dilution and monitoring of formation of a raft of alginate polysaccharide within the stomach. PMID:15288145

  7. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  8. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized (129)Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon ((129)Xe and (131)Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe could be increased 2-7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of (129)Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm(2)/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm(2)/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  9. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation.

  10. Dielectric relaxation of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; You, Xinli; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2015-11-24

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are widely used solvents in lithium (Li)-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Ion dissolution and diffusion in those media are correlated with solvent dielectric responses. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the pure solvents to calculate dielectric constants and relaxation times, and molecular mobilities. The computed results are compared with limited available experiments to assist more exhaustive studies of these important characteristics. As a result, the observed agreement is encouraging and provides guidance for further validation of force-field simulation models for EC and PC solvents.

  11. Fabrication of high-performance supercapacitors based on transversely oriented carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoulidis, F.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.

    2013-04-01

    High-performance supercapacitors with organic electrolyte 1 M TEABF4 (tetraethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate) in PC (propylene carbonate) were fabricated and tested, based on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) deposited by electrophoresis on three types of alternative substrates: aluminium foil, ITO (indium tin oxide) coated PET (polyethylene terephthalate) film and PET film. In all cases, SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) micrographs demonstrated that protruding, transversely oriented MWNT structures were formed, which should increase the transverse conductivity of these MWNT electrodes. The best supercapacitor cell of MWNT electrodes deposited on aluminium foil displayed good transverse orientation of the MWNT structures as well as an in-plane MWNT network at the feet of the protruding structures, which ensured good in-plane conductivity. Capacitor cells with MWNT electrodes deposited either on ITO-coated PET film or on PET film demonstrated lower but still very good performance due to the high density of transversely oriented MWNT structures (good transverse conductivity) but some in-plane inhomogeneities. Capacitor cells with drop-printed MWNTs on aluminium foil, without any transverse orientation, had 16-30 times lower specific capacitance and 5-40 times lower power density than the capacitor cells with the electrophoretically deposited MWNT electrodes.

  12. Vibrational relaxation of carbon monoxide studied by two-wavelength infrared emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the vibrational relaxation of pure carbon monoxide behind incident shock waves over the temperature range 4000 to 6300 K. The data were obtained as infrared emission from the fundamental and overtone vibrational band systems (in some of the experiments the two-band systems were recorded simultaneously). The data are consistent with present theories for the vibrational relaxation of diatomic molecules and can be interpreted in terms of an initial Boltzmann vibrational distribution relaxing toward final equilibrium via a continuous sequence of intermediate Boltzmann distributions.

  13. Effect of Carr-Purcell refocusing pulse trains on transverse relaxation times of metabolites in rat brain at 9.4 T

    PubMed Central

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjańska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of Carr-Purcell (CP) pulse trains on transverse relaxation times, T2, of tissue water and metabolites (both non-coupled and J-coupled spins) in the rat brain at 9.4 T using LASER, CP-LASER and T2ρ-LASER sequences. Methods Proton NMR spectra were measured in rat brain in vivo at 9.4 T. Spectra were acquired at multiple echo times ranging from 18 to 402 ms. All spectra were analyzed using LCModel with simulated basis sets. Signals of metabolites as a function of echo time were fitted using a mono-exponential function to determine their T2 relaxation times. Results Measured T2s for tissue water and all metabolites were significantly longer with CP-LASER and T2ρ-LASER compared to LASER. The T2 increased by a factor of ~1.3 for non-coupled and weakly coupled spins (e.g., N-acetylaspartate and total creatine) and by a factor of ~2 (e.g., glutamine and taurine) to ~4 (e.g., glutamate and myo-inositol) for strongly coupled spins. Conclusion Application of a CP pulse train results in a larger increase in T2 relaxation times for strongly coupled spins than for non-coupled (singlet) and weakly coupled spins. This needs to be taken into account when correcting for T2 relaxation in CP-like sequences such as LASER. PMID:24436256

  14. Control of Transverse Corner Cracks on Low-Carbon Steel Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Yang, Xiaogang; Li, Shusen; Li, Ming; Ma, Wei

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the formation mechanism of transverse corner cracks on a low-carbon steel continuous-casting slab was investigated. The factors influencing the transverse corner cracks were discussed. The hot ductility of the low-carbon steel within 600°C and 1250°C was detected using a thermal simulator Gleeble 1500 (Dynamic Systems, Inc., Poestenkill, NY) to determine the embrittling temperature range of the steel. The temperature of the slab varied with time, especially at the slab corner, and it was calculated and discussed. It was found that transverse corner cracks were generated on the ferrite films along grain boundaries, and there was little decarburization layer near the cracks. According to the calculated temperature at slab corner, the cooling water flow rate and cooling strategy were optimized by adjusting the cooling water flow rate at each spray cooling zone to avoid the embrittling temperature range at the bending and straightening segments of the caster. As a result, the transverse corner cracks were successfully weakened.

  15. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  16. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket. PMID:27497540

  17. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  18. Anomalous relaxation and molecular dynamics of buckminsterfullerene in carbon disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, X.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1997-01-09

    We have employed the Hubbard relation to acquire semiquantitative information on the {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation rate of buckminsterfullerene in CS{sub 2}. We found the spin rotation mechanism to be operative and its contribution to be significant at all temperatures studied here. With the exception of values at 303 K, we found very different chemical shift and spin rotation contributions in this solvent than in 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4}. In fact, the respective contributions were reversed at 313 K. This observation indicates that solvent effects play a critical role in determining how effective these mechanisms will be in a given solvent. Three hydrodynamic-based models were applied in an attempt at theoretically describing the rotational motion of the title molecule in CS{sub 2}. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) model proved superior in duplicating our experimental findings. The agreement between the SED predictions and our experimental reorientational times suggests that C{sub 60} reorients in the `stick` limit where solute-solvent velocities are predicted to be similar. We, however, believe that the velocity coherence is not due to their separate matched velocities but rather originates from the presence of intermolecular interactions. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  20. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  1. Transverse Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Measurements of Carbon Fibers Using ESEM at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, O.; Jiang, J.; Putnam, D.; Lo, Z.; Ellis, A.; Effinger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The transverse coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of single IM7, T1000, and P55 carbon fibers are measured at elevated temperatures. The specimens are prepared by press-fitting fiber tows into 0.7mm-diameter cavity in a graphite disk of 5mm in diameter and 3mm high. The specimens are placed on a crucible in an ESEM, and images of the fiber cross section are taken as the fibers are heated up to 800 C. Holding time, heating and cool down cycles are also introduced. The geometrical changes are measured using a graphics tablet. The change in area/perimeter is calculated to determine the strain and transverse CTE for each fiber. In a complimentary computational effort, displacements and stresses are calculated with finite element models.

  2. Second harmonic generation in carbon nanotubes induced by transversal electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Mads Lund; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-08-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of armchair and zigzag type contain an inversion centre, and are thus intrinsically unable to generate dipole even-order nonlinearities, such as second harmonic generation (SHG). Breaking the inversion symmetry by application of an external voltage transversal to the CNT axis will, however, induce a second harmonic response. Similarly, additional non-vanishing second harmonic tensor elements will be induced in chiral tubes already displaying an intrinsic response. Many geometries realizing such a setup can be envisaged, e.g., an experimental gate setup or deposition of CNTs on, or integration in, strongly polarized host media, perhaps facilitating a tunable second harmonic response. In this work, we calculate the SHG signal from CNTs under transversally applied electric fields based on a tight-binding model. PMID:23838573

  3. Lightweight superhard carbon allotropes obtained by transversely compressing the smallest CNTs under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shengliang; Wang, Lidong; Liu, Yabo; Yuan, Rui; Xu, Xuechun; Cai, Yingxiang

    2015-09-01

    By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we predict three novel sp3-hybridized carbon allotropes, α-, β- and γ-C with space group P63/m, P63 and R 3 bar , respectively. These structures are both mechanically and dynamically stable. In spite of the lower densities (about 1.50 g/cm3) of the α-, β- and γ-C with respective to the diamond, they still have high Vickers hardness (over 70 GPa) and thus are lightweight superhard materials. Electronic structure calculations show three carbon allotropes are indirect bandgap semiconductors. These structures can be obtained by transversely compressing (3 , 3) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different positions and directions.

  4. Effect of filler surface properties on stress relaxation behavior of carbon nanofiber/polyurethane nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedat Gunes, I.; Jimenez, Guillermo; Jana, Sadhan

    2009-03-01

    The effect of carbon nanofiber (CNF) surface properties on tensile stress relaxation behavior of CNF/polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites was analyzed. PU was synthesized from methylene diisocyanate, polypropylene glycol (PPG diol), and butanediol. CNF, oxidized CNF (ox-CNF), and PPG diol grafted CNF (ol-CNF) were selected as fillers. ol-CNF was obtained by grafting PPG diol onto ox-CNF by reacting it with the carboxyl groups present on ox-CNF surface. The atomic ratios of oxygen to carbon present on the filler surfaces were 0.13 and 0.18 on ox-CNF and on ol-CNF as compared to 0.015 on CNF, mostly due to the presence oxygen containing polar groups on the surfaces of the former. The composites were prepared by in-situ polymerization and melt mixing in a chaotic mixer. The stress relaxation behavior of composites was determined at room temperature after inducing a tensile strain of 100%. The presence of fillers augmented the rate of stress relaxation in composites which was highest in the presence of CNF. The results suggested that relatively weak polymer-filler interactions in composites of CNF promoted higher stress relaxation.

  5. Relaxation of the V = 4,5,6,7, Sigma g/+/ vibrational levels of carbon monoxide studied by laser absorption.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Weisbach, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational relaxation of individual vibration rotation levels of carbon monoxide behind incident shock waves of carbon monoxide has been studied by the method of laser absorption. For the particular vibrational states (V = 4 to 7) and temperature range (2500 to 5500 K) studied, it is concluded that the characteristic relaxation times are in excellent agreement with those obtained via previous measurements of 'bulk' gas properties. Further, the data furnish strong corroboration of the idea that the individual levels are in Boltzmann vibrational equilibrium during the relaxation process.

  6. Exciton-exciton annihilation and relaxation pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Narkeliunas, Jonas; Graham, Matt W.; Fleming, Graham R.; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-01

    We present a thorough analysis of one- and two-color transient absorption measurements performed on single- and double-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes. By combining the currently existing models describing exciton-exciton annihilation--the coherent and the diffusion-limited ones--we are able to simultaneously reproduce excitation kinetics following both E11 and E22 pump conditions. Our simulations revealed the fundamental photophysical behavior of one-dimensional coherent excitons and non-trivial excitation relaxation pathways. In particular, we found that after non-linear annihilation a doubly-excited exciton relaxes directly to its E11 state bypassing the intermediate E22 manifold, so that after excitation resonant with the E11 transition, the E22 state remains unpopulated. A quantitative explanation for the observed much faster excitation kinetics probed at E22 manifold, comparing to those probed at the E11 band, is also provided.

  7. Theoretical study of spin relaxation in a carbon nanotube quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Brian; Hu, Xuedong

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes offer an attractive environment for coherent spin manipulation due to the small population of nuclear spins and weak spin-orbit interaction. While a couple of specific spin relaxation mechanisms have been investigated theoretically[1][2], there is still no comprehensive study of spin lifetimes in carbon nanotubes. In the present study we calculate the spin decay rate for electrons in gate-defined quantum dots on carbon nanotubes due to the spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions. More specifically, we explore effects of magnetic field strength and orientation, tube diameter and chirality, and confinement. [1] Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 75, 045429 (2007) [2] K. M. Borysenko, Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, J. M. Zavada, arXiv 0710.3382 (2007)

  8. Prognostic Significance of Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2*) in Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Young; Ko, Eun Sook; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Sun Mi; Lim, Yaeji; Kim, Rock Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and prognostic factors. Materials and Methods A total of 159 women with invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) sequence at 3 T. The distribution of the measured R2* values were analyzed, and the correlation between R2* and various prognostic factors (age, tumor size, histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, and axillary lymph node status, as well as expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, p53, and Ki-67) were retrospectively assessed using patient medical records. Results The baseline R2* values of the IDCs were very heterogeneous with wide range among the patients. The mean R2* value was (32.8 ± 14.0) Hz with a median of 29.3 Hz (range 13.5–109.4 Hz). In multivariate analysis, older age was associated with decreased R2* value (P = 0.011) and IDCs with p53-overexpression showed higher R2* values than those without p53-overexpression group (P = 0.031). Other prognostic factors were not significantly correlated with R2* value. Conclusion In this study, R2* values were significantly correlated with age and expression of p53. Further studies are necessary to determine the prognostic value of BOLD-MRI. PMID:27384310

  9. Extension of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy techniques to allosteric proteins: CO- and paramagnetic fluoromet-hemoglobin [beta (15N-valine)].

