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Sample records for carbonation-related microstructural changesin

  1. Seasonal changes of water carbon relations in savanna ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsch, W. L.; Merbold, L.; Archibald, S.

    2011-12-01

    During evolution plant species have developed different strategies to optimize the water carbon relations. These stratgies summarize to ecosystem properties. As an example we show how tropical and subtropical savannas and woodlands can respond flexibly to changes in temperature and water availability and thus optimize carbon and water fluxes between land surface and atmosphere. Several phenomena are presented and discussed in this overview from African flux sites in Zambia, Burkina Faso and South Africa: Pre-rain leaf development: Many trees developed new leaves before the first rain appeared. As a consequence of this early timing of leaf flush, the phenological increase of photosynthetic capacity (Amax) was steeper than in temperate forests. Mid-term response of conductance and photosynthesis to soil water relations: The regulation of canopy conductance was temporally changing in two ways: changes due to phenology during the course of the growing season and short-term (hours to days) acclimation to soil water conditions. The most constant parameter was water use efficiency. It was influenced by water vapour pressure deficit (VPD) during the day, but the VPD response curve of water usage only changed slightly during the course of the growing season, and decreased by about 30% during the transition from wet to dry season. The regulation of canopy conductance and photosynthetic capacity were closely related. This observation meets recent leaf-level findings that stomatal closure triggers down-regulation of Rubisco during drought. Our results may show the effects of these processes on the ecosystem scale. Furthermore, we observed that the close relationship between stomatal conductance and photosynthesis resulted in different temperature optima of GPP that were close to the average daytime temperature. Adaptation of respiration to rain pulses: Finally, the response of respiration to rain pulses showed changes throughout the growing season. The first rain events early

  2. 40 CFR 600.114-12 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations. Paragraphs (a.... Paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section are used to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emission... emissions and carbon-related exhaust emissions. For each vehicle tested, determine the 5-cycle city...

  3. 40 CFR 600.114-12 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations. Paragraphs (a.... Paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section are used to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emission... emissions and carbon-related exhaust emissions. For each vehicle tested, determine the 5-cycle city...

  4. 40 CFR 600.114-12 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations. Paragraphs (a.... Paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section are used to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emission... emissions and carbon-related exhaust emissions. For each vehicle tested, determine the 5-cycle city...

  5. 40 CFR 600.114-08 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations. Paragraphs (a.... Paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section are used to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emissions..., determine the 5-cycle city carbon-related exhaust emissions using the following equation: (1) CityCREE =...

  6. 40 CFR 600.114-08 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations. Paragraphs (a.... Paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section are used to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emissions..., determine the 5-cycle city carbon-related exhaust emissions using the following equation: (1) CityCREE =...

  7. Diagnostics of optical anisotropy changesin biological tissues using Mueller matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ushenko, Yu A; Tomka, Yu Ya; Dubolazov, A V; Telen'ga, O Yu

    2011-03-31

    We study the efficiency of Mueller matrix diagnostics of birefringence in biological tissue layers with different optical thickness by measuring a set of third- and fourth-order statistical moments, characterising the coordinate distributions of the matrix element Z{sub 44} at different points of the histological section. (laser applications and other problems in quantum electronics)

  8. 40 CFR 600.114-08 - Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Model Year Automobiles-Test Procedures § 600.114-08 Vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy and carbon... to calculate 5-cycle carbon-related exhaust emissions values for the purpose of determining optional... each vehicle tested, determine the 5-cycle city carbon-related exhaust emissions using the...

  9. 40 CFR 600.008 - Review of fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emission data, testing by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and carbon-related exhaust emission data, testing by the Administrator. 600.008 Section 600.008... emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emission data, testing by the Administrator. (a) Testing by the... promptly as possible. (ii) Starting with the 2012 model year for carbon-related exhaust emissions and...

  10. Carbon related donor bound exciton transitions in ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadbeigi, F.; Kumar, E. Senthil; Alagha, S.; Anderson, I.; Watkins, S. P.

    2014-08-07

    Several shallow donor bound exciton photoluminescence (PL) transitions are reported in ZnO nanowires doped with carbon. The emission energies are in the range of 3360.8–3361.9 meV, close to previously reported emission lines due to excitons bound to donor point defects, such as Ga, Al, In, and H. The addition of small amounts of hydrogen during growth results in a strong enhancement of the PL of these carbon related emission lines, yet PL and annealing measurements indicate no appreciable bulk hydrogen. The observation of two electron satellites for these emission lines enables the determination of the donor binding energies. The dependence of exciton localization energy on donor binding energy departs somewhat from the usual linear relationship observed for group III donors, indicating a qualitatively different central cell potential, as one would expect for a complex. Emission lines due to excitons bound to ionized donors associated with these defects are also observed. The dependence of the PL emission intensities on temperature and growth conditions demonstrates that the lines are due to distinct complexes and not merely excited states of each other.

  11. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  12. 40 CFR 600.510-12 - Calculation of average fuel economy and average carbon-related exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary of Transportation (49 CFR part 538) to obtain the CAFE credit determined in paragraphs (c)(2)(iv... automobiles shall be as follows: Model year Maximum increase(mpg) 1993-2014 1.2 2015 1.0 2016 0.8 2017 0.6..., for model years 2016 and later, the carbon-related exhaust emissions value calculated for that...

  13. Carburizing: Microstructures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, G.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed discussions and over 250 graphs and charts describe the effects of microstructure on the properties of carburized steels. In-depth coverage clarifies the causes, interpretation, prevention, and consequences of various microstructural variations and defects in carburized parts. Also covered are the effects of post-hardening heat treatments, surface grinding, and shot peening.

  14. Microstructure of neat alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Aurélien; Sokolić, Franjo; Zoranić, Larisa

    2007-06-01

    Formation of microstructure in homogeneous associated liquids is analyzed through the density-density pair correlation functions, both in direct and reciprocal space, as well as an effective local one-body density function. This is illustrated through a molecular dynamics study of two neat alcohols, namely, methanol and tert-butanol, which have a rich microstructure: chainlike molecular association for the former and micellelike for the latter. The relation to hydrogen bonding interaction is demonstrated. The apparent failure to find microstructure in water—a stronger hydrogen bonding liquid—with the same tools is discussed.

  15. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accordance with § 600.010-08(c)(1)(ii). (3) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections...-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for a model type. 600.208-12 Section 600... Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles § 600.208-12...

  16. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  17. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  18. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The manufacturer shall supply total model year sales projections for each car line/vehicle...-based fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. 600.208-12... fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emissions for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  19. 40 CFR 600.113-12 - Fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. 600.113-12 Section 600.113-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS...

  20. 40 CFR 600.008-08 - Review of fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission data, testing by the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Review of fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission data, testing by the Administrator. 600.008-08 Section 600.008-08 Protection...

  1. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for a model type. 600.208-12 Section 600.208-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...

  2. Carbon-related materials for electrochemical and high-temperature structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Andi

    The processing, structure and properties of carbon-related materials for structural and electrochemical applications have been addressed. In relation to the structural materials, a new material, namely a nanostructured ceramic-carbon hybrid that is prepared by hot-pressing organobentonite particles is provided. In addition, carbon-carbon (C/C) composites that have been improved by filler incorporation, with the fillers including organobentonite and fumed alumina, are provided. In relation to the electrochemical electrode materials, which include various types of particulate carbons, a new method of electrical characterization of such materials in the absence of an electric double layer is provided, thereby enabling for these materials the first determination of (i) the relative dielectric constant, (ii) the effect of the electrolyte on the relative dielectric constant and the volumetric electrical resistivity, (iii) the specific capacitance and areal electrical resistivity of the interface between the electrode and its electrical contact, and (iv) the specific capacitance and areal resistivity of the interface between the electrode and the electrolyte. The need for densification (thereby decreasing the fabrication cost) has been reduced by the incorporation of a particulate filler (fumed alumina or organoclay) during the C/C fabrication. Fumed alumina is in the form of aggregates of nanosize alumina particles. Due to this structure, it is highly deformable (squishable). The squishability enables conformability, which is attractive for the filler to fill the space between the carbon fibers in C/C. Partly due to the presence of the organic component in organoclay, it is possible to use the organoclay both as a binder and a reinforcing filler in C/C. Also partly due to the organic component in organoclay, it is possible to consolidate organoclay particles by the application of heat and pressure, thereby forming a monolith in the absence of a binder and providing a new

  3. Diffusion in polycrystalline microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, T.P.; Holm, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    Mass transport properties are important in polycrystalline materials used as protective films. Traditionally, such properties have been studied by examining model polycrystalline structures, such as a regular array of straight grain boundaries. However, these models do not account for a number of features of real grain ensembles, including the grain size distribution and the topological aspects of grain boundaries. In this study, a finite difference scheme is developed to study transient and steady-state mass transport through realistic two-dimensional polycrystalline microstructures. Effects of microstructural parameters such as average grain size and grain boundary topology are examined, as are effects due to limits of the model.

  4. About the leak microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, M.; Guoxiang, H. Huo-J.; Lombardi, F. S.

    2001-04-01

    The capabilities of a new microstructure, anode point based, for the detection of gas ionizing radiations are presented. For every single detected ionizing radiation it gives a pair of "induced" charges (anodic and cathodic) of the same amount (pulses of the same amplitudes), of opposite sign, with the same collection time and essentially in time coincidence, that are proportional to the primary ionization collected. Each pulse of a pair gives the same energy and timing information, thus one can be used for these information and the other for the position. The complete lack of insulating materials in the active volume of this microstructure avoids problems of charging-up and makes its behaviour stable and repeatable. Primary avalanches with a size of more than 2.5×10 7 electrons (4 pC) giving current pulses with a peak of more than 0.26 mA on 100 Ω and about 30 ns duration are possible with 5.9 keV X-rays of 55Fe working in proportional region and in isobutane gas. Single electrons emitted by a heated filament ( Ec<1 eV) were detected in 760 Torr of isobutane; with an estimated gas gain of 1.2×10 6 a counting rate of up to 800 kpulses/s per single microstructure was achieved. Three different types of sensitive-position two-dimensional read-out detectors, based on these microstructures, in development, as well as the best geometry (height of the tip with respect to the cathode) and the shapes and strengths of the electric field in the active volume of these microstructures, evaluated with Poison Superfish and Mafia programs, are presented.

  5. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  6. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively. PMID:20197803

  7. Microstructural examination of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, C.; Yoshizawa, H.; Nakagawa, Y. G.; Lapides, M. E.

    1993-10-01

    Fatigue tests were performed to examine how microstructural conditioning influences crack initiation and propagation in SA508 class 3 low-carbon steel. A 3-mm-long crack was introduced in compact tension (CT) fatigue test specimens under four different loads in order to obtain crack tip plastic zones at different stress intensity factor ranges, ΔK = 18, 36, 54, and 72 MPa√m. The microstructure of the plastic zones around the crack tip were examined by trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAD). Micro- orientation of the dislocation cells in the plastic zones of all of the CT samples increased to 4 deg from the level of an as-received sample. Four-point bending fatigue tests were performed for plate shape samples with a large cyclic strain range. The SAD value of the bending samples was also 4 deg in the damaged area where cracks already initiated at an early stage of the fatigue process. These test results indicate that the microstructural conditioning is a prerequisite for the fatigue crack initiation and propagation in SA508. These observations may lead to better under- standing of how fatigue initiation processes transit to cracks.

  8. Laser microstructured biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, Anastasia; Kufelt, Olga; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina; Hinze, Ulf; Chichkov, Boris

    2013-10-01

    The two-photon polymerization technique (2PP) uses non-linear absorption of femtosecond laser pulses to selectively polymerize photosensitive materials. 2PP has the ability to fabricate structures with a resolution from tens of micrometers down to hundreds of nanometers. Three-dimensional microstructuring by the 2PP technique provides many interesting possibilities for biomedical applications. This microstructuring technique is suitable with many biocompatible polymeric materials, such as polyethylene glycol, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, gelatin, zirconium-based hybrids, and others. The process of fabrication does not require clean room conditions and does not use hazard chemicals or high temperatures. The most beneficial property of 2PP is that it is capable of producing especially complex three-dimensional (3-D) structures, including devices with overhangs, without using any supportive structure. The flexibility in controlling geometries and feature sizes and the possibility to fabricate structures without the addition of new material layers makes this technique particularly appealing for fabrication of 3-D scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:23729598

  9. Modeling of microstructure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Jacot, A.; Charbon, C.

    1995-12-31

    As macroscopic models of solidification are now well advanced, the simulation of microstructure formation is becoming increasingly important. Tools based on Greens` functions (i.e., front-tracking) or diffuse interface methods (e.g., phase field) have been developed recently for the calculation of individual dendritic grains or of a few eutectic lamellae. Although very powerful and useful, such methods cannot be extended at present to the scale of a whole process mainly because of the very large computation time involved. At the intermediate mesoscopic scale of the grains, Monte Carlo (MC) or Cellular Automata (CA) methods can integrate nucleation and grain growth mechanisms in order to simulate the formation of grains during solidification. These latter methods have been coupled with Finite Element (FE) heat flow calculations in order to predict the grain structure at the scale of a whole process (computer metallography). The microstructural features which can be predicted using this coupled CA-FE model are: the morphology of the grains (columnar, equiaxed), the columnar-to-equiaxed transition, the selection of grains in the columnar zone, the crystallographic texture of the grains, the extension of grains in open regions of liquid, etc. Calculated parameters of the three-dimensional grain structure can also be related to the same entities obtained in metallographic cross sections (computer stereology).

  10. Non-tropical carbonates related to rocky submarine cliffs (Miocene, Almerı´a, southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, C.; Martín, J. M.; Braga, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    Upper Miocene deposits in the Cabo de Gata region (SE Spain) provide a unique opportunity to study cliff-related temperate carbonates, a poorly known type of fossil non-tropical carbonates. The studied submarine cliffs lie on the western flank of the Monte Ricardillo volcanic dome. Two main biocenoses colonised the cliff walls: vertical and subvertical walls were either overgrown by vermetid gastropods, forming a vermetid framestone, or colonised by robust branching bryozoans, which were reworked post-mortem and accumulated as aprons at the foot of the submarine cliffs. Coralline algae in the vermetid build-up indicate palaeodepths below 15-20 m. Depressions in front of the cliffs were occupied by nodular bryozoans and bivalves. Within these depressions, barnacles settled on secondary hard substrates. With progressive flooding of the depositional area, substrate relief was filled in and a carbonate ramp with facies belts following the palaeobathymetric gradient evolved. A delicate branching bryozoan facies occurs in the proximal part of the ramp and a nodular bryozoan-bivalve facies in its middle part. Distally, these deposits give way to a coralline algal facies. These results provide a first insight into temperate-water carbonates related to rocky submarine cliffs. This work also reveals a major control of substrate relief on temperate carbonate facies and biofacies.

  11. Optical Imaging in Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P. M.

    2001-04-11

    This research was focused on developing morphology-dependent stimulated raman scattering (MDSRS) spectroscopy as an analytic optical imaging technique. MDSRS uses the cavity modes (called morphology dependent resonances, MDRs) associated with axisymmetric dielectric microstructures to generate nonlinear optical signals. Since different cavity modes span different regions inside the microstructure, it becomes possible to generate location-specific spectra. The information gotten from MDSRS imaging experiments is analogous with that generated from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in that spatial variations in chemical composition and molecular configuration within a structure can be mapped out. The authors demonstrated that MDSRS imaging is feasible and is free from nonlinear artifact. They did this by measuring the molecular structure variations that are present in the interfaces of 180 {micro}m dia. charged water droplets. The 4 publications that resulted from these studies are attached. From a chemical perspective a water droplet is, however, a simple thing. Will it be possible to use MDSRS imaging to study more complex systems such as combusting fuel droplets, layered polymer or glass fibers, or biological cells? The long-term goal of the research was to answer this question. The answer they have come up with is yes and no. The results on nitrate aerosols show that it is possible to do imaging studies on optically non-absorbing, ion containing systems, but that the ultimate sensitivity is dictated by ion concentration. hence systems containing large quantities of mobile ions will be difficult to look at, so this essentially eliminates being able to look at biological samples in situ. But on the positive side, organic systems, such as layered polymer and glass fibers, and combusting organic fuel droplets can be looked at with MDSRS imaging.

  12. Dynamic behavior of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    2008-11-01

    Continued demand for flexible and sophisticated, yet lightweight and low power as well as small, systems is being satisfied by advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). These advances require use of computational modeling and simulation accompanied by physical measurements. Successful combination of computer aided design (CAD) and multiphysics simulation tools with the state-of-the-art (SOTA) measurement methodology will contribute to reduction of high prototyping costs, long product development cycles, and time-to-market pressures while developing MEMS for a multitude of increasingly diversified applications. In one approach a unique, fully integrated, software environment for multiscale, multiphysics, high fidelity modeling of MEMS is combined with the SOTA optoelectronic laser interferometric microscope (OELIM) methodology for measurements. The OELIM methodology allows remote, noninvasive, full-field-of-view (FFV) measurements of displacements/deformations and vibrations with high spatial resolution, nanometer accuracy, and in near real-time. In this paper, an approach - employing both, the modeling environment (including an analytical process used to quantitatively show the influence that various parameters defining a microstructure, e.g., RF MEMS, a microswitch, or a sensor, may have on its dynamics; using this process dynamic characteristics of a device/sensor can be optimized by constraining its nominal dimensions and finding the optimum set of uncertainties/tolerances in these dimensions) and the OELIM methodology - is described and its applications are illustrated with representative examples. The examples reveal viability of the approach, combining measurements and modeling (i.e., M&M), for the development of MEMS. The representative results demonstrate capacity of the M&M approach to quantitative determination of the effects of dynamic operational loads on performance of selected microstructures of current interest.

  13. 40 CFR 600.113-12 - Fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests... exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. The Administrator... cold temperature FTP tests. Additionally, the specific gravity, carbon weight fraction and net...

  14. 40 CFR 600.113-12 - Fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests... exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. The Administrator... cold temperature FTP tests. Additionally, the specific gravity, carbon weight fraction and net...

  15. 40 CFR 600.113-12 - Fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. 600.113-12 Section... and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP... the FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. Additionally, the specific gravity,...

  16. 40 CFR 600.113-12 - Fuel economy, CO2 emissions, and carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon-related exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests... exhaust emission calculations for FTP, HFET, US06, SC03 and cold temperature FTP tests. The Administrator... cold temperature FTP tests. Additionally, the specific gravity, carbon weight fraction and net...

  17. 40 CFR 600.206-12 - Calculation and use of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, that value, rounded to the nearest tenth of a mile... one equivalent petroleum-based fuel economy value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, all... HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for vehicle configurations....

  18. 40 CFR 600.206-12 - Calculation and use of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, that value, rounded to the nearest tenth of a mile... one equivalent petroleum-based fuel economy value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, all... HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for vehicle configurations....

  19. Computer vision in microstructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Malur N.; Massarweh, W.; Hough, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to be performed by advanced-high school and beginning-college students. It is hoped that this experiment will create an interest in and further understanding of materials science. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate that the microstructure of engineered materials is affected by the processing conditions in manufacture, and that it is possible to characterize the microstructure using image analysis with a computer. The principle of computer vision will first be introduced followed by the description of the system developed at Texas A&M University. This in turn will be followed by the description of the experiment to obtain differences in microstructure and the characterization of the microstructure using computer vision.

  20. Microstructure and properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamano, K.

    1984-01-01

    The history of research into the microstructure and properties of ceramic ware is discussed; methods of producing ceramics with particular characteristics are investigated. Bubbles, sintering, cracks, and electron microscopy are discussed.

  1. Hydrophobicity of curved microstructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, A. H.; King, W. P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents measurements and models for how the macroscopic curvature of microstructured polymers affects hydrophobicity. Flexible polymer substrates were fabricated with arrays of regular microstructures. The interaction of liquid drops with these surfaces was analyzed for flat substrates and substrates flexed into either positive or negative cylindrical shapes. Liquid droplet static contact angle and dynamic slide angle were measured for a range of surfaces. An increase in substrate curvature corresponded with decreased slide angle for liquid droplets suspended on the surface asperities. This phenomenon is investigated in terms of solid-liquid contact line and the periodicity of surface microstructures. We present a model that can be used to understand the observed phenomena and to design microstructure geometries for hydrophobicity.

  2. Modelling microstructure evolution during recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahme, Abhijit P.

    The main aim of this work was to model microstructural evolution during recrystallization. This was achieved by characterizing it in terms of recrystallization kinetics and texture development and by identifying factors that exert the greatest effect on the recrystallization process. To achieve the above, geometric and crystallographic observations from two orthogonal sections through a polycrystal were used. Using these as input to the computer simulations, a statistically representative three dimensional model was created. Assignment of orientations to the grains was done such that nearest neighbor relationships match the observed distributions. The microstructures thus obtained were allowed to evolve using a Monte-Carlo simulation. A parametric study was done to study the effects of various factors on recrystallization kinetics and texture development during microstructural evolution. A set of software tools (Microstructure builder) were developed to generate the microstructures. The process involved the use of a ellipsoidal packing method combined with a voxel-based tessellation technique to create a 3 dimensional digital microstructure having the desired set of grain aspect ratios. Orientation assignment to the grains in the microstructure was done using a simulated annealing method that minimized the error between the orientation distribution function (ODF) and misorientation distribution function (MDF) of the measured and simulated materials. The effect of grain geometry and placement of nuclei on recrystallization kinetics was studied. A close match in the recrystallization kinetics as measured in the experiments and the simulations was found to be most sensitive to the accuracy with which the geometry of the simulated microstructure matched that observed in experiments. Also the effects of anisotropy, both in energy and in mobility, stored energy and oriented nucleation on overall texture development were studied in the light of various established

  3. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Caram, Rubens; Mohanty, A. P.; Seth, Jayshree

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the difference in microstructure caused by solidifying the MnBi-Bi eutectic in space is sought. The objectives for the three year period are as follows: (1) completion of the following theoretical analyses - determination of the influence of the Soret effect on the average solid composition versus distance of off-eutectic mixtures directionally solidified in the absence of convection, determination of the influence of convection on the microstructure of off-eutectic mixtures using a linear velocity profile in the adjacent melt, determination of the influence of volumetric changes during solidification on microconvection near the freezing interface and on microstructure, and determination of the influence of convection on microstructure when the MnBi fibers project out in front of the bismuth matrix; (2) search for patterns in the effect of microgravity on different eutectics (for example, eutectic composition, eutectic temperature, usual microstructure, densities of pure constituents, and density changes upon solidification); and (3) determination of the Soret coefficient and the diffusion coefficient for Mn-Bi melts near the eutectic composition, both through laboratory experiements to be performed here and from data from Shuttle experiments.