    PubMed

    Nocek, J M; Huang, K; Hoffman, B M

    2000-03-14

    We present the first steps in applying transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) techniques to the study of allosterism. Each beta-chain of the hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer has 17 valine residues. We have (15)N-labeled the beta-chain Val residues and detected 16 of the 17 (1)H-(15)N correlation peaks for beta-chain Val of the R state CO-Hb structure by using the TROSY technique. Sequence-specific assignments are suggested, based mainly on analysis of the (1)H pseudocontact-shift increments produced by oxidizing the diamagnetic R state HbCO to the paramagnetic R state fluoromet form. When possible, we support these assignments with sequential nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) information obtained from a two-dimensional [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY-TROSY experiment (NOESY, NOE spectroscopy). We have induced further the R-T conformational change by adding the allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate, to the fluoromet-Hb sample. This change induces substantial increments in the (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts, and we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of the tentative sequence assignments. These preliminary results suggest that amide nitrogen and amide proton chemical shifts in a selectively labeled sample are site-specific probes for monitoring the allosteric response of the ensemble-averaged solution structure of Hb. More important, the chemical-shift dispersion obtained is adequate to permit a complete assignment of the backbone (15)N/(13)C resonances upon nonselective labeling. PMID:10716987

  10. Fitting the excess wing in the dielectric α-relaxation of propylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, R.

    2002-03-01

    A novel fitting function for the complex frequency-dependent dielectric susceptibility is introduced and compared against other fitting functions for experimental broadband dielectric loss spectra of propylene carbonate taken from Schneider et al (Schneider U, Lunkenheimer P, Brand R and Loidl A 1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 6924). The fitting function contains a single stretching exponent similar to the familiar Cole-Davidson or Kohlrausch stretched exponential fits. It is compared to these traditional fits as well as to the Havriliak-Negami susceptibility and a susceptibility for a two-step Debye relaxation. The results for the novel fit are found to give superior agreement.

  11. Lung Parenchymal Signal Intensity in MRI: A Technical Review with Educational Aspirations Regarding Reversible Versus Irreversible Transverse Relaxation Effects in Common Pulse Sequences

    PubMed Central

    MULKERN, ROBERT; HAKER, STEVEN; MAMATA, HATSUHO; LEE, EDWARD; MITSOURAS, DIMITRIOS; OSHIO, KOICHI; BALASUBRAMANIAN, MUKUND; HATABU, HIROTO

    2014-01-01

    Lung parenchyma is challenging to image with proton MRI. The large air space results in ~l/5th as many signal-generating protons compared to other organs. Air/tissue magnetic susceptibility differences lead to strong magnetic field gradients throughout the lungs and to broad frequency distributions, much broader than within other organs. Such distributions have been the subject of experimental and theoretical analyses which may reveal aspects of lung microarchitecture useful for diagnosis. Their most immediate relevance to current imaging practice is to cause rapid signal decays, commonly discussed in terms of short T2* values of 1 ms or lower at typical imaging field strengths. Herein we provide a brief review of previous studies describing and interpreting proton lung spectra. We then link these broad frequency distributions to rapid signal decays, though not necessarily the exponential decays generally used to define T2* values. We examine how these decays influence observed signal intensities and spatial mapping features associated with the most prominent torso imaging sequences, including spoiled gradient and spin echo sequences. Effects of imperfect refocusing pulses on the multiple echo signal decays in single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences and effects of broad frequency distributions on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence signal intensities are also provided. The theoretical analyses are based on the concept of explicitly separating the effects of reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation processes, thus providing a somewhat novel and more general framework from which to estimate lung signal intensity behavior in modern imaging practice. PMID:25228852

  12. Lung Parenchymal Signal Intensity in MRI: A Technical Review with Educational Aspirations Regarding Reversible Versus Irreversible Transverse Relaxation Effects in Common Pulse Sequences.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert; Haker, Steven; Mamata, Hatsuho; Lee, Edward; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Oshio, Koichi; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-03-01

    Lung parenchyma is challenging to image with proton MRI. The large air space results in ~l/5th as many signal-generating protons compared to other organs. Air/tissue magnetic susceptibility differences lead to strong magnetic field gradients throughout the lungs and to broad frequency distributions, much broader than within other organs. Such distributions have been the subject of experimental and theoretical analyses which may reveal aspects of lung microarchitecture useful for diagnosis. Their most immediate relevance to current imaging practice is to cause rapid signal decays, commonly discussed in terms of short T2 (*) values of 1 ms or lower at typical imaging field strengths. Herein we provide a brief review of previous studies describing and interpreting proton lung spectra. We then link these broad frequency distributions to rapid signal decays, though not necessarily the exponential decays generally used to define T2 (*) values. We examine how these decays influence observed signal intensities and spatial mapping features associated with the most prominent torso imaging sequences, including spoiled gradient and spin echo sequences. Effects of imperfect refocusing pulses on the multiple echo signal decays in single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences and effects of broad frequency distributions on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence signal intensities are also provided. The theoretical analyses are based on the concept of explicitly separating the effects of reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation processes, thus providing a somewhat novel and more general framework from which to estimate lung signal intensity behavior in modern imaging practice. PMID:25228852

  13. On the Lorentzian versus Gaussian Character of Time-Domain Spin-Echo Signals from the Brain as Sampled via Gradient-Echoes: Implications for Quantitative Transverse Relaxation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether Lorentzian or Gaussian intra-voxel frequency distributions are better suited for modeling data acquired with gradient-echo sampling of single spin-echoes for the simultaneous characterization of irreversible and reversible relaxation rates. Clinical studies (e.g., of brain iron deposition) using such acquisition schemes have typically assumed Lorentzian distributions. Theory and Methods Theoretical expressions of the time-domain spin-echo signal for intra-voxel Lorentzian and Gaussian distributions were used to fit data from a human brain scanned at both 1.5T and 3T, resulting in maps of irreversible and reversible relaxation rates for each model. The relative merits of the Lorentzian versus Gaussian model were compared via quality of fit considerations. Results Lorentzian fits were equivalent to Gaussian fits primarily in regions of the brain where irreversible relaxation dominated. In the multiple brain regions where reversible relaxation effects become prominent, however, Gaussian fits were clearly superior. Conclusion The widespread assumption that a Lorentzian distribution is suitable for quantitative transverse relaxation studies of the brain should be reconsidered, particularly at 3T and higher field strengths as reversible relaxation effects become more prominent. Gaussian distributions offer alternate fits of experimental data that should prove quite useful in general. PMID:25078089

  14. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. III. Volume viscosity, depolarized Rayleigh scattering, and nuclear spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S; Vesovic, Velisa

    2004-09-01

    Transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for volume viscosity, depolarized Rayleigh scattering, and nuclear spin relaxation for temperatures ranging from 200 to 1000 K. Three recent carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces have been investigated. Calculated values for the rotational collision number for all three intermolecular surfaces are consistent with the measurements and indicate that the temperature dependence of the Brau-Jonkman correlation is not applicable for carbon dioxide. The results for the depolarized Rayleigh scattering cross section and the nuclear spin relaxation cross section show that calculated values for the generally more successful potentials differ from the observations by 9% at about 290 K, although agreement is obtained for nuclear spin relaxation at about 400 K. PMID:15332957

  15. Relaxation NMR as a tool to study the dispersion and formulation behavior of nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, David; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    Solvent relaxation NMR has been used to estimate the surface areas and wettability of various types of nanostructured carbon materials in a range of solvents including water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran. We illustrate the application of the technique through several short case studies using samples including nanocarbon blacks, graphene oxide, nanographites, and porous graphenes. The technique is shown to give a good measure of surface area, correlating well with conventional surface area estimates obtained by nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, or light scattering for the non-porous samples. NMR relaxation has advantages in terms of speed of analysis and being able to use concentrated, wet, and opaque samples. For samples that are porous, two distinct surface areas can be estimated assuming the two environments ('inner' and 'outer') have the same surface chemistry, and that there is a slow exchange of solvent molecules between them. Furthermore, we show that differences in wettability and dispersability between samples dispersed in water, ethanol, and cyclopentanone can be observed, along with changes to the surface chemistry of the interface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25989999

  16. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  17. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  18. Transverse flowmetry of carbon particles based on photoacoustic Doppler standard deviation using an auto-correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Sun, Li-jun

    2015-05-01

    In order to measure the flow velocity of carbon particle suspension perpendicular to the receiving axis of ultrasound transducer, the standard deviation of photoacoustic Doppler frequency spectrum is used to estimate the bandwidth broadening, and the spectrum standard deviation is calculated by an auto-correlation method. A 532 nm pulsed laser with the repetition rate of 20 Hz is used as a pumping source to generate photoacoustic signal. The photoacoustic signals are detected using a focused PZT ultrasound transducer with the central frequency of 10 MHz. The suspension of carbon particles is driven by a syringe pump. The complex photoacoustic signal is calculated by Hilbert transformation from time domain signal before auto-correlation. The standard deviation of the Doppler bandwidth broadening is calculated by averaging the auto-correlation results of several individual A scans. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the spectrum standard deviation of the transversal carbon particle flow from 5.0 mm/s to 8.4 mm/s. The experimental results show that the auto-correlation result is approximately linearly distributed within the measuring range.

  19. Dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, P.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have studied the dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate. Structural and thermal properties have been examined using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. We have analyzed the complex conductivity spectra by using power law model coupled with the contribution of electrode polarization at low frequencies and high temperatures. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity and crossover frequency exhibits Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and ethylene carbonate concentrations. The analysis of the ac conductivity also shows the existence of a nearly constant loss in these polymer electrolytes at low temperatures and high frequencies. The fraction of free anions and ion pairs in polymer electrolyte have been obtained from the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectra. It is observed that these quantities influence the behavior of the composition dependence of the ionic conductivity.

  20. High-pressure nuclear-magnetic-resonance study of carbon-13 relaxation in 2-ethylhexyl benzoate and 2-ethylhexyl cyclohexanecarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamy, S. T.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Masuda, Y.; Campbell, D.; Jonas, J.

    1991-03-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times and 13G-1H nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) times of 2-ethyl hexylbenzoate (EHB) and 2-ethyl hexylcyclohexanecarboxylate (EHC) have been measured along isotherms of -20, 0, 20, 40, and 80 °C at pressures of 1-5000 bars using high-pressure, high-resolution NMR techniques. The ability to use pressure as an experimental variable has allowed us to study a wide range of molecular motions from extreme narrowing into the slow motional regime. In addition, the high-resolution capability even at high pressure permits the measurement of 13C and NOE for each individual carbon in the molecules studied. Relaxation in both molecules is successfully analyzed in terms of a model assuming a Cole-Davidson distribution of correlation times. The comparison of parameters used in the model demonstrates the increased flexibility of the EHC ring over the EHB ring and also shows how the presence of the flexible ring contributes to the increased over-all mobility of the EHC molecule. The analysis of molecular reorientations in terms of activation volumes also indicates that EHB motion is highly restricted at low temperature.

  1. Tuning Localized Transverse Surface Plasmon Resonance in Electricity-Selected Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Electrochemical Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Toru; Kawai, Hideki; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Okada, Susumu; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Localized surface-plasmon resonance affects the optical absorption and scattering of nanosized materials. The intensities and peak energies of the surface plasmons strongly depend on the carrier density; thus, the optical absorption peaks originating from the surface-plasmon resonance can be manipulated by the density of injected carriers. In single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the correct identification of surface-plasmon resonance modes is of great interest due to their emerging plasmonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate that high-carrier injection by electric double layers can induce a transverse surface-plasmon peak in aggregated, electricity-selected SWCNTs. In contrast to the well-discussed surface-plasmon resonance mode, whose polarization is parallel to the axis and whose resonance frequency is located in the THz region, our identified mode, which was normal to the axis, was located in the near-infrared range. In addition, our mode's peak position and intensities were tunable by carrier injections, indicating a route to control plasmonic optical processes by electric double-layer carrier injections using ionic liquid.

  2. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  3. Enhanced NMR relaxation of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids and the magnitude of the carbon hyperfine coupling in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, A; Pályi, A; Ihara, Y; Wzietek, P; Simon, P; Alloul, H; Zólyomi, V; Koltai, J; Kürti, J; Dóra, B; Simon, F

    2011-10-28

    Recent transport measurements [Churchill et al. Nature Phys. 5, 321 (2009)] found a surprisingly large, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than usual (13)C hyperfine coupling (HFC) in (13)C enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes. We formulate the theory of the nuclear relaxation time in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory to enable the determination of the HFC from recent data by Ihara et al. [Europhys. Lett. 90, 17,004 (2010)]. Though we find that 1/T(1) is orders of magnitude enhanced with respect to a Fermi-liquid behavior, the HFC has its usual, small value. Then, we reexamine the theoretical description used to extract the HFC from transport experiments and show that similar features could be obtained with HFC-independent system parameters. PMID:22107670

  4. Variable-temperature measurements of the dielectric relaxation in carbon black loaded epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosseau, C.; Achour, M. E.