  4. Computer simulation of microstructural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, G.S.; Anderson, M.P.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since many of the physical properties of materials are determined by their microstructure, it is important to be able to predict and control microstructural development. A number of approaches have been taken to study this problem, but they assume that the grains can be described as spherical or hexagonal and that growth occurs in an average environment. We have developed a new technique to bridge the gap between the atomistic interactions and the macroscopic scale by discretizing the continuum system such that the microstructure retains its topological connectedness, yet is amenable to computer simulations. Using this technique, we have studied grain growth in polycrystalline aggregates. The temporal evolution and grain morphology of our model are in excellent agreement with experimental results for metals and ceramics.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Microstructured Evaporators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibel, W.; Westermann, S.; Maikowske, S.; Brandner, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Microfluidic devices have become more and more popular over the last decades [1]. Cooling is a topic where microstructures offer significant advantages compared to conventional techniques due the much higher possible surface to volume ratios and short heat transfer lengths. By evaporating of a fluid in microchannels, compact, fast and powerful cooling devices become possible [2]. Experimental results for different designs of microstructured evaporators are presented here. They have been obtained either using water as evaporating coolant or the refrigerant R134a (Tetrafluoroethane). A new microstructured evaporator design consisting of bended microchannels instead of straight channels for a better performance is shown and compared to previous results [2] for the evaporation of R134a in straight microchannels.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extruded Gamma Microstructure Met PX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Das, G.; Locci, J.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Lerch, B. A.; Kestler, H.

    2003-01-01

    A gamma TiAl alloy with a high Nb content is being assessed as a compressor blade material. The microstructure and mechanical properties of extruded Ti-45Al-X(Nb,B,C) (at.%) were evaluated in both an as-extruded condition and after a lamellar heat treatment. Tensile behavior of both as-extruded and lamellar heat treated specimens was studied in the temperature range of RT to 926 C. In general, the yield stress and ultimate tensile strength reached relatively high values at room temperature and decreased with increasing deformation temperature. The fatigue strength of both microstructures was characterized at 650 C and compared to a baseline TiAl alloy and to a Ni-base superalloy. Tensile and fatigue specimens were also exposed to 800 C for 200 h in air to evaluate the alloy's environmental resistance. A decrease in ductility was observed at room temperature due to the 800 C. exposure but the 650 C fatigue properties were unaffected. Compressive and tensile creep testing between 727 and 1027 C revealed that the creep deformation was reproducible and predictable. Creep strengths reached superalloy-like levels at fast strain rates and lower temperatures but deformation at slower strain rates and/or higher temperature indicated significant weakening for the as-extruded condition. At high temperatures and low stresses, the lamellar microstructure had improved creep properties when compared to the as-extruded material. Microstructural evolution during heat treatment, identification of various phases, and the effect of microstructure on the tensile, fatigue, and creep behaviors is discussed.

  7. Microstructure of the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma reveal a complex microstructure which includes hydromagnetic wave and discontinuities. The identification of hydromagnetic waves and discontinuities, their statistical properties, their relation to large-scale structure, and their relative contribution to power spectra are discussed.

  8. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  9. Microstructural effects in foam fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    We examine the fracture of a quasi two-dimensional aqueous foam under an applied driving pressure, using a network modelling approach developed for metallic foams by Stewart & Davis (J. Rheol., vol. 56, 2012, p. 543). In agreement with experiments, we observe two distinct mechanisms of failure analogous to those observed in a crystalline solid: a slow ductile mode when the driving pressure is applied slowly, where the void propagates as bubbles interchange neighbours through the T1 process, and a rapid brittle mode for faster application of pressures, where the void advances by successive rupture of liquid films driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The simulations allow detailed insight into the mechanics of the fracturing medium and the role of its microstructure. In particular, we examine the stress distribution around the crack tip and investigate how brittle fracture localizes into a single line of breakages. We also confirm that pre-existing microstructural defects can alter the course of fracture.

  10. Microstructure Characterization of RERTR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser; T. R. Allen; D. M. Wachs

    2008-09-01

    A variety of phases have the potential to develop in the irradiated fuels for the reduced enrichment research test reactor (RERTR) program. To study the radiation stability of these potential phases, three depleted uranium alloys were cast. The phases of interest were identified including U(Si,Al)3, (U,Mo)(Si,Al)3, UMo2Al20, UAl4, and U6Mo4Al43. These alloys were irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 200ºC up to 3.0 dpa. The microstructure is characterized using SEM and TEM. Microstructural characterization for an archive dispersion fuel plate (U-7Mo fuel particles in Al-2%Si cladding) was also carried out. TEM sample preparation for the irradiated dispersion fuel has been developed.

  11. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  12. Microstructure evolution in irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Caturla, M

    1999-11-30

    Study the interaction of defects produced during irradiation or deformation of a metal with the microstructure of that particular material, such as dislocations and grain boundaries. In particular we will study the interaction of dislocation with interstitial loops and stacking fault tetrahedral, and the production of displacement cascades close to dislocations and grain boundaries. The data obtained from these simulations will be used as input to diffusion models and dislocation dynamics models.

  13. Diamond turning microstructure optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenda

    2009-05-01

    Microstructure optical components in the form of Fresnel, TIR, microgroove, micro lens array provide a lot design freedom for high compact optical systems. It is a key factor which enables the cutting edge technology for telecommunication, surveillance and high-definition display system. Therefore, the demand of manufacturing such element is rapidly increasing. These elements usually contain high precision, tiny structure and complex form, which have posed many new challenges for tooling, programming as well as ultra-precision machining. To cope with the fast development of the technology and meet the increasing demand of the market, we have developed our own manufacturing process to fabricate microstructure optical components by way of Diamond tuning, Shaping, Raster cutting, Slow Slide Servo (SSS), Diamond milling and Post polishing. This paper is to focus on how we employed these methods to produce complex prototype of microstructure optical components and precision mold inserts which either contains aspheric lens array or freeform V grooves. The high quality finish of these surfaces meets application requirements. Measurement results are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared and discussed in the paper.

  14. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, Gaber Faheem; Chandrasekhar, S.; Larrousse, Mark; Banan, Mohsen

    1988-01-01

    The influence was studied of convection during directional solidification on the resulting microstructure of eutectics, specifically lead/tin and manganese/bismuth. A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar and fibrous eutectics, through the effect of convection on the concentration field in the melt in front of the growing eutectic. While the theory agrees with the experimental spin-up spin-down results, it predicts that the weak convection expected due to buoyancy will not produce a measurable change in eutectic microstructure. Thus, this theory does not explain the two fold decrease in MnBi fiber size and spacing observed when MnBi-Bi is solidified in space or on Earth with a magnetic field applied. Attention was turned to the morphology of the MnBi-Bi interface and to the generation of freezing rate fluctuations by convection. Decanting the melt during solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectic showed that the MnBi phase projects into the melt ahead of the Bi matrix. Temperature measurements in a Bi melt in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration showed temperature variations of up to 25 C. Conclusions are drawn and discussed.

  15. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  16. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  17. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).

    SciTech Connect

    ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

    2001-07-12

    Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron

  18. Carbon microstructures for electrochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kostecki, Robert; Song, Xiang Yun; Kinoshita, Kim

    2001-06-22

    Thin layers of photoresist were spin coated onto silicon wafers, and then carbonized to form smooth carbon films by heating in nitrogen for 1 hour at temperatures between 600 to 1100 C. Well-defined carbon microstructures on Si wafers that are being considered for electrodes in a microbattery concept were obtained by additional processing steps involving patterning and lithography of the photoresist prior to carbonization. The status of the fabrication of carbon microelectrodes obtained by pyrolysis of photoresist, characterization of the carbons by surface-sensitive techniques and electrochemical analysis by cyclic voltammetry of the I{sup -}/I{sub 3}{sup -} redox reaction is described.

  19. Modelling fracture in fibrous microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerlein, I.

    1998-04-01

    This work describes some complementary studies directed towards micromechanical modeling and simulation of the statistical fracture process in composites with fibrous microstructures. A few studies involve combining efficient computational stress analyses and piezospectroscopic measurement techniques to quantify interface deformation around a single break in model composites. It is shown how estimated interface parameters can be used to predict activity around more complex break arrangement in much larger composites. The final studies involve incorporating these experimentally refined stress analyses into large scale simulation for statistical predictions and subsequent analytical modeling of composite fracture.

  20. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  1. Linking properties to microstructure through multiresolution mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Cahal James

    The macroscale mechanical and physical properties of materials are inherently linked to the underlying microstructure. Traditional continuum mechanics theories have focused on approximating the heterogeneous microstructure as a continuum, which is conducive to a partial differential equation mathematical description. Although this makes large scale simulation of material much more efficient than modeling the detailed microstructure, the relationship between microstructure and macroscale properties becomes unclear. In order to perform computational materials design, material models must clearly relate the key underlying microstructural parameters (cause) to macroscale properties (effect). In this thesis, microstructure evolution and instability events are related to macroscale mechanical properties through a new multiresolution continuum analysis approach. The multiresolution nature of this theory allows prediction of the evolving magnitude and scale of deformation as a direct function of the changing microstructure. This is achieved via a two-pronged approach: (a) Constitutive models which track evolving microstructure are developed and calibrated to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the microstructure. (b) The conventional homogenized continuum equations of motion are extended via a virtual power approach to include extra coupled microscale stresses and stress couples which are active at each characteristic length scale within the microstructure. The multiresolution approach is applied to model the fracture toughness of a cemented carbide, failure of a steel alloy under quasi-static loading conditions and the initiation and velocity of adiabatic shear bands under high speed dynamic loading. In each case the multiresolution analysis predicts the important scale effects which control the macroscale material response. The strain fields predicted in the multiresolution continuum analyses compare well to those observed in direct numerical simulations of the

  2. Microstructural design of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1992-01-01

    The optimum performance design of composite microstructures is discussed. The forces driving progress in fiber composites are examined, and recent developments in the mechanics of laminated composites are surveyed, emphasizing thick laminates, hygrothermal effects, and thermal transient effects. The strength of continuous-fiber composites is discussed, presenting analyses of local load redistribution due to fiber breakages and treatments of statistical tensile strength theories. Modes of failure of laminated composites are examined. Elastic, physical, and viscoelastic properties as well as the strength and fracture behavior of short-fiber composites are studied, and it is shown how the performance of composites can be controlled by selecting material systems and their geometric distributions. 2D textile structural composites based on woven, knitted, and braided preforms are considered, and techniques for analyzing and modeling the thermomechanical behavior of 2D textile composites are presented. Recent developments in the processing of 3D textile preforms are introduced and the processing-microstructure relationship is demonstrated. Finite elastic deformation of flexible composites is addressed.

  3. HYDROGEN IN METALS: Microstructural Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundt, A.; Kirchheim, R.

    2006-08-01

    Metal-hydrogen (M-H) systems are interesting from both a theoretical and a practical point of view. M-H systems are utilized for energy-storage systems, in sensor applications, and in catalysis. These systems are often exploited as models for studying basic material properties, especially when the size of these systems is small and nonbulk-like contributions become dominant. Surfaces, nanocrystals, vacancy- and dislocation-rich materials, thin films, multilayers, and clusters as systems of major interest are addressed in this review. We show that the hydrogen solubility of M-H systems is strongly affected by the morphology and microstructure of and the stress between regions of different hydrogen concentration. For small-sized systems, surface- or interface-related sites become important and change the overall solubility as well as the phase boundaries of M-H systems. In thin films deposited on stiff substrates, compressive stresses evolve during hydrogen loading because the films are effectively clamped to substrates. These stresses are in the GPa range and strongly depend on microstructure. Nanoparticles even change their crystallographic structure, which results in completely new phases.

  4. Deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or large planar surfaces.

  5. Microstructural studies on Alloy 693

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, R.; Dutta, R. S.; Sengupta, P.; Samajdar, I.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-10-01

    Superalloy 693, is a newly identified ‘high-temperature corrosion resistant alloy’. Present study focuses on microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy prepared by double ‘vacuum melting’ route. In general, the alloy contains ordered Ni3Al precipitates distributed within austenitic matrix. M6C primary carbide, M23C6 type secondary carbide and NbC particles are also found to be present. Heat treatment of the alloy at 1373 K for 30 min followed by water quenching (WQ) brings about a microstructure that is free from secondary carbides and Ni3Al type precipitates but contains primary carbides. Tensile property of Alloy 693 materials was measured with as received and solution annealed (1323 K, 60 min, WQ) and (1373 K, 30 min, WQ) conditions. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of the alloy are found to drop with annealing. It is noted that in annealed condition, considerable cold working of the alloy can be performed.

  6. Microstructural analysis of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Rice, P.M.; Farrell, K.

    1995-10-01

    Microstructural characterization was performed on long-term ({approximately}100,000-h) thermally aged and neutron-irradiated surveillance materials obtained from the Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Technologies and a high phosphorus weld from a Russian reactor. Although mechanical testing indicated that thermal aging did not cause any significant changes in the Charpy impact properties, it is important to determine if there are any changes in the composition of the matrix and if any ultrafine precipitates had formed due to the thermal component of service environment only. The characterization of the Russian weld was performed to determine if the behavior of a steel with a phosphorus level in excess of that typically found in Western steels changes, and to ascertain whether the results for formation of copper-enriched regions are specific to the narrow composition band of the Western steels or a more general phenomenon. The ORNL APFIM is well suited to the microstructural characterization of neutron-irradiated RPV materials because of its near-atomic spatial resolution and ability to chemically analyze all elements. In addition to detecting, chemically identifying, and determining the size, morphology, and approximate number density of ultrafine features, the atom probe is able to quantify the amount of each element remaining in solution in the matrix and the amount of solute segregated to grain or lath boundaries.

  7. Thermal stability of nanocrystalline microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Kris Allen

    The objective of the proposed research is to develop the experimental data and scientific basis that can optimize the thermodynamic stabilization of a nanoscale microstructure during consolidation of Fe powder particles through select solute diffusion to grain boundaries. Fe based alloys were high energy ball milled to produce supersaturated solid solutions with a nominal grain size of ˜10nm. Solutes such as Y, W, Ta, Ni and Zr were selected based on their propensity to grain boundary segregated in Fe. Based on preliminary heat treatments Zr was selected as the solute of choice. Upon further heat treating experiments and microstructural analysis it was found that Zr solute additions of <4at% could stabilize a nanocrystalline microstructure of <100nm at temperatures in excess of 900°C. This is in stark comparison to pure nanocrystalline Fe which shows coarsening to the micron scale after annealing above 600°C. Reduction in grain boundary energy due to Zr segregation and solute drag are proposed as mechanism responsible for the observed thermal stability. In addition to the work presented on Fe based Zr alloys supplementary research is presented on the following systems: Fe based Ni alloys, Pd 20at%Zr, Cu3Ge and CuGeO3. The addition of Ni to Fe was selected as a control. Since Ni and Fe have similar atomic radii, the elastic enthalpy of segregation of Ni in Fe is low (+1kJ/mol) and at high temperatures Ni has complete solid solubility in Fe; it is suggested that Ni will have a negligible influence in the thermal stability of nanocrystalline Fe. It was shown that at 700°C the addition of 1at% Ni produce a bimodal microstructure consisting of ˜70% abnormally grown grains and ˜30% nanocrystalline grains of 100-200nm. While these results are interesting extensive work is still needed to understand the mechanisms governing the thermal stability in this system. A presentation of the collected data is given. Pd 20 at% Zr was high energy ball milled to produce an

  8. Area scalable optically induced photorefractive photonic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wentao; Xue, Yan Ling; Jiang, Dongdong

    2016-07-01

    A convenient approach to fabricate area scalable two-dimensional photonic microstructures was experimentally demonstrated by multi-face optical wedges. The approach is quite compact and stable without complex optical alignment equipment. Large-area square lattice microstructures are optically induced inside an iron-doped lithium niobate photorefractive crystal. The induced large-area microstructures are analyzed and verified by plane wave guiding, Brillouin-zone spectroscopy, angle-dependent transmission spectrum, and lateral Bragg reflection patterns. The method can be easily extended to generate other more complex area scalable photonic microstructures, such as quasicrystal lattices, by designing the multi-face optical wedge appropriately. The induced area scalable photonic microstructures can be fixed or erased even re-recorded in the photorefractive crystal, which suggests potential applications in micro-nano photonic devices.

  9. Microstructure of Kinetic Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhee; Kim, Jaeick

    2015-04-01

    Kinetic spray process has been applied to various industrial fields such as automotive, aviation, and defense industries due to its availability to produce high-performing coating layer. However, since the properties of kinetic-sprayed coating layer are significantly affected by the microstructures of deposit, the microstructures of the deposit should be controlled to acquire advanced coating layer and, accordingly, deep understanding of microstructural evolution must be achieved before controlling the microstructure of the coating layer. This paper gives an overview of contents related to the microstructure of kinetic-sprayed deposition. The most powerful influencing factors in microstructural evolution of kinetic-sprayed coating layer are instant generation of thermal energy and high-strain, high-strain-rate plastic deformation at the moment of particle impact. A high-density coating layer with low porosity can be produced, although some micro-cracks are occasionally induced at the interparticle boundary or at the inner region of the particles. Also, a microstructure which is distinct from the inner particle region is created in the vicinity of the particle-particle or particle-substrate interface region. However, almost no crystal phase transformation or chemical reaction is induced since the deposited particles are not heated directly by a thermal energy source.

  10. Microstructure Modeling of Third Generation Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program was to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool was to be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishments achieved during the third year (2009) of the program are summarized. The activities of this year included: Further development of multistep precipitation simulation framework for gamma prime microstructure evolution during heat treatment; Calibration and validation of gamma prime microstructure modeling with supersolvus heat treated LSHR; Modeling of the microstructure evolution of the minor phases, particularly carbides, during isothermal aging, representing the long term microstructure stability during thermal exposure; and the implementation of software tools. During the research and development efforts to extend the precipitation microstructure modeling and prediction capability in this 3-year program, we identified a hurdle, related to slow gamma prime coarsening rate, with no satisfactory scientific explanation currently available. It is desirable to raise this issue to the Ni-based superalloys research community, with hope that in future there will be a mechanistic understanding and physics-based treatment to overcome the hurdle. In the mean time, an empirical correction factor was developed in this modeling effort to capture the experimental observations.

  11. Development of Matrix Microstructures in UHTC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues hindering the use of ultra high temperature ceramics for aerospace applications is low fracture toughness. There is considerable interest in developing fiber-reinforced composites to improve fracture toughness. Considerable knowledge has been gained in controlling and improving the microstructure of monolithic UHTCs, and this paper addresses the question of transferring that knowledge to composites. Some model composites have been made and the microstructures of the matrix developed has been explored and compared to the microstructure of monolithic materials in the hafnium diboride/silicon carbide family. Both 2D and 3D weaves have been impregnated and processed.

  12. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  13. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  14. Asymptotic analysis of hierarchical martensitic microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, Pierluigi; Porta, Marcel; Lookman, Turab

    2014-12-01

    We consider a hierarchical nested microstructure, which also contains a point of singularity (disclination) at the origin, observed in lead orthovanadate. We show how to exactly compute the energy cost and associated displacement field within linearized elasticity by enforcing geometric compatibility of strains across interfaces of the three-phase mixture of distortions (variants) in the microstructure. We prove that the mechanical deformation is purely elastic and discuss the behavior of the system close to the origin.

  15. Exponential kinetics of formation of organic microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, C. L.; Folsome, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Organic microstructure production in Miller-Urey spark discharge flasks is an energy-dependent, autocatalytic process which follows first order kinetics similar to microbial growth curves. These relationships hold for all three major morphological types of microstructures observed. The three types are assembled from smaller precursor subunits which associate according to a binomial distribution. These structures could have formed bounded systems in which pre-biological processes might have occurred.

  16. Exponential kinetics of formation or organic microstructures.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C L; Folsome, C E

    1975-07-01

    Organic microstructure production in Miller-Urey spark discharge flasks in an energy-dependent, autocatalytic process which follows first order kinetics similar to microbial growth curves. These relationships hold for all three major morphological types of microstructures observed. The three types are assembled from smaller precursor subunits which associate according to a binomial distribution. These structures could have formed bounded systems in which pre-biological processes might have occurred. PMID:1187106

  17. Programming fluid flow with microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Masaeli, Mahdokht; di Carlo, Dino

    2011-11-01

    Flow control and fluid interface manipulation in microfluidic platforms are of great importance in a variety of applications. Current approaches to manipulate fluids generally rely on complex designs, difficult-to-fabricate 3D platforms or use of active methods. Here we show that in the presence of simple cylindrical obstacles (i.e. pillars) in a microchannel, at moderate to high flow rates, streamlines tend to turn and stretch in a manner that, unlike intuition for Stokes flow, does not precisely reverse after passing the pillar. The asymmetric flow behavior up- and down-stream of the pillar due to fluid inertia manifests itself as a total deformation of the topology of streamlines that effectively creates a net secondary flow which resembles the recirculating Dean flow in curving channels. Confocal images were taken to investigate the secondary flow for a variety of microstructure settings. We also developed a numerical technique to map the fluid motion in the channel which is utilized to characterize the secondary flow as well as to engineer the fluid patterns within the channel. This passive method creates the possibility of exceptional control of the 3D structure of the fluid within a microfluidic platform which can significantly advance applications requiring fluid interface control (e.g. optofluidics), ultrafast mixing and solution control around cells.

  18. Snow Micro-Structure Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-06-25

    PIKA is a MOOSE-based application for modeling micro-structure evolution of seasonal snow. The model will be useful for environmental, atmospheric, and climate scientists. Possible applications include application to energy balance models, ice sheet modeling, and avalanche forecasting. The model implements physics from published, peer-reviewed articles. The main purpose is to foster university and laboratory collaboration to build a larger multi-scale snow model using MOOSE. The main feature of the code is that it is implementedmore » using the MOOSE framework, thus making features such as multiphysics coupling, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel scalability native to the application. PIKA implements three equations: the phase-field equation for tracking the evolution of the ice-air interface within seasonal snow at the grain-scale; the heat equation for computing the temperature of both the ice and air within the snow; and the mass transport equation for monitoring the diffusion of water vapor in the pore space of the snow.« less

  19. Snow Micro-Structure Model

    SciTech Connect

    Micah Johnson, Andrew Slaughter

    2014-06-25

    PIKA is a MOOSE-based application for modeling micro-structure evolution of seasonal snow. The model will be useful for environmental, atmospheric, and climate scientists. Possible applications include application to energy balance models, ice sheet modeling, and avalanche forecasting. The model implements physics from published, peer-reviewed articles. The main purpose is to foster university and laboratory collaboration to build a larger multi-scale snow model using MOOSE. The main feature of the code is that it is implemented using the MOOSE framework, thus making features such as multiphysics coupling, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel scalability native to the application. PIKA implements three equations: the phase-field equation for tracking the evolution of the ice-air interface within seasonal snow at the grain-scale; the heat equation for computing the temperature of both the ice and air within the snow; and the mass transport equation for monitoring the diffusion of water vapor in the pore space of the snow.

  20. Mesoscale kinetics produces martensitic microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Oliver; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a martensitic phase transformation studying post-transformation microstructure and moving austenite-martensite interfaces. Unlike in energy-minimisation theories, the transformation dynamics dominate the martensite morphology. We use a binary Lennard-Jones potential to describe a square-to-hexagonal transformation by shear-and-shuffle. The high-T stable square lattice and low-T hexagonal lattice represent austenite and martensite, giving four martensitic variants. Compatible twin variants have no lattice misfit and zero interfacial energies which makes our model directly comparable with the crystallographic theory of martensite. Although our dynamical interpretation is different to previous work, our MD simulations exhibit very similar martensitic morphologies to real materials. We observe the nucleation of wedge-shaped, twinned martensite plates, plate growth at narrow, travelling transformation zones, subsonic transformation waves, elastic precursors inducing secondary nucleations and the formation of martensitic domains. Martensite is produced within narrow transformation zones where atoms change their lattice sites in a co-operative manner so as to form crystallographic layers. These motions produce inertia forces on the mesoscopic length-scale which induce the formation of twin variants in the subsequent layers to transform.

  1. Gelled polymerizable microemulsions. 2. Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Tessendorf, Renate; Salvati, Anna; Topgaard, Daniel; Sottmann, Thomas; Strey, Reinhard; Lynch, Iseult

    2008-08-19

    Using bicontinuous microemulsions as templates opens a new field for the design of novel structures and thus novel materials, but has significant challenges due to the very small composition and temperature windows in which microemulsions are bicontinuous. In previous work we had shown that we can take a ternary base system (water-n-dodecane--C 13/15E 5), add monomer and cross-linker ( N-isopropylacrylamide and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide) to the water phase, and add a gelator (12-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid) to the oil phase while remaining in the one-phase region of the phase diagram. It was also possible to allow the gelator to form an organogel by changing the temperature such that we crossed the sol--gel line, which fell within the one-phase region. In this work, we show conclusively that addition of the monomers and the gelator does not affect the microemulsion microstructure and that, even in the gelled state, the polymerizable microemulsion is indeed bicontinuous. 1H NMR self-diffusion, conductivity, and small-angle neutron scattering measurements all confirm the bicontinuous nature of the gelled polymerizable microemulsion. PMID:18558728

  2. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Caram, Rubens; Mohanty, A. P.; Seth, Jayshree

    1990-01-01

    In eutectic growth, as the solid phases grow they reject atoms to the liquid. This results in a variation of melt composition along the solid/liquid interface. In the past, mass transfer in eutectic solidification, in the absence of convection, was considered to be governed only by the diffusion induced by compositional gradients. However, mass transfer can also be generated by a temperature gradient. This is called thermotransport, thermomigration, thermal diffusion or the Soret effect. A theoretical model of the influence of the Soret effect on the growth of eutectic alloys is presented. A differential equation describing the compositional field near the interface during unidirectional solidification of a binary eutectic alloy was formulated by including the contributions of both compositional and thermal gradients in the liquid. A steady-state solution of the differential equation was obtained by applying appropriate boundary conditions and accounting for heat flow in the melt. Following that, the average interfacial composition was converted to a variation of undercooling at the interface, and consequently to microstructural parameters. The results obtained show that thermotransport can, under certain circumstances, be a parameter of paramount importance.

  3. The influence of matrix microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyletel, G. M.; Allison, J. E.; Aken, D. C.

    1993-11-01

    The low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue behavior and cyclic response of naturally aged and artificially aged 2219/TiC/15p and unreinforced 2219 Al were investigated utilizing plastic strain-controlled and stress-controlled testing. The cyclic response of both the reinforced and un-reinforced materials was similar for all plastic strain amplitudes tested except that the saturation stress level for the composite was always greater than that of the unreinforced material. The cyclic response of the naturally aged materials exhibited cyclic hardening and, in some cases, cyclic softening, while the cyclic response for the artificially aged materials showed no evidence of either cyclic hardening or softening. The higher ductility of the unreinforced material made it more resistant to fatigue failure at high strains, and thus, at a given plastic strain, it had longer fatigue life. It should be noted that the tensile ductilities of the 2219/TiC/15p were significantly higher than those previously reported for 2XXX-series composites. During stress-controlled test-ing at stresses below 220 MPa, the presence of TiC particles lead to an improvement in fatigue life. Above 220 MPa, no influence of TiC reinforcement on fatigue life could be detected. In both the composite and unreinforced materials, the low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue lives were found to be virtually independent of matrix microstructure.

  4. Modelling microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Rios, E. R.; Xin, X. J.; Navarro, A.

    1994-10-01

    Microstructurally sensitive fatigue short crack growth can occur in many engineering components devoid of large defects. Continuum mechanics principles, including linear elastic fracture mechanics, used in damage tolerance design and life prediction methods are not applicable in these situations and therefore new concepts need to be developed to characterize this type of growth. A microstructurally sensitive model of fatigue crack growth is presented in which the effect of microstructure is dominant in the early stage of growth but plays a negligible role after the crack has gone through the transition from structure-sensitive to structure-insensitive growth. The effect of both microstructure and structure sensitive variables on the transition from short cracks to continuum mechanics and the conditions for crack instability leading to final failure are examined. The microstructural variables incorporated in the equations that describe the model are those controlling the extent and intensity of crack tip plasticity such as grain size, precipitation and dispersion hardening, strain hardening and mis-orientation between grains. It is expected that the concepts developed within the model will form the basis for the design of new crack-resistant materials.

  5. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  6. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  7. Microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Thomas, Rajesh; Rao, G. Mohan

    2009-10-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films are of great interest due to their promising applications in various optoelectronic thin film devices. We have investigated the microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films grown by DC magnetron sputtering on silicon substrate. The structural characterization and surface morphology were carried out using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The as deposited films were amorphous, where as, the films annealed above 400 °C were crystalline. In order to explain the microstructural changes due to annealing, we have proposed a "instability wheel" model for the evolution of the microstructure. This model explains the transformation of mater into various geometries within them selves, followed by external perturbation.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

    2012-04-01

    This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

  9. Microstructures in rapidly solidified niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Locci, Ivan E.

    1988-01-01

    The microstructures of niobium aluminides produced by chill block melt spinning were compared to those of niobium aluminides produced by conventional casting. The rapidly solidified alloys were rapidly solidified by melt spinning in an argon atmosphere, and the melt-spun ribbons were examined by optical, X-ray, and TEM techniques. Microstructures were found to range from single-phase for Nb-75 at. pct Al (NbAl3) to two phase for Nb-46 at. pct Al (NbAl3 + Nb2Al). It was found that the melt spinning of Nb-aluminides produced finer grained microstructures than those produced in induction-melted ingots or in powders produced by the rotating electrode process. Ternary additions such as Cr, Ti, and Si tended to form intermetallic phases along the grain boundaries.

  10. Improved measurement of thermal effects on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastani, Mansur

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were to introduce a simple methodology which could be used to replace the time-consuming and expensive conventional methods of metallographic and quantitative analysis of thermal treatment effect on microstructure. Metallurgical analysis continually calls for the evaluation of thermal treatment effects on microstructure. This commonly demands metallographic sample preparation and microscopic examination, which are time absorbing and costly. These drawbacks are burdensome when large numbers of samples must be levied fast. Mechanical testing can sometimes be substituted, but sample size and shape frequently make these methods impractical. The experiment described here is ideal for the microstructural evaluation of lamp filaments and other wire samples such as copper wire which can be conveniently coiled.

  11. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, P.; Bellingeri, S.; Massimino, F.; Baldissin, D.; Battezzati, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  12. Microstructural characterization of nitrided Timetal 834.

    PubMed

    Moskalewicz, T; Grogger, W; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-09-01

    The microstructure of Timetal 834, in as-received condition and after nitriding under glow discharge has been examined by light microscopy and analytical transmission electorn microscopy (TEM) methods (SAED, EDS, EELS and EFTEM). The microstructure of the as-received alloy consists of the alpha phase and a small amount of the beta phase. Silicide precipitates (Zr5Si4) are present both inside the grains and at the grain boundaries. TEM investigations of cross-sectional thin foils allow for detailed analysis of the nitrided layer microstructure. It was found that the nitrided layer exhibits a graded character with continuously varying nitrogen content. The outermost sublayer consists of nanocrystals of delta-TiN. The following sublayers consist mainly of delta'-Ti2N and epsilon-Ti2N grains. The last sublayer, closest to the substrate, is identified as a nitrogen-rich alpha(N) solid solution containing up to 14 at% of nitrogen. PMID:17059528

  13. Connectivity Measures in EEG Microstructural Sleep Elements

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Koupparis, Andreas M.; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Koutroumanidis, Michalis; Kostopoulos, George K.

    2016-01-01

    During Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep (NREM) the brain is relatively disconnected from the environment, while connectedness between brain areas is also decreased. Evidence indicates, that these dynamic connectivity changes are delivered by microstructural elements of sleep: short periods of environmental stimuli evaluation followed by sleep promoting procedures. The connectivity patterns of the latter, among other aspects of sleep microstructure, are still to be fully elucidated. We suggest here a methodology for the assessment and investigation of the connectivity patterns of EEG microstructural elements, such as sleep spindles. The methodology combines techniques in the preprocessing, estimation, error assessing and visualization of results levels in order to allow the detailed examination of the connectivity aspects (levels and directionality of information flow) over frequency and time with notable resolution, while dealing with the volume conduction and EEG reference assessment. The high temporal and frequency resolution of the methodology will allow the association between the microelements and the dynamically forming networks that characterize them, and consequently possibly reveal aspects of the EEG microstructure. The proposed methodology is initially tested on artificially generated signals for proof of concept and subsequently applied to real EEG recordings via a custom built MATLAB-based tool developed for such studies. Preliminary results from 843 fast sleep spindles recorded in whole night sleep of 5 healthy volunteers indicate a prevailing pattern of interactions between centroparietal and frontal regions. We demonstrate hereby, an opening to our knowledge attempt to estimate the scalp EEG connectivity that characterizes fast sleep spindles via an “EEG-element connectivity” methodology we propose. The application of the latter, via a computational tool we developed suggests it is able to investigate the connectivity patterns related to the

  14. Manipulation of microstructure in laser additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Yang, Lihmei; Liu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, additive manufacturing (AM) of tungsten parts is investigated by using femtosecond fiber lasers. For the first time, manipulating microstructures of AM parts is systematically investigated and reported. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, and microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained for femtosecond laser, compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. Micro-hardness is investigated for the fabricated samples. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  15. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of cervical microstructure.

    PubMed

    Feltovich, Helen; Nam, Kibo; Hall, Timothy J

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to determine whether quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can provide insight into, and characterization of, uterine cervical microstructure. Throughout pregnancy, cervical collagen reorganizes (from aligned and anisotropic to disorganized and isotropic) as the cervix changes in preparation for delivery. Premature changes in collagen are associated with premature birth in mammals. Because QUS is able to detect structural anisotropy/isotropy, we hypothesized that it may provide a means of noninvasively assessing cervical microstructure. Thorough study of cervical microstructure has been limited by lack of technology to detect small changes in collagen organization, which has in turn limited our ability to detect abnormal and/or premature changes in collagen that may lead to preterm birth. In order to determine whether QUS may be useful for detection of cervical microstructure, radiofrequency (rf) echo data were acquired from the cervices of human hysterectomy specimens (n = 10). The angle between the acoustic beam and tissue was used to assess anisotropic acoustic propagation by control of transmit/receive angles from -20 degrees to +20 degrees. The power spectrum of the echo signals from within a region of interest was computed in order to investigate the microstructure of the tissue. An identical analysis was performed on a homogeneous phantom with spherical scatterers for system calibration. Power spectra of backscattered rf from the cervix were 6 dB higher for normal (0 degree) than steered (+/- 20 degrees) beams. The spectral power for steered beams decreased monotonically (0.4 dB at +5 degrees to 3.6 dB at +20 degrees). The excess difference (compared to similar analysis for the phantom) in normally-incident (0 degree) versus steered beams is consistent with scattering from an aligned component of the cervical microstructure. Therefore, QUS appears to reliably identify an aligned component of cervical microstructure

  16. Microstructural examination of the α- ω Two-Phase Shock-Induced Microstructure in Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Escobedo, J. Pablo; Field, Robert D.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Dickerson, Patricia O.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Cerreta, Ellen K.

    2015-06-01

    Omega phase can be formed in alpha-phase Zr during shock loading. Interestingly, the high pressure phase can be retained upon release allowing for post-mortem study of the omega phase. Currently, the transformation pathway is not well understood. To provide more insight into this pathway during dynamic loading, shocked-induced microstructures of Zr have been studied. Soft recovered, plate impact specimens have been examined via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the orientation relationships (OR) and habit planes (HP) between phases. This enables a better understanding of transformation path that is then compared to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Based on key microstructural features observed in the post-mortem microstructures, a significant amount of the observed alpha phase appears to have originated from the reverse transformation upon release. Results of microstructural analysis will be discussed, along with implications toward phase transformation pathways.

  17. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations aremore » other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.« less

  18. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations are other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.

  19. Computational and mathematical models of microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, J.W.; Chen, L.Q.; Kalia, R.K.; Stoneham, A.M.

    1998-12-31

    This symposium was designed to bring together the foremost materials theorists and applied mathematicians from around the world to share and discuss some of the newest and most promising mathematical and computational tools for simulating, understanding, and predicting the various complex processes that occur during the evolution of microstructures. Separate abstracts were prepared for 25 papers.

  20. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-03-15

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  1. Microstructural characterization of high-carbon ferrochromium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, A.; Navara, E.

    1996-04-01

    Light optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for high-carbon ferrochromium microstructural analysis. Different microstructures were observed for industrially and laboratory-produced ferroalloys. Primary carbides of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} with chromium ferrite were found in the industrially produced, slowly solidified, and cooled ferroalloy, while primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides accompanied a eutectic mixture of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides and chromium ferrite in the laboratory-melted and in the water-solidified and water-cooled materials. Different microstructural arrangements are directly related to the friability properties of this material, which characterizes its resistance to abrasion on handling and impact. In ferrochromium upgraded by carbon content reduction, the eutectic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} hexagonal carbides are partly replaced by M{sub 23}C{sub 6} dendritic carbides. The presence of dendritic carbides in the ferrochromium eutectic microstructure can be interpreted as a proof of a lower carbon content, raising the commercial value of the ferroalloy. The hexagonal M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides exhibited a central hollow along the longitudinal axis, and on metallographic samples they looked like screw nuts. A model of the solidification mechanism for such crystals is proposed.

  2. Microstructure property relationships of urethane magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boczkowska, Anna; Awietjan, Stefan F.; Wroblewski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Studies on the structure of urethane magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), with respect to their magnetic and mechanical properties, are reported. MREs were obtained from a mixture of polyurethane gel and carbonyl-iron particles cured in a magnetic field of 100 and 300 mT. Samples with different numbers of particles (1.5, 11.5 and 33 vol%) were produced. The microstructure and magnetic properties of the obtained MREs were studied. Also, the displacement of the samples in an external magnetic field was examined using a specially designed experimental set-up. The influences of the number of ferromagnetic particles and their arrangement in relation to the external magnetic field were investigated. It was found that the microstructure of the MREs depends on the number of ferrous particles and the fabrication conditions. The orientation of the iron particles into aligned chains is possible for a lower volume content of the ferromagnetic fillers. The high carbonyl-iron volume content in the matrix leads to the formation of more complex microstructures, similar to three-dimensional lattices. The magnetic measurements also confirmed the existence of the microstructure anisotropy for the MREs with 1.5 and 11.5 vol% of iron particles. The structural and magnetic anisotropy has not been found in the MREs with 33 vol% of Fe. To evaluate the effect of the external magnetic field on the magnetorheological properties, the displacement under magnetic field, the compressive strength, and the rheological properties were measured. The experiments showed that both the particle content and the field strength used during curing have a significant effect on the microstructure of the MREs and, in consequence, on their properties.

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  4. On the analysis of rotational symmetric microstructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.; Santamaría, Asunción; Hernández, Maikel

    2007-03-01

    A previous paper [2] presented an analysis of a class of microstructured optical surfaces in two dimensions, in which a classification of the microstructures was obtained (regular and anomalous) and a concept of 2D ideal microstructures was introduced. In this paper the study of those microstructured optical surfaces is extended to three dimensions with rotational symmetry. As a starting point, non-microstructured rotational optical systems in the First Order Approximation are also classified as point-spot type and ring-spot type, with remarkable perfect particular cases. This classification is also extended to the case in which ideal microstructured rotational surfaces are used, for both regular and anomalous type. The case of perfect ring-spot type system with an odd number of rotational, anomalous, ideal microstructures enables the definition of an anomalous aplanatic system that has direct application for mixing spatially and angularly the light emitted by several sources.

  5. Modeling of microstructural effects on electromigration failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ceric, H.; Orio, R. L. de; Zisser, W.; Selberherr, S.

    2014-06-19

    Current electromigration models used for simulation and analysis of interconnect reliability lack the appropriate description of metal microstructure and consequently have a very limited predictive capability. Therefore, the main objective of our work was obtaining more sophisticated electromigration tools. The problem is addressed through a combination of different levels of atomistic modeling and already available, continuum level macroscopic models. A novel method for an ab initio calculation of the effective valence for electromigration is presented and its application on the analysis of EM behavior is demonstrated. Additionally, a simple analytical model for the early electromigration lifetime is obtained. We have shown that its application provides a reasonable estimate for the early electromigration failures including the effect of microstructure. A simulation study is also applied on electromigration failure in tin solder bumps, where it contributed the understanding of the role of tin crystal anisotropy in the degradation mechanism of solder bumps.

  6. Microstructural aspects of spallation in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Frantz, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compressive shock waves result in a specific kind of fracture called a spall. The metallurgical aspects of copper spalling and crack or void initiation sites, the effects of grain size and substructure, and the micromechanical aspects of growth and coalescence have not received the detailed attention that other deformation phenomena have received. The present work was stimulated by the observation that under identical shock loading conditions the spall strength of copper can vary between 0.4 to 2.4 GPa - an unusually wide range - merely as a result of changes in its microstructure. Examples of fracture morphology are presented and possible micromechanics of fracture resulting from different microstructures are discussed. Finally, the implications of these observations on modeling are presented.

  7. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  8. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, John W., Jr.; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  9. Metallographic techniques and microstructures: uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Romig, A.D. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    The techniques used for the metallographic analysis of uranium and its alloys are discussed. Sample preparation and characterization procedures are described for: optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. A brief overview of electron optics, electron/sample interactions, signal detectors, and x-ray microanalysis is presented. Typical uranium alloy microstructures observed by these techniques are presented and discussed. The microstructures examined include those produced by the diffusional decomposition of ..gamma..:U-0.75Ti and ..gamma..:U-6Nb, the martensitic decomposition of U-2Mo, U-6Nb, U-0.75Ti and Mulberry, and the aging of quenched U-2Mo.

  10. Microstructure movements study by dynamic speckle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, Laurent; Brun, Alice; Snabre, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In paint and ink industries, no commercial instruments can perform non-intrusive monitoring of the drying process. We propose here an optical instrument, called HORUS(R), that monitors the drying process of any product deposited on any substrate by analyzing micro-structure movement of the product. Most of drying processes have in common that this movement becomes slower with time. On the basis of the "multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy" (MSDWS) technique, we propose here a simple and robust algorithm called ASII for "adaptive speckle imaging interferometry", able to detect in real time the micro-structure agitation by plotting what we call "speckle rate" (SR) as a function of time. We show the hardware configuration and 3 typical experiments made with HORUS(R) film formation analyser.

  11. Multiple wavelength photolithography for preparing multilayer microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2003-06-24

    The invention relates to a multilayer microstructure and a method for preparing thereof. The method involves first applying a first photodefinable composition having a first exposure wavelength on a substrate to form a first polymeric layer. A portion of the first photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the first exposure wavelength to form a first pattern in the first polymeric layer. After exposing the first polymeric layer, a second photodefinable composition having a second exposure wavelength is applied on the first polymeric layer to form a second polymeric layer. A portion of the second photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the second exposure wavelength to form a second pattern in the second polymeric layer. In addition, a portion of each layer is removed according to the patterns to form a multilayer microstructure having a cavity having a shape that corresponds to the portions removed.