    2009-06-01

    Technologically, an understanding of the temperature influence on the transport properties is essential to the study of many random conductor-insulator composites, while fundamentally it is related to a variety of questions in statistical physics, dielectrics, and materials science, to name a few. Variable-temperature measurements of the frequency dependent complex effective permittivity were performed on amine-cured epoxy resins loaded with carbon black (CB). Two series of prepercolative samples differing from the kind of CB particles (Raven 2000 and Raven 5000) mixed in an amine-cured epoxy matrix (diglycidylic ether of bisphenol F) were studied. In this effort to contribute to our understanding of the role of frequency (100 Hz-15 MHz) and temperature (from ambient temperature up to 90 °C) on the complex effective permittivity which describes the linear response of the system to an electromagnetic wave, we investigate these composites with CB loadings below the percolation threshold. Two features are observed. First, our observations cannot be understood in the typical framework of a simple Debye-like dipolar process. In this analysis, we argue that the appearance of the broad temperature and frequency dependent maximum loss can be understood within the heuristic framework proposed by Jonscher which applies to disordered heterogeneous systems. This theoretical framework is consistent with several aspects of the experiments, notably the power-law decays of the real and imaginary parts of the effective permittivity characterized by two fractional exponents m and n. These exponents are both positive and smaller than unity. We further quantified their different temperature variations: while m is strongly decreasing with increasing temperature, n takes a value close to 1. Second, the observed maximum loss frequency found for each CB volume fraction shifts to higher frequencies with increasing temperature and exhibits a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence well

  5. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  6. Transversity 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Ratcliffe, Philip G.

    Introduction. Purpose and status of the Italian Transversity Project / F. Bradamante -- Opening lecture. Transversity / M. Anselmino -- Experimental lectures. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries from polarized and unpolarized hydrogen targets at HERMES / G. Schnell (for the HERMES Collaboration). Collins and Sivers asymmetries on the deuteron from COMPASS data / I. Horn (for the COMPASS Collaboration). First measurement of interference fragmentation on a transversely polarized hydrogen target / P. B. van der Nat (for the HERMES Collaboration). Two-hadron asymmetries at the COMPASS experiment / A. Mielech (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Measurements of chiral-odd fragmentation functions at Belle / R. Seidl ... [et al.]. Lambda asymmetries / A. Ferrero (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Transverse spin at PHENIX: results and prospects / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX Collaboration). Transverse spin and RHIC / L. Bland. Studies of transverse spin effects at JLab / H. Avakian ... [et al.] (for the CLAS Collaboration). Neutron transversity at Jefferson Lab / J. P. Chen ... [et al.] (for the Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration). PAX: polarized antiproton experiments / M. Contalbrigo. Single and double spin N-N interactions at GSI / M. Maggiora (for the ASSIA Collaboration). Spin filtering in storage rings / N. N. Nikolaev & F. F. Pavlov -- Theory lectures. Single-spin asymmetries and transversity in QCD / S. J. Brodsky. The relativistic hydrogen atom: a theoretical laboratory for structure functions / X. Artru & K. Benhizia. GPD's and SSA's / M. Burkardt. Time reversal odd distribution functions in chiral models / A. Drago. Soffer bound and transverse spin densities from lattice QCD / M. Diehl ... [et al.]. Single-spin asymmetries and Qiu-Sterman effect(s) / A. Bacchetta. Sivers function: SIDIS data, fits and predictions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Twist-3 effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering / M. Schlegel, K. Goeke & A. Metz. Quark and gluon Sivers functions / I

  7. Dissociation and regeneration kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vesnov, I G

    2010-06-23

    An improved mathematical model describing the dissociation and regenerations kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers is presented. It is shown that the calculation of the active medium composition of such lasers requires the equations of the gas-mixture kinetics to take into account the diffuse flow of oxygen atoms on metal electrodes and on the surface of heterogeneous catalysts used to reduce the degree of the carbon dioxide dissociation. The rate constants of the heterogeneous recombination reaction CO + O {yields} CO{sub 2} on the surface of alumina ceramics and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are determined. (active media)

  8. Improvement of the relaxation time and the order parameter of nematic liquid crystal using a hybrid alignment mixture of carbon nanotube and polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyojin; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Soo Park, Young

    2014-05-01

    We examined the electrooptical properties of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) sample whose substrates were coated with a mixture of carbon nanotube (CNT) and polyimide (PI). The relaxation time of the sample coated with 1.5 wt. % CNT mixture was about 35% reduced compared to the pure polyimide sample. The elastic constant and the order parameter of the CNT-mixture sample were increased and the fast relaxation of LC could be approximated to the mean-field theory. We found the CNT-mixed polyimide formed more smooth surface than the pure PI from atomic force microscopy images, indicating the increased order parameter is related to the smooth surface topology of the CNT-polyimide mixture.

  9. Improvement of the relaxation time and the order parameter of nematic liquid crystal using a hybrid alignment mixture of carbon nanotube and polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyojin; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Soo Park, Young

    2014-05-12

    We examined the electrooptical properties of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) sample whose substrates were coated with a mixture of carbon nanotube (CNT) and polyimide (PI). The relaxation time of the sample coated with 1.5 wt. % CNT mixture was about 35% reduced compared to the pure polyimide sample. The elastic constant and the order parameter of the CNT-mixture sample were increased and the fast relaxation of LC could be approximated to the mean-field theory. We found the CNT-mixed polyimide formed more smooth surface than the pure PI from atomic force microscopy images, indicating the increased order parameter is related to the smooth surface topology of the CNT-polyimide mixture.

  10. Therapy of deep caries by transverse excited atmosphere pressure carbon dioxide laser: an in-vitro investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meese, Gabriele; Zuhrt, Rainer

    1993-07-01

    Deep carious decay is still a problem for conservative dentistry. A prototype of a transverse excited atmospheric pressure carbondioxide laser (TEA-CO2-Laser) was used for testing the properties in selective ablation of softened carious dentin, artificially sclerosing the remaining dentin, and providing thermal damage for the pulp. Using low pulse frequencies of 1 or 2 Hz, pulse durations of 50 ns, and pulse energies of 5 J/cm2 the TEA-CO2- Laser seems to be able to solve the therapeutic problem.

  11. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  12. Transverse myelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.J.; Motaghedi, B.; Robitaille, Y.

    1980-05-01

    Transverse myelitis is a known complication of radiation treatment for carcinoma of the heat and neck. In a five year period, 1970 to 1975, 120 patients with head and neck cancer received radiation as part of their treatment in this hospital. A review of the records of these patients showed only two cases of myelitis, an incidence of about 2%. This paper reviews the clinical syndrome; treatment and preventive measures are discussed and a survey of the literature is presented.

  13. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Methods Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Results Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P < 0.01) following desensitisation of purinergic receptors with α,β-methylene-ATP (10 μM). In the presence of guanethidine, atropine, and α,β-methylene-ATP, the remaining relaxatory responses to EFS were examined. These responses were not altered by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5 μM), the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor antagonist, [d-p-Cl-Phe6,Leu17]-vasoactive intestinal peptide (PheLeu-VIP; 100 nM), or the purinoceptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophyline (P1 receptors) or suramin (P2 receptors). However, relaxation responses were reduced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (40–50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20–40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15–20% reduction). Conclusions Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide

  14. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay. PMID:25741748

  15. Dielectric relaxations and conduction mechanisms in polyether-clay composite polymer electrolytes under high carbon dioxide pressure.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Shunsuke; Bertasi, Federico; Vezzù, Keti; Negro, Enrico; Tominaga, Yoichi; Di Noto, Vito

    2013-10-21

    The composite material P(EO/EM)-Sa consisting of synthetic saponite (Sa) dispersed in poly[ethylene oxide-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl glycidyl ether] (P(EO/EM)) is studied by "in situ" measurements using broadband electrical spectroscopy (BES) under pressurized CO2 to characterize the dynamic behavior of conductivity and the dielectric relaxations of the ion host polymer matrix. It is revealed that there are three dielectric relaxation processes associated with: (I) the dipolar motions in the short oxyethylene side chains of P(EO/EM) (β); and (II) the segmental motion of the main chains comprising the polyether components (αfast, αslow). αslow is attributed to the slow α-relaxation of P(EO/EM) macromolecules, which is hindered by the strong coordination interactions with the ions. Two conduction processes are observed, σDC and σID, which are attributed, respectively, to the bulk conductivity and the interdomain conductivity. The temperature dependence of conductivity and relaxation processes reveals that αfast and αslow are strongly correlated with σDC and σID. The "in situ" BES measurements under pressurized CO2 indicate a fast decrease in σDC at the initial CO2 treatment time resulting from the decrease in the concentration of polyether-M(n+) complexes, which is driven by the CO2 permeation. The relaxation frequency (fR) of αslow at the initial CO2 treatment time increases and shows a steep rise with time with the same behavior of the αfast mode. It is demonstrated that the interactions between polyether chains of P(EO/EM) and cations in the polymer electrolyte layers embedded in Sa are probably weakened by the low permittivity of CO2 (ε = 1.08). Thus, the formation of ion pairs in the polymer electrolyte domains of P(EO/EM)-Sa occurs, with a corresponding reduction in the concentration of ion carriers. PMID:23963202

  16. Paramagnetic Inversion of the Sign of the Interference Contribution to the Transverse Relaxation of the Imido Protons of the Coordinated Imidazoles in the Uniformly 15N-Labeled Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Tomoaki; Harada, Erisa; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kawai, Gota; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Akutsu, Hideo

    1998-04-01

    In the spectrum of uniformly15N-labeled cytochromec3, the relative linewidths of the doublet peaks of the15N-coupled imido proton of the coordinated imidazole group were reversed on oxidation. This inversion was explained by the interference relaxation process between the electron-proton dipolar and15N-1H dipolar interactions. The inversion can be used to assign the imido protons of the coordinated imidazole groups in heme proteins.

  17. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  18. The physical state of osmoregulatory solutes in unicellular algae. A natural-abundance carbon-13 nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation study.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, R S; MacKay, M A; Borowitzka, L J

    1982-01-01

    Natural-abundance 13C n.m.r. spin-lattice relaxation-time measurements have been carried out on intact cells of the unicellular blue--green alga Synechococcus sp. and the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina, with the aim of characterizing the environments of the organic osmoregulatory solutes in these salt-tolerant organisms. In Synechococcus sp., all of the major organic osmoregulatory solute, 2-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosylglycerol, is visible in spectra of intact cells. Its rotational motion in the cell is slower by a factor of approx. 2.4 than in aqueous solution, but the molecule is still freely mobile and therefore able to contribute to the osmotic balance. In D. salina, only about 60% of the osmoregulatory solute glycerol is visible in spectra of intact cells. The rotational mobility of this observable fraction is approximately half that found in aqueous solution, but the data also indicate that there is a significant concentration of some paramagnetic species in D. salina which contributes to the overall spin-lattice relaxation of the glycerol carbon atoms. The non-observable fraction, which must correspond to glycerol molecules that have very broad 13C resonances and that are in slow exchange with bulk glycerol, has not been properly characterized as yet, but may represent glycerol in the chloroplast. The implications of these findings in relation to the physical state of the cytoplasm and the mechanism of osmoregulation in these cells are discussed. PMID:6807296

  19. Fluid mixing technique increases the gain and output power of carbon dioxide laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cool, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    High speed flowing gas system provides uniform mixing in short times compared to flow transit times and carbon dioxide vibrational relaxation times. This system minimizes the effects of surrounding surfaces and provides a uniformly high gain that is independent of dimensions transverse to the flow direction.

  20. Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama S.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic carbon-based nanostructures are presented as contrast agents (CAs) for advanced imaging applications such as cellular and molecular imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gadolinium-loaded, ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (gadonanotubes; GNTs) are shown to have extremely high r1 relaxivities (contrast enhancement efficacy), especially at low-magnetic field strengths. The inherent lipophilicity of GNTs provides them the ability to image cells at low magnetic field strength. A carboxylated dextran-coated GNT (GadoDex) has been synthesized and proposed as a new biocompatible high-performance MRI CA. The r1 relaxivity is ca. 20 times greater than for other paramagnetic Gd-based CAs. This enhanced relaxivity for GadoDex is due to the synergistic effects of an increased molecular tumbling time (tauR) and a faster proton exchange rate (taum). GNTs also exhibit very large transverse relaxivities (r2) at high magnetic fields (≥ 3 T). The dependence of the transverse relaxation rates (especially R2*) of labeled cells on GNT concentration offers the possibility to quantify cell population in vivo using R2* mapping. The cell-labeling efficiency and high transverse relaxivities of GNTs has enabled the first non-iron oxide-based single-cell imaging using MRI. The residual metal catalyst particles of SWNT materials also have transverse relaxation properties. All of the SWNT materials exhibit superior transverse relaxation properties. However, purified SWNTs and US-tubes with less residual metal content exhibit better transverse relaxivities (r2), demonstrating the importance of the SWNT structure for enhanced MRI CA performance. A strategy to improve the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CAs by geometrically confining them within porous silicon particles (SiMPs) has been investigated. The enhancement in relaxivity is attributed to the slow diffusion of water molecules through the pores and the increase in the molecular tumbling time of the nanoconstruct

  1. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  2. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  3. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  4. Suppression of magnetic relaxation by a transverse alternating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, I. F.; Kalinov, A. V.; Fisher, L. M. Yampol'skii, V. A.

    2007-07-15

    The evolution of the spatial distribution of the magnetic induction in a superconductor after the action of the alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the trapped magnetic flux has been analyzed. The observed stabilization of the magnetic induction profile is attributed to the increase in the pinning force, so that the screening current density becomes subcritical. The last statement is corroborated by direct measurements.

  5. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  6. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  7. Transverse gravity versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂μξμ = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  8. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation. PMID:22107675

  9. Transverse Instability of Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-10-01

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  10. TRANSVERSE INSTABILITIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M; Cameron, P; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Dawson, C; Degen, C; Drees, K; Fischer, W; Koropsak, E; Michnoff, R; Montag, C; Roser, T

    2003-05-12

    The beam quality in RHIC can be significantly impacted by a transverse instability which can occur just after transition [1]. Data characterizing the instability are presented and analyzed. Techniques for ameliorating the situation are considered.

  11. Transverse Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect

    Belinfante, F.J.

    1982-06-15

    For Schwarzschild's static spherically symmetric external field, a coordinate system is determined in which the metric field is the transverse field satisfying the coordinate conditions of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner.

  12. Paramagnetic relaxation of long-lived coherences in solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Srinivas, Chinthalapalli; Deb, Mayukh; Kurur, Narayanan D

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLCs) are known to have lifetimes much longer than transverse magnetization or single quantum coherences (SQCs). The effect of paramagnetic ions on the relaxation of LLCs is not known. This is particularly important, as LLCs have potential applications in various fields like analytical NMR, in vivo NMR and MR imaging methods. We study here the behaviour of LLCs in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation agents. The stepwise increase in the concentration of the metal ion is followed by measuring various relaxation rates. The effect of paramagnetic ions is analysed in terms of the external random field's contribution to the relaxation of two coupled protons in 2,3,6-trichlorobenzaldehyde. The LLCs relax faster than ordinary SQCs in the presence of paramagnetic ions of varying character. This is explained on the basis of an increase in the contribution of the external random field to relaxation due to a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism. Comparison is also made with ordinary Zeeman relaxation rates like R1, R2, R1ρ and also with rate of relaxation of long-lived states RLLS which are known to be less sensitive to paramagnetically induced relaxation. Also, the extent of correlation of random fields at two proton sites is studied and is found to be strongly correlated with each other. The obtained correlation constant is found to be independent of the nature of added paramagnetic impurities. PMID:24151221

  13. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments in porous media with portable Halbach-Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile NMR became a powerful tool following the development of portable NMR sensors for well logging. By now there are numerous applications of mobile NMR in materials analysis and chemical engineering where, for example, unique information about the structure, morphology and dynamics of polymers is obtained, and new opportunities are provided for geo-physical investigations [1]. In particular, dynamic information can be retrieved by two-dimensional Laplace exchange NMR, where the initial NMR relaxation environment is correlated with the final relaxation environment of molecules migrating from one environment to the other within a so-called NMR mixing time tm [2]. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments of water in inorganic porous media were performed at low and moderately inhomogeneous magnetic field with a simple, portable Halbach-Magnet. By conducting NMR transverse relaxation exchange experiments for several mixing times and converting the results to 2D T2 distributions (joint probability densities of transverse relaxation times T2) with the help of the inverse 2D Laplace Transformation (ILT), we obtained characteristic exchange times for different pore sizes. The results of first experiments on soil samples are reported, which reveal information about the complex pore structure of soil and the moisture content. References: 1. B. Blümich, J. Mauler, A. Haber, J. Perlo, E. Danieli, F. Casanova, Mobile NMR for Geo-Physical Analysis and Material Testing, Petroleum Science, xx (2009) xxx - xxx. 2. K. E. Washburn, P.T. Callaghan, Tracking pore to pore exchange using relaxation exchange spectroscopy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 175502.

  14. Spin relaxation of iron in mixed state hemoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wajnberg, E; Kalinowski, H J; Bemski, G; Helman, J S

    1986-01-01

    In hemoproteins the relaxation mechanism of iron is Orbach for high spin (HS) and Raman for low spin (LS). We found that in met-hemoglobin and met-myoglobin, under conditions in which the two spin states coexist, both the HS and the LS states relax to the lattice through Orbach-like processes. Alos, very short (approximately 1 ns) and temperature independent transverse relaxation times T2 were estimated. This may result from the unusual electronic structure of mixed states hemoproteins that allows thermal equilibrium and interconversion of the spin states. PMID:3013333

  15. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  16. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  17. Modified Statistical Dynamical Diffraction Theory: A Novel Metrological Analysis Method for Partially Relaxed and Defective Carbon-doped Silicon and Silicon Germanium Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreeman, Paul K.

    The statistical dynamical diffraction theory, which has been initially developed by late Kato remained in obscurity for many years due to intense and difficult mathematical treatment that proved to be quite challenging to implement and apply. With assistance of many authors in past (including Bushuev, Pavlov, Pungeov, and among the others), it became possible to implement this unique x-ray diffraction theory that combines the kinematical (ideally imperfect) and dynamical (the characteristically perfect diffraction) into a single system of equations controlled by two factors determined by long range order and correlation function within the structure. The first stage is completed by the publication (Shreeman and Matyi, J. Appl. Cryst., 43, 550 (2010)) demonstrating the functionality of this theory with new modifications hence called modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory (mSDDT). The foundation of the theory is also incorporated into this dissertation, and the next stage of testing the model against several ion-implanted SiGe materials has been published: (Shreeman and Matyi, physica status solidi (a)208(11), 2533-2538, 2011). The dissertation with all the previous results summarized, dives into comprehensive analysis of HRXRD analyses complete with several different types of reflections (symmetrical, asymmetrical and skewed geometry). The dynamical results (with almost no defects) are compared with well-known commercial software. The defective materials, to which commercially available modeling software falls short, is then characterized and discussed in depth. The results will exemplify the power of the novel approach in the modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory: Ability to detect and measure defective structures qualitatively and quantitatively. The analysis will be compared alongside with TEM data analysis for verification and confirmation. The application of this theory will accelerate the ability to quickly characterize the relaxed

  18. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  19. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  20. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  1. Transverse Spin at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin asymmetries in polarized p+p and and DIS collisions. As a unique polarized proton-proton collider, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics mechanisms that cause the large single spin asymmetry at the forward rapidity. Both PHENIX and STAR experiments have been studying the transverse spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes since 2006. Especially, recent theoretical development on scattering a polarized probe on the saturated nuclear may provide a unique way to probe the gluon and quark TMDs. RHIC successfully ran polarized p+Au collisions in 2015. We will expect to have new results from polarized d+Au to compare with existing results from p+p collision to extend our understanding of QCD. Further more, In 2015, PHENIX installed MPC-ex calorimeter at very forward region to measure direct photon AN and STAR installed Roman Pots to study the diffractive events in polarized p+p and p+Au collisions. The recent results on transverse polarized p+p and p+Au collisions from both PHENIX and STAR experiments will be presented in this talk. I will also briefly discuss the possibility for the transverse Spin program at future experiments sPHENIX and forward sPHENIX at RHIC. Supported by US Department of Energy and RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center.

  2. Superparamagnetism and dynamic transverse susceptibility in magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, L.; Srikanth, H.; O'Connor, C. J.

    2000-03-01

    Dynamic transverse susceptibility (\\chi _T) measurements yield important information about spin dynamics in magnetic materials. They also provide a very sensitive and unique way to probe the magnetic anisotropy in novel systems like nanoparticles. We have developed a resonant method based on a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) operating at around 5 MHz to accurately measure the variation in dynamic transverse susceptibility over a wide range in temperature (5K to 300K) and static magnetic fields (0 to 9 T). Our experiments on magnetic nanoparticles (γ -Fe_2O_3/Ag nanocomposites), synthesized using reverse-micelle technique, reveal singular peaks in the low temperature transverse susceptibility at characteristic anisotropy fields (± 400 Oe). As the temperature is increased, the peaks evolve from being asymmetric to symmetric and eventually disappear at high temperatures well into the superparamagnetic regime. For the first time, we have mapped the complete variation of \\chi T in the H-T plane. We have also theoretically analyzed our results based on coherent rotation and find good agreement with a two-level model developed by us that includes thermal relaxation effects. This work is supported by DARPA through grant No. MDA 972-97-1-003

  3. Coherent coupling of multiple transverse modes in quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nanfang; Diehl, Laurent; Cubukcu, Ertugrul; Bour, David; Corzine, Scott; Höfler, Gloria; Wojcik, Aleksander K; Crozier, Kenneth B; Belyanin, Alexey; Capasso, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are a unique laboratory for studying nonlinear laser dynamics because of their high intracavity intensity, strong intersubband optical nonlinearity, and an unusual combination of relaxation time scales. Here we investigate the nonlinear coupling between the transverse modes of quantum cascade lasers. We present evidence for stable phase coherence of multiple transverse modes over a large range of injection currents. We explain the phase coherence by a four-wave mixing interaction originating from the strong optical nonlinearity of the gain transition. The phase-locking conditions predicted by theory are supported by spectral data and both near- and far-field mode measurements. PMID:19257192

  4. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  5. Transverse testicular ectopia.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Abdullah; Yiğiter, Murat; Oral, Akgün; Bakan, Vedat

    2014-02-01

    Described herein are six cases of transverse testicular ectopia. All patients who underwent orchidopexy at the one pediatric surgical unit between October 2001 and January 2008 were evaluated. The medical records of all patients diagnosed with transverse testicular ectopia were evaluated retrospectively. Five patients (84%) were admitted with a symptomatic right inguinal hernia and empty scrotum on the left side. Only one child (16%) had left-sided hernia and right non-palpable testis (age ranged from 1 month to 3 years). Four patients (66%) were diagnosed in the operating theatre and the last two (33%) on inguinal ultrasound preoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in the last patient. Herniorrhaphy with fixation of the ectopic gonad to the opposite hemiscrotum through a transseptal incision was performed in all patients. Postoperative complications were not observed. PMID:24548194

  6. [Ettore Majoran's transversal epistemology].

    PubMed

    Bontems, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    « Il valore delle leggi statistiche nella fisica e nelle scienze sociali » is Ettore Majorana's only work on science. It offers a critique of classical determinism, establishing an analogy between the laws of quantum mechanics and social science and arguing that both are intrinsically linked to probability. This article first studies this argument from the standpoing of metaphysics, physics, and sociology, and then assesses the significance of this transversal epistemology. PMID:23636783

  7. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  8. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  9. Dielectric relaxation of electrolyte solutions using terahertz transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaki, M. L. T.; Redondo, A.; Zawodzinski, T. A.; Taylor, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    We use terahertz (THz) transmission spectroscopy to obtain the frequency dependent complex dielectric constants of water, methanol, and propylene carbonate, and solutions of lithium salts in these solvents. The behavior of the pure solvents is modeled with either two (water) or three (methanol and propylene carbonate) Debye relaxations. We discuss the effects of ionic solvation on the relaxation behavior of the solvents in terms of modifications to the values of the Debye parameters of the pure solvents. In this way we obtain estimates for numbers of irrotationally bound solvent molecules, the numbers of bonds broken or formed, and the effects of ions on the higher-frequency relaxations.

  10. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  11. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  12. Transverse susceptibility method in nanoparticulate magnetic media.