  12. Microstructural investigation of thermally treated titanium subhydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.S.; Wittberg, T.N.; Wolf, J.D.

    1984-09-05

    The ignition of titanium subhydride/potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic blends is influenced by the diffusion of oxygen into the titanium subhydride fuel. The following work is a preliminary study of the microstructural changes that take place during the dehydriding of titanium subhydride. Samples of TiH/sub 1/ /sub 63/ were dehydrided at temperatures between 625 and 775/sup 0/C. In the partially dehydrided samples, evidence of three different phases - ..cap alpha.. Ti (hexagonal), ..beta.. Ti (cubic), and ..gamma.. TiH/sub 2/ (cubic) - was seen. Microstructural examination of a TiH/sub 1/ /sub 15/ sample that had a layered structure is also reported. A furnace constructed for hydriding titanium foils is also described. Titanium subhydride foils having the stoichiometries TiH/sub 1/ /sub 53/ and TiH/sub 0/ /sub 87/ were prepared using this furnace.

  13. MDF cements: Chemistry, processing and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, A.J.; Tan, L.S.; Lewis, J.

    1995-12-31

    Macro-Defect-Free (MDF) cements are low water content, polymer-cement composites which can exhibit flexural strengths over 30 times in excess of normally cast cement. The microstructure of hardened MDF, responsible for the vastly improved properties, is the direct outcome of mechano-chemically induced reactions which take place during shear mixing of the damp powder. Mixing torque curves exhibit a characteristic shape which reflects the temperature and shear-rate-dependent kinetics of the polymer-cement crosslinking reactions. These kinetics are parametrically related to the viscoelastic and Theological properties of the paste which also enhance its overall processability. The evolution of overall composite structure and the microstructure of the cement-polymer interphase region are quantified using scanning and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersion spectrometry. Mechanical flexural strength of the hardened composites are also determined.

  14. Duplex stainless steel—Microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debold, Terry A.

    1989-03-01

    Literature describing the microstructure of austenitic-ferritic stainless steels is reviewed, including phases which can be deleterious, such as σ and ά. The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Carpenter Technology's 7-Mo PLUSsr stainless (UNS S32950) demonstrate the resistance of this material to the formation of these phases and their deleterious effects. This material was evaluated in the annealed and welded conditions and after extended thermal treatments to simulate boiler and pressure vessel service.

  15. Temperature history and microstructure of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang Tsair.

    1992-05-01

    A simple process for the attainment of fully dense and improved microstructure for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics has been developed. Pure, narrow size distribution, submicron powder is used. Homogenization heat treatment of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder compacts at 800{degree}C for 50 hours produces more uniform pore structure and higher green strength. Pore size distribution becomes narrower. Near fully dense, fine-grained (< 1.2{mu}m) and uniform grain size-distribution, undoped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics can be produced using a high quality powder, a high-pressure cold isostatic forming method, and a two-step sintering technique. Improvements in the microstructure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics homogenized at 800{degree}C/50 h include a smaller pore size and a more uniform pore size distribution. Prevention of differential densification in the early stages and delay of pore channel closure to the later stages of sintering are believed to be the primary mechanisms for the microstructure improvement in two-step sintering. Two-step sintering is an alternate way to improve the microstructure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics compared to fast firing or MgO doping. When a homogenization heat treatment and the fast firing are combined, the final density is higher than from fast firing alone. However, the two-step sintering technique is simple and there is no size limit. Generalization of two-step sintering to more systems is needed. For 250 ppM MgO-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics, homogenization of powder compacts at 800{degree}C for 50 hours produces 0.80{mu}m. This improvement is explained by the distribution of MgO becoming more uniform during the homogenization heat treatment, which enhances the effectiveness of MgO doping.

  16. Self-modulational formation of pulsar microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, A. C.-L.; Kennel, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    A nonlinear plasma theory for self-modulation of pulsar radio pulses is discussed. A nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived for strong electromagnetic waves propagating in an electron-positron plasma. The nonlinearities arising from wave-intensity-induced particle-mass variation may excite the modulational instability of circularly and linearly polarized pulsar radiation. The resulting wave envelopes can take the form of periodic wave trains or solitons. These nonlinear stationary waveforms may account for the formation of pulsar microstructures.

  17. Microstructural design in low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycombe, R. W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of microalloyed steels from plain carbon steels is examined with emphasis on grain size control by use of Nb, Ti and V additions and by the application of controlled rolling. The structural changes during controlled rolling are described as well as the influence of alloying elements on these changes, and on the final microstructure. The achievement of high strength and toughness is discussed including the role of inclusions.

  18. Self-modulational formation of pulsar microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, A. C.-L.; Kennel, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear plasma theory for self modulation of pulsar radio pulses is discussed. A nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived for strong electromagnetic waves propagating in an electron positron plasma. The nonlinearities arising from wave intensity induced particle mass variation may excite the modulational instability of circularly and linearly polarized pulsar radiation. The resulting wave envelopes can take the form of periodic wave trains or solitons. These nonlinear stationary waveforms may account for the formation of pulsar microstructures.

  19. A simple microstructure return model explaining microstructure noise and Epps effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A.; Sornette, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel simple microstructure model of financial returns that combines (i) the well-known ARFIMA process applied to tick-by-tick returns, (ii) the bid-ask bounce effect, (iii) the fat tail structure of the distribution of returns and (iv) the non-Poissonian statistics of inter-trade intervals. This model allows us to explain both qualitatively and quantitatively important stylized facts observed in the statistics of both microstructure and macrostructure returns, including the short-ranged correlation of returns, the long-ranged correlations of absolute returns, the microstructure noise and Epps effects. According to the microstructure noise effect, volatility is a decreasing function of the time-scale used to estimate it. The Epps effect states that cross correlations between asset returns are increasing functions of the time-scale at which the returns are estimated. The microstructure noise is explained as the result of the negative return correlations inherent in the definition of the bid-ask bounce component (ii). In the presence of a genuine correlation between the returns of two assets, the Epps effect is due to an average statistical overlap of the momentum of the returns of the two assets defined over a finite time-scale in the presence of the long memory process (i).

  20. From Microstructures to Predict Properties of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Gang

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the precise and fundamental manner in which materials structures (nanostructures or microstructures) and their evolution influences properties and service lifetimes of advanced materials profoundly impacts material design and today materials design plays an increasingly important rôle in many engineering applications. Linking structures to properties and predicting properties of materials is fundamental step for materials design. First, a framework of applications of multiscale modeling to property prediction of advanced materials will be briefly presented. As an example, a methodology will be shown to link micro-scale to the continuum scale, integrating microstructure modeling with the large Thermo-Calc^ database. This paradigm was successfully applied to the case of Fe-12Ni-6Mn maraging steel. Next, methodology for integrating first-principle calculation into simulations of microstructure evolution will be reviewed. Our methods are sufficiently reliable to permit control and fabrication of quantum-dots structures, nanocrystals, and particle-reinforced nanocomposites, as well as assist in the predictive behavior of macro-scale colloids, aerosols, and other soft matter systems.

  1. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Micro-EDM for silicon microstructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaozhong; Reynaerts, Dominiek; Meeusen, Wim; Van Brussel, Hendrik

    1999-03-01

    Currently, most silicon microstructures used in microstructures are produced by photolithographic methods. The reason for this is the well-developed etching technology, used in microelectronics, that has been transferred to the microsystem domain. But since the making of an arbitrary shape or angle on silicon mainly depends on the crystal orientation, some severe limits exist in the production of 3D structures. Electro-discharge machining (EDM) is basically a thermal process. During the EDM process material is removed by electric sparking. It is therefore completely different from etching. In this work, micro-EDM is introduce as a potential approach for solving the above mentioned drawbacks. First, this work presents several testing experiments with different process parameters to investigate the influence of the micro-EDM process on the silicon structure. Main emphasis is put on the surface roughness and on avoiding microcracks generated by the sparking process. It is found that microstructures with a sufficiently low surface roughness and with small microcracks can be produced. The remainder of the work concentrates on making small beam structures, which is a common structure in many microsensor designs. It is found that for a wafer thickness of 650 micrometers , the thinnest beam that can be produced is about 30 micrometers wide. This means that micro-EDM can offer an aspect ratio of 20 in combination with a god dimensional control.

  3. FAME: Software for analysing rock microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammes, Daniel M.; Peternell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Determination of rock microstructures leads to a better understanding of the formation and deformation of polycrystalline solids. Here, we present FAME (Fabric Analyser based Microstructure Evaluation), an easy-to-use MATLAB®-based software for processing datasets recorded by an automated fabric analyser microscope. FAME is provided as a MATLAB®-independent Windows® executable with an intuitive graphical user interface. Raw data from the fabric analyser microscope can be automatically loaded, filtered and cropped before analysis. Accurate and efficient rock microstructure analysis is based on an advanced user-controlled grain labelling algorithm. The preview and testing environments simplify the determination of appropriate analysis parameters. Various statistic and plotting tools allow a graphical visualisation of the results such as grain size, shape, c-axis orientation and misorientation. The FAME2elle algorithm exports fabric analyser data to an elle (modelling software)-supported format. FAME supports batch processing for multiple thin section analysis or large datasets that are generated for example during 2D in-situ deformation experiments. The use and versatility of FAME is demonstrated on quartz and deuterium ice samples.

  4. Model for halftone color prediction from microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agar, A. U.

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we take a microstructure model based approach to the problem of color prediction of halftones created using an inkjet printer. We assume absorption and scattering of light through the colorant layers and model the subsurface light scattering in the substrate by a Gaussian point spread function. We restrict our analysis to transparent substrates. To model the absorption and scattering of light through the colorant layers, we employ the Kubelka-Munk color mixing mode. To model the scattering in the substrate and to predict the spectral distribution, we use a wavelength dependent version of the reflection prediction model developed by Ruckdeschel and Hauser. Using spectral distributions and ink weight measurements for transparencies completely and homogeneously coated with colorants, we compute the absorption and scattering spectra of the colorants using the Kubelka-Munk theory. We train our model using measured spectral distribution and synthesized microstructure images of primary ramps printed on transparent media. For each patch in the primary ramp, we synthesize a high-resolution halftone microstructure image from the halftone bitmap assuming dot profiles with Gaussian roll-offs, form which we compute a high-resolution transmission image using the Kubelka-Munk theory and the absorption and scattering spectra of the colorants. We then convolve this transmission image with the Gaussian point spread function of the transparent substrate to predict the average spectral distribution of the halftone. We use our model to predict the spectral distribution of a secondary ramp printed on the same media.

  5. Damage Tolerant Microstructures for Shock Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Ellen; Dennis-Koller, Darcie; Escobedo, Juan Pablo; Fensin, Saryu; Valone, Steve; Trujillo, Carl; Bronkhorst, Curt; Lebensohn, Ricardo

    While dynamic failure, due to shock loading, has been studied for many years, our current ability to predict and simulate evolving damage during dynamic loading remains limited. One reason for this is due to the lack of understanding for the linkages between process-induced as well as evolved microstructure and damage. To this end, the role of microstructure on the early stages of dynamic damage has been studied in high purity Ta and Cu. This work, which utilizes plate-impact experiments to interrogate these effects, has recently been extended to a subset to Cu-alloys (Cu-Pb, Cu-Nb, and Cu-Ag). These multi-length scale studies, have identified a number of linkages between damage nucleation and growth and microstructural features such as: grain boundary types, grain boundary orientation with respect to loading direction, grain orientation, and bi-metal interfaces. A combination of modeling and simulation techniques along with experimental observation has been utilized to examine the mechanisms for the ductile damage processes such as nucleation, growth and coalescence. This work has identified differing features of importance for damage nucleation in high purity and alloyed materials, lending insight into features of concern for mitigating shock induced damage in more complicated alloy systems.

  6. Assessment of Bone Microstructural Changes by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that age related increases in bone porosity without significant changes in bone mineral density (BMD) (without bone microstructural information) result in a decrease in bone strength. Bone fracture toughness is also significantly correlated to changes in porosity, microarchitecture, collagen integrity, microdamage, and water distribution, all of which are measures of bone quality. Unfortunately, current technology does not allow the non-destructive and non-invasive detection of bone water distribution or other measures of bone quality including microporosity. On the other hand, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation time measurements and computational analytical method have been used to determine microstructural characteristics of various types of fluid filled porous materials. The study in here is to demonstrate that non-destructive and non-invasive NMR proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation techniques has been developed and applied to quantify the porosity, pore size distribution and water distribution in human cortical bone. This new bone microstructural information can then be used as descriptions of bone quality and, along or in combination with existing method (BMD) to more accurately assess bone fracture risk, and the results could help doctors and researchers to detect osteoporosis and other conditions related to weak bones in persons.

  7. Microcontact printing of proteins inside microstructures.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer; Schmid, Heinz; Stutz, Richard; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2005-11-22

    Microfluidic devices are well suited for the miniaturization of biological assays, in particular when only small volumes of samples and reagents are available, short time to results is desirable, and multiple analytes are to be detected. Microfluidic networks (MFNs), which fill by means of capillary forces, have already been used to detect important biological analytes with high sensitivity and in a combinatorial fashion. These MFNs were coated with Au, onto which a hydrophilic, protein-repellent monolayer of thiolated poly(ethyleneglycol) (HS-PEG) was self-assembled, and the binding sites for analytes were present on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealing cover. We report here a set of simple methods to extend previous work on MFNs by integrating binding sites for analytes inside the microstructures of MFNs using microcontact printing (muCP). First, fluorescently labeled antibodies (Abs) were microcontact-printed from stamps onto planar model surfaces such as glass, Si, Si/SiO2, Au, and Au derivatized with HS-PEG to investigate how much candidate materials for MFNs would quench the fluorescence of printed, labeled Abs. Au coated with HS-PEG led to a fluorescence signal that was approximately 65% weaker than that of glass but provided a convenient surface for printing Abs and for rendering the microstructures of the MFNs wettable. Then, proteins were inked from solution onto the surface of PDMS (Sylgard 184) stamps having continuous or discontinuous micropatterns or locally inked onto planar stamps to investigate how the aspect ratio (depth:width) of microstructures and the printing conditions affected the transfer of protein and the accuracy of the resulting patterns. By applying a controlled pressure to the back of the stamp, Abs were accurately microcontact-printed into the recessed regions of MFNs if the aspect ratio of the MFN microstructures was lower than approximately 1:6. Finally, the realization of a simple assay between Abs (used as antigens

  8. Microstructural and continuum evolution modeling of sintering.

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, Michael V.; Olevsky, Eugene A.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Tikare, Veena; Garino, Terry J.; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    All ceramics and powder metals, including the ceramics components that Sandia uses in critical weapons components such as PZT voltage bars and current stacks, multi-layer ceramic MET's, ahmindmolybdenum & alumina cermets, and ZnO varistors, are manufactured by sintering. Sintering is a critical, possibly the most important, processing step during manufacturing of ceramics. The microstructural evolution, the macroscopic shrinkage, and shape distortions during sintering will control the engineering performance of the resulting ceramic component. Yet, modeling and prediction of sintering behavior is in its infancy, lagging far behind the other manufacturing models, such as powder synthesis and powder compaction models, and behind models that predict engineering properties and reliability. In this project, we developed a model that was capable of simulating microstructural evolution during sintering, providing constitutive equations for macroscale simulation of shrinkage and distortion during sintering. And we developed macroscale sintering simulation capability in JAS3D. The mesoscale model can simulate microstructural evolution in a complex powder compact of hundreds or even thousands of particles of arbitrary shape and size by 1. curvature-driven grain growth, 2. pore migration and coalescence by surface diffusion, 3. vacancy formation, grain boundary diffusion and annihilation. This model was validated by comparing predictions of the simulation to analytical predictions for simple geometries. The model was then used to simulate sintering in complex powder compacts. Sintering stress and materials viscous module were obtained from the simulations. These constitutive equations were then used by macroscopic simulations for simulating shrinkage and shape changes in FEM simulations. The continuum theory of sintering embodied in the constitutive description of Skorohod and Olevsky was combined with results from microstructure evolution simulations to model shrinkage and

  9. Texture, microstructure and formability of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang-Ming

    Texture, microstructure and formability were studied in Direct Chill Cast (DC) and Strip Cast (SC) aluminum alloys with regard to crystallographic anisotropy, the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect and aging softening behavior. It was found that material properties change greatly with manufacturing processes (DC vs. SC) and chemical composition (3xxx vs. 5xxx alloys). DC cast hot band materials are usually fully recrystallized and have strong softening textures while SC hot band materials have a rolling structure with strong deformation textures. Softening textures cause 90° earing, while deformation textures result in 45° earing after deep drawing. During cold rolling, 90° earing in DC cast hot band materials decreases and eventually changes to 45° earing after certain degrees of cold reduction. Correspondingly, the intensity of the softening texture components in DC cast hot band materials decreases while the intensity of deformation texture components increases with increasing degrees of cold reduction. These two kinds of textures interact and attempt to balance each other during cold rolling which produces resultant earing. However, this is not true for SC hot band materials since it's hard to obtain strong softening textures and thus 90° earing in these materials. 5xxx Al-Mg alloys are more difficult to work than 3xxx aluminum alloys. Elevated temperature annealing, which greatly reduces the strength (hardness), improves significantly the workability of Al-Mg alloys. On the other hand, the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect and aging softening behavior are stronger in Al-Mg alloys than in 3xxx aluminum alloys, and both increase with increasing cold reduction and with increasing Mg content. An apparent tensile anisotropy exists in as received SC hot band materials. The tensile yield strength (YS) is smaller in the QD (45° to the rolling direction) and larger in the RD (rolling direction) and the TD (transverse direction). There is no obvious difference in YS between

  10. Influence of microstructure on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.P.; Putatunda, S.K.

    1997-07-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron. Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with nickel, copper, and molybdenum was austenitized and subsequently austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized through optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and was correlated with the microstructure. The results of the present investigation indicate that the lower bainitic microstructure results in higher fracture toughness than upper bainitic microstructure. Both volume fraction of retained austenite and its carbon content influence the fracture toughness. The retained austenite content of 25 vol pct was found to provide the optimum fracture toughness. It was further concluded that the carbon content of the retained austenite should be as high as possible to improve fracture toughness.

  11. Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

    1998-10-01

    This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

  12. Microstructure Optimization in Fuel Cell Electrodes using Materials Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Saheli, Ghazal; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2006-08-01

    Abstract A multiscale model based on statistical continuum mechanics is proposed to predict the mechanical and electrical properties of heterogeneous porous media. This model is applied within the framework of microstructure sensitive design (MSD) to guide the design of the microstructure in porous lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) fuel cell electrode. To satisfy the property requirement and compatibility, porosity and its distribution can be adjusted under the guidance of MSD to achieve optimized microstructure.

  13. Supersoft lithography: candy-based fabrication of soft silicone microstructures.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Christopher; Labuz, Joseph M; Shao, Yue; Fu, Jianping; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We designed a fabrication technique able to replicate microstructures in soft silicone materials (E < 1 kPa). Sugar-based 'hard candy' recipes from the confectionery industry were modified to be compatible with silicone processing conditions, and used as templates for replica molding. Microstructures fabricated in soft silicones can then be easily released by dissolving the template in water. We anticipate that this technique will be of particular importance in replicating physiologically soft, microstructured environments for cell culture, and demonstrate a first application in which intrinsically soft microstructures are used to measure forces generated by fibroblast-laden contractile tissues. PMID:26245893

  14. Relationships between microstructure and microfissuring in alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microfissures which occur in the weld heat affected zone of alloy 718 can be a limiting factor in the material's weldability. Several studies have attempted to relate microfissuring susceptibility to processing conditions, microstructure, and/or heat-to-heat chemistry differences. The present investigation studies the relationships between microstructure and microfissuring by isolating a particular microstructural feature and measuring microfissuring as a function of that feature. Results to date include the identification of a microstructure-microfissure sequence, microfissuring susceptibility as a function of grain size, and microfissuring susceptibility as a function of solution annealing time.

  15. Influence of microstructure on the properties of resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Babu, S.S.; Riemer, B.W.; Feng, Z.

    1998-11-01

    An integrated model approach was proposed for relating resistance welding parameters to weldment properties. A key element of the approach is microstructure modeling. It was demonstrated that existing process models and microstructure models can be used to determine the spatial distribution of microstructures and properties in resistance spot welds of a plain carbon steel. It was also shown by finite element analysis that the existence of microstructure gradients in the welds is expected to reduce their ability to support shear loads by about 50%.

  16. Liquid-filled hollow core microstructured polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Cox, F M; Argyros, A; Large, M C J

    2006-05-01

    Guidance in a liquid core is possible with microstructured optical fibers, opening up many possibilities for chemical and biochemical fiber-optic sensing. In this work we demonstrate how the bandgaps of a hollow core microstructured polymer optical fiber scale with the refractive index of liquid introduced into the holes of the microstructure. Such a fiber is then filled with an aqueous solution of (-)-fructose, and the resulting optical rotation measured. Hence, we show that hollow core microstructured polymer optical fibers can be used for sensing, whilst also fabricating a chiral optical fiber based on material chirality, which has many applications in its own right. PMID:19516562

  17. Microstructural influences on the mechanical properties of solder

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Goldstein, J.L.F.; Mei, Z.

    1993-04-01

    Intent of this book is to review analytic methods for predicting behavior of solder joints, based on continuum mechanics. The solder is treated as a continuous, homogeneous body, or composite of such bodies, whose mechanical behavior is uniform and governed by simple constitutive equations. The microstructure of a solder joint influences its mechanical properties in 3 ways: it governs deformation and failure; common solders deform inhomogeneously; and common solders are microstructurally unstable. The variety of microstructures often found in solder joints are briefly reviewed, and some of the ways are discussed in which the microstructure influences the common types of high-temperature mechanical behavior. 25 figs, 40 refs.