    PubMed

    Cimpoesu, Dorin; Spinu, Leonard; Stancu, Alexandru

    2008-06-01

    Transverse susceptibility (TS) method is a reliable method for the determination of anisotropy in nanoparticulate media. To correctly evaluate the value of anisotropy in various modern nanostructured materials, a number of theoretical problems related to the method have to be well understood to avoid significant systematic errors. This paper presents the state of the art in the TS method which includes the expression for single domain particles with any type of anisotropy, the theoretical and micromagnetic, using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and stochastic LLG equation studies of the effects of ac field amplitude, inter-particle interactions, and magnetic relaxation. The problem of both real and imaginary parts of the TS signal is also discussed. PMID:18681012

  13. Dielectric relaxation time spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulson, K S; Jouravleva, S; McLeod, C N

    2000-11-01

    A new mathematical method is developed to recover the permittivity relaxation spectrum of living tissue from measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the impedance. Aiming to derive information about electrical properties of living tissue without the prior selection of any impedance model, the procedure calculates the relaxation time distribution. It provides new characteristic independent parameters: time constants, their distribution, and the amplitudes of the associated dispersion. As the beta-dispersion is the most important in the area of electrical impedance spectroscopy of tissue, the paper gives an estimate of the essential frequency range to cover the whole relaxation spectrum in that area. Results are presented from both simulation and known lumped--constant element circuit. PMID:11077745

  14. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  15. Transverse Spin Effects at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Wollny, H.

    2009-08-04

    The measurement of transverse spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. In the years 2002-2004 data was taken by scattering a 160 GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized deuteron target. In 2007, additional data was collected on a transversely polarized proton target. New preliminary results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries from the analysis of the proton data are presented.

  16. Transverse wobbling in ^{135}pr.

    PubMed

    Matta, J T; Garg, U; Li, W; Frauendorf, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Patel, D; Schlax, K W; Palit, R; Saha, S; Sethi, J; Trivedi, T; Ghugre, S S; Raut, R; Sinha, A K; Janssens, R V F; Zhu, S; Carpenter, M P; Lauritsen, T; Seweryniak, D; Chiara, C J; Kondev, F G; Hartley, D J; Petrache, C M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Lakshmi, D Vijaya; Raju, M Kumar; Madhusudhana Rao, P V; Tandel, S K; Ray, S; Dönau, F

    2015-02-27

    A pair of transverse wobbling bands is observed in the nucleus ^{135}Pr. The wobbling is characterized by ΔI=1, E2 transitions between the bands, and a decrease in the wobbling energy confirms its transverse nature. Additionally, a transition from transverse wobbling to a three-quasiparticle band comprised of strong magnetic dipole transitions is observed. These observations conform well to results from calculations with the tilted axis cranking model and the quasiparticle rotor model. PMID:25768759

  17. Pediatric transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Absoud, Michael; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Lim, Ming; Lotze, Tim; Thomas, Terrence; Deiva, Kumaran

    2016-08-30

    Pediatric acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an immune-mediated CNS disorder and contributes to 20% of children experiencing a first acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). ATM must be differentiated from other presentations of myelopathy and may be the first presentation of relapsing ADS such as neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The tenets of the diagnostic criteria for ATM established by the Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group can generally be applied in children; however, a clear sensory level may not be evident in some. MRI lesions are often centrally located with high T2 signal intensity involving gray and neighboring white matter. Longitudinally extensive ATM occurs in the majority. Asymptomatic lesions on brain MRI are seen in more than one-third and predict MS or NMO. The role of antibodies such as myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in monophasic and relapsing ATM and their significance in therapeutic approaches remain unclear. ATM is a potentially devastating condition with variable outcome and presents significant cumulative demands on health and social care resources. Children generally have a better outcome than adults, with one-half making a complete recovery by 2 years. There is need for standardization of clinical assessment and investigation protocols to enable international collaborative studies to delineate prognostic factors for disability and relapse. There are no robust controlled trials in children or adults to inform optimal treatment of ATM, with one study currently open to recruitment. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of clinical features, investigative workup, pathogenesis, and management of ATM and suggests future directions. PMID:27572861

  18. RELAX: detecting relaxed selection in a phylogenetic framework.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Murrell, Ben; Smith, Martin D; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    Relaxation of selective strength, manifested as a reduction in the efficiency or intensity of natural selection, can drive evolutionary innovation and presage lineage extinction or loss of function. Mechanisms through which selection can be relaxed range from the removal of an existing selective constraint to a reduction in effective population size. Standard methods for estimating the strength and extent of purifying or positive selection from molecular sequence data are not suitable for detecting relaxed selection, because they lack power and can mistake an increase in the intensity of positive selection for relaxation of both purifying and positive selection. Here, we present a general hypothesis testing framework (RELAX) for detecting relaxed selection in a codon-based phylogenetic framework. Given two subsets of branches in a phylogeny, RELAX can determine whether selective strength was relaxed or intensified in one of these subsets relative to the other. We establish the validity of our test via simulations and show that it can distinguish between increased positive selection and a relaxation of selective strength. We also demonstrate the power of RELAX in a variety of biological scenarios where relaxation of selection has been hypothesized or demonstrated previously. We find that obligate and facultative γ-proteobacteria endosymbionts of insects are under relaxed selection compared with their free-living relatives and obligate endosymbionts are under relaxed selection compared with facultative endosymbionts. Selective strength is also relaxed in asexual Daphnia pulex lineages, compared with sexual lineages. Endogenous, nonfunctional, bornavirus-like elements are found to be under relaxed selection compared with exogenous Borna viruses. Finally, selection on the short-wavelength sensitive, SWS1, opsin genes in echolocating and nonecholocating bats is relaxed only in lineages in which this gene underwent pseudogenization; however, selection on the functional

  19. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know. February 2013. Available at: nccih.nih.gov/health/stress/relaxation.htm . Accessed September 21, 2015. National Center ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Stress Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  20. The origin of biexponential T2 relaxation in muscle water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, W. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the multiexponential transverse relaxation of muscle water protons: "anatomical" and "chemical" compartmentation. In an attempt to obtain evidence to support one or the other of these two theories, interstitial and intracellular macromolecular preparations were studied and compared with rat muscle tissue by proton NMR transverse relaxation (T2) measurements. All macromolecule preparations displayed monoexponential T2 decay. Membrane alteration with DMSO/glycerin did not eliminate the biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue. Maceration converted biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue to single exponential decay. It is concluded that the observed two component exponential T2 decay of muscle represents anatomical compartmentation of tissue water, probably intracellular versus extracellular.

  1. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  2. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  3. Dielectric Relaxation of Hexadeutero Dimethylsulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betting, H.; Stockhausen, M.

    1999-11-01

    The dielectric relaxation parameters of the title substance (DMSO-d6) in its pure liquid state are determined from meas-urements up to 72 GHz at 20°C in comparison to protonated DMSO. While the relaxation strengths do not differ, the relax-ation time of DMSO-d 6 is significantly longer (21.3 ps) than that of DMSO (19.5 ps).

  4. Relaxation in Physical Education Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coville, Claudia A.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical framework for incorporating relaxation instruction in the physical education curriculum is presented based on the assumption that relaxation is a muscular-skeletal skill benefitting general motor skill acquisition. Theoretical principles, a definition of relaxation, and an analysis of stages of skill development are also used in the…

  5. Relaxation phenomena in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this article we discuss how the assumptions of self-similarity imposed on the distribution of independently relaxing modes, as well as on their amplitude and characteristic times, manifest in the global relaxation phenomena. We also review recent applications of such approach to the description of relaxation phenomena in microemulsions and molecular glasses.

  6. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  7. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  8. Transverse Spin Physics at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Marco, Contalbrigo

    2009-08-04

    HERMES results on azimuthal single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive leptoproduction of pions and charged kaons from a transversely polarised hydrogen target are presented. Preliminary results for both Collins and Sivers Fourier amplitudes are extracted with a much higher statistical significance than the evidence firstly published by HERMES for charged pions in 2005. The first evidence for a correlation between the transverse target polarization and the azimuthal orientation of the plane containing a pair of produced pions is also observed. It is expected to be related to the product of the transversity and an as-yet unmeasured dihadron fragmentation function.

  9. Transverse phase-space evolution in non-stationary charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.

    1992-10-01

    The transverse dynamics of a nonrelativistic, mismatched, one- dimensional sheet beam propagating through a continuous, linear focusing channel is investigated. The investigation is based on the Fokker-Planck equation in which the relaxation rate and diffusion coefficient are calculated from a simple model of turbulence resulting from charge redistribution.

  10. Transverse phase-space evolution in non-stationary charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    The transverse dynamics of a nonrelativistic, mismatched, one- dimensional sheet beam propagating through a continuous, linear focusing channel is investigated. The investigation is based on the Fokker-Planck equation in which the relaxation rate and diffusion coefficient are calculated from a simple model of turbulence resulting from charge redistribution.

  11. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  12. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Transverse Relaxometry in Early-Onset Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonenc, Atilla; Frazier, Jean A.; Crowley, David J.; Moore, Constance M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Transverse relaxation time (T2) imaging provides the opportunity to examine membrane fluidity, which can affect a number of cellular functions. The objective of the present work was to examine T2 abnormalities in children with unmodified DSM-IV-TR bipolar disorder (BD) in bilateral cingulate-paracingulate (CPC) white matter. Method: A…

  13. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 2. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. PMID:21334231

  14. Relaxation Dispersion in MRI Induced by Fictitious Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-01-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 3. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. PMID:21334231

  15. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ⩾2. RAFF generates a fictitious field ( E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i. e. the angle ɛ between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ɛ > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/ cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange ( e. g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ɛ induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ɛ ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable.

  16. A transversely isotropic biphasic model for unconfined compression of growth plate and chondroepiphysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B; Lai, W M; Mow, V C

    1998-08-01

    Using the biphasic theory for hydrated soft tissues (Mow et al., 1980) and a transversely isotropic elastic model for the solid matrix, an analytical solution is presented for the unconfined compression of cylindrical disks of growth plate tissues compressed between two rigid platens with a frictionless interface. The axisymmetric case where the plane of transverse isotropy is perpendicular to the cylindrical axis is studied, and the stress-relaxation response to imposed step and ramp displacements is solved. This solution is then used to analyze experimental data from unconfined compression stress-relaxation tests performed on specimens from bovine distal ulnar growth plate and chondroepiphysis to determine the biphasic material parameters. The transversely isotropic biphasic model provides an excellent agreement between theory and experimental results, better than was previously achieved with an isotropic model, and can explain the observed experimental behavior in unconfined compression of these tissues. PMID:10412420

  17. Wall region of a relaxing three-dimensional incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebbar, K. S.; Melnik, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    A three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer relaxing behind a transverse hump (shaped as a 30-deg swept 5-ft chord wing-type model) was studied in a low-speed wind tunnel. Data obtained with hot-wire probes showed that the apparent dimensionless velocity profiles in the viscous sublayer prevail universally; evidence for wall similarity in the relaxing flow field was confirmed in the form of a log law. An unusual region of slightly decreasing cross-flow angle was found in collateral regions, and a near-wall noncollateral flow was posited. Streamwise relaxation of the mean flow field was also investigated.

  18. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  19. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control. PMID:22097099

  20. Characterisation and application of ultra-high spin clusters as magnetic resonance relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Guthausen, Gisela; Machado, Julyana R; Luy, Burkhard; Baniodeh, Amer; Powell, Annie K; Krämer, Steffen; Ranzinger, Florian; Herrling, Maria P; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2015-03-21

    In Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) image contrast can be improved by adding paramagnetic relaxation agents such as lanthanide ions. Here we report on the use of highly paramagnetic isostructural Fe(III)/4f coordination clusters with a [Fe10Ln10] core to enhance relaxation. Measurements were performed over the range of (1)H Larmor frequencies of 10 MHz to 1.4 GHz in order to determine the relevant parameters for longitudinal and transverse relaxivities. Variation of the lanthanide ion allows differentiation of relaxation contributions from electronic states and molecular dynamics. We find that the transverse relaxivities increase with field, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities depend on the nature of the lanthanide. In addition, the Gd(III) analogue was selected in particular to test the interaction with tissue observed using MRT. Studies on biofilms used in waste water treatment reveal that the behaviour of the high-spin clusters is different from what is observed for common relaxation agents with respect to the penetration into the biofilms. The Fe10Gd10 cluster adheres to the surface of the biofilm better than the commercial agent Gadovist. PMID:25670214

  1. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: multiscale spin relaxation in molecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J S

    2013-09-01

    This paper studies the relaxation of the molecular spin angular velocity in the framework of generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that for uncharged diatomic molecules the relaxation time decreases with increasing molecular moment of inertia per unit mass. In the regime of large moment of inertia the fast relaxation is wave-vector independent and dominated by the coupling between spin and the fluid streaming velocity, whereas for small inertia the relaxation is slow and spin diffusion plays a significant role. The fast wave-vector-independent relaxation is also observed for highly packed systems. The transverse and longitudinal spin modes have, to a good approximation, identical relaxation, indicating that the longitudinal and transverse spin viscosities have same value. The relaxation is also shown to be isomorphic invariant. Finally, the effect of the coupling in the zero frequency and wave-vector limit is quantified by a characteristic length scale; if the system dimension is comparable to this length the coupling must be included into the fluid dynamical description. It is found that the length scale is independent of moment of inertia but dependent on the state point. PMID:24125208

  2. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  3. Compact, multipass, single transverse mode CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, J.G.; Hall, D.R.

    1987-08-17

    We report the design and basic operating characteristics of a co-axial radio-frequency discharge carbon dioxide laser which employs a multipass Herriott cell folding system within a linear resonator. A continuous wave laser power output of 65 W was obtained from a device 35 cm in length in a high-quality TEM/sub 00/ mode without gas flow. The characteristics of transverse rf discharges and the image rotation properties of such resonators indicate that this approach may be scalable to provide much higher laser powers with excellent transverse mode properties.

  4. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  5. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  6. Flutter analysis using transversality theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, D.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of calculating flutter boundaries of undamped aeronautical structures is presented. The method is an application of the weak transversality theorem used in catastrophe theory. In the first instance, the flutter problem is cast in matrix form using a frequency domain method, leading to an eigenvalue matrix. The characteristic polynomial resulting from this matrix usually has a smooth dependence on the system's parameters. As these parameters change with operating conditions, certain critical values are reached at which flutter sets in. Our approach is to use the transversality theorem in locating such flutter boundaries using this criterion: at a flutter boundary, the characteristic polynomial does not intersect the axis of the abscissa transversally. Formulas for computing the flutter boundaries and flutter frequencies of structures with two degrees of freedom are presented, and extension to multi-degree of freedom systems is indicated. The formulas have obvious applications in, for instance, problems of panel flutter at supersonic Mach numbers.

  7. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  8. Time-based fractional longitudinal-transverse strain model for viscoelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Deshun; Duan, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Xuanji; Li, Yanqing

    2014-02-01

    Using a simple model to represent the complex relationship between longitudinal and transverse deformation is of much importance for a correct modelization of mechanical behaviors in viscoelastic solids. In this paper, a time-based fractional longitudinal-transverse strain model is presented based on the analogy with fractional stress-strain equation. Experimental results of a series of uniaxial compression and tension tests under strain-relaxation and constant longitudinal strain rate are employed to validate the proposed model. It is shown that the fractional longitudinal-transverse strain model can accurately describe the experimental response, and the fractional order may be positive or negative, which is helpful to characterize the complicated longitudinal-transverse deformation relationship.

  9. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  10. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  11. Rotating frame relaxation during adiabatic pulses vs. conventional spin lock: simulations and experimental results at 4 T.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2009-10-01

    Spin relaxation taking place during radiofrequency (RF) irradiation can be assessed by measuring the longitudinal and transverse rotating frame relaxation rate constants (R(1rho) and R(2rho)). These relaxation parameters can be altered by utilizing different settings of the RF irradiation, thus providing a useful tool to generate contrast in MRI. In this work, we investigate the dependencies of R(1rho) and R(2rho) due to dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange (i.e., exchange between spins with different chemical shift deltaomega not equal0) on the properties of conventional spin-lock and adiabatic pulses, with particular emphasis on the latter ones which were not fully described previously. The results of simulations based on relaxation theory provide a foundation for formulating practical considerations for in vivo applications of rotating frame relaxation methods. Rotating frame relaxation measurements obtained from phantoms and from the human brain at 4 T are presented to confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:19559559

  12. Rotating frame relaxation during adiabatic pulses versus conventional spin-lock: simulations and experimental results at 4T

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2009-01-01

    Spin relaxation taking place during radiofrequency (RF) irradiation can be assessed by measuring the longitudinal and transverse rotating frame relaxation rate constants (R1ρ and R2ρ). These relaxation parameters can be altered by utilizing different settings of the RF irradiation, thus providing a useful tool to generate contrast in MRI. In this work we investigate the dependencies of R1ρ and R2ρ due to dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange (i.e., exchange between spins with different chemical shift δω≠0) on the properties of conventional spin-lock and adiabatic pulses, with particular emphasis on the latter ones which were not fully described previously. The results of simulations based on relaxation theory provide a foundation for formulating practical considerations for in vivo applications of rotating frame relaxation methods. Rotating frame relaxation measurements obtained from phantoms and from the human brain at 4T are presented to confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:19559559

  13. Stress Relaxation of Magnetorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. H.; Chen, G.; Yeo, S. H.; Du, H.

    In this paper, the experimental and modeling study and analysis of the stress relaxation characteristics of magnetorheological (MR) fluids under step shear are presented. The experiments are carried out using a rheometer with parallel-plate geometry. The applied strain varies from 0.01% to 100%, covering both the pre-yield and post-yield regimes. The effects of step strain, field strength, and temperature on the stress modulus are addressed. For small step strain ranges, the stress relaxation modulus G(t,γ) is independent of step strain, where MR fluids behave as linear viscoelastic solids. For large step strain ranges, the stress relaxation modulus decreases gradually with increasing step strain. Morever, the stress relaxation modulus G(t,γ) was found to obey time-strain factorability. That is, G(t,γ) can be represented as the product of a linear stress relaxation G(t) and a strain-dependent damping function h(γ). The linear stress relaxation modulus is represented as a three-parameter solid viscoelastic model, and the damping function h(γ) has a sigmoidal form with two parameters. The comparison between the experimental results and the model-predicted values indicates that this model can accurately describe the relaxation behavior of MR fluids under step strains.

  14. Magnetic phases and relaxation effects in fullerite C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigvinadze, J. G.; Buntar, V.; Ashimov, S. M.; Dolbin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive torsional vibration technique is used to study the magnetic properties of fullerite C60 (99.98%) at temperatures of 77-300 K in dynamic and static experiments. Vibrational energy absorption peaks associated with phase transitions and realignment of the magnetic structure of the fullerite are detected at T = 152, 195, 230, and 260 K. Relaxation magnetic processes in fullerite C60 at room temperature are studied. "Spontaneous" rotation of a motionless sample of fullerite freely suspended on an elastic filament is observed when external longitudinal or transverse magnetic fields are switched on. The direction of the "spontaneous" rotation changes with time. It is proposed that these phenomena are related to relaxation processes in the rotational subsystem of C60 molecular rotators, as well as to magnetic flux trapped in the fullerite and weakly damped eddy currents induced in the sample by the applied field.

  15. Magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in thick ferromagnetic films in contact with normal metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Azevedo, A.

    2013-07-01

    Spin pumping is the most important magnetic relaxation channel in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers in contact with normal metals (NMs). Recent experiments indicate that in thick films of insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) there is a large broadening of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) lines with deposition of a thin Pt layer which cannot be explained by the known damping processes. Here we present a detailed study of the magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in bilayers made of a ferromagnetic material (FM) and a NM. Two alternative approaches are used to calculate the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates used in the Bloch-Bloembergen formulation of damping. In one we consider that the dynamic exchange coupling at the interface transfers magnetic relaxation from the heavily damped conduction electron spins in the NM layer to the magnetization of the FM layer while the other utilizes spin currents and the concept of the spin-mixing conductance at the interface. While in thin FM films, the relaxation rates vary with the inverse of the FM layer thickness; in thick films, they become independent of the thickness because in the FM/NM structure the FMR excitation has a surface mode character. Regardless of the thickness range the longitudinal relaxation rate is twice the transverse rate resulting in damping of the magnetization with constant amplitude characterizing a Gilbert process. The enhanced spin-pumping damping explains the experimental observations in YIG/Pt bilayers.

  16. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  17. Quench dynamics and relaxation in isolated integrable quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Fabian H. L.; Fagotti, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    We review the dynamics after quantum quenches in integrable quantum spin chains. We give a pedagogical introduction to relaxation in isolated quantum systems, and discuss the description of the steady state by (generalized) Gibbs ensembles. We then turn to general features in the time evolution of local observables after the quench, using a simple model of free fermions as an example. In the second part we present an overview of recent progress in describing quench dynamics in two key paradigms for quantum integrable models, the transverse field Ising chain and the anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain.

  18. Nuclear relaxation and critical fluctuations in membranes containing cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Harden

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear resonance frequencies in bilayer membranes depend on lipid composition. Our calculations describe the combined effects of composition fluctuations and diffusion on nuclear relaxation near a miscibility critical point. Both tracer and gradient diffusion are included. The calculations involve correlation functions and a correlation length ξ =ξ0T/(T -Tc), where T -Tc is temperature above the critical temperature and ξ0 is a parameter of molecular length. Several correlation functions are examined, each of which is related in some degree to the Ising model correlation function. These correlation functions are used in the calculation of transverse deuterium relaxation rates in magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculations are compared with experiments that report maxima in deuterium and proton nuclear relaxation rates at the critical temperature [Veatch et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 17650 (2007)]. One Ising-model-related correlation function yields a maximum 1/T2 relaxation rate at the critical temperature for both magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculated rates at the critical temperature are close to the experimental rates. The rate maxima involve relatively rapid tracer diffusion in a static composition gradient over distances of up to 10-100 nm.

  19. NMR relaxation studies of the interaction of thiocyanate with lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Crull, G B; Goff, H M

    1993-05-15

    The interaction of lactoperoxidase, LPO, with its substrate, thiocyanate, SCN-, has been investigated by 13C and 15N NMR relaxation measurements. When 0.1 M SCN-, enriched with either 13C or 15N, was titrated with native ferric lactoperoxidase a large change in the spin-lattice relaxation time of the respective nucleus was observed. In the presence of saturating amounts of CN-, a high affinity ligand for the heme iron, a similar but much smaller change in the relaxation time for SCN- was found. Studies of the rate of carbon relaxation as a function of temperature have shown that thiocyanate is in fast exchange between a site on the enzyme and bulk solution. When LPO in either the absence or presence of CN- was titrated with SCN- a linear increase in the relaxation time was observed. Dissociation constants (Kd values) have been determined from a least-squares analysis of these data. Apparent distances between the heme iron of lactoperoxidase and either the carbon or nitrogen atoms of bound thiocyanate ion have been determined through application of the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. These distances demonstrate that the observed association does not involve iron-thiocyanate coordination, suggesting the possibility of an anion binding site. PMID:8501464

  20. Simulation of DNA Supercoil Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ivenso, Ikenna D; Lillian, Todd D

    2016-05-24

    Several recent single-molecule experiments observe the response of supercoiled DNA to nicking endonucleases and topoisomerases. Typically in these experiments, indirect measurements of supercoil relaxation are obtained by observing the motion of a large micron-sized bead. The bead, which also serves to manipulate DNA, experiences significant drag and thereby obscures supercoil dynamics. Here we employ our discrete wormlike chain model to bypass experimental limitations and simulate the dynamic response of supercoiled DNA to a single strand nick. From our simulations, we make three major observations. First, extension is a poor dynamic measure of supercoil relaxation; in fact, the linking number relaxes so fast that it cannot have much impact on extension. Second, the rate of linking number relaxation depends upon its initial partitioning into twist and writhe as determined by tension. Third, the extensional response strongly depends upon the initial position of plectonemes. PMID:27224483

  1. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  2. Transverse spin effects at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaro, G.

    2009-03-23

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the nucleon spin structure and on hadron spectroscopy, using both muon and hadron beams. One of the main objectives for the spin program with the muon beam is the measurement of transverse spin effects in semi inclusive deep inelastic scattering. A longitudinally polarized 160 GeV/c muon beam is impinging on a transversely polarized target: from 2002 to 2004 a {sup 6}LiD(deuteron) target has been used, while during 2007 data taking a NH{sub 3}(proton) target was put in place. All measured transverse asymmetries on deuteron have been found to be small, and compatible with zero, within the few percent statistical errors. These results, which are currently used as input for global fits, can be interpreted as cancellation between u and d quark contribution in the deuteron. The first results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons from the 2007 proton COMPASS data are also presented and discussed.

  3. From Strong to Fragile Glass Formers: Secondary Relaxation in Polyalcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied details of the molecular origin of slow secondary relaxation near Tg in a series of neat polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H NMR. From glycerol to threitol, xylitol, and sorbitol the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing-type scenario to a pronounced β peak. It is found that in sorbitol the dynamics of the whole molecule contributes equally to the β process, while in glycerol the hydrogen bond forming OH groups remain rather rigid compared to the hydrogens bonded to the carbon skeleton.

  4. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  5. QCD Evolution of Helicity and Transversity TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  6. Transversity distribution functions in the valon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh Yazdi, Z.; Taghavi-Shahri, F.; Arash, F.; Zomorrodian, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    We use the valon model to calculate the transversity distribution functions inside the nucleon. Transversity distributions indicate the probability to find partons with spin aligned (antialigned) to the transversely polarized nucleon. The results are in good agreement with all available experimental data and also global fits.