  18. Terahertz microstructured optical fibers: An analytical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Varshney, R. K.; Pal, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have wavelength scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional microstructured cladding might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms over an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz (THz) frequency region. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. We analytically study the modal properties of terahertz microstructured optical fiber (THz MOF), by using our analytical field model, developed for optical waveguides.

  19. Anisotropic microstructured poly(vinyl alcohol) tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andrew; Harris, Paul; Gouws, Gideon

    2010-07-01

    Novel microstructured PVA phantoms mimicking fibrous tissues have been developed using a simple freeze-casting process. Scanning electron micrographs reveal highly anisotropic microstructure with dimensions of the order of 5 to 100 microm. Characterization of an example phantom revealed acoustic properties consistent with those found in fibrous tissues. At 20 MHz, the velocity measured parallel to the microstructure orientation of 1555 ms(-1) was significantly greater than that perpendicular to the microstructure of 1537 ms(-1). The attenuation coefficient was measured to be 5 dBxmm(-1) and proportional to the 1.6 power of frequency, which is in good agreement with that for normal human myocardium. PMID:20639144

  20. Microstructure Related Properties of Optical Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, John James, Jr.

    Both the optical and physical properties of thin film optical interference coatings depend upon the microstructure of the deposited films. This microstructure is strongly columnar with voids between the columns. Computer simulations of the film growth process indicate that the two most important factors responsible for this columnar growth are a limited mobility of the condensing molecules and self-shadowing by molecules already deposited. During the vacuum deposition of thin films, the microstructure can be influenced by many parameters, such as substrate temperature and vacuum pressure. By controlling these parameters and introducing additional ones, thin film coatings can be improved. In this research, ultraviolet irradiation and ion bombardment were examined as additional parameters. Past studies have shown that post-deposition ultraviolet irradiation can be used to relieve stress and reduce absorption in the far ultraviolet of silicon dioxide films. Ion bombardment has been used to reduce stress, improve packing density, and increase resistance to moisture penetration. Three refractory oxide materials commonly used in thin film coatings were studied; they are silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zirconium dioxide. Both single-layer films and narrowband filters made of these materials were examined. A 1000-watt mercury-xenon lamp was used to provide ultraviolet irradiation. An inverted magnetron ion source was used to produce argon and oxygen ions. Ultraviolet irradiation was found to reduce the absorption and slightly increase the index of refraction in zirconium oxide films. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that ultraviolet irradiation caused titanium oxide films to become more amorphous; their absorption in the ultraviolet was slightly reduced. No changes were noted in film durability. Ion bombardment enhanced the tetragonal (lll) peak of zirconium oxide but increased the absorption of both zirconium oxide and titanium oxide films. The titanium oxide

  1. Third Generation of AHSS: Microstructure Design Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlock, David K.; Speer, John G.

    In recent years there has been an increased emphasis on the development of new advanced high strength sheet steels (AHSS), particularly for automotive applications. Descriptive terminology has evolved to describe the “First Generation” of AHSS, i.e. steels that possess primarily ferrite-based microstructures, and the “Second Generation” of AHSS, i.e. austenitic steels with high manganese contents which include steels that are closely related to austenitic stainless steels. First generation AHSS have been referred to by a variety of names including dual phase (DP), transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), complex-phase (CP), and martensitic (MART). Second generation austenitic AHSS include twinninginduced plasticity (TWIP) steels, Al-added lightweight steels with induced plasticity (L-IP®), and shear band strengthened steels (SIP steels). Recently there has been increased interest in the development of the “Third Generation” of AHSS, i.e. steels with strength-ductility combinations significantly better than exhibited by the first generation AHSS but at a cost significantly less than required for second generation AHSS. Approaches to the development of third generation AHSS will require unique alloy/microstructure combinations to achieve the desired properties. Results from a recent composite modeling analysis have shown that the third generation of AHSS will include materials with complex microstructures consisting of a high strength phase (e.g. ultra-fine grained ferrite, martensite, or bainite) and significant amounts of a constituent with substantial ductility and work hardening (e.g. austenite). In this paper, design methodologies based on considerations of fundamental strengthening mechanisms are presented and evaluated to assess the potential for developing new materials. Several processing routes will be assessed, including the recently identified Quenching & Partitioning (Q&P) process developed in the authors’ own laboratory.

  2. Microstructure Informed Tractography: Pitfalls and Open Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Daducci, Alessandro; Dal Palú, Alessandro; Descoteaux, Maxime; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    One of the major limitations of diffusion MRI tractography is that the fiber tracts recovered by existing algorithms are not truly quantitative. Local techniques for estimating more quantitative features of the tissue microstructure exist, but their combination with tractography has always been considered intractable. Recent advances in local and global modeling made it possible to fill this gap and a number of promising techniques for microstructure informed tractography have been suggested, opening new and exciting perspectives for the quantification of brain connectivity. The ease-of-use of the proposed solutions made it very attractive for researchers to include such advanced methods in their analyses; however, this apparent simplicity should not hide some critical open questions raised by the complexity of these very high-dimensional problems, otherwise some fundamental issues may be pushed into the background. The aim of this article is to raise awareness in the diffusion MRI community, notably researchers working on brain connectivity, about some potential pitfalls and modeling choices that make the interpretation of the outcomes from these novel techniques rather cumbersome. Through a series of experiments on synthetic and real data, we illustrate practical situations where erroneous and severely biased conclusions may be drawn about the connectivity if these pitfalls are overlooked, like the presence of partial/missing/duplicate fibers or the critical importance of the diffusion model adopted. Microstructure informed tractography is a young but very promising technology, and by acknowledging its current limitations as done in this paper, we hope our observations will trigger further research in this direction and new ideas for truly quantitative and biologically meaningful analyses of the connectivity. PMID:27375412

  3. Microstructure Informed Tractography: Pitfalls and Open Challenges.

    PubMed

    Daducci, Alessandro; Dal Palú, Alessandro; Descoteaux, Maxime; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    One of the major limitations of diffusion MRI tractography is that the fiber tracts recovered by existing algorithms are not truly quantitative. Local techniques for estimating more quantitative features of the tissue microstructure exist, but their combination with tractography has always been considered intractable. Recent advances in local and global modeling made it possible to fill this gap and a number of promising techniques for microstructure informed tractography have been suggested, opening new and exciting perspectives for the quantification of brain connectivity. The ease-of-use of the proposed solutions made it very attractive for researchers to include such advanced methods in their analyses; however, this apparent simplicity should not hide some critical open questions raised by the complexity of these very high-dimensional problems, otherwise some fundamental issues may be pushed into the background. The aim of this article is to raise awareness in the diffusion MRI community, notably researchers working on brain connectivity, about some potential pitfalls and modeling choices that make the interpretation of the outcomes from these novel techniques rather cumbersome. Through a series of experiments on synthetic and real data, we illustrate practical situations where erroneous and severely biased conclusions may be drawn about the connectivity if these pitfalls are overlooked, like the presence of partial/missing/duplicate fibers or the critical importance of the diffusion model adopted. Microstructure informed tractography is a young but very promising technology, and by acknowledging its current limitations as done in this paper, we hope our observations will trigger further research in this direction and new ideas for truly quantitative and biologically meaningful analyses of the connectivity. PMID:27375412

  4. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  5. Microstructurally Controlled Composites with Optimal Elastodynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hossein

    Periodic composites (PCs) are artificial materials with specially designed microstructure to manage stress waves. The objective of this dissertation is to study various techniques for microstructural design of PCs for a desired elastodynamic response. A mixed variational formulation is studied for band structure calculation of PCs. Dynamic homogenization is studied for calculation of the frequency dependent effective properties of PCs. Optimization techniques are used together with mixed variational formulation and dynamic homogenization to make a computational platform for microstructural design of PCs. Several PCs are designed and fabricated, and various tests are performed for experimental verification. First, band-gap in one- and two-dimensional PCs is investigated experimentally. Mixed variational formulation is used to design samples with band-gaps at frequencies convenient to conduct experiment. Samples are fabricated and their transmission coefficient is measured. Experimental data are compared with theoretical results for evaluation of the band structure. Using constituent materials with temperature dependent material properties, it is also shown that band structure of PCs can be tuned by changing the ambient temperature. Furthermore, dynamic homogenization is used to design a one-dimensional PC for acoustic impedance matching. As a result, the reflection of stress waves at the interface of two impedance matched media becomes zero. Samples are fabricated and ultrasound tests are performed to measure the reflection coefficient for experimental verification. In addition, a one-dimensional PC with metamaterial response is designed to achieve a composite with both high stiffness-to-density ratio and high attenuation at low frequency regime. Samples are fabricated and the attenuation coefficient is measured for experimental verification. Moreover, optimal design of PCs for shock wave mitigation is investigated. A genetic algorithm is used to design the

  6. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  7. Microstructural Characterization of Polymers with Positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1997-01-01

    Positrons provide a versatile probe for monitoring microstructural features of molecular solids. In this paper, we report on positron lifetime measurements in two different types of polymers. The first group comprises polyacrylates processed on earth and in space. The second group includes fully-compatible and totally-incompatible Semi-Interpenetrating polymer networks of thermosetting and thermoplastic polyimides. On the basis of lifetime measurements, it is concluded that free volumes are a direct reflection of physical/electromagnetic properties of the host polymers.

  8. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  9. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  10. Microstructural diagnosis using electromagnetic wave scattering methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kevin Jenn Chien

    Scattered electromagnetic waves were used in the present work to characterize the microstructural effects on the performance of metallic materials. A Nisb3Al alloy with a dendritic microstructure has exhibited better creep resistance compared to similar alloys having equiaxed microstructure of grains. X-ray diffraction was applied along the dendritic arms to investigate their orientations. Both the interlocking boundaries and crystallographic texture of the dendritic arms resulted in the superior creep behavior. Non-invasive laser scattering was also used to optically probe smooth fatigue specimens to detect and monitor the development of fatigue damage. Inconel 718 specimens with a cylindrical geometry were tested under low cycle fatigue conditions with constant strain amplitudes ranging from 0.3% to 1%. A detection scheme to minimize computational time and memory was used to achieve in-situ data analysis. Both laser scanning and surface replication procedures were periodically performed throughout the life of the specimens. The scattered light signals were compared with microcrack length and density data from surface replicate SEM images. Three characteristic stages of the scattering signal were observed. The scanning laser light scattering (SLLS) technique was sufficiently robust, and well suited for the non-planar geometry in the leading edge. The SLLS signals correlated well with microstructural features over a large surface area. A physical model of microcrack size distribution within a surface grain was developed. The results of the model suggest that a SLLS signal saturation which coincides with the onset of microcrack density saturation corresponds to a transition from predominately single grain microcracks to microcracks that transverse multiple grains. The saturation of SLLS signal versus mean surface crack length also provided the following findings. Low cycle fatigue cracks were contained and saturated in those surface grains with the highest Schmid

  11. Compliant electrostatic chuck based on hairy microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeki; Soda, Fumiaki; Dhelika, Radon; Takahashi, Kunio; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck (ESC) is a device used to clamp and transport flat-surfaced objects such as thin semiconductor wafers. Working by the principle of electrostatic force, its functionality is limited in handling objects with rough surfaces, as the attractive forces at work are significantly reduced. To improve this weak point, by employing 70 μm diameter polymer-based electrostatic inductive fibers with a conductive core, we develop a device prototype with an adhesional mechanism having a hairy microstructure with appropriate mechanical compliance. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the prototype works, and how the fibers’ mechanical compliance affects the performance of ESC.

  12. Electrochromic oxides: Microstructures and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Granqvist, C.G.

    1993-12-31

    This paper attempts to lay down a foundation for a comprehensive theory of electrochromism among oxides. It is pointed out that crystals of all the well known electrochromic metal (Me) oxides are composed of MeO{sub 6} octahedra in various corner-sharing and edge-sharing arrangements. In electrochromic thin films there are cluster-type and columnar microstructures based on the MeO{sub 6} units. The coordination of the ions leads to schematic electronic bandstructures that, at least for the (defect) perovskite and rutile lattices, are able to explain the presence or absence of cathodic and anodic electrochromism. Small polaron absorption prevails in disordered oxides.

  13. Microstructural evolution of Udimet 720 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Calliari, I.; Magrini, M.; Dabala, M.

    1999-02-01

    The microstructural evolution of the nickel-base superalloy Udimet 720 (Special Metals Corp., New Hartford, NY) aged at 850 C for 1000 to 2000 h is presented. After aging, the {gamma}{prime} precipitates change from cubic to globular morphology. Secondary {gamma}{prime} particles and topologically close-packed phases were not found. The {gamma}{prime} mean diameter increases with aging times, following the Lifshitz-Wagner model. The experimented aging times have no strong effects on mechanical properties of Udimet 720.

  14. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Porous Mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Chwan-Hai Harold

    Mullite (3 Al2O3 : 2 SiO2) is a technologically important ceramic due to its thermal stability, corrosion resistance, and mechanical robustness. One variant, porous acicular mullite (ACM), has a unique needle-like microstructure and is the material platform for The Dow Chemical Company's diesel particulate filter AERIFY(TM). The investigation described herein focuses on the microstructure-mechanical property relationships in acicular mullites as well as those with traditional porous microstructures with the goal of illuminating the critical factors in determining their modulus, strength, and toughness. Mullites with traditional pore morphologies were made to serve as references via slipcasting of a kaolinite-alumina-starch slurry. The starch was burned out to leave behind a pore network, and the calcined body was then reaction-sintered at 1600C to form mullite. The samples had porosities of approximately 60%. Pore size and shape were altered by using different starch templates, and pore size was found to influence the stiffness and toughness. The ACM microstructure was varied along three parameters: total porosity, pore size, and needle size. Total porosity was found to dominate the mechanical behavior of ACM, while increases in needle and pore size increased the toughness at lower porosities. ACM was found to have much improved (˜130%) mechanical properties relative to its non-acicular counterpart at the same porosity. A second set of investigations studied the role of the intergranular glassy phase which wets the needle intersections of ACM. Removal of the glassy phase via an HF etch reduced the mechanical properties by ˜30%, highlighting the intergranular phase's importance to the enhanced mechanical properties of ACM. The composition of the glassy phase was altered by doping the ACM precursor with magnesium and neodymium. Magnesium doping resulted in ACM with greatly reduced fracture strength and toughness. Studies showed that the mechanical properties of the

  16. Microstructural examination of irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Chung, H.M.

    1997-04-01

    Microstructural examination results are reported for a V-5Cr-5Ti unirradiated control specimens of heat BL-63 following annealing at 1050{degrees}C, and V-4Cr-4Ti heat BL-47 irradiated in three conditions from the DHCE experiment: at 425{degrees}C to 31 dpa and 0.39 appm He/dpa, at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 0.54 appm He/dpa and at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 4.17 appm He/dpa.

  17. Electrochemical microstructuring with short voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The application of short (nanosecond) voltage pulses between a tool electrode and a work piece immersed in an electrolyte solution allows the three-dimensional machining of electrochemically active materials with submicrometer resolution. The method is based on the finite charging time constant of the double-layer capacitance, which varies approximately linearly with the local separation between the electrode surfaces. Hence, the polarization of the electrodes during short pulses and subsequent electrochemical reactions are confined to regions where the electrodes are in sufficiently close proximity. This Minireview describes the principles behind electrochemical micro-structuring with short voltage pulses, and its current achievements and limitations. PMID:17111455

  18. Covariant balance laws in continua with microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the Green-Naghdi-Rivlin balance of energy method to continua with microstructure. The key idea is to replace the group of Galilean transformations with the group of diffeomorphisms of the ambient space. A key advantage is that one obtains in a natural way all the needed balance laws on both the macro and micro levels along with two Doyle-Erickson formulas. We model a structured continuum as a triplet of Riemannian manifolds: a material manifold, the ambient space manifold of material particles and a director field manifold. The Green-Naghdi-Rivlin theorem and its extensions for structured continua are critically reviewed. We show that when the ambient space is Euclidean and when the microstructure manifold is the tangent space of the ambient space manifold, postulating a single balance of energy law and its invariance under time-dependent isometries of the ambient space, one obtains conservation of mass, balances of linear and angular momenta but not a separate balance of linear momentum. We develop a covariant elasticity theory for structured continua by postulating that energy balance is invariant under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms of the ambient space, which in this case is the product of two Riemannian manifolds. We then introduce two types of constrained continua in which microstructure manifold is linked to the reference and ambient space manifolds. In the case when at every material point, the microstructure manifold is the tangent space of the ambient space manifold at the image of the material point, we show that the assumption of covariance leads to balances of linear and angular momenta with contributions from both forces and micro-forces along with two Doyle-Ericksen formulas. We show that generalized covariance leads to two balances of linear momentum and a single coupled balance of angular momentum. Using this theory, we covariantly obtain the balance laws for two specific examples, namely elastic

  19. Computer simulations of realistic three-dimensional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuxiong

    A novel and efficient methodology is developed for computer simulations of realistic two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. The simulations incorporate realistic 2D and 3D complex morphologies/shapes, spatial patterns, anisotropy, volume fractions, and size distributions of the microstructural features statistically similar to those in the corresponding real microstructures. The methodology permits simulations of sufficiently large 2D as well as 3D microstructural windows that incorporate short-range (on the order of particle/feature size) as well as long-range (hundred times the particle/feature size) microstructural heterogeneities and spatial patterns at high resolution. The utility of the technique has been successfully demonstrated through its application to the 2D microstructures of the constituent particles in wrought Al-alloys, the 3D microstructure of discontinuously reinforced Al-alloy (DRA) composites containing SiC particles that have complex 3D shapes/morphologies and spatial clustering, and 3D microstructure of boron modified Ti-6Al-4V composites containing fine TiB whiskers and coarse primary TiB particles. The simulation parameters are correlated with the materials processing parameters (such as composition, particle size ratio, extrusion ratio, extrusion temperature, etc.), which enables the simulations of rational virtual 3D microstructures for the parametric studies on microstructure-properties relationships. The simulated microstructures have been implemented in the 3D finite-elements (FE)-based framework for simulations of micro-mechanical response and stress-strain curves. Finally, a new unbiased and assumption free dual-scale virtual cycloids probe for estimating surface area of 3D objects constructed by 2D serial section images is also presented.

  20. Artificial Microstructures to Investigate Microstructure-Property Relationships in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarac, Baran

    Technology has evolved rapidly within the last decade, and the demand for higher performance materials has risen exponentially. To meet this demand, novel materials with advanced microstructures have been developed and are currently in use. However, the already complex microstructure of technological relevant materials imposes a limit for currently used development strategies for materials with optimized properties. For this reason, a strategy to correlate microstructure features with properties is still lacking. Computer simulations are challenged due to the computing size required to analyze multi-scale characteristics of complex materials, which is orders of magnitude higher than today's state of the art. To address these challenges, we introduced a novel strategy to investigate microstructure-property relationships. We call this strategy "artificial microstructure approach", which allows us to individually and independently control microstructural features. By this approach, we defined a new way of analyzing complex microstructures, where microstructural second phase features were precisely varied over a wide range. The artificial microstructures were fabricated by the combination of lithography and thermoplastic forming (TPF), and subsequently characterized under different loading conditions. Because of the suitability and interesting properties of metallic glasses, we proposed to use this toolbox to investigate the different deformation modes in cellular structures and toughening mechanism in metallic glass (MG) composites. This study helped us understand how to combine the unique properties of metallic glasses such as high strength, elasticity, and thermoplastic processing ability with plasticity generated from heterostructures of metallic glasses. It has been widely accepted that metallic glass composites are very complex, and a broad range of contributions have been suggested to explain the toughening mechanism. This includes the shear modulus, morphology

  1. Microstructure Evolution of a Multifunctional Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yu Xing; Hao, Yu Lin

    2016-03-01

    To optimize both mechanical and functional properties of multifunctional titanium alloys via grain refinement, an example of such alloys termed as Ti2448 is adopted to investigate its microstructure evolution and strain rate sensitivity by compression in the single β-phase field. The results show that flow stress and strain rate follow a bilinear relation, which is in sharp contrast with other metallic materials exhibiting a monotonic linearity. Below the critical strain of 1 s-1, the alloy has a normal strain rate sensitivity factor of 0.265. Above the critical value, its hardening rate is ultra-low with a factor of 0.03. Inspite of ultra-low hardening, the alloy is plastic stable under the tested conditions. With the aid of electron back-scattering diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses, microstructure evolution via several mechanisms such as dynamic recovery and recrystallization is evaluated by quantitative measurements of grain misorientation and its distribution, sub-grain formation, and localized grain refinement. These results are helpful to obtain the homogenous ultrafine-grained alloy by multi-step thermo-mechanical processing.

  2. The Microstructural Design of Trimodal Aluminum Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lin; Ma, Kaka; Yang, Hanry; Li, Meijuan; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2014-06-01

    Trimodal composites, consisting of nanocrystalline or ultrafine grains (UFGs), coarse grains (CGs), and ceramic particles, were originally formulated to achieve combinations of physical and mechanical properties that are unattainable with the individual phases, such as strength, ductility, and high-strain-rate deformation. The concept of a trimodal structure is both scientifically novel as well as technologically promising because it provides multiple controllable degrees of freedom that allow for extensive microstructure design. The UFGs provide efficient obstacles for dislocation movement, such as grain boundaries and other crystalline defects. The size, distribution, and spatial arrangement of the CGs can be controlled to provide plasticity during deformation. The size, morphology, and distribution of the reinforcement particles can be tailored to attain various engineering and physical properties. Moreover, the interfaces that form among the various phases also help determine the overall behavior of the trimodal composites. In this article, a review is provided to discuss the selection and design of each component in trimodal Al composites. The toughening and strengthening mechanisms in the trimodal composite structure are discussed, paying particular attention to strategies that can be implemented to tailor microstructures for optimal mechanical behavior. Recent results obtained with high-performance trimodal Al composites that contain nanometric reinforcements are also discussed to highlight the ability to control particle-matrix interface characteristics. Finally, a perspective is provided on potential approaches that can be explored to develop the next generation of trimodal composites, and interesting scientific paradigms that evolve from the proposed design strategies are discussed.