  7. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The

  8. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  9. Transverse Force on Quarks in DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The $x^2$-moment of the twist-3 polarized parton distribution $g_2(x)$ is related to the transverse force acting on the active quark in deep-inelastic scattering off a transversely polarized nucleon immediately after it has absorbed the virtual photon. Lattice calculations of the corresponding matrix element as well as experimental measurements of $g_2(x)$ are used to estimate sign and magnitude of this force. Similarly, the $x^2$-moment of the chirally odd twist-3 unpolarized parton distribution $e(x)$ can be related to the transverse force experienced by a transversely polarized quark ejected from a transversely polarized nucleon.

  10. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  11. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  12. Proton and carbon NMR measurements of the effects of hydration on the wheat protein ω-gliadin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, P. S.; Gil, A. M.; Grant, A.; Alberti, E.; Tatham, A. S.

    1998-07-01

    The wheat protein ω-gliadin consists of a simple repeat sequence composed mainly of proline and glutamine. It thus represents a simple model for many cereal proteins and other proline and glutamine rich sequences which occur in multiple repeats. The behaviour on hydration has been examined by the measurement of proton NMR relaxation times. Sidechain motions (methyl and amino group rotation, proline ring puckering) were largely responsible for T1 relaxation. It was found that the glass transition does not affect T1 and T1 ρ relaxation and only affects transverse relaxation. Magic angle spinning experiments have been used to observe line narrowed proton spectra as well as carbon cross polarisation spectra. In the proton spectra, at high levels of hydration, backbone and sidechain NH groups are observed indicating that whole segments of the protein chain are in the mobile regime. The carbon spectra are characterised by a loss of the proline C δ signal intensity at high levels of hydration indicating the involvement of proline in the hydration process. It is concluded that the behaviour of ω-gliadin on hydration may be explained by the formation of mobile protein loops together with residual regions of strong interprotein interaction.

  13. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  14. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  15. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  16. Transverse SSA in inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitonyak, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA) in inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS), which requires a two-photon exchange to generate a non-zero effect. We present numerical results for the SSA that allow us to comment on the so-called "sign mismatch" issue invloving the Efremov-Teryaev-Qiu-Sterman (ETQS) function TF(x,x). In particular, we discuss how our results indicate a collinear twist-3 Sivers-type effect may not be the main cause of the SSAs seen in proton-proton (pp) collisions.

  17. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  18. Transverse Echo Measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Wolfram

    2006-03-20

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular we examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  19. A three-dimensional constitutive model for the stress relaxation of articular ligaments.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frances M; De Vita, Raffaella

    2014-06-01

    A new nonlinear constitutive model for the three-dimensional stress relaxation of articular ligaments is proposed. The model accounts for finite strains, anisotropy, and strain-dependent stress relaxation behavior exhibited by these ligaments. The model parameters are identified using published uniaxial stress-stretch and stress relaxation data on human medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) subjected to tensile tests in the fiber and transverse to the fiber directions (Quapp and Weiss in J Biomech Eng Trans ASME 120:757-763, 1998; Bonifasi-Lista et al. in J Orthop Res 23(1):67-76, 2005). The constitutive equation is then used to predict the nonlinear elastic and stress relaxation response of ligaments subjected to shear deformations in the fiber direction and transverse to the fiber direction, and an equibiaxial extension. A direct comparison with stress relaxation data collected by subjecting human MCLs to shear deformation in the fiber direction is presented in order to demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the model. PMID:23990018

  20. Shoreline relaxation at pocket beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Imen; Medina, Raul; Kakeh, Nabil; González, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    A new physical concept of relaxation time is introduced in this research as the time required for the beach to dissipate its initial perturbation. This concept is investigated using a simple beach-evolution model of shoreline rotation at pocket beaches, based on the assumption that the instantaneous change of the shoreline plan-view shape depends on the long-term equilibrium plan-view shape. The expression of relaxation time is developed function of the energy conditions and the physical characteristics of the beach; it increases at longer beaches having coarse sediments and experiencing low-energy conditions. The relaxation time, calculated by the developed model, is validated by the shoreline observations extracted from video images at two artificially embayed beaches of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean) suffering from perturbations of sand movement and a nourishment project. This finding is promising to estimate the shoreline response and useful to improve our understanding of the dynamic of pocket beaches and their stability.

  1. Multigrid Methods for Mesh Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J

    2006-06-12

    When generating a mesh for the initial conditions for a computer simulation, you want the mesh to be as smooth as possible. A common practice is to use equipotential mesh relaxation to smooth out a distorted computational mesh. Typically a Laplace-like equation is set up for the mesh coordinates and then one or more Jacobi iterations are performed to relax the mesh. As the zone count gets really large, the Jacobi iteration becomes less and less effective and we are stuck with our original unrelaxed mesh. This type of iteration can only damp high frequency errors and the smooth errors remain. When the zone count is large, almost everything looks smooth so relaxation cannot solve the problem. In this paper we examine a multigrid technique which effectively smooths out the mesh, independent of the number of zones.

  2. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  3. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. PMID:26686485

  4. Global relaxation of superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, T.; Niskanen, A. O.; Nakamura, Y.; Abdumalikov, A. A. Jr.

    2007-09-01

    We consider coupled quantum two-state systems (qubits) exposed to a global relaxation process. The global relaxation refers to the assumption that qubits are coupled to the same quantum bath with approximately equal strengths, appropriate for long-wavelength environmental fluctuations. We show that interactions do not spoil the picture of Dicke's subradiant and super-radiant states where quantum interference effects lead to striking deviations from the independent relaxation picture. Remarkably, the system possess a stable entangled state and a state decaying faster than single qubit excitations. We propose a scheme for how these effects can be experimentally accessed in superconducting flux qubits and, possibly, used in constructing long-lived entangled states.

  5. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  6. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325829

  7. The influence of the counterion on the relaxation of polyacrylate deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rijn, C. J. M.; Maat, A. J.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    Relaxation rates of 2H methylene polyacrylate solutions have been determined for five different types of monovalent counter-ions: tetramethylammonium (TMA) and four alkali ions, Li, Na, K and Cs. TMA influences the polymer 2H relaxation rates in a way that differs qualitatively from the effect of the alkali counterions. In the presence of TMA the transverse rates of the polymer nuclei are increased relative to their values in the presence of alkali ions. For the longitudinal rates another effect is observed, the rates are larger for Li and Na and essentially the same for K, Cs and TMA.

  8. A 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein.

  9. Relaxation of heavy ions in collisionless shock waves in cosmic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotina, Yu. A.; Bykov, A. M.; Krasil'shchikov, A. M.; Levenfish, K. P.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results of hybrid particle-in-cell simulation of shock waves (SWs) in the cosmic plasma with admixture of heavy weakly charged ions. The dependence of ion relaxation and the SW structure on the angle between the magnetic field and the normal to the wavefront is analyzed. The conditions for invariability of the anisotropic ion velocity distribution behind the front of quasi-transverse SWs are indicated on scales substantially exceeding the width of the collisionless SW front (up to the Coulomb relaxation length). The obtained results are essential for determining the effectiveness of heating of heavy ions and observation diagnostic of collisionless SWs in the cosmic plasma.

  10. Relaxation dynamics of branched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnav

    The Rouse model for star polymers was successfully derived by solving the differential equations governing the net force acting on each bead in a star polymer chain. As opposed to a linear polymer, where we have N unique roots for N beads, in the case of star polymers, there are only 2 Na+1 unique roots and all odd unique roots (except the last root corresponding to the branch point) starting with the first root have a multiplicity of f-1. The relaxation time of the pth unique Rouse mode of a star polymer varies as (2Na + 1)2/p2. Since alternate Rouse modes in a star polymer have a multiplicity of f-1, they add to the terminal modulus of the star polymers and the terminal modulus, G(tau) ends up being proportional to f-1 (besides being inversely proportional to N, which is also the case with linear polymers). A self-consistent theory for the relaxation of entangled star polymers was developed based on the work done by Colby and Rubinstein on linear blends. This theory considers the duality of relaxation dynamics (direct stress relaxation and indirect relaxation by release of constraints) and models the relaxation due to constraint release R(t) based on Dean's approach in solving the vibration frequencies of glassy chains with random spring constants. In our case, the mobilities of beads were considered to be random and based on the relative weight of the prefactor of a Maxwell function, a group of which was fitted to the stress relaxation function mu(t) of a star polymer (proposed and derived by Doi). The tube dilation model for star and comb polymers was investigated in detail and predictions compared to rheological data from polypropylene, polybutadiene and polystyrene comb polymers along with PEP star polymers. The relaxation time from the Tube Dilation Model was compared with the classical Tube Model and was shown to have an extra power dependence on the fraction of the comb backbone.

  11. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, David N.; Hernquist, Lars

    1992-01-01

    We propose a functional that is extremized through violent relaxation. It is based on the Ansatz that the wave-particle scattering during violent dynamical processes can be approximated as a sequence of discrete scattering events that occur near a particle's perigalacticon. This functional has an extremum whose structure closely resembles that of spheroidal stellar systems such as elliptical galaxies. The results described here, therefore, provide a simple framework for understanding the physical nature of violent relaxation and support the view that galaxies are structured in accord with fundamental statistical principles.

  12. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,ω) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  13. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  14. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  15. CPMG relaxation rate dispersion in dipole fields around capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kurz, F T; Kampf, T; Buschle, L R; Heiland, S; Schlemmer, H-P; Bendszus, M; Ziener, C H

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rates for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences increase with inter-echo time in presence of microscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities due to nuclear spin diffusion. For a weak field approximation that includes diffusion effects, the CPMG relaxation rate shift for proton diffusion around capillaries in muscle tissue can be expressed in terms of a frequency correlation function and the inter-echo time. The present work provides an analytical expression for the local relaxation rate shift that is dependent on local blood volume fraction, diffusion coefficient, capillary radius, susceptibility difference and inter-echo time. Asymptotic regions of the model are in agreement with previous modeling results of Brooks et al., Luz et al. and Ziener et al. In comparison with simulation data, the model shows an equal or better accuracy than established approximations. Also, model behavior coincides with experimental data for rat heart and skeletal muscle. The present work provides analytical tools to extract sub-voxel information about uniform capillary networks that can be used to study capillary organization or micro-circulatory remodeling. PMID:27071310

  16. Density matrix solutions for the susceptibilities of a three-level system with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    The susceptibilities for a three-level system with arbitrary pump and signal field strengths are derived for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. The results are of interest in connection with the calculation of the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role.

  17. NMR Relaxation and Petrophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Marc

    2011-03-01

    NMR relaxation is routinely used in the field of geosciences to give basic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution, saturation etc. In this tutorial, we focus on the pore size distribution deduced from NMR. We recall the basic principle used in the interpretation of the NMR signal and compare the results with other standard petrophysical techniques such as mercury pore size distribution, BET specific surface measurements, thin section visualizations. The NMR pore size distribution is a unique information available on water saturated porous media and can give similar results as MICP in certain situations. The scaling of NMR relaxation time distribution (s) into pore sizes (μm) requires the knowledge of the surface relaxivity (μm/s) and we recommend using specific surface measurements as an independent determination of solid surface areas. With usual surface relaxivities, the NMR technique can explore length-scales starting from nano-meters and ending around 100 μm. Finally, we will introduce briefly recent techniques sensitive to the pore to pore diffusional exchange, providing new information on the connectivity of the pore network, but showing another possibility of discrepancy in the determination of pore size distribution with standard techniques.

  18. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  19. Ellipsoidal relaxation of electrodeformed vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Lira, Rafael; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin

    2015-11-01

    Electrodeformation has been extensively applied to investigate the mechanical behavior of vesicles and cells. While the deformation process often exhibits complex behavior and reveals interesting physics, the relaxation process post-pulsation is equally intriguing yet less frequently studied. In this work theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented, which reveal the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula, which is derived only for equilibrated shapes, is shown to be applicable to dynamic situations such as in relaxation. A closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a timescale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the ``entropic'' and the ``constant-tension'' regime. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data/model analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  20. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  1. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  2. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  3. Choosing a skeletal muscle relaxant.

    PubMed

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal muscle relaxants are widely used in treating musculoskeletal conditions. However, evidence of their effectiveness consists mainly of studies with poor methodologic design. In addition, these drugs have not been proven to be superior to acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated. Comparison studies have not shown one skeletal muscle relaxant to be superior to another. Cyclobenzaprine is the most heavily studied and has been shown to be effective for various musculoskeletal conditions. The sedative properties of tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine may benefit patients with insomnia caused by severe muscle spasms. Methocarbamol and metaxalone are less sedating, although effectiveness evidence is limited. Adverse effects, particularly dizziness and drowsiness, are consistently reported with all skeletal muscle relaxants. The potential adverse effects should be communicated clearly to the patient. Because of limited comparable effectiveness data, choice of agent should be based on side-effect profile, patient preference, abuse potential, and possible drug interactions. PMID:18711953

  4. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  5. Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Interactions of a Novel Triazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jesse J; Schneider, Yanika; Kail, Brian W; Luebke, David R; Nulwala, Hunaid; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-11

    Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

  6. Transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Equations are derived for the transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells. Without making assumptions for thickness distribution for either transverse shear stresses or strains, constitutive equations for the transverse shear deformation theory of anisotropic heterogeneous shells are found. The equations are based on Taylor series expansions about a generic point for stress resultants and couples, identically satisfying plate equilibrium equations. These equations are used to find statically correct expressions for in-surface stresses, transverse shear stresses, and the area density of transverse shear strain energy, in terms of transverse shear stress resultants and redundants. The application of Castigliano's theorem of least work minimizes shear strain energy with respect to the redundants. Examples are presented for several laminated walls. Good agreement is found between the results and those of exact three-dimensional elasticity solutions for the cylindrical bending of a plate.