  3. Microstructural analysis of Iberian expanded clay aggregates.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Mauricio, António; Pereira, M F C

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a detailed study of the microstructure of Iberian expanded clay lightweight aggregates (LWA). Other than more commonly used mercury porosimetry (MP) and water absorption methods, the experimental study involves optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtomography (μ-CT). Pore connectivity and how it is deployed are shown to some degree, and the pore size spectrum is estimated. LWA are in general characterized by a dense outer shell up to 200 μm thick, encasing an inner cellular structure of 10-100 times bigger pore size. Aggregate pore sizes may span from some hundreds of nanometers up to over 1 mm, though the range of 1-25 μm is more typical. A noteworthy fraction of these pores is closed, and they are mainly up to 1 μm. It is also shown that macropore spatial arrangement is affected by the manufacturing process. A step forward is given to understanding how the outer shell and the inner pore network influence the mechanical and physical LWA properties, particularly the density and water absorption. The joint consideration of μ-CT and SEM seems to be the most appropriate methodology to study LWA microstructure. MP analysis is likely to distort LWA pore spectrum assessment. PMID:23031601

  4. Metal microstructures in advanced CMOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gignac, L.M.; Rodbell, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    As advanced semiconductor device features shrink, grain boundaries and interfaces become increasingly more important to the properties of thin metal film. With film thickness decreasing to the range of 10 nm and the corresponding features also decreasing to sub-micrometer sizes, interface and grain boundary properties become dominant. In this regime the details of the surface and grain boundaries dictate the interactions between film layers and the subsequent electrical properties. Therefore it is necessary to accurately characterize these materials on the proper length scale in order to first understand and then to improve the device effectiveness. In this talk we will examine the importance of microstructural characterization of thin metal films used in semiconductor devices and show how microstructure can influence the electrical performance. Specifically, we will review Co and Ti silicides for silicon contact and gate conductor applications, Ti/TiN liner films used for adhesion and diffusion barriers in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten vertical wiring (vias) and Ti/AlCu/Ti-TiN films used as planar interconnect metal lines.

  5. R2-Dispersion Simulation of Foam Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baete, S.; De Deene, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The spin-spin relaxation rate R2 ( = 1/T2) in hydrogel foams measured by use of a multi spin echo sequence is found to be dependent on the echo time spacing. This property, referred to as R2-dispersion, originates from both surface relaxation and molecular self-diffusion of water within internal field gradients that result from magnetic susceptibility differences between the gel and air phase. In hydrogel foams, correlations between the average air bubble size and R2-values are found (S. Baete and Y. De Deene, Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med. (15) 37, 2007.). Random walk diffusion is simulated to correlate the R2-dispersion with the foam microstructure (i.e. the mean air bubble radius and standard deviation of the air bubble radius) and foam composition properties (i.e. magnetic susceptibilities, diffusion coefficient and surface relaxivity). Simulations of R2-dispersion are in agreement with NMR measurements of a hydrogel foam. By correlating the R2-dispersion parameters and microstructure properties a semi-empirical relationship is obtained that enables the mean air bubble size to be derived from measured R2-dispersion curves. The R2-derived mean air bubble size of a hydrogel foam is in agreement with the bubble size measured with X-ray micro-CT. This illustrates the applicability of 1H R2-dispersion measurements for the macroscopic determination of the size of air bubbles in hydrogel foams and alveoli in lung tissue.

  6. Stability Study of the RERTR Fuel Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Dennis Keiser; Brandon Miller; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    The irradiation stability of the interaction phases at the interface of fuel and Al alloy matrix as well as the stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice is believed to be very important to the U-Mo fuel performance. In this paper the recent result from TEM characterization of Kr ion irradiated U-10Mo-5Zr alloy will be discussed. The focus will be on the phase stability of Mo2-Zr, a dominated second phase developed at the interface of U-10Mo and the Zr barrier in a monolithic fuel plate from fuel fabrication. The Kr ion irradiations were conducted at a temperature of 200 degrees C to an ion fluence of 2.0E+16 ions/cm2. To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated dispersion U-7Mo fuel and monolithic U-10Mo fuel, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel (3.53E+21 fission/cm3) was used for a TEM in-situ heating experiment. The preliminary result showed extraordinary thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of the TEM observation from these two experiments on the fuel microstructural evolution under irradiation will be discussed.

  7. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  8. Microstructure of high-strength foam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Just, A.; Middendorf, B.

    2009-07-15

    Foam concretes are divided into two groups: on the one hand the physically foamed concrete is mixed in fast rotating pug mill mixers by using foaming agents. This concrete cures under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand the autoclaved aerated concrete is chemically foamed by adding aluminium powder. Afterwards it is cured in a saturated steam atmosphere. New alternatives for the application of foam concretes arise from the combination of chemical foaming and air curing in manufacturing processes. These foam concretes are new and innovative building materials with interesting properties: low mass density and high strength. Responsible for these properties are the macro-, meso- and microporosity. Macropores are created by adding aluminium powder in different volumes and with different particle size distributions. However, the microstructure of the cement matrix is affected by meso- and micropores. In addition, the matrix of the hardened cement paste can be optimized by the specific use of chemical additives for concrete. The influence of aluminium powder and chemical additives on the properties of the microstructure of the hardened cement matrices were investigated by using petrographic microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Fresh fruit: microstructure, texture, and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Delilah F.; Imam, Syed H.; Orts, William J.; Glenn, Gregory M.

    2009-05-01

    Fresh-cut produce has a huge following in today's supermarkets. The trend follows the need to decrease preparation time as well as the desire to follow the current health guidelines for consumption of more whole "heart-healthy" foods. Additionally, consumers are able to enjoy a variety of fresh produce regardless of the local season because produce is now shipped world-wide. However, most fruits decompose rapidly once their natural packaging has been disrupted by cutting. In addition, some intact fruits have limited shelf-life which, in turn, limits shipping and storage. Therefore, a basic understanding of how produce microstructure relates to texture and how microstructure changes as quality deteriorates is needed to ensure the best quality in the both the fresh-cut and the fresh produce markets. Similarities between different types of produce include desiccation intolerance which produces wrinkling of the outer layers, cracking of the cuticle and increased susceptibility to pathogen invasion. Specific examples of fresh produce and their corresponding ripening and storage issues, and degradation are shown in scanning electron micrographs.

  10. Microstructure Evolution of a Multifunctional Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yu Xing; Hao, Yu Lin

    2016-06-01

    To optimize both mechanical and functional properties of multifunctional titanium alloys via grain refinement, an example of such alloys termed as Ti2448 is adopted to investigate its microstructure evolution and strain rate sensitivity by compression in the single β-phase field. The results show that flow stress and strain rate follow a bilinear relation, which is in sharp contrast with other metallic materials exhibiting a monotonic linearity. Below the critical strain of 1 s-1, the alloy has a normal strain rate sensitivity factor of 0.265. Above the critical value, its hardening rate is ultra-low with a factor of 0.03. Inspite of ultra-low hardening, the alloy is plastic stable under the tested conditions. With the aid of electron back-scattering diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses, microstructure evolution via several mechanisms such as dynamic recovery and recrystallization is evaluated by quantitative measurements of grain misorientation and its distribution, sub-grain formation, and localized grain refinement. These results are helpful to obtain the homogenous ultrafine-grained alloy by multi-step thermo-mechanical processing.

  11. Neutral color semitransparent microstructured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. PMID:24467381

  12. Wafer-level microstructuring of glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Loïc. E.; Prater, Karin; Kilchoer, Cédric; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. One application is glass molding that allows to realize high resolution diffractive optical elements on large areas and at affordable price appropriate for mass production. We study glassy carbon microstructuring for future precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature. For applications in optics the uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are very important parameters for a stamp and the final product. We study different methods of microstructuring of glassy carbon by etching and milling. Reactive ion etching with different protection layers such as photoresists, aluminium and titanium hard masks have been performed and will be compare with Ion beam etching. We comment on the quality of the structure definition and give process details as well as drawbacks for the different methods. In our fabrications we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 micron and 700 nm depth qualified for high precision glass molding.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of sheep horn.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The sheep horn presents outstanding mechanical properties of impact resistance and energy absorption, which suits the need of the vehicle bumper design, but the mechanism behind this phenomenon is less investigated. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the sheep horn of Small Tailed Han Sheep (Ovis aries) living in northeast China were investigated in this article. The effect of sampling position and orientation of the sheep horn sheath on mechanical properties were researched by tensile and compression tests. Meanwhile, the surface morphology and microstructure of the sheep horn were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation mechanism of the mechanical properties of the sheep horn was investigated by biological coupling analysis. The analytical results indicated that the outstanding mechanical properties of the sheep horn are determined by configuration, structure, surface morphology and material coupling elements. These biological coupling elements make the sheep horn possess super characteristics of crashworthiness and energy absorption through the internal coupling mechanism. We suppose that these findings would make a difference in vehicle bumper design. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:664-674, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184115

  14. Microstructural development of rapid solidification in Al-Si powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, F.

    1995-11-01

    The microstructure and the gradient of microstructure that forms in rapidly solidificated powder were investigated for different sized particles. High pressure gas atomization solidification process has been used to produce a series of Al-Si alloys powders between 0.2 {mu}m to 150 {mu}m diameter at the eutectic composition (12.6 wt pct Si). This processing technique provides powders of different sizes which solidify under different conditions (i.e. interface velocity and interface undercooling), and thus give different microstructures inside the powders. The large size powder shows dendritic and eutectic microstructures. As the powder size becomes smaller, the predominant morphology changes from eutectic to dendritic to cellular. Microstructures were quantitatively characterized by using optical microscope and SEM techniques. The variation in eutectic spacing within the powders were measured and compared with the theoretical model to obtain interface undercooling, and growth rate during the solidification of a given droplet. Also, nucleation temperature, which controls microstructures in rapidly solidified fine powders, was estimated. A microstructural map which correlates the microstructure with particle size and processing parameters is developed.

  15. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  16. In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Mathews, Royce; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roberts, Kamandi C.

    2010-12-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The engineering properties of CASS made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that are difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of wave interactions with the microstructure. To address the inspection needs, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious effects of the coarse-grained microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam will require knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detecting flaws. The goal of improving the reliability and effectiveness of ultrasonic inspection of CASS specimens can therefore potentially be achieved by first characterizing the microstructure of the component. The characterization of CASS microstructure must be done in-situ, to enable dynamic selection and optimization of the ultrasonic inspection technique. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two consistent microstructures-equiaxed-grain material and columnar-grain material.

  17. Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Iwori; Kawanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Arata

    2015-05-01

    Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5-40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm. PMID:25746259

  18. Essays on Market Microstructure, Behavioral Finance, and Asset Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochec, Marek

    2009-01-01

    This is a study on various aspects of market microstructure, behavioral finance and asset management. In the first chapter we put the PIN variable (Probability of Information-based trading) to test. The PIN variable has been used extensively in the microstructure literature despite the fact that its construction is based on rather strong…

  19. Using prismatic microstructured films for image blending in OLEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Haenichen, Lukas; Pschenitzka, Florian

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a microstructured film disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The microstructured film contains features which diffuse light emitted by said OLED device and increase the luminance of the device.

  20. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  1. 2-Point microstructure archetypes for improved elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Brent L.; Gao, Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Rectangular models of material microstructure are described by their 1- and 2-point (spatial) correlation statistics of placement of local state. In the procedure described here the local state space is described in discrete form; and the focus is on placement of local state within a finite number of cells comprising rectangular models. It is illustrated that effective elastic properties (generalized Hashin Shtrikman bounds) can be obtained that are linear in components of the correlation statistics. Within this framework the concept of an eigen-microstructure within the microstructure hull is useful. Given the practical innumerability of the microstructure hull, however, we introduce a method for generating a sequence of archetypes of eigen-microstructure, from the 2-point correlation statistics of local state, assuming that the 1-point statistics are stationary. The method is illustrated by obtaining an archetype for an imaginary two-phase material where the objective is to maximize the combination C_{xxxx}^{*} + C_{xyxy}^{*}

  2. Microstructurally based model of fatigue initiation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockenbrough, J. R.; Hinkle, A. J.; Magnusen, P. E.; Bucci, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A model to calculate fatigue life is developed based on the assumption that fatigue life is entirely composed of crack growth from an initial microstructural inhomogeneity. Specifically, growth is considered to start from either an ellipsoidal void, a cracked particle, or a debonded particle. The capability of predicting fatigue life from material microstructure is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics principles, the sizes of the crack-initiating microstructural inhomogeneities, and an initiation parameter that is proportional to the cyclic plastic zone size. A key aspect of this modeling approach is that it is linked with a general purpose probability program to analyze the effect of the distribution of controlling microstructural features within the material. This enables prediction of fatigue stress versus life curves for various specimen geometries using distributional statistics obtained from characterizations of the microstructure. Results are compared to experimental fatigue data from an aluminum alloy.

  3. Simulating microstructural evolution during the hot working of alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataya, Martin C.

    1999-01-01

    The simulation of microstructural evolution during the primary breakdown of production-sized alloy 718 ingots and billets by radial forging was accomplished in the laboratory via multiple-stroke axial compression testing of cylindrical specimens. The dwell or hold time between strokes was varied to simulate the deformation-time history for three different locations along the radial-forging work piece: lead-end, mid-length, and tail-end positions. The microstructural evolution varied with simulated work piece position. Static, rather than dynamic, recrystallization was responsible for the observed grain-size refinement, and its repetitive occurrence during consecutive dwell periods resulted in the maintenance of a fine-grain microstructure during multiple-stroke deformation sequences. For comparison, the total plastic strain was also applied in a single-stroke test. The single- and multiple-stroke techniques gave differing microstructural results, indicating that multiple-stroke testing is necessary in modeling microstructural evolution during primary breakdown.

  4. A Markov random field approach for microstructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Nguyen, L.; DeGraef, M.; Sundararaghavan, V.

    2016-03-01

    We test the notion that many microstructures have an underlying stationary probability distribution. The stationary probability distribution is ubiquitous: we know that different windows taken from a polycrystalline microstructure are generally ‘statistically similar’. To enable computation of such a probability distribution, microstructures are represented in the form of undirected probabilistic graphs called Markov Random Fields (MRFs). In the model, pixels take up integer or vector states and interact with multiple neighbors over a window. Using this lattice structure, algorithms are developed to sample the conditional probability density for the state of each pixel given the known states of its neighboring pixels. The sampling is performed using reference experimental images. 2D microstructures are artificially synthesized using the sampled probabilities. Statistical features such as grain size distribution and autocorrelation functions closely match with those of the experimental images. The mechanical properties of the synthesized microstructures were computed using the finite element method and were also found to match the experimental values.

  5. Monitoring microstructural evolution in irradiated steel with second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Wall, James J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-31

    Material damage in structural components is driven by microstructural evolution that occurs at low length scales and begins early in component life. In metals, these microstructural features are known to cause measurable changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Physically, the interaction of a monochromatic ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and vacancies, generates a second harmonic wave that is proportional to the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques thus have the capability to evaluate initial material damage, particularly before crack initiation and propagation occur. This paper discusses how the nonlinear ultrasonic technique of second harmonic generation can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to monitor microstructural changes in steel, focusing on characterizing neutron radiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. Current experimental evidence and analytical models linking microstructural evolution with changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are summarized.

  6. Strain-engineered manufacturing of freeform carbon nanotube microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Volder, M.; Park, S.; Tawfick, S.; Hart, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    The skins of many plants and animals have intricate microscale surface features that give rise to properties such as directed water repellency and adhesion, camouflage, and resistance to fouling. However, engineered mimicry of these designs has been restrained by the limited capabilities of top-down fabrication processes. Here we demonstrate a new technique for scalable manufacturing of freeform microstructures via strain-engineered growth of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Offset patterning of the CNT growth catalyst is used to locally modulate the CNT growth rate. This causes the CNTs to collectively bend during growth, with exceptional uniformity over large areas. The final shape of the curved CNT microstructures can be designed via finite element modeling, and compound catalyst shapes produce microstructures with multidirectional curvature and unusual self-organized patterns. Conformal coating of the CNTs enables tuning of the mechanical properties independently from the microstructure geometry, representing a versatile principle for design and manufacturing of complex microstructured surfaces.

  7. PREFACE: Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu Lung; Chen, John J. J.; Hodgson, Michael A.; Thambyah, Ashvin

    2009-07-01

    A workshop on Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials was held at the University of Auckland, School of Engineering, on 8-9 April 2009. Organised by the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, this meeting consisted of international participants and aimed at addressing the state-of-the-art research activities in processing, microstructure characterization and performance integrity investigation of materials. This two-day conference brought together scientists and engineers from New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, France, and the United Kingdom. Undoubtedly, this diverse group of participants brought a very international flair to the proceedings which also featured original research papers on areas such as Materials processing; Microstructure characterisation and microanalysis; Mechanical response at different length scales, Biomaterials and Material Structural integrity. There were a total of 10 invited speakers, 16 paper presentations, and 14 poster presentations. Consequently, the presentations were carefully considered by the scientific committee and participants were invited to submit full papers for this volume. All the invited paper submissions for this volume have been peer reviewed by experts in the various fields represented in this conference, this in accordance to the expected standards of the journal's Peer review policy for IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The works in this publication consists of new and original research as well as several expert reviews of current state-of-the art technologies and scientific developments. Knowing some of the real constraints on hard-copy publishing of high quality, high resolution images, the editors are grateful to IOP Publishing for this opportunity to have the papers from this conference published on the online open-access platform. Listed in this volume are papers on a range of topics on materials research, including Ferguson's high strain

  8. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  9. Microstructures minimizing the energy of a two phase elastic composite in two space dimensions. II: The vigdergauz microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovsky, Yury; Kohn, Robert V.

    1995-06-01

    For modeling coherent phase transformations, and for applications to structural optimization, it is of interest to identify microstructures with minimal energy or maximal stiffness. The existence of a particularly simple microstructure with extremal elastic behavior, in the context of two-phase composites made from isotropic components in two space dimensions, has previously been shown. This "Vigdergauz microstructure" consists of a periodic array of appropriately shaped inclusions. We provide an alternative discussion of this microstructure and its properties. Our treatment includes an explicit formula for the shape of the inclusion, and an analysis of various limits. We also discuss the significance of this microstructure (i) for minimizing the maximum stress in a composite, and (ii) as a large volume fraction analog of Michell trusses in the theory of structural optimization.

  10. Microstructure and properties of pipeline steel with a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rutao Zuo Xiurong Hu Yueyue Wang Zhenwei Hu, Dingxu

    2011-08-15

    In order to satisfy the transportation of the crude oil and gas in severe environmental conditions, a ferrite/martensite dual-phase pipeline steel has been developed. After a forming process and double submerged arc welding, the microstructure of the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pipe showed good deformability and an excellent combination of high strength and toughness, which is suitable for a pipeline subjected to the progressive and abrupt ground movement. The base metal having a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure exhibited excellent mechanical properties in terms of uniform elongation of 7.5%, yield ratio of 0.78, strain hardening exponent of 0.145, an impact energy of 286 J at - 10 deg. C and a shear area of 98% at 0 deg. C in the drop weight tear test. The tensile strength and impact energy of the weld metal didn't significantly reduce, because of the intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites microstructure, leading to high strength and toughness in weld metal. The heat affected zone contained complete quenching zone and incomplete quenching zone, which exhibited excellent low temperature toughness of 239 J at - 10 deg. C. - Research Highlights: {yields}The pipe with ferrite/martensite microstructure shows high deformability. {yields}The base metal of the pipe consists of ferrite and martensite. {yields}Heat affected zone shows excellent low temperature toughness. {yields}Weld metal mainly consists of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites. {yields}Weld metal shows excellent low temperature toughness and high strength.

  11. Atomic level microstructural characterization by APFIM

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to characterize Ni aluminides in addition to changes in microstructure of pressure vessel steels as a result of exposure to neutron irradiation. Ultrafine intragranular Cu precipitates and P segregation to grain and lath boundaries have been quantified in the pressure vessel steels. In boron-doped Ni{sub 3}Al, the B additions were found to segregate to dislocations, low angle boundaries, antiphase boundaries, stacking faults, and grain boundaries. In boron-doped NiAl, B segregation to grain boundaries and ultrafine MB{sub 2} precipitates were observed. In Mo-doped NiAl, enrichments of Mo, C, N/Si, B, and Fe were observed at the grain boundaries together with Mo precipitates and low Mo matrix solubility.

  12. White matter microstructure alterations in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bellani, Marcella; Perlini, Cinzia; Ferro, Adele; Cerruti, Stefania; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Isola, Miriam; Cerini, Roberto; Dusi, Nicola; Andreone, Nicola; Balestrieri, Matteo; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi; Tansella, Michele; Brambilla, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Genetic, neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings support the presence of diffuse white matter cytoarchitectural disruption in bipolar disorder. In this study, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was applied to study cortical white matter microstructure organisation in 24 patients with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 35 matched normal controls. DWI images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla scanner and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined over regions of interest placed, bilaterally, in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital white matter. Significantly increased ADC values were found in bipolar patients with respect to normal controls in the right temporal lobe, left parietal lobe and bilateral occipital lobes. ADC values did not associate significantly with age or with clinical variables (p>0.05). Diffuse cortical white matter alterations on DWI in bipolar disorder denote widespread disruption of white matter integrity and may be due to altered myelination and/or axonal integrity. PMID:22687164

  13. Biomimicry of optical microstructures of Papilio palinurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crne, Matija; Sharma, Vivek; Blair, John; Park, Jung Ok; Summers, Christopher J.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    The brilliant coloration of animals in nature is sometimes based on their structure rather than on pigments. The green colour on the wings of a butterfly Papilio palinurus originates from the hierarchical microstructure of individual wing scales that are tiled on the wing. The hierarchical structure gives rise to two coloured reflections of visible light, blue and yellow which when additively mixed, produce the perception of green colour on the wing scales. We used breath figure templated assembly as the starting point for the structure and, combining it with atomic layer deposition for the multilayers necessary for the production of interference colors, we have faithfully mimicked the structure and the optical effects found on the wing scale of the butterfly Papilio palinurus.