  7. Paleogene depositional framework of western Transverse ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, W.R.

    1988-03-01

    In the western Transverse Ranges, widespread Paleogene sequences (mid-Paleocene to mid-Oligocene) accumulated to thicknesses locally in excess of 5000 m. The Paleogene basin occupied a complex forearc setting located near the offshore Franciscan trench, but distant from the inland Laramide orogenic system, where magmatism was quiescent during the interval of most rapid sedimentation. The pre-Tertiary substratum, largely masked by its Paleogene cover, was probably disrupted by transpressional and/or transtensional tectonics associated with separate episodes of mid-Cretaceous sinistral and Late Cretaceous (to Paleocene.) dextral dislocation of the continental margin. Paleogene strata include diachronous facies of intertonguing deep-marine, shallow-marine, marginal-marine, and nonmarine clastic strata representing varied depositional systems. Turbidite assemblages include both progradational and retrogradational phases of canyon-fed submarine fans and delta-fed submarine ramps. Exposed shelf-break successions were deposited offshore from strandline complexes fringing delta margins and broad coastal plains. Sparse but diagnostic nonclastic facies include local algal carbonate edifices built on isolated submarine banks, and minor lagoonal beds of algal carbonates and gypsiferous evaporites associated with emergent delta platforms. The complex Paleogene forearc basin was flanked on the northeast by Salinian basement rocks and on the southwest by a tectonic ridge of subduction complex uplifted along the Paleogene trench-slope break. The present geographic distribution of Paleogene facies tracts is fully compatible with proposed Neogene tectonic rotations of panel-like basin segments, bounded by antithetic sinistral faults within the dextral San Andreas system, as detected by recent paleomagetic investigations.

  8. Dielectric relaxations in aliphatic polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sudeepto

    2001-07-01

    The dielectric technique was used to study the relaxation processes of five linear aliphatic polyesters. The polyesters studied were poly (ethylene succinate/adipate) or PESA, poly (trimethylene succinate/adipate) or PTSA, poly (butylene succinate/adipate) or PBSA, poly (ethylene succinate) or PES, and poly (ethylene adipate) or PEA. Three of the polyesters were copolymers (PESA, PTSA, and PBSA), and the remaining two (PES and PEA) were homopolymers. Two of the five were amorphous (PESA and PTSA), and the remaining three (PBSA, PES, and PEA) were semicrystalline. All the five polyesters were synthesized in the laboratory using a poly-condensation reaction between a series of aliphatic diols and diesters. The succinic and adipic groups in the copolymers are in equimolar amounts. The polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and density measurements. Elemental analysis done on the polymers confirmed that their compositions matched theoretical estimates. The relaxation processes were studied dielectrically using an IMASS time domain dielectric spectrometer (TDS) and an HP 4284A LCR meter. Together they allowed a frequency range from 0.001 Hz to 1 MHz. Typically in the subglass region, good data were obtained between 0.01 Hz and 100 kHz. In the glass transition region, good data were occasionally available over the entire range. Two relaxation processes were detected in the subglass temperature region for all the polymers, and in the case of the copolymers PTSA and PBSA, they were also well resolved. Both the processes showed Arrhenius behavior with modest activation energies characteristic of subglass processes in general. They also progressively merged with increasing temperature, which implies a lower activation energy for the faster process which is consistent with the current understanding of relaxation phenomena. The glass transition region of all the polymers also showed a merging of the dominant alpha relaxation with the subglass

  9. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  10. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  11. Transverse-longitudinal integrated resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Donald P; Simpson, Marcus L; Simpson, John T

    2003-03-11

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  12. Gluonic transversity from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, W.; Shanahan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study of the gluonic structure of the ϕ meson using lattice QCD (LQCD). This includes the first investigation of gluonic transversity via the leading moment of the twist-2 double-helicity-flip gluonic structure function Δ (x ,Q2). This structure function only exists for targets of spin J ≥1 and does not mix with quark distributions at leading twist, thereby providing a particularly clean probe of gluonic degrees of freedom. We also explore the gluonic analogue of the Soffer bound which relates the helicity flip and nonflip gluonic distributions, finding it to be saturated at the level of 80%. This work sets the stage for more complex LQCD studies of gluonic structure in the nucleon and in light nuclei where Δ (x ,Q2) is an "exotic glue" observable probing gluons in a nucleus not associated with individual nucleons.

  13. Transverse Reinforcement in Reinforced Concrete Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramblička, Štefan; Veróny, Peter

    2013-11-01

    In the article we are dealing with the influence of transverse reinforcement to the resistance of a cross-section of the reinforced concrete columns and also with the effective detailing of the column reinforcement. We are verifying the correctness of design guides for detailing of transverse reinforcement. We are also taking into account the diameter of stirrups and its influence over transverse deformation of column.

  14. TRANSVERSE POLARIZATION DISTRIBUTION AND FRAGMENTATION FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2000-04-11

    The authors discuss transverse polarization distribution and fragmentation functions, in particular, T-odd functions with transverse momentum dependence, which might be relevant for the description of single transverse spin asymmetries. The role of intrinsic transverse momentum in the expansion in inverse powers of the hard scale is elaborated upon. The sin {phi} single spin asymmetry in the process e {rvec p} {r_arrow} e{prime} {pi}{sup +} X as recently reported by the HERMES Collaboration is investigated, in particular, by using the bag model.

  15. Theory of Transverse Spin and Transverse Structure of the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yuji

    2009-10-01

    Large single transverse spin asymmetries (SSA) observed in various collision processes opened a new window to disentangle QCD dynamics and quark-gluon substructure of the nucleon. Since SSA is a ``naively T-odd'' observable, it can only occur as an interference between the scattering amplitudes which have different complex phases in a time-reversal invariant theory like QCD. A conventional framework for hard inclusive processes, i.e. perturbative QCD in the twist-2 level, can only give rise to a negligible asymmetry and thus can not explain the observed data. Understanding the origin of the large SSAs requires the extention of the framework of the QCD hard processes, and by now QCD mechanisms leading to large SSAs have been clarified in greater detail. These mechanisms based on different perspectives introduce new concepts describing the nucleon structure not present in the conventional parton model, such as ``parton's intrinsic transverse momentum'' and ``multi-parton correlations.'' Precise and unambiguous definition of these ideas requires much more careful theoretical analyses than the twist-2 case, in particular, in connection with the universality of the parton distribution/fragmentation functions, gauge invariance and factorization properties of the cross sections. In the literature, QCD mechanisms for SSAs are often classified into two categories. One is based on the (naively) ``T-odd'' distribution and fragmentation functions in the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorization approach. Sivers and Collins functions are typical examples for this one. The other one is based on the twist-3 quark-gluon (more generally, multi-parton such as triple-gluon) correlation functions in the collinear factorization approaches. The former mechanism can describe SSAs in the small-pT region (pTQ) as a leading-twist effect, while the latter one describes SSAs in the large pT region as a twist-3 effect. Both approaches have been applied to study SSAs in various

  16. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  17. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  18. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  19. Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes containing traces of iron as new negative MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Doan, Bich-Thuy; Seguin, Johanne; Breton, Marie; Le Beherec, Ronan; Bessodes, Michel; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Banhart, Florian; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing traces of iron oxide were functionalized by noncovalent lipid-PEG or covalent carboxylic acid function to supply new efficient MRI contrast agents for in vitro and in vivo applications. Longitudinal (r(1)) and transversal (r(2)) water proton relaxivities were measured at 300 MHz, showing a stronger T(2) feature as an MRI contrast agent (r(2)/r(1)  = 190 for CO(2) H functionalisation). The r(2) relaxivity was demonstrated to be correlated to the presence of iron oxide in the SWNT-carboxylic function COOH, in comparison to iron-free ones. Biodistribution studies on mice after a systemic injection showed a negative MRI contrast in liver, suggesting the presence of the nanotubes in this organ until 48 h after i.v. injection. The presence of carbon nanotubes in liver was confirmed after ex vivo carbon extraction. Finally, cytotoxicity studies showed no apparent effect owing to the presence of the carbon nanotubes. The functionalized carbon nanotubes were well tolerated by the animals at the dose of 10 µg g(-1) body weight. PMID:22434627

  20. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  1. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  2. Viscoelastic Relaxation of Lunar Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohit, P. S.; Phillips, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    The large lunar impact basins provide a unique glimpse into early lunar history. Here we investigate the possibility that the relief of the oldest lunar basins (with the exception of South-Pole Aitken) has decayed through viscous relaxation. We identify nine ancient multi-ring basins with very low relief and low-amplitude Bouguer and free-air gravity anomalies. The characteristics of these basins are consistent with either 1) relaxation of topographic relief by ductile flow (e.g. Solomon et al., 1982) or 2) obliteration of basin topography during crater collapse immediately following impact. Both scenarios require that the basins formed early in lunar history, when the Moon was hot. The latter possibility appears to be unlikely due to the great topographic relief of South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA), the largest and oldest impact basin on the Moon (with the possible exception of the putative Procellarum basin; Wilhelms, 1987). On the other hand, the thin crust beneath SPA may not have allowed ductile flow in its lower portions, even for a hot Moon, implying that a thicker crust is required beneath other ancient basins for the hypothesis of viscous relaxation to be tenable. Using a semi-analytic, self-gravitating viscoelastic model, we investigate the conditions necessary to produce viscous relaxation of lunar basins. We model topographic relaxation for a crustal thickness of 30 km, using a dry diabase flow law for the crust and dry olivine for the mantle. We find that the minimum temperature at the base of the crust (Tb) permitting nearly complete relaxation of topography by ductile flow on a timescale < 108 yrs is 1400 K, corresponding to a heat flow of 55mW/m2, into the crust. Ductile flow in the lower crust becomes increasingly difficult as the crustal thickness decreases. The crust beneath SPA, thinned by the impact, is only 15-20 km thick and would require Tb ≥ 1550 K for relaxation to occur. The fact that SPA has maintained high-amplitude relief suggests that

  3. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon). PMID:22181304

  4. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  5. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  6. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  7. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ , provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ -weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26811973

  8. Gadolinium(III)-loaded nanoparticulate zeolites as potential high-field MRI contrast agents: relationship between structure and relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Csajbók, Eva; Bányai, István; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Zhou, Wuzong; Peters, Joop A

    2005-08-01

    The effects of dealumination, pore size, and calcination on the efficiency (as expressed in the relaxivity) of Gd3+-loaded zeolites for potential application as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were studied. Partial dealumination of zeolites NaY or NaA by treatment with (NH4)2SiF6 or diluted HCl resulted in materials that, upon loading with Gd3+, had a much higher relaxivity than the corresponding non-dealuminated materials. Analysis of the 1H NMR dispersion profiles of the various zeolites showed that this can be mainly ascribed to an increase of the amount of water inside the zeolite cavities as a result of the destruction of walls between cavities. However, the average residence time of water inside the Gd3+-loaded cavities did not change significantly, which suggests that the windows of the Gd3+-loaded cavities are not affected by the dealumination. Upon calcination, the Gd3+ ions moved to the small sodalite cavities and became less accessible for water, resulting in a decrease in relaxivity. The important role of diffusion for the relaxivity was demonstrated by a comparison of the relaxivity of Gd3+-loaded zeolite NaY and NaA samples. NaA had much lower relaxivities due to the smaller pore sizes. The transversal relaxivities of the Gd3+-doped zeolites are comparable in magnitude to the longitudinal ones at low magnetic fields (<60 MHz). However at higher fields, the transversal relaxivities steeply increased, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities decreased as field strength increased. Therefore, these materials have potential as T1 MRI contrast agents at low field, and as T2 agents at higher fields. PMID:15929138

  9. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  10. Dynamic Relaxation of Financial Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Zheng, B.; Lin, H.; Qiu, T.

    The dynamic relaxation of the German DAX both before and after a large price-change is investigated. The dynamic behavior is characterized by a power law. At the minutely time scale, the exponent p governing the power-law behavior takes a same value before and after the large price change, while at the daily time scale, it is different. Numerical simulations of an interacting EZ herding model are performed for comparison.