  14. Langevin Simulation of Microstructure in Martensitic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We present a dynamical model to simulate microstructure in martensitic transformations within the context of shape memory alloys. The Hamiltonian of the system includes a triple-well potential (φ^6 model) in local shear strain, (2) strain gradient terms up to second order in strain and fourth order in gradient, and (3) all symmetry allowed compositional fluctuation induced strain gradient terms. We show the formation of twinned martensite below the transformation temperature and tweed precursors above the transformation temperature, as well as indications of hierarchical structures near the habit plane. These phases result from a competition between short range attraction and long range elastic repulsive forces. The long range interaction is incorporated via Fourier spectral methods as discussed by C. Roland and R.C.Desai [Phys. Rev. B 42, 6658 (1990)].

  15. Microstructural Characterization of Cast Metallic Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    J. I. Cole; D. D. Keiser; J. R. Kennedy

    2007-09-01

    As part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is participating in an international collaboration to irradiate prototypic actinide-bearing transmutation fuels in the French Phenix fast reactor (FUTURIX-FTA experiment). The INL has contributed to this experiment by fabricating and characterizing two compositions of metallic fuel; a non-fertile 48Pu-12Am-40Zr fuel and a low-fertile 35U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr fuel for insertion into the reactor. This paper highlights results of the microstructural analysis of these cast fuels, which were reasonably homogeneous in nature, but had several distinct phase constituents. Spatial variations in composition appeared to be more pronounced in the low-fertile fuel when compared to the non-fertile fuel.

  16. Design tools for microstructured optical fiber fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchak, Peter; Crowdy, Darren; Stokes, Yvonne; Chen, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The advent of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) has opened up possibilities for controlling light not available with conventional optical fiber. A MOF, which differs from a conventional fiber by having an array of air channels running along its length, is fabricated by heating and drawing a glass preform at low Reynolds number. However, because surface tension causes the cross section to deform, the geometry of the channels in the fiber differs from the preform. As a result, fabricating a desired fiber configuration may necessitate extensive trial and error. In this talk, we describe our work on fiber drawing, which has led to methods for predicting the fiber geometries that result at given draw conditions. More importantly, our methods can be used to obtain the preform configuration required to produce a fiber with a desired arrangement of channels. We have implemented our methods in software tools to facilitate preform design.

  17. Highly nonlinear layered spiral microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Sílvia M.; Facão, Margarida M.; Latas, Sofia C.; Ferreira, Mário F.

    2013-08-01

    A layered spiral microstructured optical fiber (LS-MOF) is presented, which offers the possibility of a good control of both the dispersion and the nonlinear properties. The proposed design is analyzed using a finite element method considering silica and air as the materials. Zero dispersion, low confinement loss, and a record value of γ = 70.0 W-1/km for the LS-MOF nonlinear parameter are simultaneously obtained at 1.55 μm, whereas a higher value γ = 169.4 W-1/km can be achieved at 1.06 μm. Our results demonstrate the great potential of the LS-MOF for several nonlinear applications, namely for an efficient generation of the supercontinuum.

  18. Diffuse Interface Model for Microstructure Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is proposed which describes both, multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  19. Effect of Nanoclay on Natural Rubber Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Carretero-Gonzalez,J.; Retsos, H.; Verdejo, R.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.; Giannelis, E.; Lopez-Manchado, M.

    2008-01-01

    The inclusion of highly anisotropic clay nanoparticles (nanoclays) in cross-linked natural rubber (NR) provides a more homogeneous distributed network structure and induces an early onset as well as enhancement of crystallization under uniaxial deformation. The molecular structure of the polymer network and its morphological changes during deformation were characterized by using broadband dielectric spectroscopy and in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction, respectively. It was found that the presence of nanoclay introduces a dual crystallization mechanism due to the alignment of nanoparticles during stretching. The improved properties in NR-nanoclay nanocomposites can be attributed to both microstructural and morphological changes induced by nanoclay as well as to the nanoclay mobility in the NR matrix during crystallization. The interplay of these factors during deformation contributes to the formation of a supernetwork structure containing cross-linked chemical chains, nanofiller, and crystallizable networks with similar length scales.

  20. Electrostatic control of microstructure thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supino, Ryan N.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2001-03-01

    A technology for controlling the thermal conductivity of etch-released microstructures is proposed and demonstrated by placing test structures in and out of contact with their underlying substrate. By adjusting the duty cycle of a periodic actuation, the thermal conductivity can be adjusted linearly across a wide range. Experimental work with microfilaments in air has shown a continuous tuning range from approximately 1.7×10-4 W/K to 3.3×10-4 W/K. These numbers are limited by thermal conduction through air and thermal contact conductance, respectively. The fundamental tuning range is orders of magnitude wider, limited by radiation heat transfer and the thermal contact conductance of coated structures.

  1. Boiling of Various Liquids on Microstructurized Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, I. A.; Shchelchkov, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the heat transfer of microstructurized surfaces of various configurations and sizes obtained by the method of deforming cutting. It has been shown that the intensity of heat transfer on such surfaces with three-dimensional columnar and channel structures increases by 20 times, and on microfinned surfaces by 2.5 times, compared to the smooth boiling surface. The critical heat flow density increases 4.1-6 times thereby. The obtained results on the heat transfer on the above surfaces and the critical flow densities on them can be used for calculating the heat transfer coefficients and the heat loads in boiling of various saturated liquids on such surfaces with sizes of fin elements from 50 to 420 μm at a pressure of 0.1 MPa under free convection conditions.

  2. The Microstructure of Lunar Micrometeorite Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The peak of the mass flux of impactors striking the lunar surface is made up of objects approximately 200 micrometers in diameter that erode rocks, comminute regolith grains, and produce agglutinates. The effects of these micro-scale impacts are still not fully understood. Much effort has focused on evaluating the physical and optical effects of micrometeorite impacts on lunar and meteoritic material using pulsed lasers to simulate the energy deposited into a substrate in a typical hypervelocity impact. Here we characterize the physical and chemical changes that accompany natural micrometeorite impacts into lunar rocks with long surface exposure to the space environment (12075 and 76015). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were obtained from cross-sections of approximately 10-20 micrometers diameter craters that revealed important micro-structural details of micrometeorite impact processes, including the creation of npFe (sup 0) in the melt, and extensive deformation around the impact site.

  3. Molecular diffusion, tissue microdynamics and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, D

    1995-01-01

    Diffusion NMR is the only method available today that noninvasively provides information on molecular displacements over distances comparable to cell dimensions. This information can be used to infer tissue microstructure and microdynamics. However, data may be fairly difficult to interpret in biological tissues which differ markedly from the theoretical "infinite isotrope medium", as many factors may affect the NMR signal. The object of this paper is to analyze the expected effects of temperature, restriction, hindrance, membrane permeability, anisotropy and tissue inhomogeneity on the diffusion measurements. Powerful methods, such as q-space imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion spectroscopy of metabolites further enhance the specificity of the information obtained from diffusion NMR experiments. PMID:8739274

  4. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  5. Microstructures in the Polar Solar Wind: Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruyani, Bruce T.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Goldstein, B. E.; Lakhina, G. S.; Sakurai, R.; Smith, E. J.; Neugebauer, M.

    1999-01-01

    We find that small (10-200 rP) magnetic decreases comprise a dominant part of the polar solar wind microstructure at Ulysses distances (2.2 AU). These magnetic field dips are almost always bounded by tangential discontinuities, a feature which is not well understood at this time. Hundreds of these events have been examined in detail and a variety of types have been found. These will be described. It is speculated that these structures have been generated by perpendicular heating of ions closer to the Sun and have then been convected to distances of Ulysses. Such structures may be very important for the rapid cross- field diffusion of ions in the polar regions of the heliosphere.

  6. White Matter Microstructure in Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Giordanna L. S.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Campos, Brunno M.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Azevedo, Paula C.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias are hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions resulting in abnormal torsional movements and postures. Recent neuroimaging studies in idiopathic craniocervical dystonia (CCD) have uncovered the involvement of multiple areas, including cortical ones. Our goal was to evaluate white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with CCD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Methods We compared 40 patients with 40 healthy controls. Patients were then divided into subgroups: cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia + cervical dystonia, using tract-based spatial statistics. We performed a region of interest-based analysis and tractography as confirmatory tests. Results There was no significant difference in the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between the groups in any analysis. Discussion The lack of DTI changes in CCD suggests that the WM tracts are not primarily affected. PMID:26056610

  7. Influence of rainfall microstructure on rainfall interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabret, Katarina; Rakovec, Jože; Mikoš, Matjaž; Šraj, Mojca

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall interception is part of the hydrological cycle. Precipitation, which hits vegetation, is retained on the leaves and branches, from which it eventually evaporates into the atmosphere (interception) or reaches the ground by dripping from the canopy, falling through the gaps (throughfall) and running down the stems (stemflow). The process is influenced by various meteorological and vegetation parameters. Often neglected meteorological parameter influencing rainfall interception is also rainfall microstructure. Rain is a discrete process consisting of various numbers of individual raindrops with different sizes and velocities. This properties describe rainfall microstructure which is often neglected in hydrological analysis and replaced with rainfall intensity. Throughfall, stemflow and rainfall microstructure have been measured since the beginning of the year 2014 under two tree species (Betula pendula and Pinus nigra) on a study plot in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The preliminary analysis of the influence of rainfall microstructure on rainfall interception has been conducted using three events with different characteristics measured in May 2014. Event A is quite short with low rainfall amount and moderate rainfall intensity, whereas events B and C have similar length but low and high intensities, respectively. Event A was observed on the 1st of May 2014. It was 22 minutes long and delivered 1.2 mm of rainfall. The average rainfall intensity was equal to 3.27 mm/h. The event consisted of 1,350 rain drops with average diameter of 1.517 mm and average velocity of 5.110 m/s. Both Betula pendula and Pinus nigra intercepted similar amount of rainfall, 68 % and 69 %, respectively. Event B was observed in the night from the 7th to 8th of May 2014, it was 16 hours and 18 minutes long, and delivered 4.2 mm of rainfall with average intensity of 0.97 mm/h. There were 39,108 raindrops detected with average diameter of 0.858 mm and average velocity of 3.855 m/s. Betula pendula

  8. Microstructure and Transport Studies of Functionalized Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Ron; Lewis, Darryl; Seifu, Dereje; Camacho, Jorge; Strongin, Myron; Zhang, Liyuan

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure and transport studies of fuctionalized graphene are reported. These studies reveal that the minimum conductivity is sample dependent and within the range (2-12) e 2 /h independent of gate voltage. The variation of the minimum conductivity is attributed to sample impurities, apparent in Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. The Raman peaks are in general consistent with graphene, but show shifts in the G and 2D peaks. These shifts are associated with strain and doping. The dependence of the current (I) on the bias voltage (VSD) is linear for most samples. The current dependence on gate voltage (Vg) curves show asymmetric behavior, showing the imbalance between the hole and electron carriers. A 16 A deposition of Fe leads to a significant modification in the transport properties due mostly the formation of iron oxide. The AFM clearly shows the formation of Fe clusters. DOE/NSF Faculty-Student Teams Program.

  9. Microstructural investigation of some biocompatible ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, M.; Creangă, D. E.; Bădescu, V.; Sulitanu, N.

    2007-09-01

    Two batches of aqueous ferrofluids based on iron oxide particles as solid nanomagnetic phase have been prepared by applying the chemical precipitation method. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (N(CH 3) 4OH) and citric acid (C 6H 8O 7) were used to functionalize magnetic cores. Physical tests have been performed in order to reveal the microstructural and magnetic features, both needed for biomedical utilization. The particle size was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetization measurements and X-ray diffraction (for composition and phase information). The dimensional distribution of the ferrophase physical diameter was comparatively discussed using the box-plot statistical method revealing the fulfilling of the main requirements for ferrofluid stability.

  10. A Nondestructive Method of Grain Microstructure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.

    2004-09-03

    Customarily, a material has been sectioned to study its internal grain microstructure and thus in the process is destroyed. Using x-rays, however, there are two nondestructive methods of determining the sources of diffraction spots and hence the internal grain microstructure of a sample. One technique consists of placing a wire in the path of a diffracted ray so that its image is prevented from appearing on the detector screen. Ray-tracing is then done to locate the source within the sample from whence the rays emanate. In this experiment, we investigate the other technique of determining source location by recording diffraction patterns at ten equally-spaced detector distances and then graphing the data with reasonable-fit lines using the least-squares fitting routine. We then perform a ray-tracing triangulation technique to pinpoint the location of the source from which the rays are coming. Cluster analyses are employed and plots of ray number versus pixel position of certain points at some particular detector distances are created. An error propagation analysis is then carried out as a check to the cluster analyses and graphs of error deviation along the detector path versus ray number are constructed. With statistical error analyses and construction of error boxes using chosen pixel error deviations and delta z error values, the best error measurement using the detector method was found to be plus/minus 100 microns. In this study, it was found that the detector method provided a much poorer resolution than the traditional wire technique of which there is a source size precision of within 1-5 microns. The detector method, though, is sufficient for large-grain material studies.

  11. Microstructural aspects of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, T. E.; Suhr, D. S.; Keller, R. J.; Lanteri, V.; Heuer, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Various combination of plasma-sprayed bond coatings and zirconia ceramic coatings on a nickel-based superalloy substrate were tested by static thermal exposure at 1200 C and cyclic thermal exposure to 1000 C. The bond coats were based on Ni-Cr-Al alloys with additions of rare earth elements and Si. The ceramic coats were various ZrO2-Y2O3 compositions, of which the optimum was found to be ZrO2-8.9 wt percent Y2O3. Microstructural analysis showed that resistance to cracking during thermal exposure is strongly related to deleterious phase changes. Zones depleted of Al formed at the bond coat/ceramic coat interface due to oxidation and at the bond coat/substrate interface due to interdiffusion, leading eventually to breakdown of the bond coat. The 8.9 percent Y2O3 coating performed best because the as-sprayed metastable tetragonal phase converted slowly into the low-Y2O3 tetragonal plus high-Y2O3 cubic-phase mixture, so that the deleterious monoclinic phase was inhibited from forming. Failure appeared to start with the formation of circumferential cracks in the zirconia, probably due to compressive stresses during cooling, followed by the formation of radial cracks due to tensile stresses during heating. Cracks appeared to initiate at the Al2O3 scale/bond coat interface and propagate through the zirconia coating. Comparisons were made with the behavior of bulk ZrO2-Y2O3 and the relationship between the microstructure of the tetragonal phase and the phase diagram. A separate investigation was also made of the ZrO2-Al2O3 interface.

  12. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  13. Optical screw-wrench for interlocking 2PP-microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Zyla, G.; Ksouri, S. I.; Esen, C.; Ostendorf, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) has emerged as a powerful platform for processing three-dimensional microstructures with high resolution. Furthermore, by adding nanoparticles of different materials to the photopolymer the microstructures can be functionalized, e.g. magnetic or electric properties can be adjusted. However, to combine different functions within one microstructure or to manufacture complex microsystems, assembling techniques for multiple 2PP written building blocks are required. In this paper a qualitative approach for assembling microstructures utilizing optical forces is presented. Therefore, screw and nut shaped microstructures are produced by 2PP-technique and screwed together using a holographic optical tweezer (HOT). The interlocking structures are trapped and rotated into each other to cause connection. In this paper the used parameters and possible designs of the interlocking connection are discussed. These findings provide not only the assembling of building blocks to complex microstructures, rather different functionalized 2PP-microstructures can be combined by simply screwing them together with the use of optical forces.

  14. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    PubMed

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. PMID:22287482

  15. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  16. Effect of Multipasses on Microstructure and Electrochemical Behavior of Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhdoom, Muhammad Atif; Kamran, Muhammad; Awan, Gul Hameed; Mukhtar, Sehrish

    2013-12-01

    Shielded metal arc welding was applied to AISI 1045 medium carbon steel. The microstructural changes and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), base metal (BM), and weld zone (WZ) were investigated. The effect of welding passes on microstructural changes of BM, HAZ, and WZ were elucidated using optical microscopy, potentiodynamic Tafel scan, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods in plain water and 3.5 pct (w/v) NaCl solution under standard temperature and pressure using corrosion kinetic parameters. From microstructural observations, the variations in ferrite morphology in the BM and WZ showed dissimilar electrochemical corrosion behavior and a corrosion rate than that of HAZ.

  17. Explosive crystallization of PZT microstructures by femtosecond infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshin, A. S.; Firsova, N. Yu; Emelianov, V. I.; Pronin, I. P.; Senkevich, S. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Mishina, E. D.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The features of microstructure crystallization into perovskite phase in lead zirconate titanate film by femtosecond laser radiation of near-infrared range were discussed. In-situ crystallization kinetics by method of second harmonic generation (SHG) was studied. The presence of several types of crystallization was shown, including ultra-fast (explosive) crystallization occurring immediately after the start of exposure, and slow (self-sustaining) crystallization, occurring after termination of exposure. The advantage of the second-harmonic generation microscopy for the study of annealed microstructures was shown. The morphology of microstructures was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  18. Microstructures fabricated by dynamically controlled femtosecond patterned vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Cai, Meng-Qiang; Li, Ping-Ping; Feng, Dan; Pan, Yue; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-04-01

    We have presented and demonstrated a method for the fabrication of various complicated microstructures based on dynamically controlled patterned vector optical fields (PVOFs). We design and generate dynamic PVOFs by loading patterned holograms displayed on the spatial light modulator and moving traces of focuses with different patterns. We experimentally fabricate the various microstructures in z-cut lithium niobate plates. The method we present has some benefits such as no motion of the fabricated samples and high efficiency due to its parallel feature. Moreover, our approach is able to fabricate three-dimensional microstructures. PMID:27192265

  19. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 200 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and modified 9Cr1Mo (T91) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and MA957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to 200 dpa. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class.

  20. Synthesis, tailored microstructures and `colossal` magnetoresistance in oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.M.; Modak, A.R.; Ju, H.; Bandaru, P.

    1996-09-01

    We have grown La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} films, using both pulsed laser deposition and a polymeric sol-gel route. These two growth techniques result in different microstructures, but in both cases the texture (epitaxy or polycrystallinity) can be controlled by choice of substrates and growth conditions. The crystallography and microstructure of these films were studied using XRD and high- resolution TEM. The magnetic/magnetotransport properties of these films are discussed in context of their growth and microstructural parameters.

  1. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  2. As-cast microstructure investigation of two iron aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo Schön, Cláudio; Geoffroy Scuracchio, Bruno

    2006-08-01

    The as-cast microstructure of Fe-30Al-6Cr and Fe-30Al-10Ti high purity alloys was investigated using Electron Backscatter Diffraction. The first alloy is characterized by a highly textured columnar grain microstructure with large grains, while the second is characterized by an equiaxed grain microstructure with small grains and a random texture. These differences are discussed with regard to the higher reactivity of Ti compared with Cr, leading to nanometric nitride or oxide, which may act as sites for heterogeneous nucleation, and the ordered state of the BCC phase in equilibrium with the liquid during solidification and its effect upon dendrite growth kinetics.

  3. Microstructure of bidisperse ferrofluids in a thin layer

    SciTech Connect

    Minina, E. S. Muratova, A. B.; Cerda, J. J.; Kantorovich, S. S.

    2013-03-15

    In this work we present a characterization of the bidisperse ferrofluid microstructures that appear in thin layers of ferrofluid. These layers have been studied by a combination of Langevin dynamics simulations and density functional theory. Our results allow us to compare the microstructures that exist in quasi-two-dimensional ferrofluid nanolayers with the microstructures found in three-dimensional bidisperse ferrofluids. Furthermore, our results allow us to explain the influence of the geometry of the sample on the topology and size-distribution of the observed aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles.

  4. Ferrofluids: Thermophysical properties and formation of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi Khoeini, NargesSadat Susan

    This work is a combined effort of experimental and theoretical studies toward better understanding the structural and physical properties of aqueous ferrofluids containing nano-sized magnetite (iron oxide magnetic particles) of about 10nm. Ferrofluids have attracted remarkable attention mainly because their properties can be controlled by means of an externally applied magnetic field. The dispersion of nano-sized magnets in a carrier liquid exhibits superparamagnetic behaviour while retaining its fluid properties. The interplay between hydrodynamic and magnetic phenomena has made ferrofluids an extremely promising and useful tool in wide spectra of applications, from technical applications to biomedical ones. In the presence of a magnetic field, magnetic moments of the nanomagnets suspended in the host liquid are aligned toward the field direction and begin to form microstructures such as short chains, strands and long stripes. As this process advances the microstructures may collapse into bundles and thick chains and form macrostructures. Upon the removal of the magnetic field, nanoparticles will be homogeneously redistributed throughout the sample due to thermal agitation. Zero-field structures, and especially the field-induced assembly of magnetic nanoparticles, are primarily responsible for the change in physical properties of ferrofluids, including thermophysical, optical, rheological, and magnetization properties. Because of the field-induced assembly of magnetic nanoparticles in the field direction, ferrofluids become strongly anisotropic and as a result, ferrofluids can significantly enhance directional heat transfer in a thermal system. Thermophysical properties of a ferrofluid are important in studying heat transfer processes in any thermal application, making the study of their behavior a necessity. Taking into account the influence of the formation and growth of microstructures on change in properties of ferrofluids, one can find the significance of

  5. Microstructural characterization in nanocrystalline ceramic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hakkwan

    The primary objective of this research is to investigate the effects of process variables on microstructure in several fluoride and oxide thin films prepared by vapor deposition, in order to predict the properties and behaviors of nanocrystalline thin film materials. There are three distinct stages of this research. The first stage focuses on measuring of the porosity in polycrystalline thin films of a variety of fluorides as a function of the substrate temperature during deposition, and discussing the mechanism by which the porosity varies as a function of the process variables. We have measured the porosity in thin films of lithium fluoride (LiF), magnesium fluoride (MgF2), barium fluoride (BaF 2) and calcium fluoride (CaF2) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a quartz crystal thickness monitor. The porosity is very sensitive to the substrate temperature and decreases as the substrate temperature increases. Consistent behavior is observed among all of the materials in this study. The second stage is to understand the film microstructure including grain growth and texture development, because these factors are known to influence the behavior and stability of polycrystalline thin films. This study focuses on grain growth and texture development in polycrystalline lithium fluoride thin films using dark field (DF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is demonstrated that we can isolate the size distribution of <111> surface normal grains from the overall size distribution, based on simple and plausible assumptions about the texture. The {111} texture formation and surface morphology were also observed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and AFM, respectively. The grain size distributions become clearly bimodal as the annealing time increases, and we deduce that the short-time size distributions are also a sum of two overlapping peaks. The smaller grain-size peak in the distribution corresponds to the {111}-oriented grains which do not grow significantly, while

  6. Microstructural Analysis of Welding: Deformation and Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quane, S. L.; Russell, K.

    2003-12-01

    Welding in pyroclastic deposits involves the sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles and is attended by systematic changes in physical properties. Welded materials contain implicit information regarding the total accumulated strain as well as the mechanisms of deformation. Here, we use detailed microstructural analysis of synthetic and natural welded materials to make quantitative estimates of strain and constrain the rheology of these materials during the welding process. Part one of our study comprises microstructural analysis of end products from unconfined high temperature deformation experiments on sintered cores of soda-lime silica glass spheres. This analogue material has relatively simple and well-characterized starting properties. Furthermore, the initially spherical shapes of particles provide excellent strain markers. Experiments were run at a variety of temperatures, strain rates and stresses resulting in end products with varying degrees of total strain. The nature of strain partitioning and accumulation are evaluated using image analysis techniques on scanned images and photomicrographs of thin sections cut perpendicular to the loading direction of each experimental product. Shapes of the individual deformed particles (e.g., oblate spheroids) were determined and the Scion image analysis program was used to create a best-fit ellipse for each particle. Statistics collected on each particle include: axial dimension (a), vertical dimension (c) and angle from the horizontal. The data are used to calculate the oblateness of each particle (1-c/a) and the angle of deformation induced foliation. Furthermore, the relative proportions of visible blue epoxy in the sample scans determine bulk porosity. The average oblateness of the particles is a direct, independent measure of the accumulated strain in each sample. Results indicate that these measured values are equal to calculated theoretical values of oblateness for spheroids undergoing the

  7. Ionizing radiation detection using microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeHaven, Stanton

    Ionizing radiation detecting microstructured optical fibers are fabricated, modeled and experimentally measured for X-ray detection in the 10-40 keV energy range. These fibers operate by containing a scintillator material which emits visible light when exposed to ionizing radiation. An X-ray source characterized with a CdTe spectrometer is used to quantify the X-ray detection efficiency of the fibers. The solid state CdTe detector is considered 100% efficient in this energy range. A liquid filled microstructured optical fiber (MOF) is presented where numerical analysis and experimental observation leads to a geometric theory of photon transmission using total internal reflection. The model relates the quantity and energy of absorbed X-rays to transmitted and measured visible light photons. Experimental measurement of MOF photon counts show good quantitative agreement with calculated theoretical values. This work is extended to a solid organic scintillator, anthracene, which shows improved light output due to its material properties. A detailed description of the experimental approach used to fabricate anthracene MOF is presented. The fabrication technique uses a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger crystal growth technique to grow anthracene single crystals inside MOF. The anthracene grown in the MOF is characterized using spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. These results show the anthracene grown is a high purity crystal with a structure similar to anthracene grown from the liquid, vapor and melt techniques. The X-ray measurement technique uses the same approach as that for liquid filled MOF for efficiency comparison. A specific fiber configuration associated with the crystal growth allows an order of magnitude improvement in X-ray detection efficiency. The effect of thin film external coatings on the measured efficiency is presented and related to the fiber optics. Lastly, inorganic alkali halide scintillator materials of CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), and

  8. Microstructures of aluminum gallium nitride epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Adam

    Stress relief mechanisms and microstructures of AlxGa 1-xN thin films were investigated by growing samples by MBE and MOCVD. For investigation of stress relief mechanisms, a series of eight GaN samples were grown using MOCVD with AlxGa1-xN interlayers ranging from xAl=0.14 to xAl=1. Each successive interlayer in a given sample was increased in thickness and followed by a GaN probe-layer. A multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) was used to monitor the stress in the sample during the growth process and determine the onset of stress relaxation. The thicknesses determined for stress relief onset in the interlayers were compared with calculations of Griffith's Criterion for hexagonal thin films and found to closely follow the predicted thicknesses of surface crack formation. For investigation of microstructures in AlxGa1-xN thin films, several sets of samples were grown by MOCVD, with varying pressure, temperature, and composition, and by MBE with varying temperature. The samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy, including [101¯0] selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns and weak beam dark field images taken with g=(0002) and g=(1¯21¯0). The MOCVD samples with composition variation were examined with [112¯0] SAED patterns, and the MBE-grown samples were examined using z-contrast imaging. All the MOCVD samples showed signs of ordering, while none of the MBE-grown samples did. In addition, the ordering was shown to be forming as thin plates of ordered material on the (0001) planes, anisotropic within the plane. Some MBE-grown samples were shown to have strong composition modulations arranged in bands arranged parallel to the surface of the sample, due to a balance between strain energy in the samples and the interfacial energy occurring between regions of high and low xAl. The samples grown by MOCVD were shown to have signs of phase separation in addition to the ordering observed. These samples show enhanced ordering in the system when

  9. Thermal modification of microstructures and grain boundaries in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-05-23

    Polycrystalline SiC samples hot-pressed with aluminum, boron, and carbon sintering additions (ABC-SiC) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The study focused on the effects of high temperature treatment on microstructure.

  10. Microstructure selection maps for Al-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgien, P.; Zryd, A.; Kurz, W.

    1995-09-01

    The solidification microstructures for Al-0.5-4 at.% Fe alloys under constrained growth conditions have been calculated using analytical models of the growth kinetics of dendritic, eutectic and plane front interface morphologies of stable and metastable phases. Laser remelting experiments are carried out on an Al-4 at.% Fe alloy with low beam velocity (10 mm/s) in order to complete previous experimental results on the solidification microstructures obtained at intermediate growth rates by Bridgman experiments and at a high growth rates by rapid laser resolidification. Comparison of predicted with experimentally determined solidification microstructure maps shows satisfactory agreement in view of the limited knowledge of the thermophysical properties of this system. These maps are useful for the interpretation of microstructures and phases forming under medium to high solidification rates and for the understanding and development of rapid solidification processing. Further the modeling is useful for improving available phase diagram information.

  11. Microstructure and Thermal History of Metal Particles in CH Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Jones, R. H.; Kotula, P. G.; Michael, J. R.

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides detailed microstructural and microchemical information at the nm to µm scale (SEM, EPMA, TEM, EBSD) for a select suite of metal particles in four CH chondrites, ALH 85085, PAT 91546, Acfer 214, NWA 739.

  12. Modeling Crack Propagation in Polycrystalline Microstructure Using Variational Multiscale Method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, S.; Sundararaghavan, V.

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation in a polycrystalline microstructure is analyzed using a novel multiscale model. The model includes an explicit microstructural representation at critical regions (stress concentrators such as notches and cracks) and a reduced order model that statistically captures the microstructure at regions far away from stress concentrations. Crack propagation is modeled in these critical regions using the variational multiscale method. In this approach, a discontinuous displacement field is added to elements that exceed the critical values of normal or tangential tractions during loading. Compared to traditional cohesive zone modeling approaches, the method does not require the use of any specialmore » interface elements in the microstructure and thus can model arbitrary crack paths. The capability of the method in predicting both intergranular and transgranular failure modes in an elastoplastic polycrystal is demonstrated under tensile and three-point bending loads.« less

  13. Alumina microstructural sample preparation using a borate glaze

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.; Hill, S.; Hosmer, K.

    1986-03-01

    A method was developed for preparing alumina surfaces for microstructural analysis. Samples were polished using a sodium borate glaze, which produced a smooth surface with the grain boundaries accented.

  14. Microstructure and abrasive wear in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    It is well known that abrasive wear resistance is not strictly a materials property, but also depends upon the specific conditions of the wear environment. Nonetheless, characteristics of the ceramic microstructure do influence its hardness and fracture toughness and must, therefore, play an active role in determining howa ceramic will respond to the specific stress states imposed upon it by the wear environment. In this study, the ways in which composition and microstructure influence the abrasive wear behavior of six commercially-produced silicon nitride based ceramics are examined. Results indicate that microstructural parameters, such as matrix grain size and orientation, porosity, and grain boundary microstructure, and thermal expansion mismatch stresses created as the result of second phase formation, influence the wear rate through their effect on wear sheet formation and subsurface fracture. It is also noted that the potential impact of these variables on the wear rate may not be reflected in conventional fracture toughness measurements.

  15. Characterization of microstructure in composites using quantitative stereology

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Microstructure of composites consists of features that are geometric in nature. For example, the features such as fibers, microcracks, voids, etc. can be described in terms of their geometric attributes such as size, shape, orientation, and location. Spatial architecture of microstructural features such as fibers, particles, microcracks, etc. affects the damage evolution, mechanical and physical properties, and the performance of composites. The spatial arrangement of microstructural features can be described in terms of attributes such as radial distribution, nearest neighbor distribution, pair-correlation, and n-point correlation functions, etc. The applications of digital image analysis and stereological techniques for statistically reliable estimation of important descriptors of the spatial order in microstructures are discussed in this paper. These techniques are applied to quantify the spatial arrangement of fibers in a metal matrix composite, and to model electrical conductivity of a polymer matrix composite.

  16. A Combined Statistical-Microstructural Model for Simulation of Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    BRAGINSKY,MICHAEL V.; DEHOFF,ROBERT T.; OLEVSKY,EUGENE A.; TIKARE,VEENA

    1999-10-22

    Sintering theory has been developed either as the application of complex diffusion mechanisms to a simple geometry or as the deformation and shrinkage of a continuum body. They present a model that can treat in detail both the evolution of microstructure and the sintering mechanisms, on the mesoscale, so that constitutive equations with detail microstructural information can be generated. The model is capable of simulating vacancy diffusion by grain boundary diffusion, annihilation of vacancies at grain boundaries resulting in densification, and coarsening of the microstructural features. In this paper, they review the stereological theory of sintering and its application to microstructural evolution and the diffusion mechanism, which lead to sintering. They then demonstrate how these stereological concepts and diffusion mechanisms were incorporated into a kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate sintering. Finally, they discuss the limitations of this model.

  17. Modeling microstructural development during the forging of Waspaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Gangshu; Semiatin, S. L.; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    1995-07-01

    A model for predicting the evolution of microstructure in Waspaloy during thermomechanical proc-essing was developed in terms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), metadynamic recrystallization, and grain growth phenomena. Three sets of experiments were conducted to develop the model: (1) preheating tests to model grain growth prior to hot deformation; (2) compression tests in a Gleeble testing machine with different deformation and cooling conditions to model DRX, metadynamic recrystallization, and short time grain growth during the post deformation dwell period and cooling; and (3) pancake and closed die forging tests conducted in a manufacturing environment to verify and refine the model. The microstructural model was combined with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict microstructure development during forging of Waspaloy. Model predictions showed good agreement with microstructures obtained in actual isothermal and hammer forgings carried out at a forging shop.

  18. Modeling microstructural development during the forging of Waspaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    A model for predicting the evolution of microstructure in Waspaloy during thermomechanical processing was developed in terms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), metadynamic recrystallization, and grain growth phenomena. Three sets of experiments were conducted to develop the model: (1) preheating tests to model grain growth prior to hot deformation; (2) compression tests in a Gleeble testing machine with different deformation and cooling conditions to model DRX, metadynamic recrystallization, and short time grain growth during the post deformation dwell period and cooling; and (3) pancake and closed die forging tests conducted in a manufacturing environment to verify and refine the model. The microstructural model was combined with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict microstructure development during forging of Waspaloy. Model predictions showed good agreement with microstructures obtained in actual isothermal and hammer forgings carried out at a forging shop.

  19. The chemistry of transient microstructure in the diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. A.; Viti, S.; Williams, D. A.; Crawford, I. A.; Price, R. J.

    2005-03-01

    Transient microstructure in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) has been observed towards Galactic and extragalactic sources for decades, usually in lines of atoms and ions, and, more recently, in molecular lines. Evidently, there is a molecular component to the transient microstructure. In this paper, we explore the chemistry that may arise in such microstructure. We use a photodissociation region (PDR) code to model the conditions of relatively high density, low temperature, very low visual extinction and very short elapsed time that are appropriate for these objects. We find that there is a well-defined region of parameter space where detectable abundances of molecular species might be found. The best matching models are those where the interstellar microstructure is young (<100 yr), small (~100 au) and dense (>104 cm-3).

  20. The influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties of solder

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Reynolds, H.L.

    1996-06-01

    Solder joints in microelectronics devices consist of low-melting solder compositions that wet and join metal contacts and are, ordinarily, used at high homologous temperatures in the as-solidified condition. Differences in solidification rate and substrate interactions have the consequence that even solder joints of similar compositions exhibit a wide range of microstructures. The variation in microstructure causes a variation in properties; in particular, the high-temperature creep properties that govern much of the mechanical behavior of the solder may differ significantly from joint to joint. The present paper reviews the varieties of microstructure that are found in common solder joints, and describes some of the ways in which microstructural changes affect mechanical properties and joint reliability.

  1. Role of Microstructural Phenomena in Magnetic Thin Films. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, D. E.; Lambeth, D. N.

    2001-04-30

    Over the period of the program we systematically varied microstructural features of magnetic thin films in an attempt to better identify the role which each feature plays in determining selected extrinsic magnetic properties. This report summarizes the results.

  2. Highly sensitive flexible pressure sensors with microstructured rubber dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Stoltenberg, Randall M.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Barman, Soumendra; Muir, Beinn V. O.; Sokolov, Anatoliy N.; Reese, Colin; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-10-01

    The development of an electronic skin is critical to the realization of artificial intelligence that comes into direct contact with humans, and to biomedical applications such as prosthetic skin. To mimic the tactile sensing properties of natural skin, large arrays of pixel pressure sensors on a flexible and stretchable substrate are required. We demonstrate flexible, capacitive pressure sensors with unprecedented sensitivity and very short response times that can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by microstructuring of thin films of the biocompatible elastomer polydimethylsiloxane. The pressure sensitivity of the microstructured films far surpassed that exhibited by unstructured elastomeric films of similar thickness, and is tunable by using different microstructures. The microstructured films were integrated into organic field-effect transistors as the dielectric layer, forming a new type of active sensor device with similarly excellent sensitivity and response times.

  3. Effects of friction stir welding on microstructure of 7075 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.G.; Mahoney, M.W.; Bingel, W.H.; Spurling, R.A.; Bampton, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a relatively new technique developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) for the joining of aluminum alloys. The technique, based on friction heating at the faying surfaces of two pieces to be joined, results in a joint created by interface deformation, heat, and solid-state diffusion. In evaluating friction stir welding, critical issues (beyond a sound joint) include microstructure control and localized mechanical property variations. A serious problem with fusion welding, even when a sound weld can be made, is the complete alteration of microstructure and the attendant loss of mechanical properties. Being a solid-state process, friction stir welding has the potential to avoid significant changes in microstructure and mechanical properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microstructural changes effected by friction stir welding of 7075 Al.

  4. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, microstructure, and mechanical property interrelations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques for mechanical property characterizations are reviewed and conceptual models are advanced for explaining and interpreting the empirically based results. At present, the technology is generally empirically based and is emerging from the research laboratory. Advancement of the technology will require establishment of theoretical foundations for the experimentally observed interrelations among ultrasonic measurements, mechanical properties, and microstructure. Conceptual models are applied to ultrasonic assessment of fracture toughness to illustrate an approach for predicting correlations found among ultrasonic measurements, microstructure, and mechanical properties.

  5. Supercontinuum Generation in a Microstructured Fiber with an Irregular Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkovich, V. P.; Sotsky, A. B.; Vaca Pereira G., M.; Dzen, I. S.; Sotskaya, L. I.

    2016-05-01

    A broad-band supercontinuum generation was obtained at excitation of a microstructured optical fiber with an irregular cladding by femtosecond laser pulses. To explain the experimental data, calculations of the mode characteristics of microstructured fibers were performed. It was shown that the creation of air channels with different radii in the fiber cladding makes it possible to involve both the fundamental and high fiber modes in the supercontinuum generation that helps to increase the width of the generation spectrum.

  6. Step-by-step growth of complex oxide microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G.; Cullen, David A.; Sharma, Jaswinder K.

    2015-06-10

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. We developed a solution phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica titania hybrid microstructures by exploiting the emulsion droplet based shape control and step by step growth. The strategy is robust and can be extended to make complex hybrid structures made of two or more materials while each having its own shape.

  7. Hemodynamic aspects of reduced platelet adhesion on bioinspired microstructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tam Thanh; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Maenz, Stefan; Gastrock, Gunter; Settmacher, Utz; Jandt, Klaus D; Zanow, Jürgen; Lüdecke, Claudia; Bossert, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Occlusion by thrombosis due to the absence of the endothelial cell layer is one of the most frequent causes of failure of artificial vascular grafts. Bioinspired surface structures may have a potential to reduce the adhesion of platelets contributing to hemostasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic aspects of platelet adhesion, the main cause of thrombosis, on bioinspired microstructured surfaces mimicking the endothelial cell morphology. We tested the hypothesis that platelet adhesion is statistically significantly reduced on bioinspired microstructured surfaces compared to unstructured surfaces. Platelet adhesion as a function of the microstructure dimensions was investigated under flow conditions on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Platelet adhesion was statistically significantly reduced (by up to 78%; p≤0.05) on the microstructured PDMS surfaces compared to that on the unstructured control surface. Finite element method (FEM) simulations of blood flow dynamic revealed a micro shear gradient on the microstructure surfaces which plays a pivotal role in reducing platelet adhesion. On the surfaces with the highest differences of the shear stress between the top of the microstructures and the ground areas, platelet adhesion was reduced most. In addition, the microstructures help to reduce the interaction strength between fluid and surfaces, resulting in a larger water contact angle but no higher resistance to flow compared to the unstructured surface. These findings provide new insight into the fundamental mechanisms of reducing platelet adhesion on microstructured bioinspired surfaces and may lay the basis for the development of innovative next generation artificial vascular grafts with reduced risk of thrombosis. PMID:27239904

  8. Transport properties of porous media from the microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, S.

    1995-12-31

    The determination of the effective transport properties of a random porous medium remains a challenging area of research because the properties depend on the microstructure in a highly complex fashion. This paper reviews recent theoretical and experimental progress that we have made on various aspects of this problem. A unified approach is taken to characterize the microstructure and the seemingly disparate properties of the medium.

  9. TASK 7 DEMONSTRATION OF THAMES FOR MICROSTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Bullard, J.; Stutzman, P.; Snyder, K.; Garboczi, E.

    2010-03-29

    The goal of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is to develop a reasonable and realible set of tools to reduce the uncertainty in predicting the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cement barriers used in nuclear applications that are exposed to dynamic environmental conditions over extended time frames. One of these tools, the responsibility of NIST, is THAMES (Thermodynamic Hydration and Microstructure Evolution Simulator), which is being developed to describe cementitious binder microstructures and calculate important engineering properties during hydration and degradation. THAMES is designed to be a 'micro-probe', used to evaluate changes in microstructure and properties occurring over time because of hydration or degradation reactions in a volume of about 0.001 mm{sup 3}. It will be used to map out microstructural and property changes across reaction fronts, for example, with spatial resolution adequate to be input into other models (e.g., STADIUM{reg_sign}, LeachSX{trademark}) in the integrated CBP package. THAMES leverages thermodynamic predictions of equilibrium phase assemblages in aqueous geochemical systems to estimate 3-D virtual microstructures of a cementitious binder at different times during the hydration process or potentially during degradation phenomena. These virtual microstructures can then be used to calculate important engineering properties of a concrete made from that binder at prescribed times. In this way, the THAMES model provides a way to calculate the time evolution of important material properties such as elastic stiffness, compressive strength, diffusivity, and permeability. Without this model, there would be no way to update microstructure and properties for the barrier materials considered as they are exposed to the environment, thus greatly increasing the uncertainty of long-term transport predictions. This Task 7 report demonstrates the current capabilities of THAMES. At the start of the CBP project, THAMES

  10. Microstructure, microstructural stability and mechanical properties of sand-cast Mg–4Al–4RE alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rzychoń, Tomasz; Kiełbus, Andrzej; Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, Lidia

    2013-09-15

    This paper presents a methodology for assessing the phase composition and the results of structural stability tests of the sand-cast Mg–4Al–4RE alloy after annealing it at 175 and 250 °C for 3000 h. The microstructure was analyzed with optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The phase composition was determined with X-ray diffraction. The structure of the Mg–4Al–4RE (AE44) alloy is composed of large grains of α-Mg solid solution, needle-shaped precipitates of the Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3}phase, polyhedral precipitates of the Al{sub 2}RE phase and Al{sub 10}RE{sub 2}Mn{sub 7} phase. After annealing at 175 °C for 3000 h, no changes in the alloy structure are observed, whereas after annealing at 250 °C the precipitates of the Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3} phase are found to be in the initial stages of spheroidization. The coarse-grained structure and unfavorable morphology of the intermetallic phases in the sand-cast AE44 alloy, which are caused by low solidification rates, result in low creep resistance up to 200 °C and low mechanical properties at ambient temperature and at 175 °C. - Highlights: • Complement the knowledge about the microstructure of Mg-Al-RE alloys. • Clarify the mechanism of formation of Mg17Al12 phase above 180 °C. • Applying a chemical dissolution of the α-Mg in order to phase identification. • Applying a statistical test to assess the spheroidization of precipitates. • Quantitative description of microstructure of Mg-Al-RE alloys.